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Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride

25 Jul 00 - 11:35 AM (#264289)
Subject: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: Ed Pellow

I mentioned in a thread a few days ago that I thought this was the best thing I'd ever heard. I'd had a few beers and was excited about other stuff, so maybe my judgement was impaired.

I can however confirm, four days later and completely sober, this song is one of the finest things I've ever heard.

Hear it if you can, you'll not regret it...


25 Jul 00 - 11:47 AM (#264293)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: John J

Twas played on R Lancashire last Thursday night......yes it's a brilliant version, and I was sober ! John J


25 Jul 00 - 11:57 AM (#264301)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: Ed Pellow

I heard the song on a BBC Radio 2 Kate Rusby special last Wednesday. I tried to find the record from various sources a few days later but kept being informed that 'we've had it for ages, but but we sold our last copy yesterday'

Raise a glass to Kate Rusby, she introduced Nic Jones to lots of us as well!

Ed


25 Jul 00 - 12:24 PM (#264319)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: Thomas the Rhymer

I quite concur. It has message, meaning, people smarts, a transcendent progression, melodious meticulation, the works!


25 Jul 00 - 12:32 PM (#264323)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: IanS

It must be about 15 years ago when I first heard Paul Brady singing Arthur McBride and its still one of my favourites. Have you heard his rendition of Lakes of Ponchetrain and the Creech in the Creel - they are equally stunning.

Ian


25 Jul 00 - 12:47 PM (#264333)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: Whistle Stop

For those who are interested, there's an article on Paul Brady in the new issue of Acoustic Guitar magazine, and it includes a transcription of his version of Arthur McBride. Apparently he originally recorded it back in the mid-1970's, and has recently re-recorded the same arrangement. Haven't heard either version myself, but I guess I'll have to give it a listen.


25 Jul 00 - 12:52 PM (#264337)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: GUEST,Den at work

You're right Ed IMO its one of the best. In fact I love that whole album wonderful songs and great playing throughout. Den


25 Jul 00 - 01:25 PM (#264356)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: Wesley S

Whistle Stop beat me to it. The issue to look for has Ani DeFranco on the cover.


25 Jul 00 - 01:37 PM (#264366)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: GUEST,PJ Curtis.

Paul's amazing and definitive version of Arthur McBride , recorded in 1976 with Andy Irvine.(Album title: Andy Irvine & Paul Brady on the Mulligan Label in Ireland) is avb. on CD. Try Mulligan Records, Middle St, Galway..they should have some in stock. Paul re-corded the song for his 'recent 'Best Of..." compilation but the '76 version is still the spine-tingler. PJ Curtis.


25 Jul 00 - 01:50 PM (#264370)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: Brendy

DGDGBD tuning.

The whole album is probably, IMO, the most influential album ever to come out of the Irish Folk scene in the '70's.

I was fascinated with it at the time, and already using the 'G' tuning for other things, I hadn't quite realised the scope of it, and it's consequences on the way trad guitarists think about accompaniment of tunes and songs.

It took me about three weeks to learn it, at the time, religiously rehearsing every nuance until it all began to sink in.
I still do it that way, Thank God.

Good craic in Milltown, P.J.?

B.


25 Jul 00 - 02:07 PM (#264383)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: GUEST,Lainie

I totally agree. An Irish friend played it for me one night and I just couldn't get over how totally fabulous it was...


25 Jul 00 - 02:40 PM (#264405)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: Ed Pellow

PJ Curtis,

Thanks for giving the details of Paul Brady's first recording of the song. One of the points I was trying to make (badly as usual) was that the few copies of that album have disappeared out of the record shops, since the song was played on mainstream radio.

I'm going to have to wait over a week to get the CD - hope my tape of it doesn't break between now and then...

Whistle Stop (and others) Is the 'Acoustic Guitar' magazine you mention an American Publication? I'd love to get the tab.


25 Jul 00 - 02:48 PM (#264410)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: Whistle Stop

Yes, it's an American magazine. Been around for about ten years, and it's generally pretty good, even though they have to broaden their appeal somewhat to stay commercially viable. Their phone number (toll-free in the USA) is 800-827-6837.

I take it that this is kind of a signature song for Paul Brady. Interestingly, he says that the 1976 original recording was played on a Yamaha FG-180 guitar, which is not a particularly good quality instrument (I worked in a music store in the 1970's, and we sold a lot of these student-grade Yamahas). The re-recording was played on a Lowden. If, as someone mentioned, the older version is the best, it goes to show that the quality of the instrument isn't everything.


25 Jul 00 - 03:09 PM (#264419)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: GUEST,Den at work

Very true Whistle stop the quality of his playing And Andy's for that matter was incredible. Just take a listen to Sailing into Walpoles Marsh. Den


25 Jul 00 - 03:22 PM (#264437)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: Ed Pellow

Thanks, Whistle Stop.

I play a Yamaha - if I had the tab maybe I could play it that well...

Anyone know if this is available in the UK?

To make a serious point, and at the risk that the thread will drift into talking about this, the quality of instrument (within reason) is one of the least important things in my opinion - your favourite guitarist would be able to make a piece of plywood sound good

Ed


25 Jul 00 - 03:25 PM (#264440)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: dwditty

Just an awesome display on notes, IMO.


25 Jul 00 - 04:13 PM (#264468)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: Wesley S

There is a website for Acoustic Guitar magazine at www.acousticguitar.com. I don't think it's been updated to include the newest issue that we're talking about. But check it later. It also has an interesting article about healing hand injuries. Check it out.


25 Jul 00 - 06:20 PM (#264570)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: oggie

Planxty also recorded a version prior to Brady joining them and in concerts on his first tour with them (1975ish) he sang their arrangement.

Steve


25 Jul 00 - 07:56 PM (#264626)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: gillymor

Thanks for the tip on the Acoustic Guitar arrangement. A fairly good tab for Lakes of Ponchartrain is on the OLGA, also in open-G. That whole Brady/Irvine album still knocks me on my ear, especially Plains of Kildare with Burke and Lunny. Brady rerecorded McBride and Ponchartrain on his Nobody Knows collection.

F


25 Jul 00 - 10:27 PM (#264719)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: Bearheart

Well, I checked out this thread thinking someone would give the lyrics! Have been listening to that particular album since the late 70's and it's still one of my favorites--- would love to see "The Plains of Kildare" lyrics in this collection too (guess I should check?), again it's one of my favorites-- one of the best versions of that ballad that is out there...


25 Jul 00 - 11:01 PM (#264745)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: gillymor

Hi Bearheart, It doesn't look like Brady's version is in the database but you can find it at www.paulbrady.com

Frankie


26 Jul 00 - 01:43 AM (#264813)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: Melani

One of the greatest folk albums ever made. Every single cut is a total classic.


26 Jul 00 - 03:32 AM (#264837)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: Thomas the Rhymer

The "Rise Up Singing" book has the lyrics in close form.


26 Jul 00 - 07:25 AM (#264870)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: Hamish

Yes: I've always loved Paul's version. And then I heard Dylan's version. And I still love Paul's. And so does Dylan, obviously, 'cos he copied as well as he could. Just not anywhere near as good as Paul (imho). Cheers, Hamish, http://www.lombardy.clara.net


08 Sep 00 - 08:16 AM (#293395)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: GUEST,bill@4-mat.net

I hav been searching for years for a copy of the fingering/chords/tuning of Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride... can u help ?

Thanks

Bill


08 Sep 00 - 08:34 AM (#293401)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: Brendy

Yo Bill.

I'll do it. Give me to the end of next week with it, though; I'm slow enough when it comes to transcribing stuff, and there's a few other things I have to do.

The tuning he uses is (from the treble 'E') DBGDGD.

B.


08 Sep 00 - 01:53 PM (#293543)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: NEIL COMER

Like 'Arthur McBride,' Paul Brady plays another classic song on the album with Andy Irvine, 'Mary and the Soldier.'

I have a live version of Paul Brady playing Arthur McBride on video. It was recorded by RTE in the Seventies, but was shown again on the program, 'Sessions from the Seventies.' I with they would repeat it.


