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BS: Recipes - what are we eating?

07 Nov 18 - 11:00 PM (#3960636)
Subject: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson

What are we eating today? I made a Yotam Ottolenghi chickpea dish and it was yum. Two tins of chickpeas with the liquid poured off. Caramelise a couple of onions and garlic to taste; add the chickpeas and then about a tablespoon each of chopped rosemary, thyme and sage, and a tablespoon of anchovies. And slivers of lemon zest - the yellow part of the skin of a (washed) lemon. Let it all simmer and combine; add a couple of cups of chicken stock and simmer a bit more. Mash some of the chickpeas a bit. Just before serving, add a tablespoon each of chopped parsley and chopped mint, the juice of the lemon and a tablespoon of za'atar, and stir them in. Very moreish indeed.


07 Nov 18 - 11:04 PM (#3960637)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage

Alas, it's the "liquid diet" portion of prep day leading to tomorrow's colonoscopy. Ask me again tomorrow after I get back home! (Sorry to do an immediate side-track on your topic - in my refrigerator I have a wonderful batch of chicken pot pie I made on Tuesday that I reheat and serve with whole grain crackers on top instead of making a crust.)


07 Nov 18 - 11:42 PM (#3960642)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson

Oh, goodness, good luck with the colonoscopy. (Here, I think they're moving more and more to colonography instead, which can be done without anaesthetic, and is supposed to be more accurate… whether it's so or not…) Waiting for that chicken pot pie recipe.


08 Nov 18 - 06:57 AM (#3960691)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman

I did a sort of spicy cauliflower/broccoli. I think it ran fry some onion, add 1 tsp each of ground cumin and corriander and 2 tsp of mild chili powder. Bit of garlic paste, 1 jar Patak Korma sauce, and a Knorr stock pot (or two?) Add some water and cook the brassica in the mix. Cooked the evening before for consumption the next tea time.

Served with basmatti rice. A typical bodge job of mine but it turned out quite well liked.


08 Nov 18 - 08:33 AM (#3960701)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson

Mmmm, sounds good! I was watching one of the English chef programmes the other day and they were making "cauliflower steak" - basically frying a big slab of cauliflower as if it's a steak. Must try it! Again, my man Yotam has a recipe.


08 Nov 18 - 08:46 AM (#3960705)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman

That link isn't working for me, try this one

The fish wouldn't go down here but perhaps I could try something on those lines one day IF feeling really keen.


08 Nov 18 - 09:35 AM (#3960715)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion

Chickpea and squash stew with couscous, from a recipe by Mark Birman. It’s a less-meatarian dish that somehow manages to get winter squash into Himself. Durn it, I’ll have to hit the supermarket for ginger root, courgettes and a red sweet pepper.


08 Nov 18 - 11:07 AM (#3960737)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson

Hmm, must check the ginger stocks; haven't been shopping for a couple of weeks - flu.


08 Nov 18 - 04:41 PM (#3960785)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Bat Goddess

I just made a large pot of my friend E.V.'s Hot & Sour Chicken Soup -- most of it for the freezer as, well, winter's coming! This soup is truly both tasty and beneficial if I come down with one of winter's maladies.

E.V., like me, doesn't so much use a recipe as use an ingredient list and guide.

Thinly slice (today I varied it and used bigger chunks of everything except the carrots) onion, red bell pepper, carrot or zucchini, garlic, ginger and saute in coconut oil until tender.

Add chicken broth and pulled chicken meat. (I cheated and used a supermarket rotisserie chicken -- and put the carcass along with some veg scraps in the freezer to make stock one of these days, also for the freezer.)

Then add Asian fish sauce (nuc mam, nam pla, etc.), chili-garlic paste (or Sambal Olek or other hot pepper sauce), and rice wine vinegar -- all to taste. Adjust the three sauces for your preferred taste or amount of heat. Oh, salt and black pepper.

Believe me, if you're in the throes of a head cold this works a treat. And I find it also settles the stomach and will coax me to eat if nothing sounds good.

Linn


08 Nov 18 - 06:25 PM (#3960795)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

This takes ten minutes max. We've had a busy day today and this is what I chucked together. With thanks to Nigel Slater, who provided the idea.

Put a pan of your favourite short pasta on to boil in salted water. 250g for two people.

Drain a jar of tuna in olive oil, preferably yellowfin (albacore). If you have tuna in spring water, throw it away unopened.

Put tuna in a bowl and add the following: a tablespoon of nonpareil capers (never use any capers bigger than those). Two cloves of garlic, finely sliced (throw your garlic crusher away - worst bloody invention ever). A helping of chopped fresh parsley (don't arse about: tear the leaves off the parsley, put them into a mug and snip away like mad for one minute with a pair of scissors). Freshly-ground black pepper. A little bit of salt, only if your tuna is unsalted. Five tablespoons of full-fat creme fraiche. Nigel uses double cream, but trust me on this. Mix up everything roughly. You want a few visible tuna flakes.

Drain the pasta and retain a mug of pasta water (you'll need some to loosen the sauce).
Mix the pasta and the tuna mix together. Use pasta water to loosen. I've never managed without it. Serve in warm bowls. Heresy coming up: serve with Parmesan. True Italians would kill me for that, but it works.


08 Nov 18 - 11:44 PM (#3960822)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson

Oooh, those sound good! Last night I made one of our standard soups: saute onions, shallot and garlic in coconut oil, add a rake of grated carrot and keep going on low-ish heat, add chicken stock (well, I use chicken usually, or sometimes vegetable stock from cubes), then chopped-up broccoli and some flakes of dried hot chilli pepper, and finally a couple of fillets of hake. Simmer till any non-grated bits of carrot are soft and the hake has broken up and disappeared into the soup. Very nice with brown soda bread on the side.


09 Nov 18 - 07:31 AM (#3960871)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

I'm doing a risotto this evening, based on scraps of sausage, chicken and stuffing rescued from our last roast chicken dinner that I'd kept in the freezer. There'll be bacon in a t and I'm using by home-made real chicken stock. I'll let you know how it goes.


09 Nov 18 - 07:33 AM (#3960873)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman

Vegetable cobbler last night. Carrots, parsnips and swede for the veg inside. Used Jos-Roll frozen pastry for the cut out rounds on top and Parmesan cheese on the pastry.

I think I’ll do a Quorn mince “cottage pie” for tea today and have with some spinach. Sat, probably pizza and (deep fried) chips. Sun may be be Quorn fillets cooked in a sauce made with a sauce that’s basically a jar of the Korma stuff mixed with a tin of chopped tomato, again with rice. Mon, perhaps macaroni cheese, etc.

As you see, rarely anything needing recipes from me… Still, it does serve a purpose with me haven taken on the bulk of the cooking, we do get fresh veg and it beats the Wiltshire Farms type meals.

Trying to get back to a recipe (mostly followed and omitting the ham), one I must repeat soon is potato and leek gratin it worked out really well last time and we have plenty of leeks , although I found the potato needed a while longer to soften in the oven.


09 Nov 18 - 09:11 AM (#3960895)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

Guess who accidentally fired off his last post before editing the damn thing...


09 Nov 18 - 03:17 PM (#3960945)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Bat Goddess

Steve Shaw -- throw in a few more things (chop up a tin of anchovies, add a can of diced tomatoes) and you've got a good puttanesca.

Love it! Will try your version as a very acceptable variant.

Linn


09 Nov 18 - 04:32 PM (#3960955)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Helen

This is a good recent food thread: https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=165070&messages=20

And I made the "Mexican" version last night:

Instead of cornmeal, I mash up a can of butter beans or white beans or chickpeas and sometimes add a small amount of flour.

The two main variations I have made are:

"Mexican" with corn kernels, red capsicum and chilli through it and grated cheese mixed in and on top.

Zucchini with grated zucchini - and other available veg - with grated cheese in and on it.

A good standby for a quick meal and very good as leftovers.

The mashed beans/chickpeas makes it high in fibre but in fact the mash looks and acts like mashed potato. A sneaky way to add fibre without ruining a dish. I use them for making fish cakes instead of mashed potato, too. Yum!


Also, has anyone tried using the liquid from the canned white beans, butter beans or chick peas as a substitute for egg white. The liquid is called aquafaba. I tried it for making maccaroon thingies. It worked well. No beanie taste. I liked them.

20 recipes for aquafaba

Hubby & I are not on a meat-free life, but have cut meat back considerably and added lots more beanie-type things. One of my fave foods is sausage rolls but now I make a version based on mashed white beans with lots of yummy vege flavours mixed in.


09 Nov 18 - 04:45 PM (#3960957)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

My version of puttanesca (whore's pasta, or prostitute's spaghetti) is as follows:

For two people.

Four anchovy fillets in oil

100g pitted black olives, roughly chopped

A tablespoon of nonpareil capers

Chopped fresh parsley

A handful of chopped cherry tomatoes, or a tin of tomatoes

Two cloves of garlic, sliced (NOT crushed: never do that abominable thing)

A goodly sprinkling of dried chilli flakes, to taste

Extra virgin olive oil

Freshly-ground black pepper (no salt)

250g spaghetti


Get your spaghetti on the boil in salted water.

In your biggest and best shallow pan (mine are Le Creuset: snob), gently fry the garlic and chill flakes in a couple of tablespoons of olive oil for a few minutes. If the garlic goes brown, you've got it wrong. Just a gentle sizzle.

Add the anchovy and break up the fillets with a wooden spoon until they've melted. Add the capers, tomatoes, parsley, pepper and olives. Simmer until the pasta is done.

Drain the pasta when it's al dente, reserving some pasta water. You may or may not need some. Throw the pasta into the pan with the sauce. Mix well and serve. No Parmesan, but a drizzle of your very finest olive goes well. The whole spirit of the thing is that you use things only out of tins, jars or packets. That's what the ladies of the night would do to fortify themselves for the night's work to come. Gawd knows what their clients thought about the ensuing garlic breath...

In Napoli they would get the Camorra on to you for using anchovies. In other regions the chilli is omitted. That's a shame. You can hold the parsley back and sprinkle it on at the end. You can add dried oregano if you like. Not the worst idea in the world.





Put your


09 Nov 18 - 06:03 PM (#3960971)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia

Put thinly sliced carrots in a big skillet. (good use for a salad shooter)
Ditto celery
add place pieces of pre-cooked kielbasa
splash in 1/3 cup white wine

cover and simmer till carrots are cooked and kielbasa is warmed through

serve with good bread, radishes for something crisp.

We had our kielbasa shipped in by Usinger's in Milwaukee. I cooked it and froze it as soon as it arrived. This may not be practical for those across the pond.


09 Nov 18 - 07:24 PM (#3960991)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage

My chicken pot pie/stew doesn't have a recipe with measurements, but I can tell you what goes in it.

I use cooked chicken, in this case, chicken breast from a package that was frozen hard from the store and I didn't bother to try to soften it enough to use some and put the rest back in the freezer. It all thawed and I had about six large chicken breasts to bake at once; this recipe used 3 or 4 of them, and my chicken dice was about 1" sized pieces.

Chopped onions, sauteed, then add diced carrots and let them soften a bit. Dice red-skinned (red lasoda) potatoes and add them last because they soften up more quickly (though these are the waxy potatoes so they hold their shape better than Russets). I had a cup or more of the liquid from when I baked the chicken and I poured that in along with some water. Salt and ground pepper, and a little dried oregano were the seasonings. Water to bring up enough liquid and let it simmer a little, then add the chicken when the veg is ready and let it simmer again. I mix flour with water to use for thickening and mix it into the liquid. Serve with pie crust if you have it (when my children were small I would make pie crust and cut it out with cookie cutters. The plate of baked shapes was on the table to add to the top of their bowls of stew). I have been using some gluten free crackers with lots of different grains and seeds an it's very good broken into large pieces on top.

The way this turned out, it has probably more chicken than vegetables.


11 Nov 18 - 03:58 PM (#3961228)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Helen

I mentioned aquafaba - an amazing little magic ingredient. It's the water you drain out of a can of white beans, butter beans or chickpeas. The bit you usually throw away.

Raspberry Rose Vegan Macarons (Using Aquafaba)

The first part of the rather long recipe at that webpage:

Ingredients

    Macaron Shells:
    250 grams Aquafaba

    1/8 teaspoon Cream of Tartar
    Pinch of Salt
    150 grams Ground Almonds
    130 gram Pure Icing Sugar*
    110 grams Superfine/Caster Sugar
    A drop of Vegan Red Food Coloring
    A few drops of Organic Rose Extract

    Raspberry Rose Buttercream:
    125 grams Vegan Butter Substitute
    55 grams Icing Sugar
    A few drops of Organic Rose Extract
    A few drops of Vegan Red Food Coloring
    25 Raspberries

    Extras:
    Piping Bags with a Round Tip attached
    Silpat Mats or Silicone Baking Paper
    Baking Trays
    Spray Bottle filled with Water

Instructions

    The night before you want to make your Macarons, prepare your Aquafaba. In a small saucepan, bring 250 grams of Aquafaba to a simmer. Let this simmer away until it has reduced to 110 grams of Aquafaba. (I pour it out and weigh it on a kitchen scale a few times in-between to check). Once it has reached 110 grams, pour it into a bowl to cool and then refrigerate overnight.
    Macaron Shells: Process Ground Almonds and Icing Sugar in a food processor and then sieve into a bowl, making sure there are no lumps in your mixture. Set aside.

[**This is the magic bit. Aquafaba acts like egg white.**]   

With a stand mixer fitted with a clean bowl and with clean beaters, whisk Aquafaba, cream of tartar and salt on high till it turns foamy and resembles frothed up egg whites. Make sure there is no more liquid left at the bottom of the bowl before moving on to the next step.


    Gradually add caster sugar in, bit by bit, whilst your mixer is turned on. Add your food coloring and Rose Extract in and then continue whisking on high for another minute. You should end up with a thick, glossy meringue. etc etc

She has other recipes e.g.
Vegan Chocolate Mousse made with Aquafaba (Chickpea Brine)

And there are heaps of recipes on the 'net if you search for "aquafaba recipes". You can use it wherever you would use egg white, as far as I know, so sweet or savoury.


I confess, I didn't precook the aquafaba the night before, blah blah. I just made a simple little crunchy meringue. They were yummy.


11 Nov 18 - 05:02 PM (#3961240)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel

Celebrate all the recipes but sometimes whatever you make is less important compared to the way you cook it.
I use ancient-like clay pots that I soak in water before cooking.
I use separate pots for fish(small) fowl(big) or meat(medium). There will always be some sterilized residue for the next recipe. I buy them from Germany.

If there is too much water at the end , simmer it separately for sauces.


11 Nov 18 - 07:16 PM (#3961255)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Helen

I read another aquafaba web page and the reason you boil the chickpea water the night before is only if you have been really diligent and cooked your own chickpeas. Like that's gonna happen!

I'm too disorganised for that so I just open a can of chickpeas or other beans. The liquid in the cans is just the right consistency to start making all the different yummy recipes.

I think I'll try the chocolate mousse recipes next.


11 Nov 18 - 07:24 PM (#3961257)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Helen

Donuel, I have owned one of those clay roasting pots for about 40 years. Haven't used it much over the last few years but maybe I should get it out of the cupboard and give it another go. It used to make a lovely roast leg of lamb.


11 Nov 18 - 07:33 PM (#3961260)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage

I have a Romertopf pot that was at my Dad's house as part of his estate. A friend had given it to him and when she was helping me at his house she spotted it and told me I should keep it. That night she roasted a chicken in her Romertopf and it was amazing—tender, moist, meat falling off of the bones. I've found several others in thrift stores and sold them on eBay; I found one large enough to bake a turkey that I sold earlier this year (I don't think I'll ever do a turkey in one, so that's why I sold it. I brine my turkeys and roast them uncovered.)


11 Nov 18 - 07:49 PM (#3961263)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel

cool, and the skin is still crisp too.


11 Nov 18 - 09:30 PM (#3961274)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage

I take the top off the clay baker before baking is finished to make the skin crisp up.


12 Nov 18 - 06:07 PM (#3961430)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Joe_F

Today, as an experiment, I bought some beets. I expect I will microwave a beet, and simmer the greens with butter & garlic, like Sicilian spinach. As another experiment, I bought sausage, which I will broil. (Sausage is one of those things I have never eaten except in restaurants.) I will have hot tea. For dessert, sugar wafers.


12 Nov 18 - 06:10 PM (#3961431)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage

Beets are pretty forgiving, however you plan to cook them. I usually steam or simmer them in shallow water. I used to peel them before I cooked them, but it seems if you cook them then the outer skin slips off easily.


12 Nov 18 - 06:40 PM (#3961435)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia

Beets are easy to grow. Even I could do it. You do need to thin them, because each beet seed is actually a packet with several seeds in it, and if you don't thin them, the beets are too crowded. You can transplant the tiny seedlings so they don't go to waste.

I used to grow beets then make myself a lunch of boiled beets with butter and black pepper. Whole wheat bread on the side.

But then sex reared its ugly head. It seems that many men have a real hate for beets. My husband hates beets so bad that even the smell of my beets, leftover from cooking lunch, was really awful for him. So I gave up as a beet farmer.


12 Nov 18 - 07:24 PM (#3961438)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

Well I love beetroot, and regard the corned beef and beetroot butty as a thing of great joy. However, I pee fake blood after eating it. It must run in the family. I think there's a gene. Nearly forty years ago my two-year-old daughter filled the potty with "blood." I rushed her to the doc in blind panic. Said the doc nonchalantly, "have you been feeding her beetroot?"

I had...


12 Nov 18 - 08:54 PM (#3961448)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage

I suspect that is fairly common, Steve.

The weather turned very cold and blustery here today so lentil soup was on the menu. The simple Egyptian version in my Middle Eastern cookbook - water, grated onion, lentils, seasoned with salt, ground pepper, a tiny amount of cumin, and lemon juice.


12 Nov 18 - 09:26 PM (#3961450)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

It's a bit hand-to-mouth this end. It's been a whirlwind four weeks since my dad died unexpectedly on 15 October (even though he was 94: he'd been a picture of health)... We've cleared the house, cremated and scattered me dad on Pendle and moved me mum from Manchester to the Westcountry into what's turned out, fortuitously, to be a lovely residential home, just five miles from our house, no mean task. Food has been a bit on the back burner, and fish and chips has been resorted to, but I did a decent chilli last night and we've had the occasional salmon arrabbiata (ask me) as well as fried salmon with lemon sauce, chips and romanesco. I've also done ox cheek casserole, which takes hours to cook but which is not only a dish of great beauty with mash and greens but which also yields plenty of lovely beefy sauce to stir into pappardelle and sprinkle with parmigiano reggiano. I also did an Elizabeth David beef daube, so simple yet so beautiful. As I've had to travel up north three times in four weeks, I've had ample opportunity to buy stuff at Gloucester Services to stock up my freezer. I have three pieces of rolled brisket, several pounds of ox cheek, two gorgeous pieces of pork shoulder with a lovely covering for crackling, and at least six man-sized pork chops which I shall cook the Delia way, with double cream, mushrooms and lemon juice. At times like this, one's gotta eat properly...


12 Nov 18 - 11:34 PM (#3961451)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage

Next time I get to a store with unadulterated pork sirloin (too many producers add a salty mix to their pork, supposedly because people overcook it so it keeps it moister but it's way too salty.) I have a casserole with tomatoes, pork, onion, and eggplant that is served with mashed potatoes. Mmmmm!


13 Nov 18 - 10:01 PM (#3961576)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman

mmm. It's a funny old life, sometimes having reservations over eating meat, being finicky with what meat I eat, normally sticking with meals suitable for me and veggie parents and rarely missing meat, etc.

But a pork casserole along those lines does sound quite tempting at the moment...

But I'l probably leave things till Christmas now. If they still do them, I'll probably go for an Iceland frozen stuffed turkey joint wrapped with bacon again, I found last years surprisingly nice. No indoor cats to share it with this year but I'm sure PussPuss, if still around, would like a slice or two to help me out.


14 Nov 18 - 12:32 AM (#3961579)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage

I'll post the recipe later. I usually use a sirloin or tenderloin, whichever is available and relatively inexpensive. The eggplant has a fabulous "umami" effect on the rest of the ingredients. I know it isn't something that is like MSG, but it doesn't so much have it's own flavor as it makes everything else taste better.


14 Nov 18 - 10:20 AM (#3961623)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion

On the theme of meat, Himself and I went shopping in Kitchener yesterday and came home with a pot roast, among other things. Now, pot roast was never a favourite dish in my family, but Himself is a fan so I made up my mind to get good at it.

Step one, get a decent piece of beef, preferably a well-marbled blade roast. Then haul out the Dutch oven; having been blessed with a generous kin group, we possess a Le Creuset braising pot that does the job in style.

Brown the roast on every side in about a tablespoonful of canola oil (high smoke point). Salt and pepper it well on all sides while you're at it. Set the roast aside and wipe out the pot. Next, sauté a chopped onion, some minced garlic, and a couple of ribs' worth of finely chopped celery in olive oil, to which then add dried thyme and about three quarters of a cup of red plonk with a bit of salt and a good grind of pepper, followed by about half a cup of beef stock and a glug of brandy. (It need not be *good* brandy.) Let it all boil for a few minutes, then put the roast back in the pot. Put on the lid and turn the gas down as low as it will go, or put the pot in the oven at 300 degrees Fahrenheit. Leave it alone for at least two hours.

When the roast is done (tender to an ordinary fork), fish it out of the pot and put it aside. Put the pot on the hob and turn up the gas. Reduce the pot liquor, stirring constantly, adding thickener if you like (I use beurre manié). Carve the roast, laying the slices (or collops, if you carve as clumsily as I do) on a warm platter. Ladle the gravy over all.

Serve with spuds, carrots, etc. I like to roast them in the oven with onion, garlic and slabs of fennel.

And that's what we had for dinner last night.

Tonight, something much less meat-arian, almost certainly involving chickpeas.


14 Nov 18 - 11:51 AM (#3961632)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman

Thanks SRS. I had to do a bit of looking up on flavours there. I do like aubergine/eggplant and grow 4 plants (Hansel, a small variety that are good from finger size fruit up and usually crop well) in a container in a greenhouse each year.


14 Nov 18 - 03:09 PM (#3961656)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Bat Goddess

Joe, how did you manage to live in Wisconsin for any length of time with never having bratwurst made on the grill in the summer?

Linn


14 Nov 18 - 06:31 PM (#3961690)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Joe_F

Microwaving a large beet was not a success. It was undercooked (tough). My second attempt, last night, was far more successful: I peeled it, cut it up, and boiled it. Likewise, beet greens take far more time than spinach.

I never knew there was anybody who did *not* piss red after eating beets. It lasts about a day.

A couple of times, I have made a real borsht (with beef cubes, turnips, carrots, etc., etc. -- not the mere shredded beet with sour cream that you get in a US deli). It is a substantial project, but worth it if you have guests.


14 Nov 18 - 07:42 PM (#3961697)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

If you like cold soup, but gazpacho turns you off a bit, you should make salmorejo, the Andalucian dish that resembles a thick gazpacho but which is made very thick by the addition of bread. It's traditionally served in small bowls as a tapas, with a topping of crumbled hard-boiled egg and finely-chopped Serrano ham, with some local breadsticks to accompany. To me, it's the absolute taste of summer and it must be eaten outdoors, and Mrs Steve won't let me make it in winter. Contrary to popular belief, it can be made with top-quality canned tomatoes instead of fresh. In any dish that relies on tomatoes of any kind, there's a magic ingredient that transforms the grub beyond all your dreams. It's a half-teaspoon of sugar. Trust me on that one. Italian cooks use it even if they have the finest sun-ripened San Marzano tomatoes, though they wouldn't admit to it.

I have my own salmorejo recipe but I couldn't possibly post it in November in the northern hemisphere. Ask me again in May.


14 Nov 18 - 07:48 PM (#3961699)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

And never skin tomatoes. That's as bad as doing garlic in a garlic crusher, the worst invention ever. If you pulverise the tomatoes with your hand-blender, you won't notice the bits. And anyway, I like the bits!


14 Nov 18 - 09:11 PM (#3961703)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage

This is what my garlic press looks like, and it's what Julia Child's garlic press looked like. She wasn't snooty about how the garlic got broken up or pulverized for her cooking so I follow her lead.


15 Nov 18 - 03:46 AM (#3961725)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: BobL

I haven't used a garlic press for ages - a lot of garlic gets left behind and is a so-and-so to remove (no hole-clearing gadget such as comes with the Shopify product). It's easier to smash the garlic under the side of a large knife. And then peel it, with no bother.


15 Nov 18 - 04:04 AM (#3961729)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson

Joe, beetroot is superb if you scrub and chop it and add it to the other vegetables roasted under a chicken lengthways-halved carrots, long slices of parsnip, peeled halved onions, whole garlic bulbs, chopped celery, fat slices of bell pepper... The beets add a sweet, earthy flavour. I like to slosh dry vermouth over the vegetables, then the chicken juice basted them further.


15 Nov 18 - 04:14 AM (#3961732)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman

Beetroot has been variable here but I've had success with "boltardy" some years. Just a simple boil, peel and slice with young samples is all you need with a salad.


15 Nov 18 - 04:24 AM (#3961737)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Senoufou

1. Take two crumpets out of the packet.
2. Place in toaster.
3. Toast until well-browned.
4. Spread with a great deal of butter.
5. Eat.
6. Give buttery plate to cats to lick.


15 Nov 18 - 04:37 AM (#3961743)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

In fast-cooked pasta sauces I just slice the garlic finely with a small knife. It's better than chopping, which can leave a few unpleasant little nibs. For slow-cooked things such as stews or ragus I just thump the unpeeled cloves with my fist, take off the skin and throw in the broken cloves. You can fish them out at the end but I never do. If I'm baking something such as skin-on chicken pieces (with cubed unpeeled potatoes, thick wedges of onion, strips of pancetta and extra virgin olive oil) in the oven, I separate out the unpeeled cloves and throw them into the baking tray about 20 minutes before the end (they burn otherwise). You can then suck the beautiful, sweet creamy middles out. Another good thing to do with garlic is to wrap the unpeeled, separated cloves of a whole head of garlic in foil with some extra virgin olive oil and bake them in the oven for about half an hour. Squeeze out the lovely middles and blend them with cooked peas, Parmesan cheese and a knob of butter. Makes a fabulous emerald-green crostini topping (thanks for that one, Nigella, you genius). Crushing garlic releases the bitter, acrid elements of the cloves far too rapidly into the dish. Gentle cooking of the cloves sweetens them and adds flavour subtly. I rarely want a pronounced garlicky taste to be the point of the thing. If you're making a pasta sauce, slice the garlic thinly into your pan of cold extra virgin olive oil and leave it to infuse for as long as you like (if the dish calls for chilli flakes, put them in there as well).


15 Nov 18 - 04:39 AM (#3961745)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman

As an alternative, one can melt St Agur into crumpets, Sen.


15 Nov 18 - 04:39 AM (#3961746)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

I forgot to say that I always remove the green stalks from inside garlic cloves. Don't want them in the dish.


