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Lyr Req: Legend of Roseberry (Vin Garbutt)

16 Feb 01 - 03:32 PM (#399619)
Subject: Legend of Roseberry
From: scouse

can any Mudcatter post the words to this song sung by Vin Garbutt. It's driving me crazy I have most of them but a few lines 'ave got me real Tiz Woz!!!!!!!!!!


16 Feb 01 - 03:59 PM (#399649)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Legend of Roseberry
From: nutty

Is it the one about Danny Daniel?


16 Feb 01 - 04:02 PM (#399650)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Legend of Roseberry
From: nutty

What is your sorrow my love he said
My only sorrow is my maidenhead
I kept it thirteen years to the day
Then Danny Daniel stole it away
OFF THE TOP OF MY HEAD -IS THIS THE ONE?


04 Aug 02 - 02:47 PM (#759659)
Subject: Lyr Add: DANNY DANIELLE (Vin Garbutt)
From: GUEST,HP

Just in case the song asked for is DANNY DANIELLE...


DANNY DANIELLE
(Vin Garbutt)

A lad sat down in Priory Square
One Sunday morning in Guisborough fair.
He heard a maid making her moan.
Her true lover had gone from his home.
"What is your sorrow, maiden?" he said.
"My only sorrow is my maidenhead.
I kept it--I kept it fourteen years to the day,
But Danny Danielle took it away.

"I wore a dress that was lily white.
Now my costume is black as the night.
I am disowned by all I know well,
For close embracing with Danny Danielle."
He wiped a tear from her eye in despair.
"Your costume hides 'neath your golden hair,
So care not--so care not for the wrong that you've done.
The wrongs against you are ten to your one."

She said, "Kind sir, I thank you indeed,
But I must leave Guisborough town with speed.
I only know that weak I would be
If Danny Danielle came back for me.
For the last time he has caused me strife
And left me here alone with my life.
My waist is--my waist is thick and I am not well,
Again forsaken by Danny Danielle.

He took her hand and he bade her goodbye.
For the South and the sun she did flee.
She passed the hill of Roseberry
Just as the sun disappeared o'er the Tees.
God only knows what happened that night.
The world did sleep until the daylight.
That lad he--that lad he knew he ne'er would sleep sound
Till Danny Danielle justice had found.

That lad sat down in Priory Square
One Sunday morning in the fall of the year.
He spied a drunk standing alone
Reading the words on a lonely gravestone.
"Here lies a girl and the child that she bore...."
He turned his head. He could read no more.
He murmured, "I am disowned by all I know well,
For my name it is Danny Danielle."

Hope that helps. Cheers.


04 Aug 02 - 02:51 PM (#759661)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Legend of Roseberry
From: GUEST,HP

Just had a debate with myself and 'other half' and for 'Friary Square' read 'Priory Square'

Well, it's years since I heard Vin sing it and I learned the words before I ever set foot in Guisborough!


05 Aug 02 - 03:33 AM (#759904)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Legend of Roseberry
From: Joan from Wigan

Just to confirm, from the Vin Garbutt Songbook, it is Priory Square. Most of the above text tallies reasonably well with the words in the book, barring the odd word or two. The first line of the last verse should read "A lad sat down in Priory Square, a Sunday morning, a following year..."

Joan


08 Aug 02 - 08:25 PM (#762220)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Legend of Roseberry
From: Jim Dixon

According to http://www.mustrad.org.uk/discos/dis_txt2.htm Vin Garbutt recorded a song called "Legend of Roseberry" on his album "Tossin' a Wobbler," Topic #12TS385, 1978.

Have we established that "Legend of Roseberry" and "Danny Danielle" are the same song? What does the Vin Garbutt Songbook say?

I can't find any confirmation online that there is a song called "Danny Danielle."