08 Sep 00 - 02:52 PM (#293586)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: GUEST,Ickle dorritt

Correct me if I am wrong ,but isn't Paul brady's wonderful Arthur McBride on the transatlantic sessions CD?


08 Sep 00 - 03:56 PM (#293642)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: Liam's Brother

I think I mentioned in another Mudcat thread that Paul started singing "Arthur McBride" when he lived in New York... about 1973. The Irish Arts Center had a session then at Munk's Park Pub on Park Avenue South. He was always being asked to sing it and, when he did, people would come flying up and down stairs - almost from the other side of town.

It's probably not generally known that the variant he sings is from a book of Maine (USA) folk songs.

He left New York to become a member of Planxty. I drove him to get some of his things from storage and he told me that was about to happen. A few months later, I flew to Edinburgh where the 5-member Planxty (Paul took Christy's place and Christy had not yet left) was performing. He sang it as a solo piece and the group said, when they first heard his rendition, they just forgot about their earlier version.

The blue album was just about to be released at that time. The group had a test pressing and it was played for them backstage. Paul fell in love with "The Lakes of Ponchartrain" right away.

All the best,
Dan Milner


08 Sep 00 - 04:01 PM (#293646)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: GUEST,Bruce O.

See 'Arthur' on the Bodley Ballads website (in Mudcat's Links) for early copies of the song (add 'cousin' or 'comrade' from 1st line for faster search)


08 Sep 00 - 05:01 PM (#293681)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: BanjoRay

I saw Paul Brady with Planxty in Doncaster on that tour when Christy was still in the band. The PA system failed totally in a large working men's club full of people. The entire audience totally kept themselves quiet and the purely acoustic unamplified set went down a storm. Arthur McBride impressed us all, even among a lot of other good stuff.
A magic night
Ray


09 Sep 00 - 04:39 AM (#293959)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: GUEST,John Moulden on holiday

I understood that Mulligan had plans to re-issue this. Perhaps they have and thatīs why itīs getting played.

This version bears an uncanny resemblance to Carrie Groverīs version as noted by Annie Griggs in "A Heritage of Song" (Bethel Maine, no date)


10 Sep 00 - 02:48 PM (#294646)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: GUEST,Bill

Thanks Brendy

BJ


10 Sep 00 - 03:06 PM (#294654)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: Ed Pellow

Brendy,

A thousand thanks if you can post the tablature here - I've hunted for the 'Acoustic Guitar' magazine version, but it doesn't appear to be available in the UK.

I very much look forward to your transcription, and will hassle you like mad if you don't do it :-)

Ed


10 Sep 00 - 03:20 PM (#294658)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: Brendy

What I'll do, Ed, Bill, Sean, et al., is to write it out, and post it onto my web-site, and link to it through this thread.

I haven't figured out quite how to go about transcribing it; I'm not the best at writing tabs, but I'll certainly do my best to 'explain' what he is doing, and on what frets he is doing it.

I'll get the guitar out tomorrow, and spend the day at it, and see how far I get.
I'll keep you posted.

B.


12 Sep 00 - 10:31 PM (#296136)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: Brendy

Yo!
How's it hangin'?

Well, I thought that I should lessen the waiting time for you all a wee bit, and post something that you could be 'getting on with'.
I have just finished the tabs for the introduction, and although there is a link at the bottom of the page to the rest of the song, I haven't quite finished it, and so the link will not work, if you click on it.
The introduction will probably prove to have been the more awkward part; I can re-use a lot of the diagrams in the rest of the song, so it wont be as time-consuming.

I am assuming that you are all familiar with the tune, or that you have the Irvine/Brady album, so you can fine-tune the phrasing, etc.

I only realised yesterday that I don't have my own copy of it in the apartment (I lent it to a friend a few months back - glad I remembered!), so what I've done is to write it as I remember it from the record, somewhere close to the way I play it myself.

In the opening bars, for instance, I could not remember whether he used the plectrum to pick out all the notes, or used a combination of plectrum and fingers, like the way I have it annotated.
It is impossible to transpose the phrasing of a piece of music satisfactorily into tab, much less to be able to convey the soul and nuance that Paul Brady brings to this version. The notes are one thing, but it's the delivery that makes a classic. And in my opinion, his version is one of the most brilliant and clever, that I have ever had the pleasure to listen to and absorb.

Anyway, you can wrap your heads around this, until I get the rest of the song finished. I wont be getting the album back until next week, but it'll hardly matter much, as the rest of it is fairly straightforward, anyway. Somewhere around Friday.

G'luck!

B.

Arthur McBride " The Intro

P.S. If you have any problems loading the page, or whatever, just refresh the thread, or send me a PM.


13 Sep 00 - 12:21 AM (#296217)
Subject: Lyr Add: ARTHUR MC BRIDE AND THE SERGEANT (Brady)
From: Brendy

I had a look in the DigiTrad, and I couldn't find the lyrics of the version that Paul sings. I grabbed these off his website here, but I'll post the lyrics as well. Here we go!

ARTHUR MC BRIDE AND THE SERGEANT
(Trad arranged and adapted Paul Brady)

Oh, me and my cousin, one Arthur McBride
As we went a-walking down by the seaside
Now, mark what followed and what did betide
For it being on Christmas morning...
Out for recreation, we went on a tramp
And we met Sergeant Napper and Corporal Vamp
And a little wee drummer, intending to camp
For the day being pleasant and charming.

"Good morning ! Good morning!" the sergeant did cry
"And the same to you gentlemen!" we did reply,
Intending no harm but meant to pass by
For it being on Christmas morning.
But says he, "My fine fellows if you will enlist,
It's ten guineas in gold I will slip in your fist
And a crown in the bargain for to kick up the dust
And drink the King's health in the morning.

For a soldier he leads a very fine life
And he always is blessed with a charming young wife
And he pays all his debts without sorrow or strife
And always lives pleasant and charming...
And a soldier he always is decent and clean
In the finest of clothing he's constantly seen
While other poor fellows go dirty and mean
And sup on thin gruel in the morning."

"But", says Arthur, "I wouldn't be proud of your clothes
For you've only the lend of them as I suppose
And you dare not change them one night, for you know
If you do you'll be flogged in the morning.
And although that we are single and free
we take great delight in our own company
And we have no desire strange faces to see
Although that your offers are charming
And we have no desire to take your advance
All hazards and dangers we barter on chance
For you would have no scruples for to send us to France
Where we would get shot without warning"

"Oh now!", says the sergeant "I'll have no such chat
And I neither will take it from spalpeen or brat
For if you insult me with one other word
I'll cut off your heads in the morning"
And then Arthur and I we soon drew our hods
And we scarce gave them time for to draw their own blades
When a trusty shillelagh came over their heads
And bade them take that as fair warning

And their old rusty rapiers that hung by their side
We flung them as far as we could in the tide
"Now take them out, Divils!", cried Arthur McBride
"And temper their edge in the morning".
And the little wee drummer we flattened his pow
And we made a football of his rowdeydowdow
Threw it in the tide for to rock and to row
And bade it a tedious returning

And we having no money, paid them off in cracks
And we paid no respect to their two bloody backs
For we lathered them there like a pair of wet sacks
And left them for dead in the morning.
And so to conclude and to finish disputes
We obligingly asked if they wanted recruits
For we were the lads who would give them hard clouts
And bid them look sharp in the morning.

Oh me and my cousin, one Arthur McBride
As we went a walkin' down by the seaside,
Now mark what followed and what did betide
For it being on Christmas morning.

( From the traditional, adapted by Paul Brady/ Copyright control)

B.


13 Sep 00 - 02:39 AM (#296271)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: Ed Pellow

Brendy,

Thank you so very, very much.

I don't have my guitar with me just now, but your transcription looks as though it will be very easy to follow.

Your hard work is much appreciated.

Thank you.