15 Nov 18 - 04:44 AM (#3961747)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Senoufou

Oh Jon, I'd absolutely love to do that, but unfortunately blue/runny cheese gives me serious vertigo which can last for days. :(


15 Nov 18 - 04:49 AM (#3961749)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Helen

I like crumpets with the tangy Rose's English Breakfast Marmalade and thin slices of a mild cheese on top. I've been buying Maasdam cheese, which is like a mild swiss cheese, not unlike Jarlsberg.

Hubby used to think I was crazy, but he has been converted to the taste. We don't go much for sweet stuff but the EB Marmalade is more tangy than sweet.


15 Nov 18 - 04:53 AM (#3961751)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

Fry some eggs in butter, set aside on a hot plate, whack up the heat and fry your crumpets (or bread) in the buttery pan. A three-minute delight. You can hasten the procedure by toasting the crumpet/bread to about half way before frying.


15 Nov 18 - 04:57 AM (#3961753)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman

Helen, I think marmalade (typically made from Ma Made here) is a topping Pip might choose for a crumpet. Not one for me but we are all different...


15 Nov 18 - 02:28 PM (#3961842)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Helen

Fried eggs. One of my fave recipes is from Claudia Roden's Middle Eastern Cookbook. I've owned a copy of this book since maybe the 1980's and had to upgrade to a new edition about 15 years ago because the old one was falling apart.

Here is someone else's recipe:
Beid bi Tom

Fried eggs with garlic and lemon
Ingredients
    2 tablespoons butter
    2 cloves garlic, crushed
    juice of ½ lemon or 1 teaspoon sumac
    6 eggs
    crushed dried mint to garnish

Directions

(Roden says, crush the garlic and put it in the lemon juice. Cook the garlic and lemon a bit to soften the garlic and then slide in the eggs.)

    Melt the butter in a large skillet, or use 2 smaller ones.
    Add the garlic and lemon or sumac.
    Slide in the eggs, previously broken into a bowl, and continue to fry gently.
    Rub some of the dried mint in the palm of your hand, letting it sprinkle over the eggs.
    When the whites are set, remove the pan from the heat, sprinkle lightly with salt, and serve.

Yum!

Jon, the thing about seville orange marmalade is that it is not overly sweet and the distinctive tang of the oranges and orange rind is music to my taste buds. I also like Cointreau, for the same reason.


15 Nov 18 - 06:33 PM (#3961865)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage

I grow my own garlic and it is very easy to peel. It's the "elephant" variety that is probably actually a large leek, but great garlic flavor. The garlic press is simple to operate - crush the portion (I have to cut up my cloves, they're very large) - then use the knife to rearrange the bit left in the press and press it again, or scoop it out into the food being prepared. I don't waste any.


15 Nov 18 - 07:28 PM (#3961867)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

I see you're holding out on the garlic-crushing, Maggie. All I can say is, give my method a whirl. I assure you that my garlic crusher (which actually looks uncannily like yours) still lives in my kitchen gizmo drawer, where it resides but never sees the light of day. It harks back to the era in which I totally misunderstood what garlic can REALLY do for dishes, but it still does have sentimental value. Chop, bash or slice your garlic, and use a lot more cloves than you otherwise would. Garlic needs to be add subtle. It does not need to add garlic...


15 Nov 18 - 07:51 PM (#3961869)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage

I have a garlic roasting thing but I've never gotten around to using it; I think my Dad sent it one xmas and he loved using his. Smashing garlic under a knife is messy and you have to clean the board or counter. There are times when I slice garlic, depending on how it's being used. Like I said, I grow the very large garlic so the skin is robust and it comes off easily. And when I grow garlic here and harvest every spring I have enough to last me all year. It keeps well in a dark area stored in a paper bag.


15 Nov 18 - 07:56 PM (#3961870)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

Exemplary. But flippin' 'eck, Maggie, a bit of squidged garlic on your worktop isn't any more trouble to clear up than trying to get all those bits out of your crusher...?


15 Nov 18 - 09:46 PM (#3961877)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia

It snowed and was cold. So we made a chicken pot pie, with real pie crust on the top and a pretty scalloped design around the edge.
Pie crust, leftover roast chicken, peas, onions, cream sauce, and herbs.

It's work, but it's worth it. I use Jiffy pie crust mix. One box makes two small crusts. The second half of the mix freezes well in the box you buy it in. Just close up the inner bag.


16 Nov 18 - 01:06 AM (#3961881)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson

Made lamb meatballs in a spicy soup with freekah, Verra nice, apart from a flaming row with the puppy, who snatched the first few from the table when I turned my back, smashing the plate they were on. Teenagers...


17 Nov 18 - 12:19 PM (#3962089)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson

Gyoza for dinner tonight thanks to the new Asian grocery just a nice dog walking distance away.


17 Nov 18 - 02:29 PM (#3962108)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel

Steve do you like small hot garlic cloves or big and mild elephant garlic?
I like a little raw hot on uncooked dishes or large quantities of mild in cooked recipes.


17 Nov 18 - 07:09 PM (#3962138)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

Mild garlic is about as useful as decaf coffee. No use at all in other words. When garlic is gently cooked, any harshness disappears and all will be sweet, soft and lovely. We've had Yottam's roasted cauliflower tonight, a one-tray dish with chopped Nocellara olives, a horseshoe of sliced piccante chorizo (skinned, natch), two red onions hacked into big wedges, a hefty sprinkling of sweet smoked paprika, a very large cauliflower hacked into florets, a handful of pumpkin seeds and a large glug of extra virgin olive oil. Not least, several cloves of garlic, smashed with the fist then lightly chopped into big pieces. Seasoning of course. You mix that lot in a big bowl then spread it all out on a baking tray on which you've put a big sheet of greaseproof paper. Roast in a hot oven (200C, or 400F for you antediluvian yanks) for half an hour, turning it all over once half way through. When you take it out, mix in a goodly amount of chopped fresh parsley. It's an amazingly beautiful dish. Me and Mrs Steve are very fond of hot spiciness, but if you're not quite as keen you could always use a milder chorizo.

If I need to use garlic in the raw, I just slice it very thinly with a sharp paring knife. I use that in my tuna pasta dish in which the only cooked ingredient is the pasta. The other ingredients are tuna in olive oil, creme fraiche, capers, garlic, parsley and seasoning. Don't be scared of raw garlic, or any garlic, but just cut it up very thinly. Garlic should rarely be the point of the thing, unless you're making garlic mayo in which to dip your chips. English chips, not crisps.

When I buy garlic I'm not concerned with how "hot" it might be. It has to look fresh and feel very firm and not smell manky. Beware of garlic that's on sale well out of season. It can be very harsh and acrid. I've had to give up growing my own because my garden soil is plagued with white rot, which screws up my onions, leeks and garlic and which has spores that live in the soil for twenty years.


17 Nov 18 - 07:38 PM (#3962141)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage

I grow garlic from some that I originally dug up in the woods across the street from my house. It's the hard-neck elephant garlic that is probably actually a leek. It can be strong, but since I grow it and keep it for a long time, I think it loses some strength over time. Use more to get the flavor you want.

Our weather warmed this week so I've worked in the yard. Dinner tonight was light—a sharp blond cheddar cheese on whole grain crackers, topped with slices of kielbasa and washed down with a merlot.


17 Nov 18 - 07:55 PM (#3962144)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

I actually cut all my grass today (half an acre). It was surprisingly long considering that we had two quite vicious frosts two weeks ago. My garden's been a bit neglected for a few weeks after my dad died, but my sprouting broccoli bed looks great and my parsnips and leeks are looking good, and my freezer is full of a bumper crop of Autumn Bliss raspberries, best year ever.


17 Nov 18 - 08:16 PM (#3962146)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage

I envy you those raspberries! If you look at agriculture maps of the US, you'll see that the state producing the most raspberries commercially is Washington state, where I grew up. We spent summers grazing on various wild patches of raspberries planted and forgotten by neighbors. Pick the berry, blow off any dust or bugs, eat. That was the routine for 9-year-old kids.


18 Nov 18 - 06:24 AM (#3962167)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

Many moons ago I tried growing summer raspberries, but they soon got decimated by reversion disease. But the Autumn Bliss ones have been growing merrily away for twenty years and are as vigorous as ever. They are primocane raspberries (they fruit on new season's wood) which means I can hack the whole lot to the ground in winter and I don't bother training them (a bit of thinning maybe). I'm at the mercy of blackbirds occasionally but I don't mind if they have a few, and in indifferent late summers the good old grey mould gets lots of them just as they're getting ready to be picked. It's generally late August before meaningful quantities can be picked. But it's very nice to have them in the freezer for indulgent winter puds. My soil pH is a bit high for raspberries so I put on loads of grass clippings and leaf mould in spring in addition to a layer of compost. Once a year I have to bust my organic principles and give them a dose of chelated iron to stop the leaves going too yellow.


18 Nov 18 - 06:39 AM (#3962168)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson

I had Autumn Bliss and they were fab, but the red fellows, the grey squirrels of raspberries, outbred them.. must replant them.


18 Nov 18 - 06:42 AM (#3962170)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

My Autumn Bliss ARE red!


18 Nov 18 - 06:52 AM (#3962172)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson

Oh? Mine were a lovely glowing amber!


18 Nov 18 - 10:07 AM (#3962194)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage

If mold is a problem put some regular store-strength hydrogen peroxide in a spray bottle and spritz them all in a preventative move or if you start to see the mold. And sprinkling ground cornmeal on the ground under them is good for fertilizing and slows or eliminates the mold growth.


18 Nov 18 - 02:07 PM (#3962207)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

I have a feeling that grey mould gets in at the flowering stage. I'll check whether hydrogen peroxide fits in with my organic sentiments. I suppose it's only water with an extra dollop of oxygen...


18 Nov 18 - 02:18 PM (#3962208)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage

I am only organic in my gardening, Steve - that's where this peroxide recommendation comes from! Same with the cornmeal. See Dirt Doctor for lots of organic tips. Near the top on the left side you'll see "Library Topics" and you can search on hydrogen peroxide as a treatment or you can search on mold and see what is recommended.


18 Nov 18 - 04:46 PM (#3962226)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage

Here is an image of my pork and eggplant recipe:

Flickr Mudcat album.

I serve it with the mashed potatoes, it's a perfect combination. I don't sprinkle parsley because I don't like parsley.


18 Nov 18 - 06:51 PM (#3962239)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

We had the Puglian dish orecchiette con cime di rape tonight. You can use any short pasta but orecchiette is the traditional thing and without it the dish would be delicious but not authentic. As a matter of fact, the fact that I use tomatoes is not authentic either, but I think they add a lot. In Puglia they use stringy turnip tops, very nice too, but I've used purple sprouting broccoli or tenderstem to good advantage and tonight I used that new-fangled veg, kalettes, aka flower sprouts. Delicious. If you use tenderstem, you need to cut the stems into small pieces (leave the tops whole), otherwise you end up with a bit too much crunch.

For two people:

Put 250g orecchiette pasta in a very large pan of boiling salted water, having noted the required cooking time on the pack.

In your best shallow casserole pan, put two cloves of finely-sliced garlic into three tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil. Add dried chilli flakes (or fresh chillies) to your taste. The dish should be quite spicy but not fiery. Sauté gently for a couple of minutes.

Add a handful of good cherry tomatoes, cut in half. At the same time add a goodly amount of chopped fresh parsley. Simmer that lot gently for a few minutes to soften the tomatoes a bit. Season gently.

Two minutes before the pasta is due to be al dente, throw 200g broccoli/kalettes into the pasta pan. It will slow the pasta down by a minute, which is what you want.

Three minutes later, having checked for doneness, drain the pasta/greens pan quickly and throw the mix into the sauce. You need a bit of the pasta water to go in there. Mix thoroughly and serve up, topped with a grating of pecorino (or parmesan) and a drizzling of your finest olive oil.

You'll find fussier versions of this that require you to pre-cook the greens, etc., but forget all that. This works a treat. It's one of our favourite dishes, and Mrs Steve is very hard to please, I assure you.


18 Nov 18 - 07:03 PM (#3962240)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

"I don't sprinkle parsley because I don't like parsley."

How can this be? What's not to like if the parsley is fresh? The only parsley I ever use is fresh out of my garden, always flat-leaf. I wouldn't allow dried parsley into the house. In fact, I find all dried herbs, with the honourable exception of dried oregano, to be utterly disgusting. Dried basil is just about the worst.


18 Nov 18 - 10:42 PM (#3962257)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage

I'm drying basil on my kitchen counter even as you type. Most of the time I put it fresh into ziplock bags, force the air out, and freeze them. It stays green that way, but for some things, dried works.

I don't like parsley, I'm not particularly fond of kale, I dislike lima beans. There, I outed myself.


18 Nov 18 - 11:18 PM (#3962258)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson

Tried the cauliflower tray bake but it didn’t really work for me. Half an hour: still raw. An hour: drying out. I added olive oil. Then I fell asleep. Woke and it had been put in fridge, rejected as too greasy. Tasted ok to me... maybe my oven’s too slow. Maybe I should have put foil over it...


19 Nov 18 - 04:27 AM (#3962281)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos

I wouldn't ever use dried parsley either, but dried thyme is fine by me.


19 Nov 18 - 07:55 AM (#3962304)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

Was your oven hot enough, Thompson? I've never had a failure! 35 mins max otherwise the cauliflower gets overcooked. Only use the best extra virgin olive oil too, enough to coat everything. A bit more fat comes out of the chorizo.


19 Nov 18 - 08:41 AM (#3962306)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson

Maybe not - it’s a Neff, so should be good, but it can lie.


19 Nov 18 - 09:30 AM (#3962310)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Raggytash

Last night it was Murghi Saag that I had made the day before, for some reason this type of food is always better the day after it was made.


20 Nov 18 - 12:13 AM (#3962383)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson

A lot of food is better as leftovers - partly because you’re anxious when cooking for others, partly because the tastes blend and intensify overnight. Here’s another good tray bake - very handy for guests because it’s so easy - the blessed Nigella Lawson’s chicken thighs with frozen peas and leeks:

Empty two packs of frozen peas into a chicken-sized roasting pan and give them a smash down. Add the whites of four or five leeks, washed and chopped in 2cm slices. Chopped cloves of garlic to taste. A bunch of dill, torn up. Eight chicken thighs on top. A good slosh of dry vermouth, or white wine if you don’t have it. A scatter of flaky salt, a glug of olive oil, or rapeseed oil.

Cook for three quarters of an hour in a 200c/400f oven, take out and give a mix (but leave the leeks up top so they get caramelised and sweet). Back in for another half hour. Chop a bit more dill over the top and serve.


20 Nov 18 - 03:45 AM (#3962392)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: sciencegeek

found beautiful escarole at the store so picked up three heads and had a ball... first off was escarole soup

chicken broth well seasoned to taste
sweet Italian sausage formed into tiny meatballs
1 head of escarole chopped
bring to boil and then simmer 1/2 hour
add 1/4 cup of acini de pepe - a tiny pasta just larger than couscous
cook until pasta is done, serve with crusty bread

greens & beans

1# Italian bulk sausage crumbled and cooked in olive oil with plenty of minced garlic
add 4 cans of cannelloni beans
simmer for 20 minutes add water if needed
add 1 head of escarole torn into large pieces
simmer until greens are tender
serve with grated cheese and crusty bread

escarole with angel hair pasta

start pot of water for pasta

add minced garlic to olive oil & heat
add diced tomatoes - canned is fine
add 1 tbsp of capers
season with basil & oregano to taste
add 1 head of escarole chopped into bite sized pieces
cover pan and simmer until greens are tender

by the time escarole is done, pasta should be done, drained and returned to pot

stir the escarole into the pasta and serve with grated cheese

I cook by eye and taste, so adjust to your taste

all three dishes hold well and reheat just fine


20 Nov 18 - 03:51 AM (#3962393)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos

I might try the chicken, leek and peas recipe, but I shall add some green pepper, just to spite the "blessed" Nigella (who threatened to excommunicate anyone who used green peppers - on the grounds that red peppers are SWEETER). That recipe would be ruined by red peppers, but green ones would be rather nice, I think.


20 Nov 18 - 05:17 AM (#3962407)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

"...the blessed Nigella Lawson’s chicken thighs..."

Oh, I don't know. I've always thought she has very nice legs...


20 Nov 18 - 07:26 AM (#3962435)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel

100 million Americans will eat Campbells green bean casserole recipe this week.


20 Nov 18 - 02:49 PM (#3962506)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage

I'm going to steam some green beans, but no Campbells soup will go near them.


20 Nov 18 - 06:57 PM (#3962549)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

I must say, over the past couple of years I've turned away from steaming. I'll still steam chopped sweetheart cabbage in order to ensure that I don't get overly soggy cabbage, but I've taken to boiling all other veg. I've found that hard veg such as carrot batons and tight Cornish cauliflower florets cook much more evenly when boiled, and, when I have awkward veg such as tenderstem, with tops that cook quickly but stalks that take much longer, I'm better off boiling with the shoots covered but with the stalks under water and the heads sticking out above in the steam. A very good idea is to split the lower parts of tenderstem stalks up the bottom inch or two with a sharp knife. When I steam, I find that the water in the pan underneath still ends up with water that looks like I might have lost nutrients. As I understand it, boiling, as opposed to steaming, doesn't really lose much at all. It's texture for me every time. Steamed carrots just don't do it for me at all. A very nice winter veg combo with your roast chicken is steamed organic cabbage mixed with boiled carrot batons. Naturally, you will also need roast parsnips, it goes without saying. And I will not use the cooking water from any brassica to make gravy. It just ain't right.


21 Nov 18 - 05:16 AM (#3962596)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Iains

Scary vegetable cooking water. The longer you boil it, the more concentrated the pesticide residues.

A school of thought below.
https://www.thehealthyhomeeconomist.com/should-vegetable-cooking-water-be-saved/

and a recent report:

[PDF]The 2016 European Union report on pesticide

https://www.actu-environnement.com/media/.../news-31777-efsa-pesticides-aliments.pdf
(I do not have much luck linking to a pdf so the link needs copying and pasting)


21 Nov 18 - 06:29 AM (#3962604)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

Well just wash all veg thoroughly before cooking or eating raw. That will get rid of almost all residues. My point was that brassica water makes for not nice gravy, and I can't think of a good use anyway for water that spuds have been boiled in, except for when you make those lovely thick winter stews that you boil up for two hours with shin of beef, potatoes, carrots, swedes and onions. I'm making a vast crock of that this weekend, to go with Atora suet dumplings, what else. Just the thing for eating off your knee out of a big bowl in front of Strictly on Saturday and the results show on Sunday. I think she doth worry too much. Eating lots of veg will far outweigh in benefits the risks of ingesting what are probably tiny amounts of toxins.


21 Nov 18 - 06:40 AM (#3962607)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson

We always steam spuds. Makes them sweeter.

Risotto, though,I make in the pressure cooker (otherwise mainly used for stock). It’s not a classic risotto but a big hearty rice based mixup.

Fry chopped onion till transparent, add some risotto rice (I like carnaroli best), then when it’s glossy, courgette and aubergine and dried mushrooms, then a good dose of stock. A sloshy mix around and the pressure cooker is closed and brought up to pressure.

While it’s coming to pressure and humming away for I think around 10 or 15 minutes, I simmer a handful of frozen shellfish mix with butter and lemon and dill.

Then I take the pressure cooker off the heat and let the pressure off with a long-handled wooden spoon. Add in the liquor from the shellfish and a glass or more of white wine. Stir well and bring back up to pressure. Five minutes and it’s done.

It’s nice with lemon wedges to squeeze over, and/or (sorry, Italians) Parmesan.


21 Nov 18 - 07:25 AM (#3962612)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

For a decent cheat's risotto (does away with all that adding and stirring), proceed as usual at first, sauteeing your onions gently (in butter, not oil). If you're also using chopped pancetta, add that now and cut down on the butter. Then turn up the heat and add the rice, just to toast it a little bit, stirring to coat with fat. Add a small glass of white wine and let that bubble for a minute or two. Then add any herbs you're using (chopped thyme is always good) and seasoning. Add your boiling stock (I find that you need slightly over twice the volume of stock as the volume of rice). Bring to a healthy simmer, give it a good stir, turn the heat down, put the lid on and forget it for 14 minutes (open the prosecco).

After that, you need to give it a really good bashing about for a minute of two to bring out the creaminess. Adjust the liquid. Only then do I add any other ingredients, such as cooked peas, broad beans or French beans, or sautéed mushrooms or scraps of leftover chicken or sausage. The world's your oyster. Turn off the heat and add a big knob of butter and a generous handful of freshly-grated Parmesan. Keep checking the liquid level (it keeps on thickening for a bit) and seasoning. For me, the coup de grace (but not for Maggie) is to stir in a handful of chopped flat-leaf parsley. You'll live forever.


21 Nov 18 - 07:45 AM (#3962613)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stanron

By this time of the year my solid fuel stove is going full time all day and banked up at night.

It has a large flat top that can be used for slow cooking and heating water. It is very good for 'foil steaming'. Yesterday's offering had a piece of pork belly, one whole, peeled onion, one large peeled carrot (not chopped up) and one large slab of peeled swede.

All of these are placed on one half of a long strip of strong foil. When I remember a few cloves of garlic are put in as well.

The foil is folded back on itself and the three seams are double folded. All four corners get an extra fold. This gets placed on the top of the stove for a couple of hours.

Water comes off the meat and the onions also give off water. Over time this turns to steam. The package blows up like a balloon. Everything is cooked after the ballooning has gone on for about thirty minutes.

The vegetables are a revelation. Super succulent and sweet. I do the occasional vegetable only steam. Parsnips end up a bit dry but an extra small onion mashed up with the parsnip sorts that out.

I think I'll do a vegetable only job tonight, just replacing the meat with a leek. Yummy.


21 Nov 18 - 08:59 AM (#3962630)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Senoufou

Husband's Fiery Horror dinner:-

Brown a large chopped onion in a little vegetable oil.
Add two tablespoons of oil and one of peanut butter, and one tablespoon of salt, plus half a pint of water.

Add three chopped tomatoes and half a jar of tomato paste, a Maggi chicken stock cube and a tablespoon of hot Madras curry powder.
Chuck in four Scotch bonnets and a pile of cubed meat.

Simmer for thirty minutes until both cats and the wife are partly asphyxiated and requiring oxygen.

Meanwhile, using the rice steamer, put a selection of any vegetables in the steaming compartment above and cook with the Basmati rice until ready (about ten minutes)

The Horror left over can be decanted into containers and put in the fridge. It will do for a further two meals.
.


21 Nov 18 - 09:16 AM (#3962631)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos

I agree that the steamer is for puddings.

I don't "boil" my vegetables, I simmer them, and whenever possible I get organic ones, so using the water shouldn't be a problem.

I am astonished at Thompson's 10 or 15 minutes in a pressure cooker to cook rice. When I used to use a pressure cooker, that sort of timing would have been for a hearty stew of the kind that would have taken several hours in a slow oven.


21 Nov 18 - 12:43 PM (#3962650)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: MMario

Tonight will be tortellini en brodo (sausage stuffed tortellini, turkey broth) with asiago shredded on top, and a mixed greens salad.


21 Nov 18 - 02:14 PM (#3962664)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

When I say boil, Jos, I don't mean a rolling boil in deep water. I mean a simmer in as little water as possible, say half way up the veg, with a tight-fitting lid, usually with a pinch of salt. I have pans with glass lids with a small vent (a hole) which means I can see what's going on in there but have the lid tight on. I got fed up with pans with lids that I had to have tottering precariously over the edge of the pan to let the steam out.

We're having my home-made chunky guacamole dip tonight with crudités, followed by cheese and biscuits (I have some Vallage triple creme cheese and a bit of leftover Gorgonzola piccante). I don't go for those abject little tubs of supermarket guacamole. I get two ripe avocados which I mush up roughly in a bowl with a fork. It can be as rough or smooth as you like, but I like a bit of texture meself. Into that goes half a green chilli, finely chopped, six diced cherry tomatoes, the juice of a small lime, a goodly seasoning of salt and some finely chopped parsley. It should be coriander/cilantro really, but Mrs Steve can't abide the stuff (she says it tastes like washing-up liquid) so I use the parsley instead. Maggie could stick with the coriander. ;-) I find it tastes better made at least several hours in advance.


21 Nov 18 - 08:51 PM (#3962711)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage

I wonder what they're serving over in the Mudcat Tavern?


22 Nov 18 - 04:19 AM (#3962736)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Senoufou

Ooooh SRS, I can't wait for the Mudcat Tavern to open its doors!
And I hope they'll be serving hot buttered crumpets!

I've been trying for years to persuade my husband to reduce the quantities of salt and fat in his Fiery Horror. A heaped tablespoon of salt is far too much. Imagine his blood pressure! And all that blooming oil. It makes a greasy mess in the dishwasher filter.

I wonder if I hid all the tablespoons? But no, he merely use his cupped hand to hull more and more into the brew, like his mother and sisters do.
He's now discovered Vindaloo microwaveable meals at Morrisons. They have a really HOT one with that logo of five chillies on the packet and a warning printed in red. He often has one as a midday snack before heading off for his work. However can he stand it?


22 Nov 18 - 10:49 AM (#3962768)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage

It's Thanksgiving day, a holiday in the US on the fourth Thursday of November, so people take the whole week off if they can, or at least take off Friday if it isn't already a part of their holiday. Wednesday is usually a good day to start preparing part of the meal, but this year I was racing to finish putting up a new corner of the fence to keep the dogs in and anything else out. I'm working carefully around the house today because I pulled a muscle yesterday.

The 16 pound (small by most standards) turkey is in the brine as of early this morning. I find it doesn't need to be in the salt and sugar mix for more than 4-6 hours to be very nicely seasoned and salted. I steam-juiced some frozen cranberries this year so instead of our usual sparking apple juice (Martinelli's is the best brand) I'm mixing frozen apple juice half strength, adding a cup or so of my full-strength cranberry juice, then when people want a drink I'll mix it with seltzer to give it a sparkle at the correct dilution.

The rolls will be started soon, the root vegetables that will be roasted will be peeled and cut up. I'm using an extra roasting oven (counter top) for either the rolls or the veg, but since the turkey is really best when it's had an hour to rest, that's plenty of time for other things to go in the oven. (I also have some green peppers that I'll put in with the root vegetables, just because I like roasted peppers.) They'll all get a coating of olive oil, salt, pepper, and anything else that strikes my fancy the roast till as much as possible is caramelized. There will probably be two, possibly three vegetarians here today, so we're going heavy on the side dishes.

Appetizers will be out for when people arrive - this crew always goes for the olives so there will be a can of those out (I didn't get by the fancy grocery store with all of the various olives that are available by the pound), some deviled eggs, cashews, just whatever is around they'll eat. Getting ready for the big meal an hour later, so they don't need to fill up, just graze.

The yeast rolls are homemade, the apple pie is brought by my ex and I have never been able to persuade him to make his own crust so it will be the tough grocery store crust with a pretty good homemade filling.