09 Aug 02 - 05:35 AM (#762440)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Legend of Roseberry
From: Joan from Wigan

The Vin Garbutt Songbook has the title as "Danny Danielle". There is no cross-reference in the book as to which song came from which record. The Songbook itself features seventeen transcriptions of some of Vin's own compositions, put together by Paul Tilley. It is endorsed by Vin, as I bought it earlier this year at one of his gigs, and you can order it direct from him. With each song is an introduction by Vin, the one to this song is: "A modern tale of seduction and deception, written in a traditional style in 1971. Possibly my first awareness of women's rights, or lack of!"

Unless there is another of Vin's songs that mentions Roseberry, it is likely this is the song in question, although we'd really need scouse to come back to the thread to confirm that this was or was not the song requested.

Joan


09 Aug 02 - 06:26 AM (#762466)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Legend of Roseberry
From: DMcG

While we are at it, is there a traditional legend of Roseberry in the first place (i.e. one unconnected with Vin G)?


09 Aug 02 - 07:00 AM (#762488)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Legend of Roseberry
From: IanC

There is one (from here and several other sites on the web).

The son of King Osmund of Northumbria was prince Oswy. The kings wise men told him that Oswy would drown before his third birthday. After Oswy's second birthday, Osmund instructed his queen to take Oswy to the highest part of the land, the summit of Odinsberg (Roseberry). He told her to make use of the hermitage. To cut a long story short, the boy drowned in the spring that flows from the top of the hill. The boy was buried in Tevotdale, the queen was so distraught that she died soon after. King Osmund buried his queen beside his son. Tivotdale was given a new name. it was called Oswy-by-his-mother-lay and is known today as Osmotherley.

You could ask Vin Garbutt (he's a local lad after all).

:-)
Ian


09 Aug 02 - 07:53 AM (#762511)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Legend of Roseberry
From: GUEST,MCP

I'd be very surprised if the song is Danny Daniel, which as far as I know has never been called anything else, and in which Roseberry appears only as a passing reference.

There is a Legend of Roseberry Topping in Halliwell's Yorkshire Anthology (9 verses, no tune named). The story is essentially as given above: a Northumbrian princess dreamed that her infant would perish by water, astrologers confirmed that Prince Oswin would die by water when one and a half, the mother took him to Roseberry Topping knowing it was far from water but when, exhausted from the ascent, she fell asleep the child was drowned when a stream of water came out from under a rock. (Halliwell adds: "It is said this incident gave name to 'Osmotherly' (Os by his mother lay), a village a few miles distant").

If anyone's interested in the Halliwell ballad I'll put it up.

Mick


09 Aug 02 - 08:08 AM (#762518)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Legend of Roseberry
From: IanC

I'd like to see it, anyway.

:-)


09 Aug 02 - 01:07 PM (#762646)
Subject: Lyr Add: THE LEGEND OF ROSEBERRY TOPPING
From: GUEST,MCP

Here is the Halliwell version, of which (following an introduction) he says "The Editor is indebted for the above observations, and for a copy of the ballad, to the obliging kindness of Dr. Rooke of Scarborough".

The name Ottenberg is explained at the start of the introduction with: "ROSEBERRY, or Rosebury, Topping, originally, it is said, called "Ottenbery"...".

Mick


THE LEGEND OF ROSEBERRY TOPPING

Ah! why do the walls of the castle to day,
No longer resound with the strains of delight?
And why does the harp of the minstrel so gay,
Now rest in the gloom and the stillness of night?

But late as I travers'd these vallies along
How high 'mid the air streamed the banners of joy!
While the birth of Prince Oswin, the boast of the song,
Gave mirth to each heart, as it beamed in each eye.

What stranger art thou, who, in Cleveland so fair,
Of the fate of Prince Oswin canst yet be untold?
How an old hoary sage had foreshown the young heir
By water should die when but half a year old!

His mother, all eager her offspring to save,
To Ottenberg high, with the morn did repair,
Still hoping to rescue her son from the grave,
For well did she know that no water was there.