Ed


13 Sep 00 - 10:52 AM (#296401)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: death by whisky

Believe it or not I picked up tihs song on a tape from the village post office.The tape is titled "Top of the morning",it also includes "The Plians of Kildare",and a couple of other crackers.


13 Sep 00 - 06:31 PM (#296724)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: lamarca

One of my favorites, too...Lisa Null says that Paul Brady got this version of the lyrics from her when she was living in CT. It's in her copy of songs collected from a Maine singer, Carrie Gover (Grover? - help me, Lisa! My spelling of the name is probably wrong), whose parents came from Nova Scotia(?). Carrie set down all the songs she learned from her mother and father; Lisa has a much-loved and worn copy of the collection, which contains many great and unusual versions of traditional songs.


14 Sep 00 - 02:30 PM (#297316)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: Brendy

Ok Folks. A day earlier than thought, but there you go!

You can link to it here, or through the link above.

Usual disclaimers!

B.


14 Sep 00 - 03:02 PM (#297338)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: Ed Pellow

Brendy,

I think the words are 'you're a complete star'

I wish I could shake you by the hand. Thank you again.

Ed


14 Sep 00 - 03:32 PM (#297361)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: Sean Belt

Brendy,
I just checked out your transcription and I've got to say you're a man to be reckoned with! I don't have my guitar with me at the moment, but just looking at it it seems you've gone far away above and beyond the call of duty on this one. Not only is it easy to read, it's attractive to look at. Many thanks. Next time you're in St. Louis, the first round's on me.

- Sean


14 Sep 00 - 05:18 PM (#297457)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: Liam's Brother

Sandy Paton and I alluded to the Maine / Grover origin above but was not aware that he found the book in Lisa Null's library. Lisa has a great library! I had a ramble through it in the late '70s when I was doing the bibliography for "A Bonnie Bunch of Roses."

Paul Brady thought a great deal of Lisa. Then, again, we all do.

All the best,
Dan Milner


15 Sep 00 - 05:25 PM (#298208)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: Brendy

No problem, lads!

I'm glad it's all 'working' correctly, and that you're all able to follow my way of explaining things.
I think there are 50 images on the intro page, and I was thinking that the whole thing would be impractical because of the potential problem of the loading of the page. But, to paraphrase Mbo: 'Smart Saver RULES'!
So at least yiz can make it out, anyway!

Indeed Sean! It's been a while (4 years), since I have been in your town. I spent a lot of time arould Soulard during that visit. And I had a few pints in Chuck Berry's place. And I look forward to the next time I'm around those parts (could be towards the end of next year).

On that day we shall meet in a 'little' pub I know on the corner of 12th and Russell, and I shall ask our congenial host, John Maguire Esq, for a pint of whatever you're having, and a coffee for me, and we'll duet Arthur.

Take it easy, folks.

B.


16 Sep 00 - 04:38 PM (#298793)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: Sean Belt

Mmmm. 12th & Russell. McGurk's pub. My home away from home, a place to hear some darned fine music, and the best tavern in St. Louis.

- Sean


16 Sep 00 - 08:03 PM (#298923)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: IvanB

Sean, 'tis a pleasure to hear McGurk's is still going strong and, from the sound of it, as great as ever. We used to get there every time we were in the area when my stepson was posted at Scott AFB. Unfortunately he hasn't been there since 1992, so we've sorely missed the place. Good to hear of it and reminisce about good times had, tho.


17 Sep 00 - 04:50 PM (#299404)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: GUEST,Bill

Many thanks for that Brendy, sorry that I caused you so much trouble, I didn't realise so many people shared my interest in Arthur McB. I've played standard tunings for the past 30 yrs or so and am absolutely thrilled by the idea of the 'new' tunings, DADGAD is another that I have just latched on to.

BJ


17 Sep 00 - 08:18 PM (#299521)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: GUEST,Mrbisok@aol

I'm late to this Paul Brady thread, but just have to jump in with this: Paul's "Arthur McBride" is what sucked me into this whole folk thing in 1989. Kathleen Biggins on Fordham U.'s WFUV in NYC (back before she went to New Age Celtic) played it for her Christmas show, I had the tape recorder going, and the rest is my history. In reading all the strands of this thread, I don't recall one negative voice, which is amazing for such an contentious crowd.


18 Sep 00 - 01:33 AM (#299688)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: Chanteyranger

Is there any difference in engineering/sound quality between the Mulligan release and it's release in the U.S. on the Green Linnet label? There were differences in sound quality between the original British releases of Beatles albums, and the U.S. releases, so it brings this question to mind. I don't know if re-engineering is a common practice.


29 Jul 01 - 06:13 AM (#517030)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: Brendy

P.J. Curtis woulld probably know the answer to that, chanteyranger. I know he was around Mulligan at the time of the recording.

I'll refresh this, and maybe he'll see it.

B.


29 Jul 01 - 09:36 PM (#517443)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: GUEST,gerky@cwcom.net

Acoustic Guitar Magazine is stocked in Tower Records Stores in the uk.


10 Dec 03 - 06:10 PM (#1069715)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: GUEST,Don F

I just wandered onto this page, but I'm blown away by you people. I never thought I'd see others that share my interest in Arthur McBride or traditional folk music. Oh, and McGurk's Pub is incredible. Cheers!


10 Dec 03 - 08:30 PM (#1069818)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: Miken

Don, join us and hang around. It's free and educatiional and damned entertaining! Membership is free.


10 Dec 03 - 09:22 PM (#1069849)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: spoons

I'm a huge fan of Paul Brady and Andy Irvin. I have 20 CD's between the two of them and Planxty. I'm looking for a very rare and early Paul Brady release, his first solo effort, titled "Welcome Here Kind Stranger". Can anyone help? I have "The Lost Liberty Tapes" which has most of the same tunes but I would like to add this rare gem to my collection.

Thanks in advance
Spoons


11 Dec 03 - 03:48 AM (#1070017)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: Brendy

I have my own copy of it, Spoons, but it took me a good while to track it down (after mislaying it moving house a few times, etc). The only thing I would recommend is to keep your eye out for it. Try the obvious places, of course; Amazon, etc., but outside of that, I wouldn't have a notion where you might get it.
Gems tend to get dug up; and often, when you don't expect them!

I put the tablature up on this site, for the finish up... "Oh, Me and my cousin, one Arthur McBride...

B.


11 Dec 03 - 11:18 AM (#1070289)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: Wolfgang

Spoons,

as Brendy I have a copy of it but I don't sell. However, if you are looking just for a tape of it I could help you.

Wolfgang


12 Dec 03 - 12:22 AM (#1070742)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: GUEST,Ron Davies

I have a story about Paul Brady's "Arthur McBride" also. When I was in Germany in 1974 I began my taping addiction, which has steadily worsened ever since. I'll never forget stumbling across a live concert with exactly this version of" Arthur McBride" on German radio. I suspect strongly it was Paul Brady singing. Also on the program were wonderful live versions of "As I Roved Out" and "Kitty Lie Over close to the Wall" and the same person who did Arthur McBride sang an incredibly exciting version of "Jolly Beggarman". I only caught the end of the concert--got these 4 songs----didn't even get the announcement as to who it was. As an impecunious foreigner I just tried to pack as much music as I could onto each tape, particularly German, French, and Italian songs.

Anyway, I started immediately hunting for an Irish pub. Found one in Frankfurt too--I was in Hanau--though it was called Zum schwarzen Ritter (At the Sign of the Black Knight) it was an Irish pub. So from then on when I wasn't working at the Public Affairs office---among other things trying to keep people from stealing the "l " in the Public Affairs sign----), I'd be looking for Hannes Wader, Reinhard Mey, Ulrich Roski or other Liedermacher songs, or I'd be haunting Zum schwarzen Ritter. I remember wishing I was Irish so I could sing Arthur McBride convincingly--I sang it to myself anyway. So there I was, an American soldier wandering around Frankfurt, singing an Irish anti-recruiting song.


25 Apr 04 - 08:23 AM (#1170354)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: GUEST,Doug

Can anyone give me easy chords to Arthur McBride i want to learn it its a ledgend song! Plus i've the words to Paddy's green shamrock shore another classic but i need the chords to it so i hope someone can help?