I'm going to mix up some cranberry sauce here soon and chill it. Make from scratch with cranberries, orange juice, and sugar. Cook it till the pectin is released and it naturally gels.


22 Nov 18 - 11:18 AM (#3962774)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson

Golly, my pressure cooker wouldn't do a stew in 15 minutes!


22 Nov 18 - 12:43 PM (#3962780)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage

I love coriander, but there is apparently a gene involved with whether people like that or not. I grow it (comes back voluntarily every fall and winter) and freeze it to use in guacamole, bean dishes, etc. Guacamole is best eaten as fresh as possible. If it has to be stored, I freeze it as soon as possible in ice cube trays to defrost as many as I need later (defrost slowly, microwaves must be used carefully if that is your preferred defrost method. 10-20 seconds at a time.)


22 Nov 18 - 02:15 PM (#3962792)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

My chunky guacamole is definitely better for a few hours in the fridge. The lime juice prevents any browning of the avocado. I suppose it could be different if you're making that smooth purée of the type supermarkets sell. I too love coriander, but it's denied to me. I suppose I could always sprinkle a bit in last minute, but it wouldn't be the same somehow.


22 Nov 18 - 05:36 PM (#3962810)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Bee-dubya-ell

For our Thanksgiving turkey dish, I sliced a raw turkey breast into thin "steaks" and sautéed them in toasted sesame oil. Dee-licious!


22 Nov 18 - 06:34 PM (#3962814)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

I understand that a wild turkey has been terrorising the town of Johnston, Rhode Island, for months. Good for him!


22 Nov 18 - 11:28 PM (#3962827)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage

My guacamole is made by squeezing a lemon into a bowl then scooping the avocado out of the skin with a tablespoon and using a couple of forks to mash it up, but it isn't smooth like the grocery store stuff. I grate onion into it because years ago my son wouldn't eat onion if he saw it in things but he liked the flavor if he didn't know it was there. I dice up jalapeno or poblano peppers really small and use the garlic press for the garlic. Chop up the cilantro and stir in. Salt and pepper.


23 Nov 18 - 03:29 AM (#3962840)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

I saw onion in some recipes and not others and decided against. I'm not a massive fan of raw onion. No garlic in mine either. I don't recall seeing that during my recipe-sweep. My recipe has a small handful of cherry tomatoes, the best I can get, per two avocados, finely diced, which nicely loosens the mix. I found that I need to use a tad more salt than I might have thought I needed. I'm not a salt fanatic.


23 Nov 18 - 03:40 AM (#3962841)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: BobL

Pressure cooker: Beef stew 15-20 mins. Topside pot roast about 30 mins depending on size. Chicken casserole 5 mins. Plus the preliminary browning and bringing up to pressure. But I wouldn't bother to use it for rice, which only takes 10 mins (15 from cold) anyway.


23 Nov 18 - 05:17 AM (#3962855)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

I don't have a pressure cooker, or a slow cooker for that matter, but I can't see how a piece of beef suited to long, slow cooking can properly develop a melting texture and depth of flavour in 30 minutes. Naturally, I stand to be corrected, but I won't be investing in such gizmos any time soon. About thirty years ago I did flirt with a slow cooker. I found that it produced a diagreeably dry texture in meat.


23 Nov 18 - 08:28 AM (#3962881)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman

And we have just ordered a pressure/multi cooker. I'm not quite sure where it's going to go yet or whether or not it will get much use but vegetable soups are one thing we have mind for it.


23 Nov 18 - 09:24 AM (#3962888)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel

Carmalize, do not carnalize, a chopped white onion per loaded Yam with chopped jalapenos. spice to your own delight and POOF the Yam is no longer sweet but a crinchy savory treat. Pile on top cooked bacon, cheese and some baked yam then bake again until melted.


23 Nov 18 - 10:14 AM (#3962890)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion

I have an Instant Pot electronic pressure cooker (otherwise known as a multi-cooker), and I give it house room because it cooks whole grains (especially brown rice) perfectly and works boffo as a stock pot. Now, I know you're all going to tell me just to put the stock pot on the back burner of the stove and go to bed, and I did just that for most of my increasingly long life, but I never slept soundly knowing that a gas hob was burning in the kitchen. The Instant Pot can be left unattended, and does not occupy a quarter of the high-value real estate of the stove top.

It also steams the Christmas pudding -- again, without supervision -- and does it in a quarter of the time required to do it the old-fashioned way, in the canner.

If your household eats in the vegetarian/vegan style, an electronic multi-cooker could be a game-changer. Here, the devices are marketed as time-savers, which is rather misleading. What they do is safely handle tasks that otherwise require personal attendance, allowing you to do other things. Where they do save time directly is in pre-cooking beans, which takes only about half an hour.

I tried cooking a pot roast in it and was disappointed in the texture of the meat: stringy. The Le Creuset enamelled iron pot remains unsurpassed for that job.


23 Nov 18 - 10:52 AM (#3962894)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman

The Instant Pot Duo V2 7 in 1 is on an Amazon (UK) "Deal of the day" today, apparently £80 compared to an RRP of £170.

It was one of the ones we considered and may be a good buy but we opted for a Tefal that was £30 cheaper.


23 Nov 18 - 11:23 AM (#3962896)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

I couldn't agree more, Charmion. I have two Le Creuset deep casseroles, a large one (pot roast, bulk ragu production and big stews, etc) and a slightly smaller one (casseroles and stews for two and brilliant for risottos) and a large Le Crueset shallow casserole (best thing for making pasta sauces that need gentle sauteeing of chilli and garlic, etc, as it's big enough to chuck the cooked pasta into and stir in). I've had them for many years and I honestly don't understand all this talk of pressure cookers and electrical gizmos. I feel sorry for whoever has to wash 'em up, and, well, do they REALLY produce good grub...?

I've inherited, at no cost to myself, two glass-lidded pans with vented lids which are perfect for boiling potatoes or veg, and (the coup de grace) a magnificent huge lidded stainless steel frying pan which is brilliant for cooking rare steaks, for starting off pork chops and pot roasts before they go in the oven and for browning minced steak for chilli or ragus.

All these pans need, at most, fifteen or twenty minutes' soaking in hot water with a drop or two of Fairy Liquid to get them clean. I only ever use silicone utensils in them, never metal ones. One thing I've never done is put my Le Cruesets in the dishwasher.


23 Nov 18 - 12:02 PM (#3962900)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson

In our house rice takes around an hour. Perhaps it’s a slow house.

My mother made the best stews I’ve tasted. She started them in the pressure cooker then moved them to a grungy old casserole in the oven for a couple of hours. Beef or mutton, carrots, celery, bay leaf, thyme, water, and a good slosh of red wine, then a squirt of Lea & Perrin’s Worcester sauce (correctly pronounced Wooster, of course) and a dash of Angostura bitters. Sometimes she’d go wild and add a little orange zest. Oh, and spuds went in too.


23 Nov 18 - 12:57 PM (#3962906)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

It's WorcesterSHIRE sauce!

Orange zest is a constituent of Elizabeth David's boeuf en daube, though she leaves the rind in strips. If you throw red wine into a stew or casserole, it's best to add it early, before the other liquid goes in, and get it to a merry bubble to give the alcohol time to evaporate with the lid off. Or just boil the wine in a small pan separately, set fire to it then pour it in. Burning the booze is good fun and it avoids a degree of harshness getting into the stew. If you have good stock you shouldn't need the Worcestershire sauce, though adding it does no harm, or the bitters. As for herbs, I might make a little bunch of thyme sprigs, parsley stems and a bay leaf, maybe a little sprig of sage, all tied together with string, that I can remove towards the end. I find I can overdo the bay and I'm always careful with rosemary, which can be a bit of a hooligan if too much is added. I've been known to add bacon pieces to a casserole, though I never put in mushrooms, which I think add nothing. However, the inclusion of soaking water from dried porcini is a great addition. Another Elizabeth David trick is to add a few bits of pork rind. She cuts hers into tiny pieces but I wouldn't want to encounter tiny pieces of soft pigskin in my food, so I leave mine in big pieces that I can fish out before serving up. I get the rind by trimming it off pork chops, which I won't buy if they have been trimmed up. They can freeze until you need them. They add a nice degree of richness. If I'm slow cooking, I leave the carrots, celery and onions in much bigger chunks that I otherwise would. That way they add nice texture.


23 Nov 18 - 01:38 PM (#3962917)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel

The instant pot duo is also a great way to sterilize your surgical tools, prepare growth medium for mushroom production, sterilize almost anything except for prions (mad cow protein).


23 Nov 18 - 02:03 PM (#3962925)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage

I remembered some of this discussion last night when most of my small family and a couple of friends were at my house for Thanksgiving dinner. "No one, absolutely NO ONE is to give me one of those multi-cooker things." They asked if this was a xmas list tip. "Yes. You won't find one of those things on my list." It was more of a threat than a non-wish.

The pots and pans and few devices I own each have their own characteristics, and I am not interested in discarding the bulk of these so one thing can take over and do a half-assed job on an assortment of dishes.

I had always thought a rice cooker was overkill, then I started reading what the movie critic and cancer survivor Roger Ebert said about them. He had to get his food through a tube for the last several years of his life, but he was always really focussed on real food. https://priceonomics.com/rice-cookers/. This is just one article about his attitudes, so a few years ago I spent about $50 for a Cuisinart rice cooker that is just what he says, cook and warm, and it has a bonus stainless steel basket that fits over the top for steaming while the rice cooks. I like this because the rice doesn't burn to the bottom of the pan (though in some cultures, "pegau" or singed rice, is a delicacy. My Puerto Rican ex taught us all that you NEVER put the pot in the sink to soak when there is rice stuck burned to the bottom. You scrape out that delicacy and put it on the top of the platter of food.)

The iron skillets are precious for sauteed foods, I have a couple of non-stick pans for other specific things that would be hard on the seasoned finish of the skillets. The stainless deep pot "Dutch oven" has as set of uses (pot roasts, boiling potatoes, soups, etc.) and the deep "chicken fryer" cast iron skillet with the well-fitting lid has others. The deep Cuisinart enameled dutch oven is great for stove-top or oven dishes like pot roasts, stew, etc. The graniteware roaster and the Romertopf clay baker are primarily for roasting chickens, etc. The pressure cooker doesn't get used often, it generally speeds of several of those other tasks already mentioned. I am not convinced that one device can replace all of those and certainly the volume it holds doesn't match all of the other devices.

The rice cooker is perfect for rice and other grains; I add things to it and (for example) have a pot of chicken and rice (isn't that the original comfort food for cultures around the world?) and broccoli or cauliflower steamed to go alongside. I'm not finished exploring the rice cooker, I'm not willing to add another universal device to the kitchen.

/rant off

https://www.rogerebert.com/rogers-journal/the-pot-and-how-to-use-it

No, I am not putting you on the Rice Diet. Eat what you like. I am thinking of you, student in your dorm room. You, solitary writer, artist, musician, potter, plumber, builder, hermit. You, parents with kids. You, night watchman. You, obsessed computer programmer or weary web-worker. You, lovers who like to cook together but don't want to put anything in the oven. You, in the witness protection program. You, nutritional wingnut. You, in a wheelchair.

And you, serving in Iraq or Afghanistan. You, person on a small budget who wants healthy food. You, shut-in. You, recovering campaign worker. You, movie critic at Sundance. You, sex worker waiting for the phone to ring. You, factory worker sick of frozen meals. You, people in Werner Herzog's documentary about life at the South Pole. You, early riser skipping breakfast. You, teenager home alone. You, rabbi, pastor, priest,, nun, waitress, community organizer, monk, nurse, starving actor, taxi driver, long-haul driver. Yes, you, reader of the second-best best-written blog on the internet.


23 Nov 18 - 02:41 PM (#3962931)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

I don't even know what a rice cooker is. You guys must have very capacious kitchens in which you have room to store all these things.

I cook rice in a non-stick pan with a vented lid. Basmati is the only rice of choice for me unless I'm doing a paella or risotto. The rice goes in the pan and gets two or three rinses with cold water. Drain (I do it roughly, against the edge of the sink). Turn on the ring and boil lots of water in the kettle. Salt the rice (check again later). Put the pan on the high heat and pour in an excess of boiling water. Stir for a minute, get it back to the boil, turn the heat down to a simmer with the lid on and set the timer for exactly twelve minutes from adding the water. Drain well in a sieve or colander - give it a minute. Fluff the rice up with a fork and serve. I really can't be arsed with all this water-measuring and rice-measuring. When I used to do that, decades ago, I got variable, unreliable results. This works every time, though just half a minute of overcooking and the rice won't forgive you. If you really hit the spot with your careful measuring, yours might turn out better than mine, but only very slightly.

Accidentally on purpose, I always cook too much rice. Next day for lunch I melt a knob of butter in a frying pan. Throw in the cooked rice and break it up a bit. Add two or three beaten eggs and a generous amount of cooked peas (anything else you fancy, bacon, mushrooms, ham...). Let the eggs set lightly, stirring gently all the while. Season lightly, put in a bowl and consume while you're watching the one o'clock news. A bit more butter or a squidge of soy sauce is good. It's so comforting that even the latest brexit gloom on the telly won't seem too bad.


23 Nov 18 - 03:08 PM (#3962935)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

I see I spelled "Creuset" two different ways. I'm working on several other imaginative variants.


23 Nov 18 - 03:17 PM (#3962939)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage

You STIR your rice during the cooking? That is forbidden in rice cooking circles around here. Not until it is completely cooked is it fluffed before serving. ;-)

Fried rice is a wonderful use of lots of leftovers. I add scrambled eggs at the very end so they don't get too broken up. https://youtu.be/2WJSUVMjNVc The thing they don't mention is that it also comes with an instruction manual, a long list of grains, rice, oats, and more that can be cooked and gives you the proportions. If you're curious, this links the a manuals online source for their rice cooker manuals.

My rice cooker sits on a lower shelf in a small bookcase in the kitchen. That bookcase has two complete shelves of cookbooks and the bottom shelf has the rice cooker, a food processor, and my blender with the glass jar.


23 Nov 18 - 03:34 PM (#3962943)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman

And I cook basmati rice in a stainless steel saucepan with a glass lid. The lids got a strainer which I find useful.

I think we've tried a few methods of cooking rice but I just use a simple method found on a packet of Tilda Basmati rice. Add about 70-80g rice per person to pan of boiling water. Boil for 12 minutes, drain the water off, put lid on pan and stand for three minutes.


23 Nov 18 - 04:07 PM (#3962952)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

No, Maggie, just at the very start to make sure the rice and water get nicely mixed and there's nothing stuck to the bottom. Then it's lid on and leave severely alone!

Well said, Jon, tho' three minutes is uncomfortably long: the rice will cook a bit more and might go a bit cleggy. Can we agree on a minute and a half...?


23 Nov 18 - 04:14 PM (#3962954)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

And Tilda is a good, reliable brand.

I wouldn't bother scrambling your eggs first, Maggie. Just beat them in a cup and stir into the rice once it's hot in the pan. That way they coat the rice nicely before they set. Mind you, I haven't tried it your way. But you're dirtying another pan, and the worst pans to clean are the ones that eggs have been scrambled in!


23 Nov 18 - 05:21 PM (#3962966)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage

I don't want the eggs to set in fried rice, I want them to be another loose bit like the pork or chicken and diced vegetables and green onion (scallions) and whatever else happens to appeal to me.

I shop at a Middle Eastern market, where they have massive offerings of rice. I usually buy very long grain Basmati rice and it's nice if I can't read most of the label. :)


23 Nov 18 - 05:31 PM (#3962967)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman

Well Steve, 3 minutes (after which I fluff the rice up with a fork) works for me but one should feel free to adapt/adjust as one sees fit...


23 Nov 18 - 06:00 PM (#3962971)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: keberoxu

Thank goodness the Bertucci's franchise of Italian family restaurants
has got an entree salad built out of baby arugula greens;
my tummy is now full of fresh crunchy tasty ones.
That way I could get my nutrition and avoid romaine lettuce at the same time.


23 Nov 18 - 06:50 PM (#3962977)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

Isn't arugula what we call rocket? I like to include a bit of that in any salad. In fact, it grows wild in my garden. Adds a nice bit of spice.

I tend to use home-grown rocket and lettuce in my salads, even at this time of year. I've still got some nice mixed lettuce growing in big pots in a sheltered spot. I'll buy a nice red pepper and some decent cherry tomatoes (mine are finished), cut them up, put them in the bottom of my salad bowl and put in a good tablespoon of my finest Tuscan extra virgin olive oil. I then add a slightly smaller amount of the most expensive, thick, syrupy balsamic vinegar (a bottle lasts me all year). I will not countenance that thin, watery abomination that sells for a couple of quid and totally discredits the name. I then mix that thoroughly with the tomatoes and pepper, and only then put the lettuce and rocket on top. I'll then cover the lot with cling film. I don't mix the lettuce with the dressing until the very last minute as I don't much care for soggy lettuce. There's only one way to toss the salad, and that's to get your two hands in there and enjoy yourself.


23 Nov 18 - 07:02 PM (#3962979)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: keberoxu

The Etymology of the Words "Arugula" and "Rocket",
or, why it's called one thing in Northern Europe
and another thing in the Americas


23 Nov 18 - 07:25 PM (#3962986)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

I know the far south of Italy and I've come across "arugula" there. "Eruca" is the botanical Latin name of the genus that includes the plants we call rocket. Unless you're in a posh restaurant that's pretending to appeal to the cognescenti only, it's "rocket" this end. Unfortunately, unless you grow your own (incredibly easy), the rocket we get here in supermarket bags is insipid and just about useless.

I have a couple of lovely recipes that use rocket in a non-salad context. We'll see how it goes.


24 Nov 18 - 12:43 AM (#3962993)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson

Worcestershire indeed, but still correctly pronounced Wooster (the sauce, that is, not the place).
We use a Japanese fuzzy-logic rice cooker that always cooks rice perfectly, whether it’s brown or white, basmati or jasmine, then keeps it hot till you use it.
I’m not that gone on non-stick otherwise. Watch the Storyville episode called Poisoning America, about the largest ever class action to know why.
Made the Guinness stew, it was hearty and was wolfed down. I wouldn’t use housekeeper’s cut for it again, though, didn’t much like the texture.
The next meal when it’s my turn will involve harissa - ‘rose harissa’, the recipe says. I have yet to find an affordable source.
By the way, a couple of years ago I asked the checkout person in a local Polish or Moldovan shop (and you can feck off, Hillary Clinton, telling Europe to “control immigration”) what the great big bunches of dill sold there in winter were used for. The answer was borscht, with pork ribs, beetroot, onions and dill.


24 Nov 18 - 07:54 AM (#3963032)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman

Well the "controversial" device came today. With the jiggling around I need to do to find it a permanent home, it's likely to be a few days before I get to trying anything on it though.

Coming back to points raised. Its ability with meat (which seems to be the most questioned) isn't an issue here. On the other hand (as well as veg soup) if I could find a few recipes on the nut/chickpea/lentil stew/casserole lines (all missing from the bits I do here now but sometimes feel I ought...) that suit it, I think from my side of things at home, it will justify its existence. Pip may also have her own ideas...

For really fancy btw, has anyone enountered a thermomix. I believe very expensive (£1000+) things that are supposed to do everything from the measuring to the cooking?


24 Nov 18 - 08:50 AM (#3963034)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos

"supposed to do everything from the measuring to the cooking?"

Wouldn't that take all the pleasure out of cooking?


24 Nov 18 - 09:17 AM (#3963036)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman

I guess that depends on the cook and time available to fit cooking in life, Jos.

For my personal part, I'm not one who particularly enjoys cooking and does't mind short cuts. I do of course aim, with a very basic repertoire, to produce things that are enjoyed by the family (and, even with my ways, did seem to pass that with visiting family from oz; and brother there can be quite a serious cook when he wants to be)...

Even got praise for my cauliflower cheese from a niece and I do nothing special. Just use a strong cheddar, cut the cauli into larger chunks than say Pip would, leaving more stalk and keep a careful watch on when the veg is cooked (I think it can turn quite quickly from nice and still a bit crisp to soggy, but maybe that's just me...).

So I suppose that all makes me lazy but tries in some ways...


24 Nov 18 - 10:35 AM (#3963045)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage

Years ago I found a set of recipes in Martha Stewart Living magazine that I started using regularly. I always baked salmon, but her simple salmon steak sauteed in butter won me over, as did the new potatoes that were simmered in water until tender, slightly cooled, then "smashed" enough to split the skins and lower their profile. Those patties of softened potato are then placed in a skillet with butter and turned once and served with salt and fresh ground pepper. All of those little crispy edges of skin (I like this with red or Yukon potatoes, the ones that are a little more waxy). Sometimes I sprinkle chives over the top. I don't remember what Martha called those potatoes, but my son and his girlfriend make "smashed potatoes" all of the time, and when I asked what it was he told me it was the ones I'd been making and he added the standardized name.

Today on Pati's Mexican Kitchen (a PBS cooking program) she made a very elaborate version and she calls them smashed potatoes - using different colors of new potatoes for the variety, and then she puts them on an olive oiled pan, smashes them slightly with a spoon and spoons olive oil and various seasonings and peppers over the top and bakes it all. My sauteed in butter version is quicker and easier, but the point of describing this is that as a comfort food goes, those little potatoes are a family favorite.


24 Nov 18 - 10:42 AM (#3963047)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman

Thinking smash, anyone heard of "stwnsh"? It's a Welsh word and can be qualified but from my childhood, I'd eg. be thinking of potatoes and swede mashed together here.


24 Nov 18 - 07:19 PM (#3963116)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

I encountered a thermomix which was on display at a food fair about a year ago. Very sophisticated and very expensive. I'll tell you what. I love cooking, though I'm not that good at it. I like to get my hands in there, to do my own chopping, grinding, mixing and timing. I don't need a machine to sort out my cooking. I need a hob, an oven, some good pans and the finest ingredients I can lay my hands on.


25 Nov 18 - 03:06 AM (#3963147)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman

And to clarify, just in case. I think there is room for more than one approach to cooking and do respect the efforts of those, including a brother, who may take a more dedicated approach.

I suppose “wrong” to me is more about total dependency on microwave meals and takeways. I can see that infirmities can make cooking difficult or impossible (and to some degree, even see that with Pip), can see that there can be the odd day where you simply fancy say fish and chips from the local takeaway, but I become more baffled by the not knowing how to do anything angles. (But Peter/dad was a bit like that. His upbringing was such that a kitchen was purely a woman’s place… We on the other hand were expected to help mum out a little which at least left us with some basics to use if needed).

I must admit though that even I am a bit undecided over the Thermomix – can there be a taking automation too far? - I don’t know. That and perhaps even I will find the pressure/multi cooker a bit strange to start with. I’m more of the “take a few veg from what’s around, taste, try a bit of this, etc.” variety than one for precise weights and measures in advance…

...At least mostly. Another gadget we have is a (Panasonic now and the best we’ve had by far) breadmaker and, while you might try, eg. an extra ½ tsp of salt, a few more ml of water, etc. to get to your ideal, I think you do need to be quite accurate with your measurements there.


25 Nov 18 - 04:09 AM (#3963151)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman

Even more OT but for those who might use a breadmaker, the things I like about this Panasonic are:

1. "Repeatability". I don't understand all the wherefores but this one produces the most consistent "same loaf each time" of the ones we've had.

2. Others have needed water first and you sort of "balance" other ingredients, starting with the flour, on top. With this one, the water goes in last and it mixes things up before adding the yeast (which goes in it's own slot) after the other bits have had a stir. Perhaps this helps towards getting more consistent results?


25 Nov 18 - 05:09 AM (#3963164)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos

The salt in bread making isn't just for flavour. Too much, and the dough won't rise properly and the bread will be very dense. Too little, and the dough will rise too much, be very light and fluffy, and seem to be trying to climb out of the top of the tin.
PS. I have never used a breadmaker so I don't know what the effect would be in one of those.


25 Nov 18 - 05:26 AM (#3963169)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman

I think the principle is the same there, Jos. As far as I understand it, as well as taste, sugar can increase rising and salt restrict rising.


25 Nov 18 - 05:45 AM (#3963171)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

Well, Jon, I'll admit to also possessing a Panasonic bread maker. We've had it for around twelve years now and I echo your remarks about repeatability. Actually, all we ever use it for is to make ciabatta loaves (the ones with 500g of strong white flour and extra virgin olive oil) and a 2/3-to-1/3 wholemeal 500g loaf. After many years I discovered that you don't need to add Vitamin C at all. I like the fact that you have control over the quality of the flour (always organic this end) and the amount of salt (I cut it down by about a third). The bread is much better than any shop bread, though I'm the first to admit that using the thing might be regarded as cheating!

I have found that I get a more homogeneous consistency in the finished article if I put the yeast in the pan but mix all the other dry ingredients thoroughly in a bowl first. That goes in on top of the yeast, then in go the oil/butter and finally the water.


25 Nov 18 - 06:15 AM (#3963180)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos

Years ago, probably in the 1970s, I was invited to one of those sales parties where there was a demonstration of a breadmaker and they tried to sign people up for a regular supply of their flour and their 'special secret ingredient' that speeded up the process. The secret ingredient was vitamin C, but they didn't tell you that (or you would have known you didn't need to buy into their regular supply).
I didn't buy it anyway - a long rising improves the flavour of the bread.


25 Nov 18 - 06:28 AM (#3963185)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman

Flour, I'm not sure it's all organic but I do like the stuff from the localish Leatheringsett watermill (and their outlets).

Jos, I can't know how the machine compares to traditionally home baked loaves (have tried a couple but not say your regular white or whatever loaf) but do believe that it can be easy to better a shop bought (and I'm not just thinking Mothers Pride or whatever cheap sliced loaf) loaf with one.


25 Nov 18 - 07:51 AM (#3963194)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

Nowt wrong with Mother's Pride for a chip butty...


25 Nov 18 - 07:54 AM (#3963195)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman

I agree there...


25 Nov 18 - 09:54 AM (#3963226)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage

I was given a bread machine years ago and thought it was a silly specialized piece of equipment, but I set out to master it and I use mine regularly still. It's a large-capacity one manufactured by Welbilt, in this case sold by another company that branded it. But it's a round 3-pound loaf and when you bake the loaf in the machine you end up with round or half-circle shaped sandwiches and such and that shape seems to dry out fast.

I started using it on the manual setting all of the time now and when it finishes mixing and kneading I remove the dough, shape it and bake it in a regular loaf pan. I make rolls, pizza dough, and more, letting the machine do the initial mixing and I use it after the first rise.


25 Nov 18 - 10:36 AM (#3963237)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman

That does sound a big loaf, SRS. The most ours will take flour wise (and what I usually use - it will do smaller ones) is 600g/ around 1.3lbs and that seems to me a fairly large loaf.


25 Nov 18 - 01:02 PM (#3963259)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage

They take about four cups of flour, sometimes a little more.


25 Nov 18 - 04:25 PM (#3963291)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

I've found the 500g loaf ideal for most things. The 600g job rises triumphantly above the top of the pan, and the slices are too tall for me toaster!