But how powerless and vain is a mortal's design,
Opposed to that will which can never recede;
Who shall pull down the bright orb of Heaven divine,
And raise up a meteor his rays to exceed!

Fatigued, and by ceaseless exertion opprest,
At length they arrive near the brow of the hill,
In whose shades on the moss they resign them to rest,
Now fearless of fate, as unconscious of ill.

Not long in soft slumbers the fond mother lay,
Ere arous'd by a dream which dire horrors betide;
But, O God, who can paint her wild grief and dismay,
When she saw her lov'd baby lie drown'd by her side!

On the proud steep of Ottenberg still may be found,
That spring which arose his sad doom to complete:
And oft on its verge sit the villagers round,
In wonder recording the fiat of fate.

For this do the walls of the castle to-day,
No longer resound with the strains of delight;
And for this does the harp of the bard once so gay,
Now rest in the gloom of the stillness of night.


Source:The Yorkshire Anthology - A collection of ancient and modern ballads, poems and songs relating to the county of Yorkshire, edited James O. Halliwell, first published 1851.


12 Aug 02 - 08:31 AM (#763769)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Legend of Roseberry
From: GUEST,MCP

I meant to add to my 9th Aug 0753 posting that the derivation of the name Osmotherly given by Halliwell is, not unexpectedly, spurious. The Oxford Dictionary of Place Names gives: "Asmudrelac (1086 DB) and Osmuderle (1088) 'Woodland clearing of a man called Asmundr' (OScand personal name + OE leah". (A pleasant village - as a child I occasionally used to go fishing in a little beck between there and Swainby).

Mick


13 Aug 02 - 03:36 AM (#764235)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Legend of Roseberry
From: Joan from Wigan

Mick, thank you for those posts. I suppose there's no indication of the tune for the ballad? I know there usually isn't in ballad books, so it's just a forlorn hope.

Joan


13 Aug 02 - 12:29 PM (#764480)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Legend of Roseberry
From: GUEST,MCP

Joan - there's no tune given for this; some of the songs in the book do have tunes cited, some not. In fact, there's no indication at all as to whether this was sung or just a poem.

Mick


05 Jan 12 - 01:33 AM (#3285089)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Legend of Roseberry
From: Jim Dixon

Well, I can hear LEGEND OF ROSEBERRY via Spotify, but I can tell you, transcribing this is no picnic. Vin Garbutt might be a decent songwriter, for all I know, but his pronunciation is rubbish! For example:

The harvest moon bars and main dingle ran cliffs and rich demain
The silver stars shone some weakly on them rock and them wooden plain
When from a stately palace the thumb bring princes strode
The questy-un that famed augur and down clift pull abode

And it goes on like that for another 8 or so verses.

I've had more success transcribing lyrics from scratchy 78s of toothless old blues singers from the 1920s.


05 Jan 12 - 06:37 AM (#3285163)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Legend of Roseberry (Vin Garbutt??)
From: scouse

OK.. Here's what I managed to get.. Though I stand to be corrected

Legend of Roseberry.

The Harvest Moon was waining,
all 'round the rich domain,
The silver Stars shone sweetly on,
the rock and the wooden plain,
When from a stately Palace,
Northubrian Princess drove,
To question that famed Auger,
who in Arncliffe did abode.

Oh,wise and dreadful Wizard,
thy Godlike gift is thine,
What speaks the heavenly Prophet,
of Northumberlands Prince and mine,
The 'morrow shall thy darling,
in deaths embraces lay,
So speaks the heavenly prophet,
tis midnight now away.

Back to her stately Palace,
with cavalcade she rode,
Tonight at least my darling,
I'll trust thee to thy God,
Oh,Motherby and Ingleby,?
Swainsberry and Stokesberry Town,?
Much marvelled greatly wonders,
to view that doubt come down.