25 Apr 04 - 12:09 PM (#1170468)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: GUEST,Bard

It used to be on Brendy's website, which is herehttp://www.brendanmckeever.com/, I think.


25 Apr 04 - 12:29 PM (#1170485)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: Ed.

See Paul Brady's site


25 Apr 04 - 07:27 PM (#1170747)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: Julie B

I too love this song and Paul Brady's version of it. I discovered it when a friend put it on a cassette tape compilation of his favourite folk music for me. I played it in the car until the tape wore out! No matter how many times I listened it still sounded fresh. Enjoyed singing it too.

Julie


26 Apr 04 - 03:43 AM (#1170951)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: GUEST,Tunesmith

I've just discovered this thread and haven't read every posting but what amazes me is that, until recently, so many people were unaware of Brady's "McBride". Surely - in the UK at least - this is one of the most revered and famous recordings of the folk revival!


26 Apr 04 - 04:10 AM (#1170968)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: George Papavgeris

Indeed, Tunesmith. I first heard Paul's version sometime in the eighties, from an album he had made with Andy Irvine. It remains firmly in my top 10 English language traditional songs.


26 Apr 04 - 04:53 PM (#1171632)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: GUEST,Andrew

Im another great fan of this version and used to play open tuned in E Ab B e Ab E. Thank heavens Ive kept the Tablature as I fear I would not remember otherwise. Was a real challenge when in the middle of a set but always one of my favourites.


21 May 04 - 02:03 PM (#1190938)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: GUEST,steve mann

Hi, just stumbled on the site.
For those who don't know it, I thoroughly recommend Martin Carthy's arrangement of this tremendous song on his Prince Heathen disc; I arranged it for guitar many years ago off a Swarbrick tape I had; amazed to hear a fiddler sawing away at it in the back room of a music ship in Newcastle, England recently!
By the way, a snippet of a WW1 recruiting song sung by Terry Woods on the Pogues If I should fall from grace with god album probably has its roots in Arthur.. the sentiment is the same for sure.
Now, I must search out a copy of this Paul Brady guy's album!


27 Jun 04 - 05:56 AM (#1214923)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: GUEST

Probably this is too late for the poster trying to track down WELCOME HERE KIND STRANGER, but thought I'd mention that Ebay is also a great place to check for deleted gems, and in fact a search there today under "Paul Brady" shows a copy (LP, think) available.


27 Jun 04 - 06:32 AM (#1214927)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: Big Al Whittle

Perhaps its also worth mentioning Rosie Hardman's lovely song the man who sang Arthur Macbride - a homage to Andy and the rest of Planxty - I think it was on the Jerseyburger album.

Rosie's song raised the profile of this song and led to its pre-eminence. In the seventies Planxty had gone on to bigger things, most of them outside England, but Rosie was touring the folk clubs almost continuously.

On the album and in her set were two homage songs, louisiana about martin simpson and this other one about arthur macbride. Even those of us who had little time for Irish folk music (remember this was at the height of 'the troubles' with bombs going off regularly in English towns) we had this fantastic song brought to our attention by Rosie.

This was the before the folk revival had grown so moribund that it needed an acoustic revival. Rosie was one of the few folk artists whose name could fill any club

Lest we forget


10 Aug 04 - 10:29 AM (#1244062)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: GUEST,Rosie Hardman

Yep - I wrote the song after watching Paul sing this song at a folk festival in Redcar in the 70s. It was a stunning performance and I wrote 'The Man Who Sang Arthur McBride' after hearing it.... though it's not JUST about the performance but also a special relationship I had with someone at the time.

If anyone would like the words, I could arrange to put these in the Songbook on my site - please just write to me - my email address is on my website at rosiehardman.com in the Contact Me section - just click on the little envelope. :)

Rosie Hardman


10 Aug 04 - 11:20 AM (#1244111)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: burntstump

How great to have Rosie chatting about things,you never know one day we may persuade her to actualy sing them again in concert.


10 Aug 04 - 11:29 AM (#1244118)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: GUEST,RE; Singing Again

Ermmmmmmmmmmm no - sorry pal. Unfortunately the arthritis means I can neither stand for long, nor play the guitar.... nice to know I'm thought about though... ;)


11 Aug 04 - 04:17 AM (#1244545)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: Murray MacLeod

I see from Brendy's post above that he reckons Paul Brady uses an Open G tuning . That would probably (though not necessarily) mean that he sings this in G. Does he really sing this in G ? Seems a hell of a high key to sing Arthur McBride in ...

Perhaps someone who has the CD could verify the actual key ?

Like Rosie, I too have a vivid memory of Paul Brady being absolutely spellbinding, at Cambridge Festival in 1976, although it is "The Lakes of Pontchartrain" that sticks in my mind.


31 Aug 04 - 05:13 AM (#1260507)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: GUEST,sues

I have come to this song very recently and discovered you all here since searching on 'Arthur McBride'!!

I love Paul Brady's version of this song (way better than Dylan's) BUT can anyone tell me its origins? Who wrote it, etc?

Thanks and happy listening :)

Sue


31 Aug 04 - 08:25 AM (#1260609)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: GUEST,Andrew

I don't know if Paul Brady sang it in G but I do know that he did sing it in 'a hell of a high key'

I used to sing it in open very strange... which I think was C ish and I found that too high. Paul Brady seemed about an Octave above where I pitched it !

Repeating what many have said it must rank as one of my favourites ever. .

Andrew


31 Aug 04 - 03:45 PM (#1260973)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: PoppaGator

Paul Brady's website , referenced above by Ed on 25 Apr 04 at 12:29 PM, provides tabs for only two songs: "Arthur McBride" and "Lakes of Pontchartrain."

I recently searched out and found the tab for "Lakes," which is in open D tuning with the capo at the 3rd fret (putting the song in the key of F, right?).

There's another version of tablature for that song, found in many locations all over the web, which is for open G tuning. Needless to say, the open D version on Brady's site seems to be the real thing.

Since the Brady website mentions a capo position for the one song but not for the other, he *probably* plays "Arthur McBride" in the key of G (i.e., open G tuning, no capo).

Mudcatter Brendy's website provides some beautiful-looking tabs. (The two or three oldest links that appear earliest in this thread are outdated, but check out the most recent link to his site). I just got a look at his "McBride" tablature while lurking at work, so I haven't had a chance to try reading/playing them -- wonder how it compares to Brady's own posted tabs?


19 Sep 04 - 10:34 AM (#1275543)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: GUEST,guest Russel sun

dear paul

I am looking for the guitar tabs of the songs of Ani defranco .

do you have any good ideas to tell me ?

thanks


19 Sep 04 - 01:43 PM (#1275668)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: shepherdlass

There's another mention of this in Tim Wood's lovely song, "Freeman" - about giving an Irish hitch-hiker a lift. "Oh but he loved to hear old Brady sing, he knew all the words to Arthur McBride, and when I put it on my stereo, The man broke right down and cried".

The combination of Brady's magical tonsils, great guitar work and that tune really does bring tears to the eyes. Glad to hear so many other people love it too.


19 Sep 04 - 08:30 PM (#1275994)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: Murray MacLeod

There are very few male singers who can hit a high G, (Paul Brady may welll be one of them) and if you were to sing Arthur McBride in G you would have to be able to hit a high G.

Open D (capoed or not) seems to me to be a much more sensible option ...


20 Sep 04 - 01:44 PM (#1276556)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: GUEST,nickr90

For an interesting sidebar see Joseph O'Connor's novel 'Star of the Sea' for an apochrypal or fictional(I know that's spelt wrong)origin of the song


20 Sep 04 - 05:20 PM (#1276721)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: GUEST,Brendy

"There are very few male singers who can hit a high G..."

True, but if you cant, you can always transpose the G tuning, into F, or if (like me) you use wire ropes for strings, even down to E.

I can hit the high Gs in 'Arthur' without much problem, but if I think it might be a bit of a strain the odd time, I take the tuning down to F.