25 Nov 18 - 05:55 PM (#3963298)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage

I'm preparing to make my famous banana nut bread that was baked in regular bread loaf pans when I had the kids here devouring it. Now I make loaves in smaller artisanal-style pans that are given to friends who live alone or have just a partner at home now. They don't need all of those calories. It's a quick bread with baking soda and I use a lot of extra bananas so it's more cake-like. I bake the pecans so they give off that warm maple-like flavor and I use butter instead of shortening or oil.


25 Nov 18 - 06:47 PM (#3963304)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

Mrs Steve does amazing banana bread out of bananas that are going a bit past it. We can't do nuts as she's seriously allergic to walnuts.


25 Nov 18 - 09:11 PM (#3963309)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage

On Thursday evening (Thanksgiving) I put the entire roasted turkey back into the fridge and pulled it out to get slices for meals; tonight I cut it apart and have the stock simmering. It's just too much to prepare for the meal and do all of the cutting up and soup on the same night. The pot is cooling a little before I pull out the bones and skin, strain the broth, and use that for making soup tomorrow.

For the banana bread, the bananas I'll be using were at the over-ripe state and then I froze them one or two at a time and they're finishing defrosting in the fridge now. I'll make a double batch of batter that will add up to probably six small loaves.


26 Nov 18 - 05:47 AM (#3963342)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman

I cut the 600g loaf from this one lengthways these days before slicing. I know that leaves you with bread with only 3 sides of crust that might not appeal to many but for our purposes at home it does give 2 loaves of a size everyone is happy with out of one run of the machine.

Our toaster btw, seems quite shallow to me. It's wide and will do crumpets nicely but in terms of shop bought loaves, is more suited to a smaller Hovis brown than much larger.
---
Pip was another who did a banana bread, using fruit past their best. Parent's loved it but I'm not sure it was one of my favourites.
--
Shame about the walnuts. Pip used to do a very nice date and walnut loaf. Seems a long while since it was last made though.


26 Nov 18 - 10:35 AM (#3963381)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion

I make almost all the bread we eat at home. I've been running a sourdough experiment for several months now, but I recently decided that it's not worth the trouble with just two of us, and only Himself eating more than a slice per day. Also, I have so far failed to produce a wholemeal loaf that I like using the sourdough method. So I'm (reluctantly) going back to active dry yeast.

Disposing of the sourdough culture (its name is Fred) feels like shooting the family dog. I hate the idea, but it must be done.


26 Nov 18 - 10:50 AM (#3963383)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos

Maybe you could give the sourdough culture to a friend or neighbour, like finding the dog a new home.


26 Nov 18 - 11:37 AM (#3963391)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage

Agreed - I bet you can find a taker for the next stage of your experiment. :)

My broth is ready to use - with as much turkey as is here I'm going to make a dense turkey pot pie stew with some of it and freeze the extra broth.


26 Nov 18 - 02:39 PM (#3963429)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Dave Hanson

White sourdough is the best white bread I've ever tasted, my starter is over 10 years old now, it never fails.

Dave H


26 Nov 18 - 02:41 PM (#3963432)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Dave Hanson

Incidently I've tried sourdough wholemeal and sourdough rye and I'm distinctly very dissapointed with both.

Dave H


27 Nov 18 - 07:08 AM (#3963551)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel

Thompson I do believe I would enjoy beet root prepared your way.
I have had such an aversion to beets as a result of having to eat Borsch as a kid.


27 Nov 18 - 07:13 AM (#3963553)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

I love beetroot and devour it with relish but I have to make a pact with myself not to look down the toilet for the next 24 hours.


27 Nov 18 - 01:19 PM (#3963607)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion

I love white sourdough bread, but my digestion does not. If I'm going to eat bread more than occasionally, it really has to be whole-grain. A batch of brown is under construction as I type.

Beetroot is great stuff. I like to include it in a batch of roasted veg, with Jerusalem artichokes, carrots, celery root and parsnips, flavoured with shallots, garlic and thyme. The carrots and beets usually have to be parboiled, but it's a small nuisance. Around here, we can get beets in every hue produced by beta-carotene, from pale yellow to darkest crimson. Golden beets are just as delicious as the red kind, but don't result in pink pee.

Just sayin'.


27 Nov 18 - 01:34 PM (#3963611)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage

I have shifted over the years to giving as many consumable gifts as possible, made at home. This year I've canned both pickled okra and mustang grape jelly and last night I made seven small loaves of banana nut bread that are now wrapped and in the freezer.

I recently send my son and my sister pickled okra, but neither is sure they'll like it, so my advice has been to wait until they have guests over to open the jar. Try it themselves and see if they like it. If not, chances are someone at the gathering will know what it is and like it and they can send the rest home with them. It keeps in the fridge for a long time so they can try that trick at parties all through the holiday season until it's eaten or given away.


27 Nov 18 - 03:42 PM (#3963641)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: EBarnacle

Aaah, back to the beets. I used to strongly dislike beet foods until I got together with Lady Hillary. She has made a convert of me. She cuts the beets up fine, then boils them and adds a few spices, finishing up with an immersion blender. We make the batch large enough to store in a couple of quart size Chinese Tupperware containers. We generally serve it cold with home made yogurt instead of sour cream [shades of my grandmother].

A couple of weeks before Thanksgiving I made up a batch of leek and potato soup. The problem I had with it was that it resisted taste. No matter what spices I added to it [again, the batch size gave us three quarts for the fridge] it was determinedly bland. Hot sauce, curry, chili sauce no effect.

For Thanksgiving Lady Hillary made up a butternut squash soup that, for its final heating got some ginger and garlic [both fresh]. Delightful.

This weekend we had sweet potato fries at a barbecue restaurant. It came with a dusting of brown sugar that was very good. There was something in the taste which suggested that a bit of finely chopped ginger would go well with it. That will get a try in the next few days.


27 Nov 18 - 04:12 PM (#3963645)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos

Sometimes when food is just too bland, what it needs as well as other flavours is a little salt.


29 Nov 18 - 09:19 PM (#3963945)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: EBarnacle

Unless I want edema, I avoid salt.
This morning, we had home made latkes [potato pancakes] with peach compote[also homemade].


29 Nov 18 - 11:14 PM (#3963953)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel

Unfortunately we have no Mustang Grapes in these parts.
As for wild Tarts, I don't know.


30 Nov 18 - 06:23 AM (#3963985)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: punkfolkrocker

Chocolate digestive bisuits topped with slices of mature chedar cheese...

and a mug of strong black tea [leave the teabag in]...


30 Nov 18 - 06:30 AM (#3963986)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

If food is too bland it could be that you're either leaving out something vital or you're using lesser-quality ingredients. The latter is why shop ready-meals are so high in salt. I always think that there's a "right" amount of salt for any recipe. To cure blandness, my first resort is fresh herbs and/or a tiny splash of Tabasco, maybe a bit more black pepper, depending. The Italians do it right when they start a ragu or a soup with a soffritto made with chopped onions, carrots and celery sautéed in extra-virgin olive oil. For a meat sauce, I add a bit of chopped-up pancetta to that for richness and savour. My chili meat sauce and bolognese always start like that. I find that slow-cooked meat dishes such as ragus and pot roasts are the very devil to judge for salt while you're actually cooking them, and they always taste different once they've stood for a few hours. Start low with your salt. You can always up it later on.


30 Nov 18 - 06:31 AM (#3963987)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

I'm just wondering how you can dunk a choccie biscuit with a slab of cheese on top...


30 Nov 18 - 07:16 AM (#3963993)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Sandra in Sydney

not that I'll be eating them, Fun and festival treats or even making them, but they look good & someone might like to add them to their recipe library

sandra (not a sweet tooth)


30 Nov 18 - 07:37 AM (#3963995)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: punkfolkrocker

Steve - I'm not a dunker..

but guess a solution could be a tightly held sandwich of TWO chocolate digestives
with twice as much cheese in the middle...

chocolate facing inwards...???

I'm not a coffee drinker.. but that might dunk quite nicely in white coffe with a mountain of sugar stirred in...???


[remembering a once a week grammer school dinner from the early 70s..
pudding was coffee, loads of sugar, cheddar chunks, and an apple..]


30 Nov 18 - 08:17 AM (#3964000)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

I do like a can-do bloke, pfr...


30 Nov 18 - 10:38 PM (#3964098)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: EBarnacle

Thai chili sauce disappeared with nary a twinge of the taste buds. We generally limit our salt intake because of my sensitivity to it. If there is some salt in a spice I will chance it but go easy.
If we can taste salt as saltiness it is definitely too much.


01 Dec 18 - 04:54 AM (#3964120)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson

Are mustang grapes the same as scuppernong, which I’ve read about but never seen?


01 Dec 18 - 11:54 AM (#3964177)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage

No, and they aren't the same as muscadine, either, though I've heard of them in the region.

http://palatepress.com/2010/06/wine/wine-indigenous-american-grape-varieties-a-primer/

Of the six native species that had been growing in North America long before European settlers arrived, some may sound more familiar than others: rotundifolia (muscadine), aestivalis (summer grape), riparia (frost grape), labrusca (fox grape), mustangensis (Mustang grape), and rupestris (sand grape). Over the last hundred years some interest has been given to this rowdy and uncouth bunch of American species. While these grapes are not as widely cultivated or commercialized as vinifera varieties, they do show potential for making enjoyable wines and deserve to be recognized.


The author of the article later dismisses our little Texas grape:
Vitis mustangensis has little to no redeeming commercial qualities. Limited in habitat to Texas, Oklahoma, and parts of Louisiana the mustang grape is highly acidic and bitter in taste. Simply handling the grapes can irritate the skin.

The bit about irritating the skin is true. The first time I picked them it was with bare hands and my hands really smarted after a while. I wear vinyl gloves when I work with them now. The remarkable thing about these grapes with their big seeds and thick tough skins is that they still manage to produce a wonderful rich dark pink/red juice and it's perfect for a sweet/tart jelly. If you've ever tasted tamarind or tamarindo, they are sweet and tart in the same way.

I like the jelly on toast, on baking powder biscuits, and I often will heat some in a small custard cup in the microwave and use it as syrup over pancakes. I think you could use it in place of cranberry sauce in a pinch.


01 Dec 18 - 12:06 PM (#3964179)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion

At last, a second good reason to visit Texas. I'd love to try your mustang grape jelly.

Himself and I are going out for dinner tonight, to the Stratford Chef School, where the students are staging "Escoffier at the Ritz". It's an eight-course (!) extravaganza in the Belle Époque style, definitely not the sort of thing we could get at home.


01 Dec 18 - 12:28 PM (#3964185)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage

You are more than welcome to come for a visit - the guest room is (remarkably!) clear. The rest of the house, not so much. But when one has grown children who might stop by and you want them to stay for a little while if they can, the guest room is ready.


02 Dec 18 - 07:14 AM (#3964270)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

Ox-cheek ragú last night, a la Jamie Oliver-ish (I'm no slave to recipes). Very cheap, tough, sinewy meat in great big hunks, braised for four hours in red wine, passata and porcini water with onions, carrots, celery, garlic (bashed, never abused by a garlic crusher) a few strips of smoked pancetta and a big bunch of fresh herbs (and a pinch or two of spices). It makes enough sauce both to use as gravy with mashed potato and veg and the chunks of ludicrously-tender meat (that's tonight) and for a goodly portion to stir into fettuccine with some of the diced beef, topped with freshly grated Parmesan and a dash of the best extra virgin olive oil (that was last night). Cucina povera!


02 Dec 18 - 07:20 AM (#3964272)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Raggytash

I know I'm late doing this but this morning has seen the Christmas cake being mixed and it's now in the oven for over 4 hours.

It weights in excess of 5lb so we will have a fair bit to go at over the festive season!


02 Dec 18 - 08:33 AM (#3964281)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

I got the accent on "ragù" the wrong way round. I knew something wasn't right. The actual ragù is very fine, however.


02 Dec 18 - 10:28 AM (#3964298)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage

So you really don't need someone to fix it because it gives you a chance to admire the sauce. :)

This "christmas cake" creature - is this what we Yanks call "fruit cake?" A very large cake that lasts as long as it seems to need to last, when a "normal" cake would be stale after a week, must be a different kind of baked good.


02 Dec 18 - 10:35 AM (#3964300)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson

Mustang jelly
You better slow that mustang down

Christmas cake has fruit, nuts, eggs, flour, sugar, spices and lots of alcohol. When my father made it the whole house reeked of whiskey from October to January.


02 Dec 18 - 10:51 AM (#3964301)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Tattie Bogle

A nice flying haggis last night: aka chicken Balmoral. Basically a chicken breast casserole but topped with slices of haggis and some whisky or Drambuie in the sauce. You can try wrapping the chicken breasts around the haggis,but it always worms its way out!
And save your best single malt for drinking: any old blend will do in the sauce - well almost!


02 Dec 18 - 03:03 PM (#3964341)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Raggytash

Tattie Bogle, the simple use of two cocktail stick through the chicken and black pudding may help to keep everything in place.








.............. or you could fall back on the Glasgow trick and dip it in batter and deep fry ..............





I'll get me coat


03 Dec 18 - 03:14 AM (#3964415)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: BobL

a "normal" cake would be stale after a week

A sponge cake might be stale after a week, but a fruit cake improves with a bit of keeping. Especially if fed with small doses of liquor at weekly intervals.

And yes, a "Christmas cake" is essentially a rich fruit cake, decorated appropriately.


03 Dec 18 - 03:28 AM (#3964417)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson

In my day a Christmas cake was iced with about a centimetre thick layer of marzipan, covered by hard white sugar icing, decorated like a Roman temple. Not so much nowadays when we’re all influenced by German and Polish customs.


03 Dec 18 - 04:55 AM (#3964439)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos

Christmas cake is traditionally made on the last Sunday in November to give it several weeks to mature. Every member of the household has a turn stirring the mixture and making a wish.
I used to ice the cake with a vaguely flat covering of white icing, a small model fir tree, and footsteps in the 'snow' made with a silver charm of a boot. (Must do it again sometime.)


04 Dec 18 - 08:31 AM (#3964668)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel

Tried the beets under the chicken with vegetables recipe. The carrots and all were good but beets are still to 'earthy' for me.

The leftover red sauce may be a good violin stain with varnish but may not be color fast.


04 Dec 18 - 09:03 AM (#3964673)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion

Yes, fruitcake. I'm a week late starting ours, but I'll get going this afternoon. It's a two-day process in which the fruit macerates overnight in brandy (or other hooch) and the juice of two lemons and two oranges.

I don't ice it: that's not the Canadian style. (Fruitcake is the only thing that's naked at Christmas in Ontario.) Also, the fondant-marzipan icing is very fiddly to make and apply, not to mention expensive (the price of almond paste these days!), and it doesn't travel well, especially in the mail.


04 Dec 18 - 06:55 PM (#3964796)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel

Grand Marine' or Drambuie is my choice.


05 Dec 18 - 02:43 AM (#3964842)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: BobL

Sailor Jerry rum in my cookbook.

While we're on the subject, a good addition to fruit salad is a 50:50 mix of Archer's peach schnapps and Southern Comfort. Just enough to moisten, not marinade!


05 Dec 18 - 10:31 AM (#3964909)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion

By the time it's in a fruitcake, any old rum'll do, BobL.

A nice but misguided person once gave me a bottle of Red Label Johnny Walker. The stuff is undrinkable, but it was boffo in fruitcake.

I agree with you on the subject of Southern Comfort in a fruit salad, but we don't eat fruit salad often enough to justify the purchase of an entire bottle of Southern Comfort. I have no experience of Archer's peach schnapps, which may not be available in Ontario.

Tonight's supper will be my sister-in-law's vegetarian lasagne. Himself came home with rather a lot of striploin steak the other day (bin-end sale at the butcher, I gather), so a veg-heavy dish feels like a good idea. It's remarkably like a normal lasagne, but with no meat in the sauce; you could feed it to your lacto-ovo vegetarian teenager without incident. It has three kinds of cheese, though, so the calorie count is not inconsiderable.

And it makes six servings, so that's dinner tonight and two days' worth of lunch.


06 Dec 18 - 09:47 AM (#3965090)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson

A nice alcoholic dessert is made by soaking porridge oats in whiskey and honey then whipping in cream just before serving it. Don't give the driver any.


07 Dec 18 - 02:31 AM (#3965192)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: BobL

Charmion, any old rum will do for any old fruitcake.


07 Dec 18 - 09:40 AM (#3965251)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion

Okay, BobL, point taken. You can't expect good results if you don't use good ingredients.

That said, I still insist that fruitcake (any old fruitcake) is a suitable destination for Red Label Johnny Walker.

Thompson, I believe the dessert you describe is Atholl Brose. I have an elderly cookbook called "The Scots Kitchen"; its version of the recipe calls for the finely ground oatmeal that I know as "pinhead" oats. Is that what you mean by porridge oats?


07 Dec 18 - 10:46 AM (#3965270)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel

Richard Wade
known to his friends as Dick Wad has been named Ass. Deputy to Facebook public relations to change minds instead of changing Facebook.


Some recipes will always taste bad no matter what you think about them.
Like Sticky Bitter Bottom Buns, changing the name won't help until you change the recipe.


07 Dec 18 - 05:57 PM (#3965331)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: keberoxu

There used to be a retail shop north of Harvard Square,
in Cambridge, Massachusetts,
called "Atholl Brose."
It stocked everything Scottish
and provided access to a tailor
who could custom-fit you for a kilt.

They had a shelf of books, some written in Scots,
like "The Shriek of the Maws."

I don't recall that they sold food, though.


07 Dec 18 - 06:21 PM (#3965340)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos

"I don't recall that they sold food, though"

What, not even haggis?


07 Dec 18 - 07:47 PM (#3965358)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

We've had salmon arrabbiata tonight. I basically follow Gino d'Acampo's recipe but not slavishly.

For two people you need some fresh keta or sockeye salmon, not tinned, about 300g. Take off the skin (easiest when the salmon is half-thawed). Cut the fish into 1cm dice.

Put your pasta on to boil in salted water. I use pennone rigate for this. I'm not too keen on those little penne tubes but suit yourself.

In the meantime sautée gently two sliced cloves of garlic (do NOT crush) and your own personal predilection of dried chilli flakes in a pan of extra virgin olive oil. The dish is supposed to be pretty spicy so don't hang back too much. After a few minutes add at least one can of plum tomatoes. Only the best will do. I usually add a few more plus a goodly dollop of sun dried tomato paste. At the same time add a good handful of chopped fresh parsley and some seasoning. Let that lot simmer uncovered for a few minutes (or you can make the sauce in advance, which is what I did tonight).

Two minutes before the pasta is ready, turn the heat up a tad under the sauce and throw in the salmon, heat it through for a minute or two then turn off the heat. Have faith, the fish is perfectly cooked. Drain the pasta (keeping a cupful of the water) and toss into the sauce. Mix well, adding a bit of pasta water if needed, and serve. No Parmesan on fish (a mortal sin in Italy). A goodly drizzle of your finest extra virgin olive oil on top is paramount, as it is on most pasta dishes and pizzas. This dish is so quick and easy, and it couldn't be healthier. And it's utterly delicious.


07 Dec 18 - 07:53 PM (#3965359)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

Dammit, I should have said that you need around four tablespoons of olive oil. Also, you can use diced chicken breast instead of salmon, though you do need to stir-fry it for a minute or two before adding to the sauce. Not hard, though, is it!


08 Dec 18 - 10:24 AM (#3965458)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman

I think I’ll be helping to make a nut roast early next week. My parents had decided on stuffed butternut squash halves from Tesco for the main part of their Christmas dinner. There were a lot of problems with the Tesco Christmas order which also included a bit of turkey for me. It started with the butternut squash item being “unavailable” on the first day Tesco opened their Christmas area and after the order finally got placed, it got wiped by a regular grocery order and all the Christmas delivery booking slots had gone for another attempt at ordering.

Anyway, after some debate, we decided to go for something home made instead and have opted to try this nut loaf which I think looks good. The deal is that I will get all the ingredients prepared and laid out. Pip will then take over. The plan is to freeze until Christmas eve/day.


08 Dec 18 - 10:34 AM (#3965461)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage

"Keta" is also called "dog salmon" up in the Northwest and Alaska. Go with the sockeye, or go home. It doesn't have nearly as much flavor or color. It's okay if you don't have anything else, but if you have a choice, go with sockeye.


08 Dec 18 - 11:01 AM (#3965468)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman

I've tried 2 meals in the multi cooker so far, both slow cook.

The first, a sort of red lentil, chick pea and carrot stew came out well. The recipe I based it on called for pasta at a later stage but, not having any, I tipped some arborio rice in and gave the mix about a 15 minute quick cook on "stew" instead. It was popular enough to be asked to do it again.

I started an attempt at a spicy/curry veg meal in the early hours of this morning (couldn't sleep). I've got this one quite wrong. The veg (potato, carrots, parsnip and sprouts) have cooked OK but I've wound up with way too much, rather insipid liquid. I knew there would be no evaporation but the veg themselves seem to have added somewhat to the liquid. I think I'm going to have to try to rescue this one using a pan on the cooker and aim to be wiser next time.


08 Dec 18 - 12:13 PM (#3965475)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

I agree about the salmon, and keta is lower in those omega-3 oils as well. I didn't have enough sockeye. But actually keta is fine in the arrabbiata, I promise you, and it's much cheaper this end. When I have sockeye I want it nicely seasoned and fried in butter, skin side down to start with, with home-made oven chips (parboiled unpeeled wedges, roughed up, coated in groundnut oil and roasted for 20 minutes in a fierce oven), tenderstem broccoli and some oven-roasted cherry tomatoes with basil.


08 Dec 18 - 04:58 PM (#3965512)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel

I have dried ghost pepper. Anyone ever use it?


08 Dec 18 - 06:05 PM (#3965519)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Joe_F

Tonight it will be lamburger, Sicilian spinach, rutabaga, tea, & icecream.


08 Dec 18 - 08:50 PM (#3965544)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

I've been on my own today and have got pissed off with one thing and another, so I did meself a trough of comfort food tonight which I scoffed out of a huge bowl in front of a repeat of Chas & Dave's Christmas special on the telly.

You need a fairly small roasting tin or Pyrex dish if it's just for one. Oil it well.

Boil about 350g waxy potatoes, unpeeled, for about twenty minutes.

Meanwhile, take about 75g pancetta or streaky bacon (unsmoked for me, but hey) and cut the rashers into inch-long pieces. Grate about 50g Parmesan. Take about 150g of a melting cheese. Gruyere, fontina, mozzarella or taleggio will all fit the bill, though, as I didn't have any of those, I used provolone dolce. Cut the cheese into small slices.

Drain the spuds, let them cool slightly then slice them up. Put the spuds into the bottom of your oiled roasting dish. Insert the pieces of cheese and bacon roughly into the spud layer. Sprinkle with the grated parmesan, making sure that there's a bit left to go on top. Finally, sprinkle a hood dollop of olive oil on top.

Bake for about 30 minutes at about 180C.

I ate mine with some peas as I needed the vitamins. Lovely it was.


09 Dec 18 - 09:14 AM (#3965589)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman

I’ve just been looking at an earlier comment about keeping metal utensils away from cookware.

I admit to damaging one stainless steel pan with a potato masher but I guess I accepted I was going to do that and I don’t use that one for things that stick. I’ve tried with the others but, eg. with last set of visiting family, I did a sort of “self service” from the pans. I put a couple of plastic ones out but they were swapped for metal ones, etc. and Pip is the type who can grab the nearest object to hand even if that means a metal knife vs a non stick frying pan (which now is the only thing I have that is non stick coated).

Anyway, she’s asked me to replace some wooden tools for her Christmas present from me (likely to be more used by me but if that’s what she wants I don’t argue) so I’ve bought a set of wooden handled ones with silicon tools and a couple of silicon desert spoons. I’m not sure whether that will help lead to more care but time will tell.

Favourite pan (if a less dedicated type is allowed to have such things) btw is a 16cm Vogue Tri wall (aluminium sandwiched between stainless steel) one which I use for gravy and sauces. It seems to heat more evenly that the Judge ones and less likely to stick (not that I’ve had major problems cleaning the others). I didn’t get a lid (metal and sold separately) for this one but retained a glass lid from an older discarded saucepan that is a good fit if needed.


10 Dec 18 - 06:14 AM (#3965745)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson

Charmion, I tried that whiskey-honey-cream-oatmeal thing with pinhead oatmeal one time but found it vaguely gritty. I just use the ordinary oatmeal you make porridge with.


12 Dec 18 - 10:53 AM (#3965915)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion

Thompson, from its other recipes, I gather that The Scots Kitchen considers vague grittiness to be a feature, not a bug. Its recipe for haggis is fit to fright the French, containing as it does items that are not legal for sale in Ontario.

I have come down with bronchitis and, if it goes the way it usually does, I will lose all olfactory function within the next 24 to 48 hours. During the taste-free days, I will live on tea and toast.

Now that we live in beautiful, leafy Stratford, Ontario, we are within shouting distance of a genuine grist mill that still produces whole-meal flour. Our bread game, always of a high standard, has consequently gone up yet another notch. I make a 100%-whole-wheat sandwich loaf that is, if not to die for, certainly something to live on. Made with flour from the Arva mill, it has a nutty flavour and a firm (but not stodgy) texture that is delicious when fresh and just magnificent as toast. I got great results with standard commercial flour (Robin Hood "Best For Bread"), but the stone-ground flour is notably better.

If I bake today, while still compos mentis, I might survive to next week ...


12 Dec 18 - 11:01 AM (#3965917)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: SPB-Cooperator

Tonight, something quick and simple - fried turkey meatballs and new potatoes with a good dollop of butter.


12 Dec 18 - 11:57 AM (#3965932)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage

The best kind of meal possible - whatever is served - an invitation from the neighbor next door to join her for (in this instance) pot roast after helping her with some yard work.


13 Dec 18 - 12:12 AM (#3966012)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: JennieG

A favourite Ozzie Christmas treat is made from a commercially-made dark fruit cake. Break up the cake in a bowl and stir in enough sherry (or orange juice if serving it to kids) to make it pliable enough to roll into balls somewhere between a walnut and a golf ball in size. Drizzle melted white chocolate or white icing on top, and decorate with bits of red and green lollies/candy/sweets, depending where in the world you live. Serve in paper cases - they look like mini Chrissie puds.

A plate of these makes a nice gift, if you are into edible givings.


13 Dec 18 - 04:46 AM (#3966038)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson

Scots? Wha? Hey!


14 Dec 18 - 11:42 AM (#3966263)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage

Salmon was brined overnight and is now in the smoker out on the front porch. This is for a friend, who brought the fish over here because I have the smoker.


15 Dec 18 - 03:14 PM (#3966425)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia

We just had a Sunday dinner on a Friday. I like this idea - a fine meal, good company, and no driving at night.

Here's the main dish: Trim the obvious fat from a beef chuck roast, then place it in a slow cooker. Place whole cranberries all over the top surface of the beef. Cook 8 to 10 hours on low, till tender. Let cool some, then put in fridge overnight.