Below that oak tree forest,
A buzz and a bird who trill,
The proud Procession halted,
the cavelcade stood still,
With toilsome weary marching,
she reached the towering hieght,
Rejoyce thy Fief from danger,
she bore her Cherub bright.


And then,O lovely vision,
lay streched beneath her feet,
The groves of sweet Opliedium,
the shores of the cargo fleet.
Yet,wouldn't that Lady shudder,
to view the boundless Sea,
Even silver Tees brought terror,
so lovely though it be.

And know like marble Statue,
in Holy sleep she lies,
And by her like an Angel,
the Royal Orphan lies,
But then O lovely vision,
beneath that that mountain brow,
A fountain fair enchanting,
with heavens own colours true.

Within that crystal mirror,
He views a lovely form,
With equal love enticing him,
into its watery home,
O fate,O dread he clasps it,
?????????
Prince Ossie is no more.

And on that rocky precipice,
beneath that wooden Knoll,
A Hermitage the Lady reared,
with Mass's for his Soul,
And with that Holy Hermit,
full oft devoutly prays,
What god has given God takes away,
and vindicates his ways.

As Aye,

Phil


05 Jan 12 - 08:48 PM (#3285542)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Legend of Roseberry (Vin Garbutt??)
From: 12barblues

A start on the translation from the intricate language of the Smoggies is:

Osmotherley and Ingleby
Swainby and Stokesley Town


21 Apr 16 - 10:29 AM (#3786456)
Subject: Lyr Add: THE LEGEND OF ROSEBERRY (Vin Garbutt)
From: GUEST,Nealon

I got in touch with Vin Garbutt's Home Roots Music. Vin himself provided these lyrics, and he applauded @scouse for his transcription. Pretty close!

THE LEGEND OF ROSEBERRY

The harvest moon was waning o'er Arncliff's rich domain.
The silver stars shone sweetly on the rock and the wooded plain,
When from her stately palace, Northumbria's princess trode.
To question that famed auger in Arncliffe who abode.
Oh,wise and dreadful wizard a godlike gift is thine.
What speaks the heavenly prophet of Northumbria's son and mine?
"The morrow shall thy darling in deaths embraces lay"
So speaks the heavenly prophet, tis midnight, now away.

Back to her stately palace with cavalcade she rode.
This night at least my darling, I'll trust thee to thy God,
Osmotherly and Ingleby, Swainby and Stokesley town,
Much marvelled, greatly wondered, to view that route come down.
Below that oak tree forest of Osnaburg's huge hill.
The proud procession halted, the cavalcade stood still.
With toilsome weary marching, she reached the towering height,
Rejoiced at, free from danger, she bore her cherub bright.

And then, a lovely vision, lay stretched beneath her feet.
The groves of sweet Upleatham, the shores of the Cargo Fleet.
Yet wouldn't that Lady shudder to view the boundless sea,
Even silver Tees brought terror, so lovely though it be.
And now like marble statue in holy sleep she lies
And by her like an angel, the royal orphan smiles
But then a lovely vision beneath that mountain brow.
A fountain fair enchanting with heavens own colours true.

Within that crystal mirror he views a lovely form.
With equal love enticing him into its watery home.
Oh fate, oh dread, he clasps it, one cry and all is o'er.
The treacherous spring enfolds him. Prince Oswy is no more.
And on that rocky precipice, beneath that wooden knoll,
A hermitage the Lady reared, with Mass's for his soul
And with that holy hermit, full oft devoutly prays,
What God has given God takes away and vindicates his ways.


14 Jul 17 - 01:48 PM (#3866100)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Legend of Roseberry (Vin Garbutt??)
From: GUEST,Alan of the wood

I heard Vin sing this at the Co-up folk club in Nottingham in the late 70's and while I remember the song what really sticks in my mind was wetting myself at Vin's hysterical introduction to it focussing largely on the hermit as I recall. Wonder if anyone's got a recording of that.