B.


21 Sep 04 - 10:56 PM (#1277900)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: Brendy

"I see from Brendy's post above that he reckons Paul Brady uses an Open G tuning.... Perhaps someone who has the CD could verify the actual key ?"

Mmmmmmmm.....

The Blue Clicky, Hyperlinky Thing From Ed's post - 25 Apr 04 - 12:29 Pm (Top-left-hand corner of the score.... just a little to the right of the word 'Tuning')


"I just got a look at his (my) "McBride" tablature while lurking at work, so I haven't had a chance to try reading/playing them -- wonder how it compares to Brady's own posted tabs"

Hi PoppaGator, and thanks for the kind words
The Tabs on Paul's site cover the intro and the first verse (as do mine). The only other thing that I did, which Andrew DuBrock didn't, was to tab the D(F#) in Verse 4, ("If you do you'll be flogged in the morning") and the 2 D7ths in Verses 5 & 7

B.


22 Sep 04 - 02:30 AM (#1277975)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: GUEST,Brendy

... Oh, and he tabbed the coda at the very end.

B.


22 Sep 04 - 08:58 AM (#1278171)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: Murray MacLeod

Brendy, thanks for drawing my attention to that link.

When I asked for someone who had the CD to confirm that Brady sang Arthur McBride in G, I was mindful of the fact that he has tabbed Lakes of Pontchartrain in Open D, capoed up 3, which would mean he is singing in F, but I know for a fact that he sings it in E (on the live performance on the Liberty Tapes, at any rate.

I just thought it was possible that for Arthur McBride he might use the Open G tuning, maybe tuned down a half-step.


22 Sep 04 - 09:02 AM (#1278175)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: Murray MacLeod

Oops, ignore that last post. I just remembered that when I listened to Lakes of Pontchartrain, I had my guitar tuned up a half-tone. He sings it in F, right enough.


22 Sep 04 - 11:33 AM (#1278317)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: PoppaGator

I'm having trouble enough trying to sing the high notes in "Pontchartrain" in D (open D, no capo), let alone three or four half-steps higher! Brady must have quite a vocal range, indeed.

Hey Brendy, hello back at ya. I'm so thankful to folks like you who can listen to a piece and transcribe it into tablature. Although I can read tabs, there's no way I could learn most arrangements directly just by listening myself.


20 Nov 04 - 07:48 AM (#1333430)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: GUEST,Alex

Although i cannot contribute anything in tabs or chords i would just like to say the Arthur Mcbride is a fine song and Paul Brady is a might fine singer and guitarist. I shall take it upon my self to learn this song with the help of all you kind people that have added chords and tuning tips.


20 Nov 04 - 12:22 PM (#1333656)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: PoppaGator

Glad to see this discussion reappear. Although I'm often guilty of trying to "get the last world" in real life, here on this forum I *hate* to post the final message to a thread!

But here I am, risking it again...

I've only recently (last couple of years) become interested in Irish folk music, and have little opportunity to hear much of it here in New Orleans. (Of course, we have plenty of other great music hereabouts to keep us all busily listening and, hence, distracted.) Because we're right on the south shore of Lake Pontchartrain, one song that is often heard from local and touring Irish and Celtoid acts is, of course, "Lakes of Pontchartrain," and my efforts to learn *that* song led me to discover Paul Brady and, consequently, to learn about "Arthur McBride."

Last month, I rented a DVD video, "Out of Ireland: From a Whisper to a Scream," a nice thorough survey course on a wide range of recorded music to come out of Ireland since the mid-60s, including rock and pop as well as plenty of traditional/revival music. That is, Van The Man, Phil Lynott, Rory Gallagher, Geldof, U2, Sinead, etc., but also plenty of Donal Lunny and Christy Moore (each in the context of several different groups), and of course Paul Brady. Brady appears at fairly great length as an interview subject -- in a "speaking role" -- but is also heard performing. You get to hear about 3/4 of the first verse of "Arthur," live and solo in the context of an interview. Very nice.

I'd recommend the film highly, especially for Americans (Irish-Americans) like me, or anyone not already thoroughly familiar with the scene and the artists in question. Because Irish musicians had such difficulty getting "out" and breaking into the UK and international markets, they had their own local culture which remained unknown to those of us across the ocean (if not *quite* so unknown to Britain). To me, it was like a peek into life on another planet or some parallel universe, where disaffected kids left home in the mid-60s, not for San Francisco or London, but for "swingin' Dublin"; where the reigning guitar-hero power-trio was not Cream but Taste; where the big folk music revival came after "rock n roll" became "rock," not before; etc. Fascinating!

My wife loved this rental DVD even more than I, and was very reluctant to return it. Fortunately, we got it from www.netflix.com, where there are no late fees. You pay a flat monthly $18 to rent out 3 DVDs at a time; the faster you view and return the videos, the more different films you get for your money, but you can keep any one of them as long as you wish.

I think we kept it three weeks and played it, who knows, 30 or 40 times (sometimes just in the background, of course), until we both had most of the narration memorized, and finally mailed it back about a week ago.


10 Nov 06 - 09:43 AM (#1881900)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: GUEST,Bill Kennedy

some of you may remember Sam Hinton, he's still performing out in California, I think, though recorded in the fifties and then again much later. He has Arthur McBride on his "The Real McCoy, Irish Folk SOngs Selected and Sung by Sam Hinton", from 1957. He doesn't credit his source, from what I remember, but I'll look at the album this evening to make sure. Obviously the guitar arrangement of Paul Brady's is unique and extraordinary, Sam's much simpler, but lyrics and melody the same, tempo a bit more metronomic on Sam's recording. I doubt very much that Paul ever heard this recording, but I would say it's the earliest recording of the song I have come across, and it was not unknown for all those years, just needed Paul's genius to transform it into a work of art.


01 Feb 07 - 01:15 PM (#1954747)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: GUEST

proberly the best version ,paul is by far the best the folk scean has seen in years .


01 Feb 07 - 03:14 PM (#1954864)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: bill kennedy

Paul's touring the East Coast of the US this February, BTW

your chances to hear him live:

08/02/07 Cambridge, MA Sanders Theatre, Harvard
09/02/07 Albany,NY The Egg
10/02/07 Fall River MA Narrows Center for the Arts
11/02/07 Northampton MA The Iron Horse
13/02/07 Hanover NH (double bill with Altan) Dartmouth University
14/02/07 Newmarket NH The Stone Church
16/02/07 Middletown CT Wesleyan College
17/02/07 New York City B.B.King Club
20/02/07 Carrboro NC Carrboro Arts Center


02 May 07 - 11:33 AM (#2041336)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: GUEST,Alan Surtees - Shrewsbury Folk Festival

And if you want to see Paul this August (2007) in England, he will be performing at the Shrewsbury Folk Festival.


02 May 07 - 12:14 PM (#2041367)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: Big Al Whittle

there is good instructional dvd on homespun where Paul goes through all the moves on this song and several others.

I think he's starting to look a bit like Jerry Springer.


02 May 07 - 01:06 PM (#2041430)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: GUEST,DonMeixner

Go to Paul Brady's web sute. He has Arthur McBride Tabbed out in his odd tuning. Then go to YouTube and watch him play it.

Don


02 May 07 - 04:21 PM (#2041590)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: GUEST,Arkie

He also has recordings, Arthur McBride among them, on emusic.com


03 May 07 - 02:50 AM (#2041960)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: Declan

PoopaGator,

Most of that stuff on the video would have happened in the early seventies rather than the 60s, but it has often been said that the 60's didn't happen in Ireland until the 70s. I was around the tail end of that scene in Dublin from about 1978 onwards. (I was too young for pubs (legally at least) before then) and it was indeed a magical time. I was there in time for the (first) Planxty reunion in early '79 which was brilliant. I first saw Planxty (original line up) when they came to play a gig in our school in around 1973. I was already listening to a bit of Irish music, but this was definitely a life changing moment.