Next day, remove fat. Slice meat, warm in oven. Just before dining, add 1 tsp molasses to the sauce. Optional: add 1/4 tsp cinnamon to the sauce. Serve with noodles.
===========
Notes: I like to use a slow-cooker liner for easier cleanup.
Use the rest of the molasses to make gingerbread, ginger cookies and BBQ sauce. Some people put butter and molasses on pancakes, too.

After dinner, we played music in the living room.


15 Dec 18 - 07:34 PM (#3966479)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Tattie Bogle

Scots wha hae leftovers tae use up: Random Scran
Piece of previously cooked cod loin, sprouts, leeks, cauliflower (all also previously cooked!) Baked beans, requested by grandchildren for THEIR tea but hardly ate a random few.
Throw randomly on plate, grate strong cheddar cheese over the whole lot equally randomly.
Randomly select 2 minutes on random poweer setting (full) on microwave and zap!
Haute cuisine!


16 Dec 18 - 05:20 AM (#3966530)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos

Leeneia, if you ever cook for me, could I ask you just to leave the fat on my share, PLEASE


16 Dec 18 - 06:00 AM (#3966537)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson

What's a slow cooker liner?

Horror story in the Guardian: unsold human food, still in its plastic packaging, is routinely thrown into the mix while making animal food, meaning that meat eaters may be harmed by the plastic the animals ingest and digest.

"More than 650,000 tonnes of unused food, from loaves of bread to Mars bars, are saved from landfill each year in the UK by being turned into animal feed. The system that strips off the plastic wrappings can’t capture it all, and so in the UK a limit of 0.15% of plastic is allowed by the Food Standards Agency. The official EU level for plastic permitted in animal feed is zero although in reality many other countries operate within the same 0.15% limit."

Meanwhile, I made borscht last night: chopped onions and beetroots, belly of pork (I'd thought those strips in the freezer were spare ribs…), celery and a big bunch of dill, and a chopped-up cabbage at the end; stock. It was tasty, but I think I'd put in the cabbage earlier and chop it finer in future, and maybe grate the beetroots before cooking them.


16 Dec 18 - 06:00 AM (#3966538)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Big Al Whittle

None of this foreign muck.

We've booked into the Balti House for Christmas,


16 Dec 18 - 11:44 PM (#3966723)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia

Hi, Thompson. A slow-cooker liner is a tough bag of some clear, synthetic material that withstands high heat. that you put in the slow cooker to keep food from getting cooked on to the ceramic. It saves a lot of scrubbing.

It is made by Reynolds, the company which makes aluminum foil and Reynolds Oven Bags.
==========
when my mother-in-law turned 70, she announced that she was not going to cook anymore. She had cooked for 50 years and was sick of it. I didn't want to follow her example, so I asked myself how I could make cooking more fun.

I decided that I like cooking but dislike cleaning up, so I decided to buy four things:

Reynolds Oven Bags
Reynolds Slow Cooker bags
parchment paper to put under roasting meats
disposable gloves for handling icky things.

I don't often use the gloves, but occasionally they are truly worth it. For example when yanking the purple gobbets out of a raw chicken.

If anybody comments that I am using up natural resources, I can tell them that I drive an 11-year-old car, I have no television, no cable, no boat...on balance I figure I can spoil myself a little.

Another thing I did is buy two cartons of Rubbermaid storage boxes. They stack nicely and are tough.


17 Dec 18 - 01:37 AM (#3966729)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos

If you never wash up you are saving on detergent and using less fuel to heat water, so you can set them against the plastic waste (just make sure those bags and gloves don't end up in the sea).


17 Dec 18 - 04:37 AM (#3966749)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

I browned a cheap hunk of brisket in my Le Creuset, set it aside, put some strips of pancetta into the pan to render, added chunks of carrot, celery and onion, fried for ten minutes, added a mug full of porcini water along with the chopped fungus, added a glass of red wine which I'd boiled and burned the alcohol from, a bit of seasoning and a bunch of fresh herbs, put the brisket back in and left it in a slow oven for thee hours. I had to hurry up so as not to miss the Liverpool kickoff. Delicious.


17 Dec 18 - 10:14 AM (#3966806)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage

I have a low-power 1-quart crockpot I like to set up overnight to cook my oatmeal for the day or enough for a few days (it reheats well). I forgot the crockpot so I'll slow-cook it in a saucepan on the stove, into which I chop up figs or dates or throw in a handful of raisins, trying to not burn cereal onto the bottom of the pan.


17 Dec 18 - 01:54 PM (#3966843)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson

Thanks, Leenia. I use rubber gloves for icky and sticky things, like taking the skins off roast peppers, but I'm afraid I just use the same ones I use for washing up the pots and things that don't go in the dishwasher. I had a pair of 'dirty jobs' rubber gloves for anything germy and non-food, but the demon puppy Oscar seems to have found and destroyed them; must get a new pair.


17 Dec 18 - 03:32 PM (#3966882)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: SamStone

being diabetic because of Agent Orange (and i don't mean trump) lots of salmon and steamed veggies


18 Dec 18 - 01:41 PM (#3967088)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia

Back to our roots - bratwurst and sauerkraut. We indulged in fresh bratwurst shipped by Usinger's in Milwaukee and cooked it right away. Then we put it in the deep freeze.

To precook: poke sausage in several places with a sharp fork. Put in a skillet with water halfway up the sides. Bring water to a boil, then turn down to simmer. Turn sausage over after 15 mins. Simmer for maybe 30 mins. Freeze.

To prepare: Place brats in heavy saucepan. Rinse sauerkraut and spread over brats. Sprinkle with caraway seeds. Add 1/4 water or white wine. Simmer till heated through.

You can eat it on a bun or not, as you prefer. Have chopped onion and good mustard on hand.


18 Dec 18 - 02:06 PM (#3967098)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

42nd anniversary so we're having steak, home-made oven chips (par-boiled in salty water then baked very hot in groundnut oil), broad beans from the freezer, home-grown, and some roasted cherry toms. I must have ribeye but Mrs Steve gets a piece of sirloin because she doesn't like trimming away the sinew (I just scoff the lot). There will be blood. And Rioja.


19 Dec 18 - 11:52 AM (#3967255)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage

I'm almost finished with a lasagna I made a few days ago of various things that needed using. Tomatoes from the garden, ripening in the house slowly after the first frost in October and now simmered long enough to use for sauce (wearing vinyl gloves I squirt them out of the skins that go into the compost bowl). Some ricotta and mozzarella from the freezer from the last time I made lasagna, and the very wet tomato mix was added to a couple of containers of marinara sauce that had been in the fridge long enough they needed to be finished off soon.

I didn't have any lasagna noodles in the house so I took a box of spaghetti and used it (dry) to make a layer after the eggplant and cheese and sauce layers. More cheese and sauce and then bake it till everything is done. The spaghetti is just fine in there, though it doesn't have the consistency of the large flat pasta, but it tastes good.


19 Dec 18 - 05:22 PM (#3967318)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel

I assume a ground nut is the same as a pomme d'terre.
Out here in the wilderness it is called a potatow.

Simple eggs can be made delicious by a clever hand.
Eggs do not deserve to be assulted by ketchup or hot sauce.
A sprinkling of tarragon and smidge of ground fennel do wonders


19 Dec 18 - 05:53 PM (#3967328)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos

Groundnuts/peanuts are seeds, from which oil is extracted, or they can be eaten raw, roasted or made into peanut butter.
If you plant a raw one in a pot you can watch the plant grow, and produce a pea-like flower, from which what looks like a stem will grow and extend downwards until it reaches the soil, where it deposits the seed - in effect, the seed plants itself in the ground, hence the name 'groundnut'.
(I've never heard of potato oil.)


19 Dec 18 - 06:15 PM (#3967330)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

Groundnuts are peanuts. Groundnut oil is an excellent neutral oil that has a high smoke point.

Our bog-standard lasagne uses a typical bolognese ragu, made with a mix of minced pork and beef, browned then added to a soffritto which includes pancetta as well as onions, carrots and celery. Add all that together with canned plum tomatoes and a good splash of chicken stock. Season well and simmer for as long as you like. I might add a glass of white wine that I've boiled and burned the alcohol from. Some recipes demand chicken liver and milk, but not for me. Mrs Steve insists on garlic, but I'm averse to crushed cloves so I might peel and bash with my fist about eight cloves which go into the mix. As for herbs, either leave them out or just add a sprinkle of dried oregano near the end. Dried basil has no place in any decent kitchen. I'll let you off if you chuck in some fresh basil leaves near the end.


19 Dec 18 - 10:16 PM (#3967369)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel

ground nuts? What on Earth do you call carrots?


20 Dec 18 - 03:00 AM (#3967382)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: BobL

Peanuts, groundnuts, monkey nuts, goober peas or (according to Wiki) pindars.


20 Dec 18 - 08:24 AM (#3967425)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Ed T

This morning for (later than normal) breakfast,creamed lobster meat on toast with a side of seared scallops.


20 Dec 18 - 08:46 AM (#3967431)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson

Now that's what I call a breakfast.

I'm partial to a fried egg and potatoes, with some of that Kalle fish roe paste they sell in Ikea on the side, and of course salt and vinegar.


20 Dec 18 - 09:54 AM (#3967450)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

Fried eggs on top of a couple of fried Rankin's potato farls make a damn fine breakfast.


20 Dec 18 - 10:00 AM (#3967453)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage

Usually on xmas morning we have pancakes, bacon, etc. but I'm thinking this year I might make baking powder biscuits and serve them with homemade jelly. They fall on both of these like they're starving. I sometimes do a side of Jimmy Dean sage sausage, though I didn't grow up in the south so there is none of that sausage and biscuit and gravy nonsense.


20 Dec 18 - 10:37 AM (#3967464)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson

What jelly do you make, Stilly? I made a dose of apple and rosehip jelly a few weeks back; just about to de-mould and re-boil the last jar and lash into it.


24 Dec 18 - 05:21 PM (#3968221)
Subject: Hinton Xmas Recipes
From: wysiwyg

Thanksgiving-style Xmas Menu


Scalloped Potatoes With Spinach And Cheese

2 pounds peeled Yukon Gold potatoes, cut into 1/8-inch slices
1 1/4 cups 1% low-fat milk
1 cup fat-free, less-sodium chicken broth
3 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon pepper
Dash of nutmeg
Cooking spray
2 teaspoons butter
2 cups sliced Vidalia or other sweet onion
1 cup (4 ounces) reduced-fat shredded sharp Cheddar cheese
1 (10-ounce) package frozen chopped spinach, thawed and squeezed dry
3 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese

Preheat oven to 450°.
Place potato slices in a large saucepan, and cover with water. Bring to a boil; reduce heat, and simmer, uncovered, 6 minutes or until tender. Drain well; set aside.

Combine milk and next 5 ingredients in a medium bowl, stirring with a whisk until blended.

Melt butter in a large nonstick skillet coated with cooking spray over medium-high heat. Add onion; sauté 7 minutes or until golden. Reduce heat to medium. Gradually add milk mixture, stirring with a whisk until blended. Cook 5 minutes or until thick and bubbly; stirring constantly with a wooden spoon. Add cheese, stirring until cheese melts. Remove from heat.

Arrange half of potato slices in an 11 x 7- inch baking dish coated with cooking spray. Top with half of spinach and half of cheese sauce. Repeat with remaining potato, spinach, and sauce. Sprinkle with Parmesan cheese. Bake at 450° for 15 to 18 minutes or until golden and bubbly.



Roasted Sweet Potatoes with Honey and Cinnamon
4 sweet potatoes, peeled and cut into 1-inch cubes
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil, plus more for drizzling potatoes after cooked
1/4 cup honey
2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.
Lay the sweet potatoes out in a single layer on a roasting tray. Drizzle the oil, honey, cinnamon, salt and pepper over the potatoes. Roast for 25 to 30 minutes in oven or until tender. Take sweet potatoes out of the oven and transfer them to a serving platter. Drizzle with more extra-virgin olive oil.

stove top stuffing for Greg and cheesy arepas for me; cheesy corn and crunch casserole;


GLUTEN-FREE GREEN BEAN CASSEROLE WITH CARAMELIZED MUSHROOMS & ONIONS

1 tablespoon gluten-free cornstarch
2 teaspoons McCormick® Basil Leaves
1 teaspoon McCormick® Onion Salt
2 tablespoons butter
1 cup thinly sliced onions
2 cups sliced mushrooms
1 1/2 cups milk2 teaspoon gluten-free soy sauce
4 ounces (1/2 package) cream cheese, cubed
1 1/2 pounds fresh green beans, trimmed, cut into 1-inch pieces and cooked

Preheat oven to 350°F. Mix cornstarch, basil and onion salt in small bowl. Set aside.
Melt butter in large skillet on medium-high heat. Add onions; cook and stir 6 to 7 minutes or until golden brown. Add mushrooms; cook and stir 2 minutes or until mushrooms are tender. Stir in cornstarch mixture. Add milk and soy sauce; stir constantly, cook until sauce is thickened and bubbly. Add cream cheese; cook and stir until cream cheese is melted. Add cooked green beans; toss gently to coat.
Spoon into 2-quart baking dish. Sprinkle top evenly with almonds.
Bake 25 minutes or until heated through and top is lightly browned.


CHEESY CRUNCHY CREAMED CORN CASSEROLE


My thinking is that since we were apart for Txgiving, our last Christmas in the house should be a big deal with items that can be made in advance w double ovens, to prevent packing burnout. Most recipes are oven rather than stove top, and I have some GF adaptations and simplification tricks up my sleeve as well.

I'm thinking quantities to carry over for our Dec. 27 anniversary and the following days before our Jan 1 move to our retirement house.

Greg has already done his signature turkey job, and may also do the scalloped potatoes.

The idea is: not much cooking in that last week before our fast departure, and cooked but frozen leftovers to take, if any.

Since romaine is now considered contaminated, veggies are casserole style. We can always add cherry tomatoes.

I plan on doing the bulk of the cleanup; I'll need that standing time. I also plan on doing the shopping.

My thought is that rather than see this as his "orders" (his default setting), he might look forward to this plan for a boatload of comfort food from his loving wife, as we are apart Thanksgivings day. (I sent him each recipe for pix and mouth watering.)

He's also made a GF cake and cheesecake.

~S~


25 Dec 18 - 11:00 AM (#3968274)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion

Today being Christmas, I are roasting a duck and making bigarade sauce. There will be steamed pud with custard to follow. I may not be capable of movement for some time after.

Himself, on the other hand, will be looking around for cheese and nuts.

I don’t know where he puts it all.


26 Dec 18 - 03:53 AM (#3968351)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: BobL

Xmas dinner was a venison joint, boned & rolled by local butcher. 2lb 8oz was just right for a party of 4, with enough left over to make one small sandwich.
Followed by mincemeat-stuffed peach halves, doused in sherry and warmed in the oven during the main course.


26 Dec 18 - 09:42 AM (#3968372)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion

Peaches stuffed with mincemeat — how delightful! Fresh or tinned peaches?


26 Dec 18 - 11:31 AM (#3968381)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage

A while back I posted a link to a good comparison of the North American wild grapes, so of course I can't find it now. Mustang grapes are featured at the bottom of this page. I make grape jelly just like in the SureJel package instructions.

Today I'll make a batch of bread pudding because I love it for breakfast or snacks. It reheats very nicely. The rest of my eating is leftovers from the last couple of days.


26 Dec 18 - 04:52 PM (#3968402)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia

For Christmas dinner we had Mexican food. It wasn't a deliberate choice; the avocados were ready to eat.


27 Dec 18 - 02:44 AM (#3968430)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: BobL

Tinned peaches Charmion, it's not a good season for fresh ones. However they do the job excellently. Might try bottled ones sometime, but my dad's recipes for fruit in vodka usually yielded uneatable fruit and wonderful liquor.


27 Dec 18 - 07:51 AM (#3968461)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman

The nut roast I mentioned earlier was a success. It froze and reheated (just thawed it and slices in the microwave) well. Rather than splitting duties with Pip as suggested before, I cooked it. It took a me lot longer than the recipe suggested (double the prep time but I’m slow even with a decent knife, a lot longer for the mix with the lentils added to absorb nearly all the liquid and at least 10 minutes more baking time) but parents enjoyed it and I would use this recipe again.


27 Dec 18 - 11:29 AM (#3968468)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion

BobL, your Dad's fruit in vodka sounds like the cordial I make most summers, which is always delicious but often results in fruit fit only for the compost heap once the liquor is tapped off. I have never made it with peaches (why not? good question); so far, I have used only raspberries or sour cherries. The osmotic process that pulls the juice into the booze reduces raspberries to tasteless pulp, but sour cherries are high enough in cellulose to retain some structure even after six months of maceration, so they are good with yoghourt or ice cream.


27 Dec 18 - 10:01 PM (#3968539)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia

Tonight we had a nice, wintry dish

turkey with root vegetables

Put a liner in a slow cooker. (If you have a scullery maid, you can skip the liner.) Place a turkey thigh in it, pressing the flesh against the crock.

Wash and peel some root vegetables and cut them into bite-size pieces. I used parsnips and carrots. You can add turnips and rutabaga, but I don't because I don't like them. Avoid beets. The world is not ready for purple turkey.

Cut an onion into wedges. Toss the wedges and the root vegetables into the pot.

cover and cook all day on low, until the meat is tender.

As dinnertime approaches, add 1/3 cup white wine or the juice of a lemon. Allow enough time for the alcohol in the wine to evaporate.

At dinnertime, remove the meat and vegetables to a serving dish. Add 1 teaspoon marjoram or rosemary to the juice, stir well and pour the juice over the top.

Salt and pepper are added at the table, as desired.   

==========
We had this with buttered cornbread and steamed cauliflower.


28 Dec 18 - 04:21 PM (#3968575)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Senoufou

Last night we whizzed off to a very large and quite new chippie called 'Deep Blue' (I think it's a chain of chippies) on the outskirts of Norwich. They seem to fry on demand, and it was all beautifully crisp and fresh (cod and chips)
Sat in the car munching away. It was served in individual cardboard trays with little wooden forks (no plastic, very environmentally friendly)
Quite a treat for us, and most enjoyable.


28 Dec 18 - 05:22 PM (#3968581)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: robomatic

I got introduced to Texas Roadhouse early in December. So far I've been back twice for the American farm-raised catfish. I bring it up here because I seriously like the place and I'm hoping some of you will tear it down for me before I give it a five star yelp review.


28 Dec 18 - 06:33 PM (#3968587)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman

Take away here too today. There was some debate over what to get and from where and I’m not sure my own contribution to that (dad, at that point, was fixed on having ½ pizza and chips and I suggested I could share the one in the freezer with him and fry some chips, just leaving 3 for a takeaway) achieved anything other than muddying the waters further…

Anyway, an Indian takeaway won but I, by then feeling the effects of a sleepless night and having to attend an appointment this morning took what was intended to be a short nap. The tea time meal was over and visiting family had returned to their B&B before I woke up. My veg curry is in the fridge. I might microwave it later but haven’t felt that hungry yet.


28 Dec 18 - 08:39 PM (#3968601)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

Well we love all the post-Christmas cold meat and we always cook a second, smaller turkey a couple of days after Christmas. I also boil up a large piece of unsmoked free-range ham on Boxing Day in a large pan of water with some carrots, onions, celery sticks, herbs and peppercorns. That gives us a lovely lump of meat and a pan of stock ideal for making pea and ham soup next week. The challenge is to vary the accompaniments. We did have a good old salad on Boxing Day with some ruby gem spuds baked in their skins, very nice but a bit too summery. Next day we had Nigella's quick version of dauphinoise (the one in Nigella Bites, with crême fraiche instead of double cream) with some greens. Delicious. Today I reheated some turkey slices in tightly-wrapped foil, along with some stuffing. Meanwhile I sautéed some sliced banana shallots in plenty of salty butter until they were beginning to caramelise. All that went in layers on warm ciabatta rolls (mayo and tommy-k optional, never for me) to be scoffed messily and greedily keeping over the plates. Nirvana. Tomorrow I'll concoct a turkey curry karahi-style with green peppers. For Sunday I'll make a hearty turkey broth with a soffritto, the smaller turkey scraps and the lovely pan of turkey stock I made on Boxing Day. I'll chuck in some tiny soup pasta ten minutes before the end to make it into more of a meal and we'll have some crusty bread with it. I have another bag of small pieces in the freezer, with which I'll make a turkey and pancetta risotto for Mrs Steve and me some time early in the New Year.


29 Dec 18 - 06:01 PM (#3968747)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia

Steve, you certainly have a lot of good ideas for what to do with turkey.

Robomatic, I ate at the Texas Roadhouse once and liked it. I still remember their house-made salad dressing. Delicious!


01 Jan 19 - 11:44 AM (#3969241)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion

After a week of rich festive meals, normal eating resumes today. Thank goodness; I don't think I could face one more chocolate truffle (oh, maybe just one more ...)!

This afternoon, the last of the orange-flavoured duck gravy is scheduled to become the basis of a batch of carrot-and-ginger soup. Supper will be a mushroom omelette with green onions and a bit of grated Parmesan. We picked the bones of the duck, and now we have lots and lots of lovely duck broth.

The supermarket reopens tomorrow, so I shall sally forth to purchase a bunch of kale in order to make minestrone. Lovely stuff for winter in Ontario.


01 Jan 19 - 12:45 PM (#3969254)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage

I have to finish up some cooking that was started on Sunday. The filling for meat pies keeps fine for a couple of days and now I'll finish them - the gift for my ex each year is a dish his mother used to make Puerto Rican chicken empanadillas will go into the freezer to be eaten over the next few weeks. A batch of beans because I'm out of the 12 ounce jars that I keep in the freezer for personal sized portions for easy meals. I used to take the frozen jar in my lunchbox to work, and everything else stayed cold enough in the bag. Time to find another job so I can take my lunch again!

The beans are a riff on a PR recipe, but I add a little heat and I use kidney beans instead of the smaller red beans.


01 Jan 19 - 12:52 PM (#3969256)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: EBarnacle

Mea culpa. I forgot to post my favorite egg nog recipe before the holidays. A fellow grad student friend gave it to me many years ago and, other than a few tweaks I continue the tradition.

Coquito, aka Puerto Rican egg nog

2 cans cream of coconut
2 cans condensed or evaporated milk, your preference
4 egg yolks
1 tablespoon good quality vanilla
1 bottle good quality dark rum [I prefer Goslings or Don Q.]
Cinnamon, to taste
Nutmeg
Lemon zest

Combine all of the wet ingredients, mixing thoroughly.
Just before serving it up, put the dry ingredients on the mixture in the bowl.


02 Jan 19 - 03:04 AM (#3969324)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Dave Hanson

Had this on Boxing day, the simplest most delicious pasta dish you can imagine ' spaghettini aglio e olio ' spaghetti, olive oil, garlic and optional chopped parsley, salt and pepper.

the recipe is is in any decent Italian cookbook.


Dave H


02 Jan 19 - 05:21 AM (#3969342)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

Indeed, Dave. Equally simple is Marcella Hazan's onion and butter tomato sauce for spaghetti. Into a saucepan you put a can of plum tomatoes, a knob of butter and a whole peeled onion. Simmer for 45 minutes, discard the onion, check the seasoning and viola! Serve with proper Parmesan.

The magic ingredient to add to any tomato sauce is half a level teaspoon of sugar.


02 Jan 19 - 07:58 AM (#3969364)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Dave Hanson

I'll try that maybe tommorrow Steve.

Cheers, Dave


02 Jan 19 - 08:19 AM (#3969369)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion

That tomato sauce is the bomb. It’s even better (if possible) when made with fresh tomatoes, but then you have to skin them which rather spoils the “easy” part of that recipe.

Himself and I are eating our way through Marcella’s “Essentials of Classic Italian Cooking”. Last night it was frittata made with the mushrooms that were sitting rather too long in the veg bin. Gone in three minutes flat.


02 Jan 19 - 01:59 PM (#3969417)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

That's where I got it from. It's the Italian bible, isn't it, Charmion!


02 Jan 19 - 02:09 PM (#3969418)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage

I'll be drawing down leftovers for a while here, but freezing rain is coating everything today so it's time for something hearty like split pea or lentil soup.


02 Jan 19 - 02:10 PM (#3969420)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

When it comes to fresh vs canned tomatoes, even the Italians frequently use canned. They are often riper, richer and sweeter than the fresh you can buy in shops. Different if you grow your own to ripe perfection before picking them. I much prefer to buy whole plum tomatoes in cans. Cirio and Napolina are good brands, but there are often annoying bits of skin and tough bits of blossom-end rot/greenback in both which I cut out. And I never leave out that pinch of sugar. It sounds wrong but it miraculously improves the flavour - even the Italians do it. Rachel Roddy always does it! I hate skinning tomatoes. When I make salmorejo in summer, my very favourite tapa, I blitz the toms with skin on. It works for me!


02 Jan 19 - 03:01 PM (#3969425)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia

With canned tomatoes, I now buy the no-salt version. They taste better, fruitier. And my husband wants low-salt food.

With garden tomatoes, I don't bother to peel them. I slice them thinly with a serrated knife, and the peels come out as thin strands that people hardly notice. And maybe tomatoes are like some other fruits, where the flavor and vitamins are in a thin layer right under the peel.

SRS, I know what you mean. We are having pea soup too.


02 Jan 19 - 03:13 PM (#3969427)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia

FLASH! Today's newspaper has an article for the hot food trends for 2019. We need to pay attention to this stuff.

cheese tea - tea sipped through a cap of cream cheese

cocktails will have lower alcohol with more botanicals, shrubs and nonalcoholic spirits like seedlip (whatever that may be) Yes, they said shrubs. How you fit a shrub in a cocktail glass is beyond me.

a new kind of salad green: celtuce with a leafy bitter top. Kind of a cross between celery and asparagus

dandelion greens will also get a chance at culinary fame

seaweed is expected to pop up in teas, jerky, desserts and cocktails

look for mushrooms in cocktails and desserts

kale is out now


02 Jan 19 - 07:17 PM (#3969479)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

I didn't even know you could buy salted canned tomatoes! If I buy canned toms I just want tomatoes. Not basil, garlic, salt or chilli. I can deal with all that meself! If I need a bit of extra tomato-ness but without the sloppy bulk, I add a tablespoon of sundried tomato paste. Definitely not tomato purée, which has no place in my house. Here in Blighty we are blessed in that we have Marks and Spencer's sundried tomato paste. I've yet to find a brand that gets anywhere close.


02 Jan 19 - 07:42 PM (#3969482)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

Anyway, on Monday we cooked far too much lasagne, so I put the leftovers in the fridge, being careful to keep the layering with the crispy top intact. We had it reheated tonight
and it was lovely. Sure, the pasta had gone a bit soft and doughy, but it mattered not a jot. I did add a good splash of water to make up for what might have been lost in the cooking first time round. It was utterly spot-on. Whenever I do lasagne in future, I'll be making too much accidentally on purpose.