A word of warning for those considering going to see Paul now, that he has considerably changed his musical direction since those days. Still good but very different. I think he still performs Arthur in his set from time to time. There was a time when he was so fed up of being pestered to sing the song all through his set that he refused to sing it at all for quite a long time.


03 May 07 - 05:28 AM (#2042041)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: Big Al Whittle

The video (Echoes and Extracts) with all the rock stuff on is fascinating - showing Paul's develpoment.

Its strange to reflect on the different directions various /singersongwriters took from the 70's.

Paul going rather in the direction of Van Morrison. Christy sticking with folk but expanding the horizons - becoming the Irish Pete Seeger. Johnny MacEvoy throwing in his lot with the Country and Irish scene.


03 May 07 - 12:21 PM (#2042374)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: PoppaGator

Declan,

The DVD "Out of Ireland: From a Whisper to a Scream" has footage from every decade since the 50s, or maybe even the 40s, but I understand what you mean about "the 60s not happening until the 70s" in Ireland. Even in much of America, between the east and west coasts, many of us felt that our local communities were a couple of years behind the times, if not a full decade.

Some of the material in the video, such Van Morrison as a member of Them and also at the time of such early solo efforts as "Astral Weeks," really does predate 1970.

WLD,

I can't find an earlier reference in this thread to a video called "Echoes and Extracts," but I'll try to look it up and, if readily available, watch it.

(Perhaps in deference to Brady's version of this lyric, I should address you as "LWD" [;^)].)

...........

Incidentally, since the last time this thread popped up, we bought a copy of "Whisper to a Scream." And we very rarely buy DVDs ~ never movies (which rarely merit re-watching) and only rarely music. Well, we do own "The Last Waltz," which came out as a theatrical film, but it's a movie of a concert...


04 May 07 - 11:22 AM (#2043232)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: GUEST,cmt49

I play a version of Arthur McBride in DADGAD. Works very well, and saves having to reach the notes only Brady can.


04 May 07 - 01:48 PM (#2043313)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: Big Al Whittle

You don't need to play the way Brady does - he is a plectrum based guitarist - and his approach to guitar playing is very similar to the 'church picking' style of rambling Jack Eliot. Not very popular in England - where we tend to be finger pickers. It calls for a very stiff plectrum and a delicacy and flexiblity of wrist movement.

another consequence of his devotion to the pick is that he segues into a style of guitar playing I have only seen rock players use - where several strings are muted to give a percussive effect. Sometimes he uses a the sixth string tuned down to C, with the rest like a normal Spanish G GBDGBD>

However the actual notes are mostly down the shallow end.


04 May 07 - 11:42 PM (#2043654)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: GUEST,DonMeixner

http://www.paulbrady.com/tablature/am.asp

Here is the address to the TAB posted on Paul Bray's site for "Arthur Mc Bride." It covers tuning which I believe is not DADGAD.
My memory says it is similar but maybe D A D F# A D or the like.

Don


05 May 07 - 12:09 PM (#2043957)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: GUEST,Brendy

There are a number of references as to what tuning Paul uses, Don, both in this thread, and at the top-left of the link you (and others) have provided.

B.


11 May 07 - 06:23 PM (#2049524)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: GUEST,Rob King of Carmina

I haven't heard PB's version of this song, although the song itself was very formative for me when I was in the process of starting Carmina. Do any of you know this following version - it's much simpler, and seems to fit the tune better, as far as I am concerned - but I suspect it's an English version, imperfectly recalled! This song has always interested me because the tune needs two ballad quatrains - ie the 4-3-4-3 stress verse pattern - for its completion - and at the end of this version, three quatrains are joined to make the finale, which I like. This is the same with 'Lakes of Ponchartrain', and a host of other ballads - the tune needs two stanzas (or quatrains) for its completion. The only song I can think of right now (but there must be others) whose tune completes in four lines, rather than eight, is 'Blackwaterside'. Sorry to sound so academic, but I find ballads fascinating, and they have have formed the basis of my professional musical life! Anyway - here is the version, that I took down in a folk club in Gloucester, ages ago:

I once knew a fellow called Arthur McBride
He and I went a-walking down by the sea-side
A-looking for pleasure, and what may betide
And the weather was pleasant and charming
And pleasant and gallant we went on our tramp
And met Sergeant Harper and Corporal Cramp
And a jolly young fellow, who called up the camp
With his 'Row de dow dow' in the morning

Ah well, says this sergeant, if ye will enlist
Five guineas in gold I will stick in your fist
Besides the fine shilling to kick up the dust
And drink the king's health in the morning
Ah well, says McBride, if we take your advice
'Tis right bloody slender would be our poor chance
For the king wouldn't scruple to send us to France
And get us both shot in the morning

And ye needn't go bragging about your fine pay
As ye go a-marching and tramping away
For all that you get is one shilling a day
To get you some gruel in the evening
And ye needn't go bragging about your fine clothes
For they're only borrowed, or so I suppose
And ye durst not sell them, in spite of your nose
Or you would get flogged in the morning

Ah well, says this sergeant, if you say one more word
I swear by the herrings I'll draw out me sword
And I'll run you both through, if me strength will afford
So now ye young buckos, take warning
We beat that bold drummer as flat as a shoe
And made a foot-ball of his 'Row de dow dow'
And as for the others, we beat them the two
Yes we were the boys in that morning
And as for the weapons that hung by their side
We took them and flung them far into the tide
'May the Devil go with you' says Arthur McBride
'For delaying our walk this fine morning'.


12 May 07 - 04:13 PM (#2050133)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: GUEST,Gerry

I play a version of Arthur McBride at www.soundclick.com/gerryburke. Please feel free to check it out! I play it in CGDGBD. Believe it or not I used to play it in open E, but I prefer this tuning. Any comments welcome.


25 Sep 10 - 12:35 PM (#2993505)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: Amos

Lyrics as sung (Paul Brady 1977)


Oh, me and my cousin, one Arthur McBride
As we went a-walking down by the seaside
Now, mark what followed and what did betide
For it being on Christmas morning...
Out for recreation, we went on a tramp
And we met Sergeant Napper and Corporal Vamp
And a little wee drummer, intending to camp
For the day being pleasant and charming.

"Good morning ! Good morning!" the sergeant did cry
"And the same to you gentlemen!" we did reply ,
Intending no harm but meant to pass by
For it being on Christmas morning.
But says he, "My fine fellows if you will enlist,
It's ten guineas in gold I will slip in your fist
And a crown in the bargain for to kick up the dust
And drink the King's health in the morning.

For a soldier he leads a very fine life
And he always is blessed with a charming young wife
And he pays all his debts without sorrow or strife
And always lives pleasant and charming...
And a soldier he always is decent and clean
In the finest of clothing he's constantly seen
While other poor fellows go dirty and mean
And sup on thin gruel in the morning."

"But", says Arthur, "I wouldn't be proud of your clothes
For you've only the lend of them as I suppose
And you dare not change them one night, for you know
If you do you'll be flogged in the morning.
And although that we are single and free
we take great delight in our own company
And we have no desire strange faces to see
Although that your offers are charming
And we have no desire to take your advance
All hazards and dangers we barter on chance
For you would have no scruples for to send us to France
Where we would get shot without warning"

"Oh now!", says the sergeant "I'll have no such chat
And I neither will take it from spalpeen or brat
For if you insult me with one other word
I'll cut off your heads in the morning"
And then Arthur and I we soon drew our hods
And we scarce gave them time for to draw their own blades
When a trusty shillelagh came over their heads
And bade them take that as fair warning

And their old rusty rapiers that hung by their side
We flung them as far as we could in the tide
"Now take them out, Divils!", cried Arthur McBride
"And temper their edge in the morning".
And the little wee drummer we flattened his pow
And we made a football of his rowdeydowdow
Threw it in the tide for to rock and to row
And bade it a tedious returning

And we having no money, paid them off in cracks
And we paid no respect to their two bloody backs
For we lathered them there like a pair of wet sacks
And left them for dead in the morning.
And so to conclude and to finish disputes
We obligingly asked if they wanted recruits
For we were the lads who would give them hard clouts
And bid them look sharp in the morning.

Oh me and my cousin, one Arthur McBride
As we went a walkin' down by the seaside,
Now mark what followed and what did betide
For it being on Christmas morning




Paul's classic rendition is awe-inspiring and near-perfect, as it strikes me.


A


25 Sep 10 - 12:50 PM (#2993513)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: GUEST,Peter Laban

I haven't gone through this thread but it's worth mentioning Arthur McBride appears in Patrick Weston Joyce's 'Old Irish Folk Music and Songs'. Pretty much the version Andy Irvine used with Planxty.

Joyce notes he learned both the song and air as a youth, which would be during the 1830s-early 1840s. He notes there's a different version, from Donegal, in Stanford-Petrie. And also notes he is disposed to think the song on the whole belongs to Donegal.

Based on that it may be safe to look for an Ulster source for Brady's version.


13 Feb 12 - 04:31 AM (#3307288)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: GUEST,Jerry Simon

As an unaccompanied singer I find it very odd how so very many of the comments here are mostly about tunings and tablature! And how many speak of "playing" the song - I always think more of SINGING a song.
Forgive me, I don't want to sound at all like I'm doing a put-down here - but why on earth would anyone want to play the accompaniment to this song as Paul Brady played it?
Surely you'd rather want to find a key that suits YOUR voice, and to select your own choice of chords to harmonise in a new way, to forget about his vocal phrasing altogether & take the words and use them to re-tell the story in YOUR own way? I mean, he's recorded a truly wonderful presentation of the song - copying what he does is always going to be less effective than what you're copying, so why try? I really don't get it.
But let me agree that Paul Brady's performance of it is just superb - and I mean that predominantly in terms of the way he SINGS the song, which is just utterly staggering. I imagine he could have sung it with the same impact (on me at least) without guitar accompaniment at all. Many people forget that old songs like this would almost NEVER have been sung with instrumental accompaniment until the folk revival.


22 Oct 12 - 02:22 PM (#3424275)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: Desert Dancer

I'm picking this old thread simply because it has the most posts...

Here is Tiernan McBride's 1977 film of Paul Brady's song 'Arthur McBride' on YouTube.

~ Becky in Tucson


22 Oct 12 - 05:28 PM (#3424371)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: GUEST,michael gill

I have to agree with Jerry Simon.

Brady's version is only definitive it that it has never been bettered. And to try to copy it is silly. I'd say it's the difference between "folk" musicians and musicians. Folk musicians, from Dylan with his Guthry impersonations to people here begging for Brady's tabs, are irrelevant.


22 Oct 12 - 06:01 PM (#3424390)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: Steve Shaw

I heard Paul Brady singing this at The Plough in Torrington, must have been 12 or more years ago. His guitar playing on the song then represented a big evolution from his playing on the infamous record (I can't spell "seminal"). Still recognisable as the same species but considerably different. If even he doesn't stand still with it, then asking for tab looks even sillier.

And don't forget what happened when the charlatan Dylan nicked Nic Jones's arrangement of Canadee-i-o.


22 Oct 12 - 08:25 PM (#3424484)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: GUEST,Ballyholme

Legend has it that when Dylan played at Slane Castle in Ireland many years back, the great and the good of Irish music (various members of U2, etc) where there to seek an audience with the Great One.

Eventualy he asked for Paul Brady. Upon entering Dylan's trailer, Bob handed Paul his guitar and said: "Show me the chords to Arthur McBride."


22 Oct 12 - 08:52 PM (#3424501)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: Steve Shaw

"Chords?" What a twat.


23 Oct 12 - 05:34 AM (#3424633)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: GUEST,raymond greenoaken

>"Chords?" What a twat.<

But did he say it? It's a legend, apparently.

But I wonder if we're not placing too much of a premium on "originality" and "making a song your own". What's the harm in performing a song like someone else if that's the way you personally like it? The fact is, unless you can do a perfect Paul Brady impression (I wish!), it would come out sounding different to the ur-version anyway. And you then might find yourself changing bits, adding bits, dropping bits, out of pure caprice or because something cool just occurred to you. You'll end up making it your own by accident. And in the process, you'll have learned something very interesting and valuable about how Paul Brady does what he does. Everyone wins!


23 Oct 12 - 05:37 AM (#3424635)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: Steve Shaw

That would be good, I agree. But you don't need tab to do it.


23 Oct 12 - 06:02 AM (#3424640)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: Brian Peters

"What's the harm in performing a song like someone else if that's the way you personally like it?"

Which is of course what all of us do, when we introduce 'Johnny B. Goode' with Chuck Berry's guitar riff, rather than a moody chord sequence on church organ or a stentorian burst of highland pipes. On the other hand, as a listener I think I'd prefer to hear a singer try and do their own thing with 'Arthur' rather than what is almost inevitably going to be a poor imitation of Paul Brady. The demand here for 'authentic' guitar tunings and tabs rather argues against the idea that an attempted Brady impression is likely to evolve into something new and creatively exciting.

"it may be safe to look for an Ulster source for Brady's version"

The origins of the song in Carrie Grover's Nova Scotia collection has already been discussed in some deatil on this other Arthur McBride thread. Ms Grover claimed English, Scottish, Welsh and Irish ancestry, so it's still quite possible the song had Ulster origins.


23 Oct 12 - 06:26 AM (#3424652)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: Steve Shaw

Well, if someone in our pub session spontaneously launched into a Brady-esque version of the song and did a decent job of it we'd all love him for it. But some git doing the same thing on stage or a CD is a different matter. As with Zim and his Canadee-i-o...

The Tree Inn, Stratton, by the way, Brian, though times have moved on somewhat since I won your vinyl in the raffle! :-)


23 Oct 12 - 06:51 AM (#3424661)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: Brian Peters

Treasure it, Steve, one day it will make you rich...


23 Oct 12 - 07:20 AM (#3424671)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: Steve Shaw

You couldn't lend me a stylus, could you...


23 Oct 12 - 07:20 AM (#3424672)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: GUEST,raymond greenoaken

It's never worked for me!


23 Oct 12 - 07:32 AM (#3424679)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: GUEST,michael gill

The dichotomy of "how does it go?" and "how do you play it?" interests me.


23 Oct 12 - 08:04 AM (#3424685)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: GUEST,raymond greenoaken

Elton John once released a single of Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds, more or less faithfully replicating the Fabs' original arrangement of the song. When reproached for this by pop commentators, he made the interesting point that a pop song exists primarily as a recorded performance (many more people buy records than buy sheet music), and that the instrumental texture and arrangement was therefore felt to be an integral element of the song. Brian hints at this with his pleasing fantasy of Johnny B Goode with highland pipes. Folk songs, on the other hand, historically existed either as texts or as unrepeated performances, so singers tended to take the bare bones of the text and tune and do it in their own way. But as soon as a folk song is enshrined in a recorded performance, that performance potentially becomes definitive, and that's how everyone feels the song to be. How often do we hear reviewers tutting: "Not bad, but it can't live with Dick Gaughan's version" etc.? Once upon a time the folk said: "How does it go?". Now they're more likely to say: "How do you play it?"

By the by, Brian's Persistence Of Memory lp will set you back Ģ15 quid at Sheffield's Record Collector.


23 Oct 12 - 08:11 AM (#3424686)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: Brian Peters


23 Oct 12 - 08:20 AM (#3424690)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: Brian Peters

"a pop song exists primarily as a recorded performance..."

Which is presumably why so many pop covers are watered-down and disappointing pastiches of the original. Now, here's how to cover a song - three occasions, different each time:

John Cale Heartbreak Hotel 1

John Cale Heartbreak Hotel 2

John Cale Heartbreak Hotel 3

I'm probably with Steve in that a decent attempt at a Brady cover is OK in a session. It's when supposedly talented musicians can't be arsed to exercise a little imagination that I get fed up.