03 Jan 19 - 07:27 AM (#3969542)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: KarenH

There is a 'thing' where you drop tomatoes in boiling water supposedly makes it easier to peel them. I never have much luck with it. ALso it creates extra dishes to wash. Some people cut out the seedy bits. Life's too short.


03 Jan 19 - 10:27 AM (#3969572)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

Put the tomatoes in a bowl and then pour the boiling water generously over them. After about 30 seconds take them out and make a little slit in the skin with a sharp knife. The skin comes off very easily. You might still have a bit at the stalk end to trim off.


04 Jan 19 - 09:04 AM (#3969771)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion

The thing where you drop tomatoes into boiling water is called “blanching”, and it definitely works. It’s also the technique to use for peeling peaches for baking or preserving. Yes, after processing a bucketful, you end up with the kitchen full of steam and maybe scalded fingers if you’re new to the game, but it’s efficient and wastes none of the fruit.

Here in the fruit belt of Ontario we have an embarrassment of riches from August until first frost, so everybody has a hatful of recipes for that six-litre basket of tomatoes, peaches, plums or whatever to be scored at market for a buck because the farmer could not be arsed to take it home again.

At family Christmas dinner I had a long, learned discussion with my niece’s Italian mother-in-law on the subject of preserving plum tomatoes. She buys them by the bushel, literally, and invests whole days in the laborious business of blanching and bottling them. I suggested the tinned article as an acceptable substitute and she gave me what can only be described as a pitying look.


04 Jan 19 - 12:21 PM (#3969798)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage

I blanch tomatoes or peaches before canning and usually put them into a wire basket to plunge into the large pot of boiling water for about 30 seconds, then have a bowl of ice water to deposit them into so I can peel them quickly. The knife to slice the skin if it didn't already split is the accepted method. The same pot is the one I use for processing the jars.

Steve, I didn't know you could make lasagna without leftovers. ;-) And a tip for the future, if you make several ahead in pans lined with foil then freeze them, you can take the foil-wrapped casseroles out of the pans and put them into plastic bags and keep them in the freezer for a really long time. When you want to eat them, put the foil-wrapped casserole back into the pan you made it in and put it in a cool oven (325o for a really long time (hours - 3 at least). Better than trying to thaw it first. The best lasagna I've eaten in the last few months was one that had been in the freezer for about three years.

My split pea soup is a little watery because I didn't get out the recipe and was guessing. And I didn't have any celery to chop and add to it. So I'll let it sit in the fridge for a couple of days to set up and get all of those flavors working then I'll reheat in bowls in the microwave.


04 Jan 19 - 12:56 PM (#3969812)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia

Got any celery seed in the spice cabinet? That will serve.


04 Jan 19 - 01:51 PM (#3969832)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel

There are few things on Earth you can cook or eat by the 'slab'.
Thank goodness Lasagna is one of them. Then there are ribs and bacon and...

Where you have a feast can be critical. I always wanted to have lunch in the Oracle's chamber inside the Hypogeum in Malta.


04 Jan 19 - 05:31 PM (#3969861)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage

Celery seed hits my gut for some reason. Once I figured out the culprit I had to stop putting it in my potato salad altogether and I got the rest of the seed out of the house. I can eat celery itself, but the seed, even ground, is a problem. Probably the strength of something in the seed, where as the stalks are mostly water.


05 Jan 19 - 06:30 PM (#3970026)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: keberoxu

Lasagna three YEARS in the freezer? Seriously?
Did it not stand up and salute the colors?


05 Jan 19 - 08:51 PM (#3970047)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage

It was amazingly good! I have a two-year-old one that will probably get used for a lunch with friends later this month.

I was watching Cook's Country last week and they did a lovely blintz with raspberry sauce (melba). I have everything except cream cheese (it uses ricotta with a small amount of cream cheese) and the frozen raspberries, but I'm planning to try making those for dessert tomorrow. You may have to give them your email to see the recipe, but I don't think you actually have to pay to join the site.


06 Jan 19 - 03:10 AM (#3970054)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Dave the Gnome

I just rediscovered pease pudding on toast for breakfast. I am a gnome of simple tastes :-)


06 Jan 19 - 09:12 AM (#3970083)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel

a raspberry blintz would brighten this sunny sunday morning.


06 Jan 19 - 03:24 PM (#3970147)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos

Tonight I am un-decorating the Christmas tree (never mind the 'discussion' on when twelfth night is - in my house it is 6 January), so I am drinking mulled wine. Recipe:
Sometime before Christmas, simmer orange and/or lemon peel and spices (cinnamon, ginger, allspice, cloves (not too many), bay leaf ... anything else you fancy) in water until well infused. Strain, and add to the liquid an equal volume (at least) of sugar. When the sugar is completely dissolved, bring to a simmer, then allow to cool. Put the resulting syrup in a bottle. I keep it in the fridge but I don't know if that is necessary.
Thereafter, add a small spoonful of the syrup to a glass, add half a glass of red wine (or white wine, or cider, or apple juice for a non-alcoholic version) and top up with boiling water.


06 Jan 19 - 09:39 PM (#3970216)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia

Beef with snow peas, Chinese style. other ingredients: white onion, garlic, ginger root, soy sauce, cornstarch, mushrooms, green pepper

If the snow peas are floppy, soak them in tepid water for a couple hours to take up water and become crisp again. This also works for the green pepper you forgot about. (Slice it up first.)


I don't cook the steak in the wok. I cook it separately, slice and add at the last minute. Snow peas are also tossed in at the last minute.

To save hassle, we now cook a big batch of brown rice and put the extra in a ziploc bag, flattened. Freeze. Next time we want rice, we break off a chunk, thaw and eat.

If I didn't say so earlier, we do that with pasta, too.


07 Jan 19 - 07:35 AM (#3970304)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy

I love the idea of instant mulling.

Super Bowl, I like to cook the teams. If it is Rams v. Saints, how about mutton etouffee?


07 Jan 19 - 06:00 PM (#3970455)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion

Mrrzy -- HA HA HA HA!

We ate the last of the Christmas pud last night (Little Christmas), and it was absolutely terrific with vanilla ice-cream. I may never make hard sauce again.

It is time to sing the praises of our electronic pressure-cooker, the Instant Pot. It is large and lumpy and takes up way too much space in the kitchen, but it earns its keep by reliably cooking brown rice, wild rice, beans, stock, and -- of all things -- Christmas pudding and other suet-assisted desserts that otherwise have to steam for hours and hours. I can set it up, turn it on and WALK AWAY, even go to bed or leave the house, and when I return to the kitchen nothing has exploded and the contents are perfectly cooked.

My most recent achievement is a pilaff of brown and wild rice that I made last night to go with roast pheasant (from a game farm; we don't know anybody who shoots them). When we had picked the bones of the pheasant -- at just under two pounds, it was a satisfying meal for two and no more -- the wreckage went into the Pot with a couple of carrots and a couple of onions, and in the morning we had a Pot full of pheasant stock. The rest of the brown-and-wild-rice pilaff made an excellent snack.

Wild rice is a thing around here, harvested and sold by the Anishnabe First Nation. It's amazing when combined with brown rice, but a bit astringent all by itself.


07 Jan 19 - 09:11 PM (#3970482)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage

My son was here for the holidays and heading back to the Pacific NW this evening so we went through what may seem a rather bizarre ritual - stopped by "Chicken Express," a small chain of fast food restaurants that we used to get as takeout when the kids were little. The $16 family pack would feed four of us in a one-salary home. Not sure what the oil is they use for frying. As he grew he continued to buy it for himself, and if you eat it hot and fresh it isn't *too* bad, but he likes it reheated. Gag. And he bought a large order to repack and stash in his luggage to eat and share with his girlfriend when he gets back home. He seems unconcerned about the amount of time it isn't refrigerated, though we always suggest he should freeze it first or take cold packs.

Since he was going to take this order home with him I made one of his favorite home-made dishes for an early dinner before he left - you guessed it - chicken strips. I dip them in flour then egg then into seasoned bread crumbs. Saute in shallow oil in which you've melted 3-4 tablespoons butter.

Kids!


08 Jan 19 - 04:00 PM (#3970621)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson

How long did you pressure cook your pudding? I did mine for an hour and it was distinctly overdone.


08 Jan 19 - 07:29 PM (#3970666)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

I don't have slow cookers or pressure cookers and I use our ancient microwave only for softening butter in winter when I need a crumpet or teacake. I have a Foreman grill that's been redundant, a white elephant, for ten years. I cooked a two-pound piece of brisket in a Le Creuset casserole on Sunday. I browned it all round in a glug of oil in the hot pan for a couple of minutes, then set it aside so that I could fry some chopped carrot, celery and shallots in the fat (I had to add a bit of butter and I take no notice of the burnt stuff on the bottom of the pan) then I added a pint of beef stock from a cube, a glass of red wine which I'd boiled and burned off the alcohol from, the soaking liquid from 25g dried porcini, then the chopped porcini. I put the meat back on top and brought it all slowly to the boil. While I was waiting I went into the garden and picked a bunch of parsley, some sprigs of thyme, a bay leaf and a small bunch of sage. I tied all these together with string and added them to the pot with some seasoning. That went in a low oven, 140C, for three hours, lid on. The meat was tender and moist, the juices made lovely gravy and we had it, three of us, with mashed potato and sprouting broccoli from my garden. There were juices left over and some goodly scraps of beef, which I made into a lovely ragu to stir spaghetti into the next day, nothing else needed except a topping of freshly-grated Parmesan,


08 Jan 19 - 07:52 PM (#3970672)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

I get very fed up when my mash doesn't turn out the way I want it, usually too sloppy and runny, too gluey or too grainy. I don't like anything in my mash except salt and butter (and plenty of the latter). What I've learned is to always hedge my bets by using at least two, preferably three, varieties of spud. I don't like spuds that collapse in the boiling water so I avoid King Edwards. Also, only a small amount of waxy sorts go in, things such as Charlotte or Nicola. Too much of those risks glueyness. Santé are very good if you can get them. I regard Lady Balfour to be horrid watery things so they don't get in. Most cookery books suggest insufficient boiling time. I reckon thirty minutes is the minimum. If I've put plenty of butter in but the mash is still a bit too stiff, under protest I'll add a drop of milk. I have a potato ricer but using it for mash risks the spuds cooling down too much. I've used it successfully to make gnocchi, for which I boil the spuds in their skins which I can slip off later. That stops the spuds from going too soggy, not great for gnocchi.

Another golden rule is to buy only the best spuds. Even the most expensive spuds are cheap.


09 Jan 19 - 07:21 AM (#3970727)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion

I’m not fond of mashed anything, so I like my spuds baked. Even an ancient microwave is a great help in this department, as a nuked whole potato becomes a field-expedient baked potato very quickly when plonked on the oven rack beside whatever is in there already.

Here in Ontario, spuds are not marketed by cultivar (e.g., King Edward), but by colour and flesh type — except for the excellent Yukon Gold, a yellow-fleshed waxy potato that makes the best hash browns ever.

I did not expect to fall in like with the Instant Pot, but was won over by its capabilities with respect to beans and whole grains, especially brown rice. The Christmas pudding took half an hour, plus time to come up to pressure and to release the pressure naturally.


09 Jan 19 - 09:29 AM (#3970757)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson

We always steam spuds, and they don't collapse. To mash them, we add an egg, a dose of butter, the top of the milk; we mash them using the hand masher, not a ricer (which makes mash gluey). Then serve with a knob of butter melting on top.

Le CrEUset is easy to spell, except for Brexiteers.


09 Jan 19 - 10:49 AM (#3970770)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage

New York Times has a good mashed potato recipe. It addresses an array of desired results. I had listened to Sam Sifton, one of the Times' recipe gurus on a radio program earlier in the week describe making potatoes, so I did it that way and they were perfect. In the past I haven't always drained the potatoes enough and they weren't as fluffy or creamy as I was trying to achieve. My Mom used to talk about keeping some of the cooking water, but that must have been a recipe from decades ago. Milk and butter, and I don't melt them first in an pan, I put a few potatoes into the stand mixer bowl then plop in the butter then add the rest of the potatoes. They're so hot the butter doesn't stand a chance and isn't going to cool anything. I usually use a hand masher first to break them up in the bowl, then use the paddle or whisk to make the finished potatoes. The milk is added at that point so I can watch the consistency. I use Russets for mashed potatoes.


09 Jan 19 - 01:46 PM (#3970813)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

I would far sooner use warm milk to loosen mash than cooking water. I only ever use a plastic hand masher. Making mash produces more than enough washing-up as it is.

When I cook the following I always cook far too much, accidentally on purpose:

Mashed potatoes
Boiled rice
Sausages
Jacket potatoes

A pile of cold mash can be fried with a knob of butter. Keep it moving to break it up and grate a healthy dose of cheddar into it. Once melted and smooth, put into large bowl, sit in front of telly and devour. Or you can make Irish-style potato farls.

As for rice, melt butter in a frying pan. Add the rice, break it up then break in an egg or two. Throw in some frozen peas (maybe boil them first). Stir around until piping hot. Add more butter if too dry. Fit for a king. Beware of keeping cold rice too long or too warm. Bacterial nasties love cooked rice. It has to be next day only for me.

Cold bangers can just be devoured, but if you slice them carefully lengthways into long, thin strips they make a beautiful butty, preferably with mayo. Or chop them up and add to a risotto, preferably with some cooked chicken scraps and bacon.

Jacket potatoes gone cold will develop a soft skin, but no matter. For breakfast, microwave a couple of them for two minutes or so. Put them in a bowl, cut them up to bite size with scissors, add butter and devour. Or add a generous amount of grated cheese instead of butter, microwave for another minute or grill (just get that cheese melted). Delicious. Microwaving them does make a strong potatoey smell. I can scoff cold jacket potatoes just as they are.


09 Jan 19 - 03:33 PM (#3970830)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos

On potatoes: "add a generous amount of grated cheese instead of butter"
In my case, change "instead of" to "as well as".


09 Jan 19 - 08:55 PM (#3970864)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

Quite, but I didn't want to wreck anyone's New Year slimming resolutions.


10 Jan 19 - 04:49 AM (#3970917)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos

It's up to people to keep their own resolutions. If they are led astray by your tasty suggestions that's their problem. You are not to blame.


10 Jan 19 - 06:29 PM (#3970970)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage

Moderation in everything - so add all of the good stuff, but don't eat a huge helping, watch your portions. Mischief managed!


10 Jan 19 - 07:22 PM (#3970984)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

Or eat a huge helping but take longer over it. :-)


11 Jan 19 - 11:32 AM (#3971103)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia

I wanted something different, so I made Thai chicken.
==========
linguine, boiled as usual

peas, nuked in the wave and drained (supposed to be sugar snap, but I only had ordinary)

chicken fried in a skillet (supposed to be breast, but I used thighs)

sauteed garlic

sauce - 1/4 cup water, 1 T soy sauce, 1 T lime juice. 2 T peanut butter, tiny amt cayenne pepper (I prefer black pepper). Don't thicken; just put the food in a serving bowl and slosh the sauce on top.

The first batch was dry, so the second day I made another batch of sauce, reducing the water and increasing the lime juice.

The peanut butter didn't want to mix with the water, and i wonder if adding a tiny bit of mayonnaise would help with that.


11 Jan 19 - 04:31 PM (#3971163)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos

I found Waitrose selling frozen herring row (very cheap and nutritious). I thawed them, dipped them in flour with a little salt and chili powder, and fried them in butter, then stir-fried onion, celery, courgette, chestnut mushrooms and a few slices of leek, and served the lot with pasta and a slug of cream.


11 Jan 19 - 05:28 PM (#3971168)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel

My experience years ago made me uneasy asking about recipes. Perhaps its just me but I have wondered if anyone has ha a similar experience.

I was offered a small portion of ribs and non chalantly popped it in my mouth. Suddenly the meat liquified and fell off the bone, all my senses turned into a river of flowing bacon and weak kneed I craved a second bite. I impetously asked "what is the recipe for this" at which point the lady stiffened and acted as if I had asked for her wallet and social security number. She said with tight lips and glaring eyes "This is a secret family recipe!".
It was if I had tried to steal from her ancestors and future grand children's fortunes and destroy the dreams of franchises for centuries to come.
Clearly my question was inappropriate and tantamount to felony.
I assumed that one should never ask except as a compliment not meant to be answered.


11 Jan 19 - 06:28 PM (#3971174)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

Recipes are like Irish tunes in a single line of notation. Not even bare bones, but possessing a whiff of an idea. Something to build on, rebel against and stray badly from. I just get meself up into the kitchen, vaguely recall something I once read in a book, then do my own thing. I have one golden rule, which is that no one ingredient, except for the main meaty or fishy one, should EVER be the point of the thing. I do not want every mouthful of any dish to taste mostly of basil/mint/garlic/chilli/apple/onion/thyme. I want integration of flavours, team work from the ingredients. I have few rules, but just a couple are that dried basil has no place in any kitchen, that garlic should NEVER be crushed, and that, if your dish tastes herby, you've got it wrong. Another thing or two I've learned are that the microwave rarely yields decent food and that steaming most vegetables is going to give you inferior results. I'd make an exception for chopped cabbage, but nothing else. Boil your veg in water half way up the veg, always with a pinch of salt, don't overcooked them, and you'll never look back. Sod the vitamins. You'll get plenty of those anyway if you live in the West like me. Food is enjoyment, not medicinal.


11 Jan 19 - 06:33 PM (#3971176)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia

Don't worry, Donuel. That was an usual experience. Most people are happy to share recipes. It is a compliment that a diner likes a food so much that they ask for it.


11 Jan 19 - 07:59 PM (#3971186)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage

I shop at an unusual one-of-a-kind grocery store in town; they buy from chain stores' warehouses with products nearing the sell-by date, and from independent grocery suppliers who were overstocked; when there is meat, poultry or fish it is frozen. The groceries are discounted, often quite deeply, and they have what they have and when it's gone it's gone. I buy a lot of my dairy products there (excellent cheeses, high-end yogurt quarts, bulk packages of eggs, yogurt cups, etc.) and veggies. Fresh veggies are anything you can think of, along with fresh flowers, flowers in vases, flowers in pots, etc.

I had some salmon today for lunch that I picked up there; I only bought one salmon package because I didn't know anything about it the supplier and it's just as well. It was quite oily (which is good) but not particularly tasty. I have resolved not to buy any more salmon there unless it's labeled as wild-caught sockeye or better; this experiment confirmed my mostly-formed suspicion. The unsold the dog salmon comes from wherever.

I cook enough of some dishes to use them for several days - this week it has been split pea soup and rice with chicken for dinner with various other small side dishes. I'm doing a "no-spend" month so these are all things that came from my shelves or out of the freezer. Given the challenge of not buying new ingredients, it's interesting to see what I can come up with.


11 Jan 19 - 08:14 PM (#3971192)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stanron

Is it just me or does anyone else link this thread with the Barrett's oesophagus thread. In the interest of expanding threeness how about a thread about the drugs we all took when we were not ill in any way at all?


11 Jan 19 - 09:41 PM (#3971197)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion

When I was not ill in any way, I was 23 and in the armed forces. Being afraid of arrest and imprisonment in those days, I used no drugs at all.


11 Jan 19 - 10:38 PM (#3971199)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel

I have never added a sacred or magical mushroom to any recipe except for tea with full disclosure. Some things are better in their fresh and anticipated original organic form like in a salad with your favorite dressing. Although convenient, dried shrooms are tough on the tummy.

Ayahuasca is not one of those things. They say it is like all bitter alkaloids with MAO inhibitors and that it tastes like a dog shit shake with alfalfa flavor and will cause vomiting. I do not believe vomiting is a required gateway to an epicurean psychoactive journey. Besides the idea of saliva as an ingredient turns me off. but that's just me. There are better ways to share spit.

Most of us would prefer a nice crab bisque.


12 Jan 19 - 05:29 AM (#3971215)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson

A dogshit shake isn't an appetising description, to be honest.

I'd personally be nervous of any of these hallucinogenics - even cannabis, now that it's been genetically engineered to be much more stoney than it was in my youth. Not that I was any great toker then either…

But with how little we know about the brain and its workings, it seems foolish to me to be seeking what are essentially artificially-induced psychotic experiences.

Incidentally, talking of mushrooms, does anyone else occasionally buy stuff in the wholesale fruit and vegetable markets? It's always super-fresh, you get things that you won't get in most shops, and the prices are extraordinary. You're buying in bulk, but not that much bulk - I sometimes go halvers with a friend or two for a box of something.

And is anyone doing any pre-Brexit stocking-up-just-in-case, and if so what are you stocking up on?


12 Jan 19 - 03:42 PM (#3971223)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos

Apologies - in my post on 11 January I meant 'herring roes', not 'herring rows' (I woke up in the night worrying about it, imagining herrings lined up in a row, or even herrings having a row and fighting noisily).


12 Jan 19 - 04:02 PM (#3971226)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel

Find some reliable food banks. Did you know a practicing Mormon is required to have a year of food stored?

There is a big difference between artificial/chemistry and billions of years of evolutionary organics. As temporary psychotic episodes go I would not place the sacred mushroom experience into that category of experience. It is a surprise I would not spoil by an attempt to define.
I would only recommend having a theme question or questions and be sure to ask.

As a bucket list experience it is in the top 10. Now they use it for geriatrics having a hard time transitioning.

Its been over 30 years since I even tried a joint but there are several gourmet cooking shows that feature pot as an ingredient.


12 Jan 19 - 06:52 PM (#3971246)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel

https://www.geniuskitchen.com/recipe/lobster-or-crab-bisque-229275

double the lump crab meat to 1 lb
salt and mushroom to taste


12 Jan 19 - 07:21 PM (#3971247)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

I'm a bit bloody annoyed. I did a great big long post about mushrooms this morning but some git pulled the website just as I hit send, and even my "select all-copy" didn't take. Grr.

Anyway.

In a nutshell, I was rabbiting on about the abuse of mushrooms in cookery. Nasty rubbery things in the "Full English Breakfast." Nasty little tasteless buttons in casseroles and stews, I love sautéed mushrooms on toast but they must be thinly sliced and fried in butter with salt and black pepper. Add a fried egg or two, done in the mushroom butter, and you have a breakfast to keep you going until mid-afternoon. If I want to be antisocial for 24 hours, I add parsley and fist-smashed garlic cloves to the sautée. Delia's pork chops recipe, done with cream and chopped mushrooms with thyme and lemon, is a thing of beauty too. But, for a casserole or stew, I use only dried porcini. I soak the fungi in boiling water for half an hour and use the beautiful liquid in the stew, and I chop the ceps finely and add them too.

I don't understand people who use mind-altering substances such as psilocybe or cannabis, still less people who brag about using them. It isn't big and it isn't clever. I use booze with caution and that's more than enough for me, thanks.


12 Jan 19 - 07:55 PM (#3971254)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

Tonight I did a dish that was inspired by, but somewhat distant from, the very last one in Nigella's book Nigellissima. It's a one-pot job that leaves very little washing up, which is highly nutritious and which you can eat out of a bowl on your knee in front of the telly.

For two people with seconds. Get your heaviest pot and put 100g chopped-up pancetta in it. Brown the bacon, then add two chopped carrots, two chopped celery sticks and a chopped onion. You will need to add a good glug of olive oil. Your best. Sautée that lot gently for a good half-hour. You are making what is known as a soffritto. I added a small pinch of dried chilli flakes to mine. Free country.

Weight out 200g of green or brown lentils. Not the red ones. I used puy lentils. Rinse them then throw them into the pot. Add a can of plum tomatoes and a splash of water and 750ml of chicken or veg stock. I used turkey stock. Throw in a handful of chopped fresh parsley and a bay leaf. Smash four garlic cloves with your fist, peel, and throw them in. No chopping and definitely no crushing. Simmer for half an hour with the lid on.

Check and adjust seasoning and make sure the lentils have softened. Then the coup de grace: throw in about 125g of small pasta. It should be something like ditalini or ditaloni, or mini-macaroni. Not the tiniest soup pastas. They wouldn't be right. I don't like tbat cheap little shell pasta much. I mused about whether to use orzo but thought better of it. If you have only bigger pasta, put some in a plastic bag and smash it up slightly with your meat mallet or rolling pin. Anyway, turn up the heat a bit, leave the lid off and get it to a jolly bubble until the pasta is al dente. It takes a bit longer than boiling it in plain water.

Ladle into bowls, drizzle with your finest olive oil, turn the telly on and devour, preferably with a bottle of Italian red.


13 Jan 19 - 02:32 PM (#3971302)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stanron

Back in the halcyon days when my waistline was less than 30 inches, I had that generosity of spirit that accepted anything anyone ever offered me. There were lots of oversized, funny smelling hand rolled cigarettes, all sorts of pills, and, fortunately, no developed opiates. I remember preferring stuff that kept me awake to stuff that sent me to sleep though more recently non alcoholic sleep assists would have been welcome.

I suspect that if cannabis becomes legal I would buy some occasionally, and in all honesty it's not the illegality that stops me right now as much as not knowing how to get it and not being sufficiently bothered to find out. This is going to sound weird I know but I can, and do, get 'high' doing Killer Sudoku puzzles and drinking Green Tea, not necessarily at the same time.

What I get from these three threads is to tell the doctors as little as possible. This stratagem has, so far, enabled me to avoid things being stuck into either end. and has not yet led to my untimely end. I did have a spell, many years ago now, of frequent and unpleasant indigestion, and recognised the term hiatus hernia from that. I can't remember what, if anything, I did about it but it no longer happens. No doctors were involved and it went away. I'm not actually recommending this as a way to go for others but I do remember someone once said, "when they get you, they don't let go".


13 Jan 19 - 02:59 PM (#3971306)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel

A few people Steve does not understand

The misunderstanding about British cuisine being dreadful is defied in this thread. Most dishes here sound very desirable.


13 Jan 19 - 03:54 PM (#3971318)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

Not interested, Donuel. Now where's that bloody corkscrew...


13 Jan 19 - 05:26 PM (#3971339)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Janie

Fixing a beef stew to take to Amos tomorrow for some respite from hospital food.

Sauted onions and garlic until translucent and removed from dutch oven. Cubed a 2lb. sirloin tip roast and browned it in batches in the dutch oven, deglazed the pan with a cheap red wine, added the meat, onions and garlic back to the pot, added more wine, beef broth, bay leaf, thyme, salt and pepper. Has been simmering about 90 minutes. Will add carrots and potatoes when the meat is nearly as tender as I desire. At the very end, will taste to see if more salt or pepper are needed and thicken slightly with a flour paste.

I think I was in a bit of a rush and did not brown the beef as well/dark as would have made for the very best flavor. Still, likely to be better than hospital fare.


13 Jan 19 - 07:52 PM (#3971353)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

Now here's a beef stew that is delicious and trouble-free. Thanks to the sainted Elizabeth David.