By the by, Brian's Persistence Of Memory lp will set you back Ģ15 quid at Sheffield's Record Collector

My sister-in-law owned up sheepishly to having taken the copy I'd given her twenty-odd years ago to a car boot sale. The good news was, it was the only LP she sold all day.


23 Oct 12 - 08:24 AM (#3424692)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: GUEST,michael gill

Yes, and The Stones' Little Red Rooster". And who didn't, when they were kids, teach themselves House of the Rising Sun on the guitar.

I remember when I was a kid saying to myself, "When I can play Toss the Feathers like Kevin Burke I'll be able to play the fiddle." Of course, by the time I could play Toss the Feathers like Kevin Burke, I'd long since realised that that was not being able to play the fiddle at all, it's merely being able to play Toss the Feathers like Kevin Burke.


23 Oct 12 - 08:33 AM (#3424694)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: Steve Shaw

Fools Of Fortune it was, Brian.


23 Oct 12 - 09:01 AM (#3424702)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: Steve Shaw

I didn't discover traditional music of any kind until I was nearly 40. By then I'd gone through a horrible phase of having loads of recordings, mostly of classical, and expecting the same perfection (and notes) in live concerts (I went to lots of 'em as I lived handily for the South Bank at the time). Any glitches or straying from the version I had at home had me gritting my teeth. I just couldn't enjoy concerts at all. Someone gave me a good talking to about it in about 1979 and I saw the light. Just in time, before I started playing myself. I am thoroughly averse to "versions" getting enshrined in any way at all. I don't understand how anything can be set in stone when it only actually exists when I'm hearing it.


23 Oct 12 - 09:07 AM (#3424704)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: GUEST,raymond greenoaken

>I remember when I was a kid saying to myself, "When I can play Toss the Feathers like Kevin Burke I'll be able to play the fiddle." Of course, by the time I could play Toss the Feathers like Kevin Burke, I'd long since realised that that was not being able to play the fiddle at all, it's merely being able to play Toss the Feathers like Kevin Burke.<

Michael, are you really saying you learned nothing about fiddle playing by the time you could play Toss The Feathers like Kevin Burke? Nothing at all worth knowing?

If I could play guitar exactly like Martin Carthy, I would. Fortunately for Martin Carthy, I can't.


23 Oct 12 - 10:02 AM (#3424726)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: GUEST

Of course I learned lots of things about fiddle playing and how to play the fiddle. It was very educational. Lots of technical stuff mostly, but most importantly, that playing music well has really not much at all to do with copying. You have to listen, of course, and be able to follow and react. but even that's not much to do with copying.

I wouldn't say I can play the fiddle now. I'd like to think that I'd never say it.


23 Oct 12 - 12:29 PM (#3424830)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: GUEST,raymond greenoaken

>playing music well has really not much at all to do with copying<

I suppose my point is, without copying, you wouldn't have made that discovery. And with all the technical stuff you picked up in the process, you could then go on to forge your own personal style — if that's what you wanted to do.


23 Oct 12 - 02:41 PM (#3424928)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: GUEST,michael gill

Yes, I agree. But I didn't know that then. I suppose you could say that being able to copy is a decent starting point from where to begin playing music


24 Oct 12 - 03:25 AM (#3425230)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: GUEST,michael gill

Also, I'm not of the opinion that "forging" a personal style is how you go about it.

I have met people who have taken their style and bashed it into shape with a heavy hammer while it was red hot. But they were never any good.

If you pay no attention to your personal style it will happen quite naturally on its own


24 Oct 12 - 05:14 AM (#3425252)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: GUEST,raymond greenoaken

I think we're in agreement, Michael. Note my caveat: "if that's what you wanted to do".


24 Oct 12 - 05:39 AM (#3425264)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: GUEST,michael gill

I don't understand the caveat. I'd say you'd have to make a real effort not have your own personal style, not the other way round. And why wold you want to do that anyway?


24 Oct 12 - 05:52 AM (#3425269)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: Steve Shaw

A rotten side-effect of both copying someone else or trying to develop your own "personal style" is that you merely pick up affectations. I think it's a good idea to listen to your own playing using a recording gizmo of some kind. Get out the hair-shirt and get someone else to criticise you too.


24 Oct 12 - 06:37 AM (#3425287)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: GUEST,michael gill

As a side issue, one of the prerequisites for playing music is that when you hear a recording of yourself (a decent recording, of course) it offers you no surprises. In order to play music you have to be able to hear yourself accurately in real time. Hear your intonation, your timing, your tone etc. You have to be able to hear if you're being boring, hear if you are the volume you want to be in the mix, hear if you are not putting someone off etc.

If you only discover these things after hearing a recording, you are not listening attentively enough to your self


24 Oct 12 - 07:06 AM (#3425299)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: Steve Shaw

That is true, but equally it's easy at times to hide behind others in a session setting. I've heard myself in session recordings sounding like I'm blending nicely (even though I wasn't trying to hide), yet when I play the same tune to myself at home I can hear all the flaws. Crap intonation, poor internal rhythm, no drive, dodgy or inconsistent ornamentation, a bit of ego creepin' in... Having said all that, mind you, you do need to be able to hear the flaws. Can be a useful exercise but not worth dwelling on for too long. There are times when I can't hear myself too well in a session. A gob iron too close to strummers, etc...


02 Dec 15 - 06:31 PM (#3755233)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: Desert Dancer

Stephen Winick ("Nerd", here) has very complete blog post up at the American Folklife Center (Library of Congress) about Paul Brady's version of "Arthur McBride" from Carrier Drover, of Maine:

Paul Brady, Carrie Grover, Bob Dylan, and "Arthur McBride"

~ Becky in Long Beach

(Cross-posted here: Lyr Req: Arthur McBride)


02 Dec 15 - 06:43 PM (#3755237)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: Steve Shaw

Ah, good to see a thread resurrected with me and me owld cyber-mucker Michael in it. I bet he doesn't see it though.


21 Dec 18 - 10:55 AM (#3967706)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: GUEST,Rigby

This is interesting... as far as I can tell, a cover of Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride, but in Swedish:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5PtvRJ0ET6A

Or have they just set different words to the same tune? Anyone?


24 Dec 18 - 01:12 AM (#3968097)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: The Sandman

Copying is ok up to a point it should be a stepping stone from a learning point, ideally everyone should develop their own style, but style will always have influences.
I developed my own personal style of song accompaniment on the concertina,[when it comes to playing melody ] based on piedmont guitar style which puts melody notes off and on the beat, a technique used by john hurt, then i dropped the basses and this was an influence that enabled me to develop a personal style on english concertina, there ius no way that my concertina acompaniments sound like, lou killen steve turner or anyone else.


25 Dec 18 - 10:13 PM (#3968332)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: GUEST

Lot of fun to play and sing on clawhammer banjo. Lays out easily in the key of "G" capoed or lowered to your pitch ("C" or"D" for me)_ gopherit


25 Dec 18 - 11:53 PM (#3968337)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: The Sandman

guest do you use g tuning?


26 Dec 18 - 08:00 AM (#3968364)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: GUEST

This is interesting... as far as I can tell, a cover of Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride, but in Swedish:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5PtvRJ0ET6A

Or have they just set different words to the same tune? Anyone?

----------------

As a Swedish speaker and having had a listen to this song, it's a different song entirely and not a translation of the English-language version.


27 Dec 18 - 04:58 PM (#3968509)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: GUEST,Rigby

Thanks -- how odd! They have copied Paul Brady's arrangement quite closely. Are the Swedish lyrics also traditional?


30 Dec 18 - 12:39 PM (#3968890)
Subject: RE: Paul Brady's version of Arthur McBride
From: GUEST,Don Meixner

I first hear Arthur McBride in the early 70's when Erik Frandsen toured through the campus coffee house in Auburn New York. As I recall Erik's version was quite remarkable but I don't recall an alt tuning. Erik is a great guitarist and singer as well.   I found a video of Paul Brady doing Arthur McBride and was taken first by the style and knew it wasn't standard tuning. And then I realized he was playing a Yamaha FG-180 just like mine. Brady's version must be the definitive version by now.

Don Meixner