For four people. You need two pounds of top rump cut into half-inch thick slices about as big as your palm, 100 g streaky bacon or pancetta, two tomatoes sliced, two carrots cut into rounds, two onions roughly chopped, a few garlic cloves smashed with your fist (NOT crushed), extra virgin olive oil, a glass of red wine and seasoning. If you have some pork rinds, the kind of thing you might trim from pork chops, that's great, otherwise have a couple of rashers of really fatty bacon to hand. Finally, you need a goodly bunch of fresh herbs tied with string. Thyme, parsley, sage, bayleaf sort of thang.

Once you've assembled that lot, the method is ridiculously easy. Everything just goes in cold.

Put a good glug of olive oil into your heaviest casserole. Chop the bacon and throw it in. Put the carrots, onion and tomatoes on top of that. Put in the bunch of herbs and the smashed garlic. Layer the pieces of beef carefully on top. Season well then put the pan on to medium heat for about fifteen minutes. While you're waiting, do the fun bit. Put the red wine into a small pan, bring to the boil and set fire to the alcohol vapour. Watch your eyebrows. As soon as the flame goes out, pour the wine all over the meat.

Cover tightly (foil under a lid), put into the oven at 160C for two and a half hours and forget it. Beautiful with mash and greens. Boeuf en daube as in rustic France. The recipe also includes thin slivers of orange zest, but I don't like that so I always leave it out.


13 Jan 19 - 09:00 PM (#3971364)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia

I'm going to print out and try some of these recipes. Thanks.

It snowed here. Snow is about 6 inches deep on lawns and sidewalks, and it has piled up on tree branches to make lovely white fans. We celebrated by having homemade gingerbread cake with lemon frosting.

We now have two little girls on our block, and there are two snowmen in the neighborhood.


13 Jan 19 - 09:32 PM (#3971367)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

We had a piece of pork this evening, boned and rolled shoulder with a goodly cover of rind, weighing in at about 3lb-plus. I have a trivet which I put the pork into, then placed that in a big roasting tin. Into the bottom I put a pint of water, two sticks of celery, two carrots, two chopped shallots and some herbs. I rubbed salt into the rind (no oil) and then put the meat into the hottest possible oven for 20 minutes. I then turned the oven down to about 130C and went out for the afternoon (I did top up the liquid before we left). After about four hours I ended up with the most gorgeous roasted meat, tender as the driven snow, topped with crackling to die for. And the liquid beneath, once I'd sieved it and skimmed some fat off (I used it to roast my spuds and parsnips), was totally divine.

I have uses for pork fillet (tenderloin), which can be cooked fast, but I won't buy leg of pork. Tasteless waste of money. Shoulder, belly and hocks for me. I bought my pork at Gloucester Services. The breed was Gloucester Old Spot. Damned fine butcher. They sell good brisket too.


13 Jan 19 - 10:29 PM (#3971372)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage

I live in a part of town with lots of Mexican and Central American groceries, and one store in particular has a large tortilla factory in place. I stopped by tonight on my way home and picked up two packages of fresh tortillas, still warm. They're in my freezer now and will be used for lunch with friends in a couple of weeks if I don't get a chance that morning to swing by and get more fresh.


14 Jan 19 - 05:32 PM (#3971486)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman

Dad had an unusual meal yesterday. I’d just done the Quorn Fillet meal with a jar of Korma sauce/can of chopped tomatoes for the sauce. When I sat down to eat mine, he said “you haven’t had any chutney” and offered to pass me the jar I’d put out.

The problem was that the “chutney” was a (clearly labelled) jar of home made plum jam that I’d put out to go with the Ambrosia rice pudding mum and I (dad doesn’t like this and was having a yoghurt) were having for afters. To make matters worse, he’d been quite liberal with the “chutney” on his plate.

While I do think a spoonful of jam can go quite nicely with rice pudding, I gather it wasn’t the best to go with his meal...


14 Jan 19 - 09:08 PM (#3971519)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Tattie Bogle

Fab gammon joint yesterday, cooked for my husband's birthday. Used a recipe from BBC Good Food: not for those on a January detox (as my daughter and son-in-law professed to be!)
2kg gammon grain simmered in full-sugar Coca-cola and various veg for over 2 hours, then baked in a dressing of maple syrup, whole grain mustard, red wine and cloves. Yummeeee!
(the recipe actually said red wine vinegar, but none in 2 supermarkets I tried, so just red wine had to do!) Served with roast potatoes, cauliflower cheese and fresh mini-sprouts.
Followed by birthday cake and lemon tart and ice-cream.


15 Jan 19 - 09:33 AM (#3971544)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion

Heavens, Tattie, that's quite a recipe. What does the Coke do to the veg? Are they edible when the joint is cooked?

After a bit more than a year of consistent use, I think I've about broken the code on the convection oven in our new stove (cooker). It has certainly taken me long enough.

Baking is easy, since I stick to bread, but roasting has been a bit more of a challenge -- especially chicken, which seems to dry out when the oven is hot enough to produce the crackly skin I like. I had a blinding flash of the obvious the other day and put the battered old pan I use in the barbecue on the bottom rack of the oven and filled it with water, then heated the oven to 375 Fahrenheit with the fan on.

I split a four-pound chicken down the back and flattened it (spatchcocked it), laid it out on a rack in a flat roasting tin, and seasoned it with salt, pepper, thyme and dehydrated garlic. I gave it an hour at 375F, then cranked up the heat to 400F for another ten or fifteen minutes.

Result: perfect chicken, thoroughly cooked in all its parts, even the joints, and with moist, flavourful breast meat. Spatchcocking makes it easy to quarter, so I'm not wrestling with the carving knife and slopping dish gravy all over the table.


15 Jan 19 - 09:38 AM (#3971545)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos

That's given me an idea. I have a gammon joint in the fridge. I also have a can of shandy that I bought by mistake in Lidl (or possibly Aldi) without reading the teeny-tiny print. The main label is in German and I had bought two cans thinking it was cheap beer, and intending to use it in slug traps, but even the slugs turned their noses up at it.
However, I may try cooking the gammon in it. Fingers crossed, it might taste quite good.


15 Jan 19 - 05:02 PM (#3971621)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia

Simple cassoulet

Put a liner in a large slow cooker (easier cleanup)
Set 3-4 chicken thighs in it, flesh side down
Drain but don't rinse 1 or 2 cans great northern beans. Add.
Chop one half of an onion, add it
pour on one can tomatoes. I prefer them without salt
slip in some bay leaf
cut up carrots into 2-inch pieces. add them
cut Polish sausage into 2-inch pieces. put on top

Slow cook on low till the chicken is tender and the carrots are how you like them. Remove chicken from bones.

Just before dining, add 1 or 1.5 teaspoons dried leaf thyme.

This is a good dish for when you forgot you were having company until the morning of the day of the dinner.


17 Jan 19 - 06:30 PM (#3971923)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Tattie Bogle

In answer to Charmion, I saved the (somewhat overcooked!) veg (onion, garlic, carrot and leek) from simmering the gammon and was going to put them into our next pot of soup, but husband found them first and threw them into a meatball casserole! Something of a mix of flavours in the latter but not bad at all!
ANd Jos, yes, why not? Though I would tend to use cider with pork or gammon and beer with beef (when not using Coke, that is!) But then shandy would be sweeter than beer. Let us know how it turns out!
Leeneia's cassoulet sounds good too!


17 Jan 19 - 08:03 PM (#3971938)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel

Now that its getting down to 4 degrees F outside were making good basic chili.
Kneed 2 tsp ground pepper into 2 lbs lean hamburger and cook with onion and peppers. Put 1 can kidney beans in croc pot with a small can of Mexican corn and combine with meat & veggies. Add a pinch of cumin and a cup of salsa. Add desired amount of picante sauce or for the bold ground ghost pepper. Slow Cook on low for 4 hours and keep warm.
Serve with French bread & butter.


17 Jan 19 - 09:06 PM (#3971946)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia

4 F - that's cold! All this time I thought you live somewhere warm.

Not last night, but the night before we had something we haven't had in 40 years. Wieners, whole-wheat buns, home-made cole slaw. It wasn't our idea; the wieners were a gift.

We hauled out all the extras - ketchup, mustard, pickle relish, chopped onions.
=============
Steve Shaw, I made your pork roast today. It was delicious.


17 Jan 19 - 10:15 PM (#3971949)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel

Opps I forgot the can of Tomato sauce. You can double the cans of beans and Tomato sauce to stretch it out.


Leenia, On Monday the DC beltway will be hit by an Arctic blast into the single digits. Upstate NY rarely goes below zero but while in Rochester I experienced a windchill of -63. I ran for cover in less than 5 minutes. Buffalo can drift 6 ft of snow in a single hour!
I've never had visible body hair, its transparent, but I think I have caveman genes. In the cold I am motivated but in the heat I wilt.


18 Jan 19 - 03:47 AM (#3971962)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos

"shandy would be sweeter than beer"

Well, yes, but compared with the gammon being "simmered in full-sugar Coca-cola and various veg for over 2 hours, then baked in a dressing of maple syrup ..."?


19 Jan 19 - 12:01 PM (#3972223)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman

Potato and leek gratin from the bbc good food site today. It’s a recipe I’ve used before and we enjoy. I find I need a bit more cooking time (say 45 minutes both with and without the foil) than the recipe suggests and some comment on par boiling the potatoes to reduce cooking time. I just slice the potatoes, I don’t peel them.


20 Jan 19 - 07:23 PM (#3972494)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia

We had a dinner party for six yesterday after a snowy day. Served Swedish meatballs, broccoli, thinly-sliced carrots with ginger butter.
A friend brought a fruit tartin and ice cream.

Still, Swedish meatballs are a nice, comfy food for a cold day. It was a relief to dispense with a salad.

I won't share a recipe because I thought the meatballs needed revision.

Donuel, I'm sorry you are getting such harsh weather. We were supposed to be clobbered with 6 to 12 inches of snow, but "dry air", presumably from the desert southwest, pushed the storm to the east. I hear Ohio got it instead.


20 Jan 19 - 08:16 PM (#3972506)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

Right. This is one of the best things I've ever done. If you're having people round, and you start with nibbles and finish with a pud, this is ideal as a main, as it's not heavy at all and is simplicity itself to prepare.

BUT: you can't compromise on the quality of the ingredients. Try to go cheap and you'll be sorry. I know. I've tried.

For two people (which is what I did tonight) you need:

Six very thin slices of the best sirloin. All six together should weigh about 250-300g. I said sirloin and I mean it. Not rump or some unspecified cheap slivers. SIRLOIN.

300g of cherry tomatoes, the best you can find.

Two tablespoons of capers, rinsed. Only the smallest ones will do.

Two cloves of garlic, smashed with your fist then peeled. Do NOT crush.

A pinch of dried chilli flakes, to taste. Heat is not the point of the thing.

A generous teaspoon of dried oregano. Crucial.

About 60 ml of extra virgin olive oil

Salt and pepper

One scant teaspoon of sugar

Put the smashed garlic, whole, into the olive oil in your best casserole pot. Sprinkle in your chilli flakes. Heat gently for a few minutes until your kitchen is full of lovely garlic aroma. Don't let the garlic go brown.

Remove and discard the garlic and turn up the heat. Fry the slices of beef in the hot oil for THIRTY SECONDS EACH SIDE. Any more and your dish is ruined. Put the beef into a dish and keep it warm somewhere.

Throw the cherry toms into the beefy, garlicky oil. When they start to go soft, throw in the capers, oregano, sugar and seasoning. Squidge the tomatoes down into a kind of rough sauce and leave the lid off.

After a few minutes put the pieces of beef into the sauce and cook it all through for three or four minutes. Voila, it's done.

So you have some lovely beef in a lovely, spicy tomato sauce. You can serve this up with crusty bread, or you can do what I do, and what they do in Sicily, serve it up with home-made skin-on oven chips. It doesn't come any better than that and it's so easy. Just don't overcook that steak, that's all.


And happy seventieth birthday to my favourite ItaIian cook, Gennaro Contaldo!


21 Jan 19 - 02:43 AM (#3972537)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson

OMG, that sounds sinfully good, Steve. Going to try it the day after tomorrow. (Tonight's my cooking night, and I'm going to make an old hippie dish I haven't made for years - a stir-fry with brown rice mixed in at the end, with lots of vegetables, including chopped Brussels sprouts and sweet peppers and tinned/frozen corn (maize) and dried chestnuts (previously soaked and boiled, then chopped up), and lots of julienned carrots; I'll throw in some leftover frozen chicken meat that's been looking accusingly at me in the freezer - not an essential part, but what the heck) and then sauces to taste, probably soy sauce (or soya sauce as it was called in those days, or tamari by us weirdos) and oyster sauce.


21 Jan 19 - 04:35 AM (#3972562)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: BobL

cherry tomatoes, the best you can find
That might be a job at this time of year - supermarket toms can be so flavourless. Fortunately there's an excellent Italian deli in Dunstable, my nearest big town, I might try there.


21 Jan 19 - 05:09 AM (#3972568)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

The Piccolo ones from M&S, the ones from Portugal, have been very good lately and the ones from Sainsbury's, grown in the Netherlands, have been quite good too. I should have mentioned that the originator of this recipe, Rachel Roddy (though it's a traditional Italian dish), suggests cutting up the tomatoes first. That way the bits of skin in the sauce aren't as big. That doesn't bother me one way or the other but I thought I'd mention it. If the toms aren't quite up to snuff the addition of the small amount of sugar makes a miraculous difference. Many Italian cooks do that even in the height of summer when the tomatoes are at their best. You could always use your favourite tinned toms. The sugar is an automatic addition to any tomato-based sauce I ever make.


23 Jan 19 - 11:40 AM (#3973093)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy

Who eats mutton? Need recipes since the Rams are in the Super Bowl. The US is fairly mutton-free but there are African markets...


23 Jan 19 - 04:38 PM (#3973161)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia

My supermarket sells lamb...
========
Last night we had barbecued pork. Take sliced pork left over from Steve's slow-roasted pork, heat gently in a heavy saucepan with home-made BBQ sauce. Serve on good buns. Make cole slaw. Add things to nibble on.

Midwestern BBQ sauce

one small can tomato paste
2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
2 tablespoons molasses
generous amt of freshly-cracked black pepper
secret ingredient - choose one

   1/2 tsp ground cloves
   grated zest of one orange (buy a zester at a liquor store)
   1 tsp dried rosemary leaves
   or invent your own.

Add water as needed for the application at hand.


23 Jan 19 - 10:07 PM (#3973184)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy

Lamb, yeah. Mutton?


24 Jan 19 - 03:31 AM (#3973194)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos

I used to be able to buy mutton in shops in Exeter in the 1960s but I haven't seen it for years. When mad cow disease happened I did wonder if mutton had been quietly removed from sale because of scrapie - a disease in sheep that is similar to BSE.


24 Jan 19 - 05:13 AM (#3973213)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

Gloucester Services sell mutton. It's one thing I haven't bothered to buy there because my local butcher's lamb, reared on his own farm, is as good as it gets. I buy the biggest whole shoulder, on the bone, that he can get me. Be wary of "whole shoulders" in supermarkets because they often remove the fillet to sell separately, which is the best bit. My shoulder usually comes in at seven or eight pounds. I'm not interested in small cuts of lamb (except for shanks) such as those little half-shoulders because I can't get the desired cooked texture in the reduced cooking time needed (for the same reason I don't buy smaller chickens than 2kg for roasting). Cooking the large shoulder is as easy as it gets. Put the meat skin side up in a large roasting tin. Season, then add a few small sprigs of rosemary. Put into a very low oven (120-130C) for about five or six hours. If you like you can turn up the heat for the last 20 minutes to crisp up the outside to get the lusted-after Maillard reaction. After that it needs a good resting, an hour in a warm place not being too long, though half an hour will do. The sticky bits left in the roasting tin make superb gravy. I tend not to roast veg with lamb. Instead I'll boil up some carrot, onion, celery and herbs for half an hour to make some veg stock and use that for the gravy (Mrs Steve always gets that job). It doesn't get any better than that. I'm not a fan of legs of lamb because they are not as tasty as shoulder, they're pound-for-pound more expensive and the meat next to the bone never really gets there for me somehow. I know that some people push garlic cloves into the meat. That's very nice for the hot roast but if I have leftovers for two or three more meals I don't necessarily want a garlicky whiff every time. In our house we can never have enough cold roast lamb. It's good for four or five days in the fridge.


24 Jan 19 - 06:13 AM (#3973220)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Dave Hanson

Mutton makes an excellent curry.

Dave H


25 Jan 19 - 07:44 AM (#3973444)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy

Yes, I see almost *only* curry recipes, as is nobody else ate mutton. Thanks for recipes!


25 Jan 19 - 11:45 AM (#3973484)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage

I love grilled lamb, or sauteed in a skillet, but boiled - nope.

Last night a friend came over for dinner so I rolled the barbecue grill (LP gas) out of the greenhouse and grilled a spatchcocked chicken. In this instance (and after trial and error, the way I usually do it) I split it down the middle of the breast and flattened it with the backbone in the middle. This way the breast is more likely to finish with the rest of the bird; some of the chickens you can buy these days are so big that the breast meat all together takes considerably longer than the rest. Since the point is to take the entire bird off of the grill at once, I don't want to turn the leg quarters into charcoal.

The chicken was perfect. Served with a side of basmati brown rice (and browned vermicelli) in the rice cooker; in the last few minutes of rice cooking I put the steamer pan on top and put fresh broccoli). Salad on the side and a glass of wine (brought by the guest - a nice Pinot Noir).

Primarily I mention this now (January 25) because I was able to grill while many of the rest of you are hip-deep in snow. :)


25 Jan 19 - 12:23 PM (#3973492)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion

Stilly, you're an evil woman. The snow in Stratford is going sideways, and our barbecue is in a big, fat drift.

The only dish I make that involves boiled mutton or lamb is Irish stew, and the technique there is really blanching. You put the meat in a soup pot with just enough water to cover and bring it just to the boil, then strain it off and rinse it in cold water. Then put the meat back in the pot with potatoes and onions (NO CARROTS!), with water only about half-way up the solids, cook until the potatoes can be mashed against the side of the pot. At the end, add salt, pepper, rather a lot of minced parsley, a little minced garlic, and a tablespoonful of Worcestershire sauce.


28 Jan 19 - 09:31 AM (#3973823)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy

I shall have to make lamb. Rats.


28 Jan 19 - 03:28 PM (#3973877)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage

This weekend I planned to make blintzes when friends were here for lunch, but we were all so full from the pizza we'd already made (we each put our preferred toppings on quarters of large Iraqi flat bread so it's a crispy thin crust) that we didn't make them. I did this morning; I'd never made crepes before but I've cooked pancakes all my life, so it didn't take much adjustment to the crepe requirements.

That said, this was the recipe I posted above, and while the crepes were good and the raspberry sauce was nice the cheese (mostly ricotta, with a little creme chese) was so bland as to be disappointing.

I see a couple of options - find a different mix of cheeses to use in this recipe or go in a different direction entirely and put something else in the crepes.

What would you do with this recipe?


28 Jan 19 - 10:06 PM (#3973901)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion

I make blintz filling with dry-curd cottage cheese, an egg, and lemon zest to deal with the bland issue. I got the recipe from the early 70s edition of The Joy of Cooking.


29 Jan 19 - 08:36 AM (#3973965)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman

I’ve started making a very basic soup using the multi-cooker. They are quite nice for a lunchtime meal (our main meal is tea time) on some of these miserable winter days.

Put 500ml water and 2 crumbled veg stock cubes in the bowl. Add peeled and chopped veg (so far, various mixes of carrot, parsnip, celery, onion and calabrese have been used), enough to sort of come over the water level a bit. Set on “soup/stew” for 15 minutes and forget about it – the machine will enter “keep warm” when done.

Later, put contents of pot in blender and give a whirl. The soup should be pretty thick. Add salt, pepper, cream, milk… if/as needed/desired and give another mix. Have with some thickly sliced buttered toast.


29 Jan 19 - 10:19 AM (#3973977)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

Two stock cubes plus extra salt in 500 ml? Really?


29 Jan 19 - 10:49 AM (#3973983)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman

Fair question Steve but I did say something like if/as needed/desired and intended to indicate you could adjust a little at that stage if you wished. I have added both double cream and milk to my own attempts but have not added either salt or pepper.

As a general rule, I tend not to add salt to my own cooking, not even to boil potatoes... and reserve the condiment for chips but I'm sure there are times I feel something does need a touch of it.


29 Jan 19 - 10:53 AM (#3973984)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy

If you want savory crepes I like ham and gruyere or comte; for sweet, chocolate and crushed walnuts. Dark dark not-too-sweet chocolate.


29 Jan 19 - 11:15 AM (#3973990)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion

We are eating stew these days. January will do that.

On Sunday, I made a version of boeuf bourguignon that does away with most of the fussing recommended by such luminaries as Julia Child -- ordinary onions cut in eighths instead of whole pearl onions peeled, for example. We ate it with brown-and-wild rice pilaf on Sunday, and again on Monday with polenta. We will probably eat the rest of it tomorrow for lunch, with toast.

Salt is always an issue with stew and soup. I normally check the seasoning at the very end and add salt only then, and then only if necessary. That boeuf bourguignon has salt pork in it and calls for salt as well; I have made it every winter for 20 years and I have yet to put in any salt, finding the pork provides all the dish requires.


29 Jan 19 - 11:42 AM (#3973996)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman

Staying on the winter soup/stew theme. I remember one very (by UK standards) cold winter, possibly 81 and in a mostly (we did have a woodburner in the living room but the rest of the house was like a fridge) very cold house, mum had a perpetual (for her veg) soup on the go for a month or so. Bits would get added when the pot emptied and it was very tasty.

Anyone here do these things?


29 Jan 19 - 12:33 PM (#3974002)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel

We used a Franklin Stove at the farmhouse in the winter and the soup thing was my idea. My current ongoing soup is a leek shalott and onion soup that will evolve into a corn and potato tomato bisque. (avoid using meats) Treat the soup like a houseplant, water it a little daily.


30 Jan 19 - 12:30 AM (#3974081)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia

Hi, Jon. I bet your cold winter was indeed 1981, because that was the winter after Mt. St Helens blew ash into the atmosphere and reduced sunlight worldwide.

Here in Missouri, where winters are usually rather mild, we had temps of -25F after that eruption. That's -31 C.

But to answer your question, no, I don't keep a pot of stew going on the stove all the time.


30 Jan 19 - 09:28 AM (#3974108)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel

Mine was 1977


30 Jan 19 - 12:07 PM (#3974132)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel

What is your favorite soup base?


Do you start with a stock of some sort like beef, chicken or fish, then bolster with something else be it sesame oil or soy sauce or worshishire sauce?
I figure most people start with a packet of spices or a can of mushroom ,celery or cream of chicken Campbell's soup.


30 Jan 19 - 02:07 PM (#3974147)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

I don't buy soup. A good hearty soup base might start with a soffritto of onion, carrot and celery, finely chopped in equal measure, sautéed gently in extra virgin olive oil. That's great if you want to make a chicken or turkey broth made with the scraps from a roast. Throw some scraps of ham in there for good measure. To make that into a meal, add some small pasta for the last ten minutes or so, ditalini or mini-macaroni sort of thing. I would never use stock cubes in such a broth, just the stock made from the carcass. For leek and potato, or a butternut squash soup, you could just sautée the leeks/onions in butter for a few minutes then throw in the cubed spuds/squash, add your stock and simmer until the veg is soft. You can then either leave as it is or blitz with a blender. A good thing to do is to blitz just half of it.

One of my favourite soups is nicked from Gino d'Acampo. The quality of your chicken stock is paramount for this. Chop up half a pound of sliced streaky bacon or pancetta (not smoked for me) and fry it merrily for a few minutes in a good glug of extra virgin olive oil. Add a pound and a half of chopped onion or some shallots and fry with the bacon for about 20 minutes on a low heat. Add two pints or more of stock and a tin of chopped tomatoes. A tin and a half is good, about 500-600g. Simmer gently for three-quarters of an hour. Check the seasoning then serve with some shavings of Parmesan and a swirl of extra virgin olive oil and eat with crusty bread. You will not BELIEVE how good this is.


30 Jan 19 - 02:22 PM (#3974149)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman

Soups are new to me, Donuel. As is the multi-cooker which I’m feeling my way with on and off… Btw, one thing I’ve found with it (actually mentioned on various web sites but I found out before reading…) that was highlighted by making an utterly tasteless veg curry (rescued by adding stuff and doing on a pan but not even vaguely presentable to anyone as it was) is that, while there is some venting, it’s pretty much a sealed system. This can affect the qty of water you would use for a vegetable meal.

Anyway back more to your question. Mum used to make some very nice soups, watercress and a stilton and celery as starters for Christmas /Boxing days in the past come to mind but I don’t recall her using a pre made base for a soup as such.

That said, I’m pretty well convinced that she has used a can of soup, quite likely the non meat ones on your list, as a quick base for a sauce to go with a meal.


30 Jan 19 - 02:56 PM (#3974156)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

I find tinned soups to be too salty, too processed and often too gloopy. I make lots of different soups and, as long as you have good stock, you can hardly go wrong. Use the best ingredients, get a good heavy-based pan and a stick blender and you're away. I won't use a food processor because I think it's insane to use a gizmo for ten seconds to produce a ton of washing up. And no dried herbs!


30 Jan 19 - 03:26 PM (#3974160)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman

I like the idea of the split “blended” and “with bits” soup.

Food processors, etc.

I think the only thing I’m currently using ours for is to grate cheese. I’ll chop a block of the extra mature cheddar mum gets in half, 2 pushes through and done and I’ll bag up what isn’t needed. I find this one convenient. I think mum does use it for a couple of recipes including one for cheese scones.

I’m not sure the blender attachment for the food processor is any more hassle to clean than the stick blender which would get used say to whip cream. In fact the stick one can be a bit of pain getting the cream out of the tool (without wasting it) but maybe you can recommend a better one?

One tool that sits in the bask of a cupboard is a mouli. That was bought to process a glut of tomatoes we had one year and would still be good for that sort of sieving use if we ever wanted to deal with another one. I have sometimes wondered about using it for mashed potatoes but that is one where getting it out of the cupboard, disassembly and washing up after is (I think) beaten easily by just using a hand masher.


30 Jan 19 - 06:17 PM (#3974182)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

I have a cheapie stick blender, Kenwood I think, around fifteen quid, that I've had for donkeys' years. It has its own plastic jug thingie. I've told Mrs Steve that, in the extremely unlikely event of a divorce, she's not getting it. Along with a particular carving knife and my cherished stainless steel heavy-based lidded frying pan. My blender-with-jug makes soups, mackerel pate and passata, and, my coup de grace, salmorejo in summer.


30 Jan 19 - 07:41 PM (#3974199)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage

Every time I have the bones and skin from a roasted chicken I put them in a pot, just cover them with water, and simmer for stock. I did the same thing last fall with the turkey carcass. No vege added until it's being used for soup or something else. I freeze it in pint canning jars and lately I've thawed a couple for making rice (in a rice cooker - as careful as I am the rice in a pan on the stove always seems to stick or burn to the bottom. The cooker is perfect every time).


30 Jan 19 - 07:59 PM (#3974200)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

Well I reckon your stock would be twice as good if you chucked in an onion, two celery sticks from the outside and a big carrot, all chopped up. A handful of parsley, a bay leaf and a sprig of thyme would complete the picture. Just boil up that lot for couple of hours, sieve it out and you have magnificent stock.


30 Jan 19 - 08:53 PM (#3974209)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage

All of those go in when I'm actually making a dish with it. I don't remember which celebrity chef I was listening to who said this gives you the most versatile stock, but I have to agree. I don't really want all of the onions and carrot and leafy stuff seasoning my rice, I like the simple chicken or turkey flavor. I can add the rest and make a richer broth when needed.


30 Jan 19 - 09:20 PM (#3974210)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

It doesn't work like that! Just bung everything into your stockpot...


30 Jan 19 - 10:35 PM (#3974213)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage

Speak to Jacques Pepin about it. I think he's the one who talked about making stock. Or perhaps Hubert Keller.


31 Jan 19 - 11:00 AM (#3974234)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia

Thanks for the straightforward stock idea, SRS.

Yesterday I asked the DH to buy one pound of ground beef, and he emerged from the checkout with 3.1 pounds. I like to cook ground meat right away, so I promptly made meatballs for spaghetti and a big meat loaf with it. One half of the meatloaf is now in the freezer.

I have a small collection of ziploc bags containing tomato sauce made with homegrown tomatoes. Last year was not a good year for tomatoes, so these bags are precious. I've found that I can take one and add a can of no-salt tomatoes to make it go further, and it still tastes homegrown.

As I mentioned before, the no-salt tomatoes taste better than salted.


31 Jan 19 - 11:18 AM (#3974238)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

Can you actually buy salted tinned tomatoes? I came across a can once in Spain of all places many years ago. Disgusting!   

SRS. Adding vegetables to a stock, along with a bayleaf, some parsley sprigs and a couple sprigs of thyme, adds much depth to the otherwise rather insipid bone stock but without any of the flavours intruding. It's a brilliant way of using up the outer bits of onions that you're not sure you should or shouldn't be chopping up, the coarse outside stringy sticks of celery and the carrot trimmings and peelings (or just a scrubbed carrot that's getting on a bit). It avoids food waste and adds greatly to the vitamin and mineral content of the stock.

Next controversial assertion: I never skim the fat off my stock, for therein lieth the flavour......


31 Jan 19 - 11:24 AM (#3974241)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman

Last year was a poor year for tomatoes at home too, Leenia. The plants grew and flowered well but few fruit set for some reason.

Again I've not heard of no salt tomatoes. We do use canned ones though. Napolini chopped tomatoes are a sort of stock item for the cupboard here.


31 Jan 19 - 12:01 PM (#3974246)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage

I leave the fat on the stock, and when I decide to soup it up, then the rest of the flavorings you suggest are used. It heats enough to get those flavors then the veg is discarded and the onions and carrots and whatever are going to stay in the soup are then sauteed and added to the stock.

In the US it used to be difficult to find no-salt vegetables. Now they're pretty much everywhere and don't cost more than their salted variety (fewer ingredients but they have to use a bit fresher food and process it separately.) Salt can disguise some quality issues. This is why I also use frozen vegetables sometimes; they are frozen closer to the field and are usually picked closer to ripe when used for freezing. I use a lot of frozen strawberries because those fruits didn't get as much of the nonsense as the big beefy flavorless berries that appear fresh (probably picked green and ripen on their way to the store). Frozen fruit is usually smaller, riper, and better tasting at the time it's frozen.


31 Jan 19 - 08:00 PM (#3974301)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

We had dab fillets tonight. I'm not all that confident with fish but I've learned not to overcook, the killer secret. We had four fillets each (they are small) which cost just over three quid. Dead cheap. I seasoned some flour and I dredged the fillets in it, then pan-fried them quite gently in half olive oil, half butter. Three minutes skin down, one minute flipped. We had the fish with Morrisons mushy peas (the ones that come frozen in 1kg bags) and my home-made oven chips (I will not buy oven chips, which are an abomination). My God, it was the meal of the week.

My oven chips: the spuds are paramount. They have to be the salad waxy types such as Charlotte or Nicola. Starchy collapsibles won't cut it here. Scrub the spuds and cut off bad bits but don't peel them. Cut them into thick chips or wedges, whatever you like. Parboil for eight minutes in well-salted water then drain. Put the drained spuds back in the pan and shake vigorously to rough up the outsides. Don't omit this crucial step. Put the spuds into a baking tray, tossed with a few good glugs of groundnut oil. Put the tray into a very hot oven (250C) for about 20 minutes. I'm telling you, you can't buy chips as good as that.


31 Jan 19 - 09:05 PM (#3974303)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

I've just remembered my Mediterranean roast potatoes, brilliant with a barbecue or with anything, and they are so easy.

For two people you need 500g salad potatoes. They must be of the waxy type. You need a baking tray big enough to spread the spuds out. Scrub the spuds but don't peel. Hack them into chunks about a half-inch in size and scatter them on your baking tray. Add several good glugs of extra virgin olive oil, two or three sprigs of rosemary, salt and pepper and a couple of cloves of bashed but skinned garlic. Toss all that lot together and put into an oven at 180C.

After fifteen minutes, remove from oven and toss everything around. At this stage, add the cloves, still in their skins, from a whole head of garlic. Mix everything around then put back in the oven for another 20 minutes or so.

Once the spuds are golden they're ready, and you can eat the garlic cloves by sucking out the middles. The recipe is more of a summery thing for us, but it's lovely with some cold meat and a few greens or a salad.


01 Feb 19 - 09:09 AM (#3974371)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy

Trick from my mom: when you've made stock and used some for soup put the rest in old-fashioned ice cube trays in the freezer (when frozen put in ziplock bags). Each stock cube is about 2 tbs, useful for flavoring up lots of things.


01 Feb 19 - 11:31 AM (#3974393)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage

Mrrzy I do the same thing with guacamole. It freezes well. Best to thaw on the counter top, not in the microwave unless you use very short spurts of energy and turn the cubes a couple of times.


01 Feb 19 - 03:13 PM (#3974429)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia

I just made some:

Pork Meatballs with Fennel

Mix together: about 1 pound ground pork, 1/4 cup oatmeal, 1 tablespoon fennel seeds (I get mine from an Indian grocery store.)

Roll into small meatballs, about 1- 14 inches across. For easier clean-up, put parchment paper on a sheet pan with low sides. Bake 20 mins at 350 degrees. These freeze well.

Sauce: saute some minced garlic in olive oil. Add more oil and lemon juice until you have a reasonable amount of sauce. If you have an actual lemon, you can add the zest as well as the juice. Add black pepper and some herbs, if you wish. Rosemary and basil are nice.

Cook some noodles. Drain. Return to the pot and gently heat up the noodles, meatballs and sauce. Serve. Add salt at the table as desired.


03 Feb 19 - 08:30 AM (#3974665)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy

Fennel as a veg is yum: as an herb, it's too liquorice-y. Weird. Coriander seeds are good, cilantro blechhh. Nutmeg is nicer than mace, too. Love nature.


03 Feb 19 - 09:53 AM (#3974671)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

Fennel seeds I've found unpleasant in everything I've ever tried them in. I can't use coriander (cilantro) because Mrs Steve sez it tastes like Fairy Liquid though I love it. That has a serious effect on my guacamole but I've found that I can use fresh parsley to advantage instead. I find the inclusion of orange peel or zest very odd in savoury dishes and I won't use it. I'm thinking of my chorizo and cannellini bean Spanish stew (which is supposed to have both orange rind and fennel seeds, though not in mine) and my Elizabeth David boeuf en daube. I don't miss it.


04 Feb 19 - 11:09 AM (#3974824)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy

Made a wonderful-seeming leg o'lamb then got the whirlies and never made the party. And a bunch of parker house rolls. Can they become the top to a sheperd's pie?


04 Feb 19 - 12:30 PM (#3974837)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage

There is apparently a genetic connection to who likes or doesn't like cilantro. Something to plug into Google. . .

I burned my mouth on hot cheese on a pizza a few days ago and keep re-injuring it, so today is a day for cooler foods. I had some left-over pancakes in the freezer that were reheated (they never exceed comfortable temperatures and don't have scratchy edges like toast might) and I'm letting my tea cool a bit before drinking (pity, but it must be done.) Salads for lunch and dinner.

I put fruit into my steam juicer periodically, and most recently used it to juice some cranberries that had been in the freezer for a long time. I now mix up a can of frozen apple juice with the regular amount of water, and add a can's worth of my cranberry juice for a nice (and affordable) cranapple juice. I mostly drink tea or water during the day, I gave up regular pop (soda, coke, etc.) years ago. This fruit juice is mostly carbs but is a treat on occasion.


05 Feb 19 - 08:14 AM (#3974933)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy

Yeah, hating cilantro is indeed a single gene mutation. I called my mom and blamed her when I found that out!


05 Feb 19 - 09:16 AM (#3974936)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion

We have a smoked ham hock and some Great Northern beans. Today, I shall conduct an experiment with the Instant Pot multi-cooker to see whether a proper mid-winter bean soup can be achieved in one afternoon.

Tune in tomorrow ...


05 Feb 19 - 09:28 AM (#3974939)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: gillymor

Bean and Bean Gumbo

READY IN: 50mins
YIELD: 8-9 cups         

    2 teaspoons olive oil
    1 large onion, chopped (about 2 1/2 cups)
    4 cloves garlic, minced or pressed
    1 -2 fresh green chili, minced
    1 tablespoon paprika
    1 1/2 teaspoons ground cumin
    1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
    3 stalks celery, diced
    1 large bell pepper, seeded and diced
    3 cups water or 3 cups vegetable stock, plus
    3 tablespoons water or 3 tablespoons vegetable stock
    2 cups fresh sliced okra or 2 cups frozen sliced okra
    1 1/2 cups cooked black-eyed peas (15-oz. can)
    1 1/2 cups cooked white beans (15-oz. can)
    1 tablespoon brown sugar
    2 cups chopped fresh tomatoes
    3 tablespoons cornmeal
    1 cup minced fresh parsley
    1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
    salt & fresh ground pepper

Directions (In spite of the all the ingredients it's pretty easy to make, mostly chopping)

    In a saucepan, warm the oil.
    Stir in the onions, garlic, and chiles.
    Cover and cook on low heat, stirring frequently, until the onions         are tender, about 8 minutes.
    Add the paprika, cumin, thyme, celery, bell peppers, and 3 cups of the water or stock.
    Bring to a simmer, cover,and cook for about 5 minutes.
    Add the okra, black-eyed peas, white beans, brown sugar, and tomatoes and simmer for another 5 minutes, or until the    vegetables are tender.
    In a small bowl, whisk together the cornmeal and the remaining 3 tbls.
    of water or stock and stir into the gumbo.
    Simmer for 5 to 10 minutes, until the cornmeal is cooked and the gumbo thickens slightly.
    Add the parsley, lemon juice, and salt and pepper.

I made this for a Super Bowl gathering the other day with cornbread and brought along some McIlheny's hot sauce. I got it out of the Moosewood Low Fat Favorites cook book and it turned out well, it got all ate up by a bunch of skeptical carnivores. I used frozen okra because we just don't seem to get the good kind here in S.W. FL, canned diced tomatoes because the fresh ones are out of season right now and used half smoked paprika and half sweet paprika otherwise I followed the recipe.


05 Feb 19 - 09:46 AM (#3974941)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage

I have a lot of frozen organic okra that came out of my yard last fall. I mostly eat it fried (when fresh) and my daughter swoops in periodically for a bag when her household decides it's time to make gumbo. I've used it in stir-fry a few times.


05 Feb 19 - 09:49 AM (#3974942)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: gillymor

I love it in black-eyed peas but the "fresh" stuff we get around here is usually dried out and flavorless.


05 Feb 19 - 10:04 AM (#3974945)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia

Thanks for that nice recipe, gillymor.

I'll have to try thickening with cornmeal, as you say.


05 Feb 19 - 10:12 AM (#3974946)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: gillymor

Cornmeal thickening works well in Chili too, leenia.


05 Feb 19 - 12:53 PM (#3974972)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage

The okra I eat has usually been picked that day or very recently; I started growing it because my next door neighbor was having trouble growing it. I thought "how difficult can it be?" and put in four plants - and as a result sometimes had to pick twice a day to keep up with it. I gave her most of it, and suggested that she should show me how she cooks it (not boiled!) because I hadn't eaten it that I could remember. Her fried okra was an instant hit. Cut into about 1/2 inch pieces on a bit of a diagonal, moist pieces rolled in seasoned cornmeal (fish fry is good) with a little white flour for sticking purposes. Place in a skillet in shallow hot corn oil, and don't crowd the pieces. They cool on a plate with paper towels and many of them are eaten at the stove by the cook. If I'm here by myself they sometimes never reach the table.


05 Feb 19 - 01:13 PM (#3974974)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: gillymor

I have fond memories of okra fried much like that by a friend from Valdosta, GA, along with farm-raised catfish. The boiled stuff can just too slimy.


05 Feb 19 - 03:53 PM (#3974997)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson

Made Steve's sirloin-tomatoes-capers-garlic-pepper casserole tonight. It was good, but I was a little stymied by the instructions to cut 300g of sirloin into 6 thin strips. Making thin strips, I had about 15. I'd be inclined to put on some more tomatoes, maybe…?

As for what to do with lamb, Irish stew is nice - traditionally it's a white stew, with just lamb and onions and potatoes and herbs and stock, and sometimes barley; however, I happily add carrots.

There are lots of Arab lamb dishes which are very nice - try Yotam Ottolenghi as a source. And the Caribbean curried goat is nowadays mostly made with lamb or mutton rather than goat.

Artificial stocks: I use those gloops of chicken gel by Knorr often, and if a bit more stocky strength is needed without more salt, one of the Kallo very low salt cubes.

Real stock: any roast chicken that passes through our house, the bones and skin go into the pressure cooker, and also the jelly part of the juice of chicken and vegetables and lemon and vermouth that's strained off from the roasting dish. I'll add a couple of stalks of celery, two big carrots, two bay leaves, a whole onion with the skin on, and the green of any leeks hanging around, plus a few herbs - a bit of thyme, mostly. That's pressure cooked for about an hour or an hour and a half, then the dog gets the carrots and celery and the rest of the solids go in the compost bin; the liquid is cooled, poured into plastic boxes and kept in the fridge.

Anyone got a nice recipe for fish stock?


05 Feb 19 - 08:28 PM (#3975034)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

I said thin slices, Thompson, not strips. In effect they are just very thin-cut sirloin steaks. The butcher I get them from calls them flash-fry steaks. Best not to have that edge of fat, then they won't curl up. Bash them even thinner if you like. The other night mine got thirty seconds each side in a very hot pan of the garlicky oil.


05 Feb 19 - 08:40 PM (#3975036)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

I like the organic Kallo stock cubes too, Thompson, if I need a lighter stock. And your stock recipe is right up my alley. Here's a cheat's secret: add a Kallo cube to your stock pot. The stock comes out even richer! I never add brassica trimmings to stock.

If I want stock for something like a slow-cooked pot roast, I'll use one Kallo beef cube to 500ml water, I'll soak a handful of dried porcini in 300ml boiled water for 20 minutes and use the liquor from that (look out for the last drop which can be gritty), and I'll boil a glass of red wine in a small saucepan and set fire to it to burn off the alcohol. Mix that lot together and you have a super stock. You can chop up the porcini and chuck that in the pot too. Why not.


05 Feb 19 - 08:52 PM (#3975037)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

For a glorious lamb stew, watch Gennaro Contaldo on YouTube making one in Malta (it Googles). It works a treat. If you're making it for the next day hold back the peas until then, then they won't lose their colour. Frozen peas work a treat and don't need long. I used diced shoulder for this. My butcher dices it for me but I found with him that I needed to do a bit of trimming on some of the pieces, but the connective tissue does cook nicely. Not so much dried skin. A great one-pot dish. It may need bit longer to go tender enough than Gennaro says.


05 Feb 19 - 09:52 PM (#3975044)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage

Yes, the gel and everything that roasted with the chicken goes into the stock. If I don't have any homemade I use bouillon cubes (I found a robust variety a while back and bought a lifetime supply). I have some beef bouillon in the fridge also. That can help boost the cooking liquid when starting out to braise a pot roast or make stew.

More than once I've seen people mentioning burning off the alcohol in wine. Why? It adds more flavor to whatever you're cooking and is gone by the time cooking is finished.

This evening I made teriyaki chicken, that I haven't made in probably years. Here in the states one of the earlier cooking programs on Public Broadcasting was with Jeff Smith, who was The Frugal Gourmet. Alas, his program disappeared from sight when he was charged with abusing the young man who was his assistant, but his teaching of how to make dishes was top-rate and I have a number of his recipes I still use. And his cookbooks are out there in the used book stores. I gave one to my son, and explained that while the man himself was in disgrace, his cookbook was helpful in teaching how to do the things needed for various recipes.

1/2 cup of sherry (though I didn't have any so used Marsala)
1/4 cup of soy sauce
2 tablespoons sugar
grated ginger (as much as seems right)

Pour the marinade over the chicken and let it sit for at least a few minutes; I turned it every so often and left it in the fridge for a couple of hours.

I usually use cut up whole chicken parts in the past, but on this occasion I had a deeply-discounted package of organic chicken thighs that had been deboned and no skin. I buy it frozen. Normally skin and bones go in the dish, but when the thighs were half-price to start with and if you bought two you got the second package for 1 cent, I got them. And thighs have so much more flavor. Anyway, use peanut oil if you have it and put enough in a deep skillet or a other lidded pan to brown the chicken. Do it in a couple of batches if needed (I had about 3.5 pounds of meat, so it took two batches). Once it is browned, return all meat to the pot, pour the marinade over the meat, cover it and let it cook for 30 minutes. Serve over rice.

Because I had as much chicken as I did I made half-again as much marinade to work with. And I'll have some wonderful leftovers for the rest of the week!


06 Feb 19 - 02:43 AM (#3975060)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson

Ooooh, will try that beef stock base, Steve. Will try that next time.

As for the strips, ahhh. Like what my father used to do with veal scallopini for a toast treat - mushrooms simmered in butter, Marsala...

Of course nothing cabbagey in stock, who would DO that!

I’ve just got a tub of bouillon powder - re-familiarising myself with cheap old hippie recipes in case Brexit gets as terrifyingly economy-destroying as looks likely. Do he use it?

We make a cold spinach salad from Japan here that would go nicely as a side dish with your teriyaki chicken, Stilly. Blanch the washed spinach quickly in boiling water, drain it and rinse it off in cold water (this removes any chalkiness) and squash out the water; mix in ground-up sesame seeds, a little sugar and soya sauce (we use Kikkoman). It’s also lovely hot. Here’s a proper recipe https://www.justonecookbook.com/spinach-with-sesame-sauce


06 Feb 19 - 05:15 AM (#3975086)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

Delia Smith always recommended Marigold bouillon powder for veg stock. I found it disgusting and threw it away. I won't use veg stock cubes or powder. If I can't use chicken stock I'll boil up a carrot, onion, celery stick and herbs for half an hour to make my own.


06 Feb 19 - 05:23 AM (#3975088)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw

Alcohol in wine used for cooking adds a harsh edge to the dish. Unless you're heating the booze very fast, when deglazing for example, it takes hours to evaporate away and there will be some left if the cooking temperature is kept low, even for hours. In a slow cooker the alcohol will hardly evaporate at all even if you leave it cooking all day. It's the fruit and acid elements in the wine that you want, not the alcohol. And burning it off is fun!


06 Feb 19 - 06:25 AM (#3975091)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos

On the sliminess of okra, which always puts me off, I saw a television programme in which they said you could cure it by soaking the okra in salt and vinegar.


06 Feb 19 - 04:35 PM (#3975179)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion

The Instant Pot multi-cooker does boffo beans. I made a beans-and-ham-hock stew for the ages yesterday, and it took only an hour, plus time to bone the hock and cut up the meat. Perfect texture, great flavour.

Further to the discussion of stock, above: I'm with Steve Shaw on bouillon cubes. I read the labels on the packets at the supermarket, including the ones that say Organic and whatever, and always end up putting them back on the shelf in favour of the cut-up veg and chicken wreckage that I have used for some fifty years.

It isn't just that I don't know what the finished article will taste like, it's also that properly made stock behaves in a particular way when you boil it down, and I have no idea whether the bouillon cube will produce a similar result.

I'm not so sure of Steve's analysis of the effect of wine, but then every cook has his/her own special understanding of "harsh". Come to think of it, everything I put wine in gets flambéed or cooked for ages, and sometimes both.

As for okra, I have no idea. The only place to buy okra around here is more than half an hour away in Kitchener, and I don't consider it worth the trip.


06 Feb 19 - 05:01 PM (#3975185)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy

You guys have Better Than Bouillon?


06 Feb 19 - 06:11 PM (#3975198)
Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage

This discussion got me thinking about all of the okra I have in the freezer, so I pulled out a gallon ziplock bag (about 5 pounds?) and took it next door. Her husband isn't allowed okra now (he loves it fried) due to kidney stones, but she can eat it. She really likes it boiled and he can easily resist the boiled version—you had to grow up with it fixed that way.

Alcohol in wine used for cooking adds a harsh edge to the dish.

I don't cook often with anything other than regular table wines, but I've had a bottle of Marsala unopened forever because I hadn't thought about how long it would last once opened. There aren't that many things I would make to use the rest of it in a week. But this is what I learned:


What’s the difference and similarities among Marsala, Sherry and Port? They all are fortified wines, but differ in origin, flavor, alcohol by volume levels, and ways of usage.

These are among the best wines to use for cooking. They pack the most intense flavors and—because they’re fortified with a little more alcohol than table wine—have the longest life on the pantry shelf.

  • Marsala has a medium-rich body that is great for sauces, marinades, meats and seafoods
  • Port has a rich sweetness and depth that’s especially good in meat-based casseroles
  • Sherry’s complex roasted nutty flavors can enhance just about any soup, stew, or sautéed dish

  • From here.

    And from another site, the Office of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Services in New York State, this one with clinical studies into the question:
    Alcohol can be found as an ingredient in many recipes. It can be added as an ingredient to add specific flavors or it can be part of an ingredient, such as extracts. Many cookbooks and cooks tell the consumer that the “alcohol will have burned off," however the process is more complicated than this simple statement implies. Alcohol does boil at a lower temperature than water - 86 degrees centigrade vs. 100 degrees C. for water, though one may have to boil a beer for 30 minutes to get it down to the NA or nonalcoholic category, which by law means it contains less than .5 percent alcohol.

    Nutritionists from Washington State University, the University of Idaho and U.S. Department of Agriculture experimented with cooking with alcohol, though not with beer, but with wine and sherry. They cooked two Burgundy-laden dishes similar to boeuf bourguignon and coq au vin, plus scalloped oysters with sherry. Depending on the method (simmering or baking), the temperature, the time and even on the size of the pan anywhere from 4 percent to 49 percent of the original alcohol remained in the dish. Long simmering in a wide pan was the most effective way to remove alcohol; baking appeared to be the least.

    I am happy with the way food tastes with no extra effort to remove alcohol beyond the natural cooking time and low boiling point of alcohol. I do use it to deglase, so there it has been happening unconsciously. But last night's delicious teriyaki simmered for 30 minutes so no doubt still contained some alcohol. I'll pass on the boiled beer.


    06 Feb 19 - 06:33 PM (#3975204)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    Well you know me - I have nothing whatsoever against booze, and there's nowt nicer than a boozy trifle or a big glug of Baileys poured over ice cream. But I don't want that boozy edge in a slow-cooked dish, for example. All I can say is try it and see. Burn it off!   

    There are some booze additions I dislike. For me, using cider to boil a ham is a no-no. Not keen on beef in beer/Guinness either. In Italian cooking, my speciality, if you're going to use wine, you should use the same wine that you're going to drink with the dish. Using a cheap wine that you wouldn't drink, or worse, "cooking wine," will always give you poor results


    07 Feb 19 - 06:43 AM (#3975258)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Mrrzy

    Right, cook with the wine you're drinking, that's what I learned. Also there was a lot of liver damage in my family... Mom could not eat one chocolate with cordial in it... But we were never triggered by food with wine, or flambeeing, so I am pretty sure the alcohol left in, say, mom's coq au vin or beef bourguinion was anything other than negligeable.

    Also my sheperd's pie failed: too much liquid, it got above the mashed and created an awful texture.


    07 Feb 19 - 06:44 AM (#3975259)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Mrrzy

    Was negligible, sorry.


    07 Feb 19 - 12:49 PM (#3975332)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Thompson

    The only alcohol I've ever found had a slightly bitter taste was the Guinness in Guinness stew, but I don't mind it there. Maybe my tastebuds are lacking (quite possible as many years of sinus infections have played merry hell with my sense of smell), but I don't get any bitter undertaste from the slosh of red wine I'll put into a stew or the slosh of vermouth I'll often put in when cooking fish.

    Steve, how do you get your sirloin flat? I went to the butcher's today and got him to flatten it, which he did, saying any further flattening would wreck the fibres of the meat. But do you flatten it yourself, for instance by beating the tripes out of it with a rolling pin while invoking the name of your favourite government minister?


    08 Feb 19 - 09:38 AM (#3975500)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Donuel

    food is violent

    Vegans won't eat meat
    Living things with eyes
    will not be their treat
    Pigs feet make them cry

    Food is violent
    Organic or not
    Screams are silent
    What ever you got

    I've beaten some eggs
    Not a sound was made
    I've fried chicken legs
    There was no first aid

    I've peeled bananas
    Potatoes I've mashed
    It sounds like torture
    the food that I've thrashed

    Make a melon ball
    slice a tomato
    Your food has been mauled
    As if torpedoed

    I've whipped cream, crushed nuts
    burned red onions
    vegetables cut
    all by the dozen

    Food is violent
    no matter your mood
    After an ambulence
    You'll one day be food


    08 Feb 19 - 11:48 AM (#3975535)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Mrrzy

    Heh heh you are *already* food, Donuel!


    08 Feb 19 - 01:39 PM (#3975570)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Donuel

    I never eat tiger
    But I do eat meat
    As a good driver
    the drive throughs are sweet

    Food is violence
    No matter your mood
    You will break silence
    When you are the food

    Tigers get hungry
    In the wild or Zoo
    When not caged but free
    the new food is you


    08 Feb 19 - 11:59 PM (#3975631)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    This evening I made a batch of my own invention, chunks of zucchini in a casserole with onion, green pepper, Italian sausage, pasta sauce, Parmesan cheese, some wine, egg noodles, and I cleared out some partial things in the fridge and freezer. A couple of peppers I needed to dice and freeze, some went in the skillet, a small container of frozen diced tomato, the rest of a jar of fancy roasted red peppers and feta cheese (by Peloponnese) from lunch a couple of weeks ago. That last ingredient made this dish amazing.


    09 Feb 19 - 09:58 AM (#3975688)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Thompson

    Ah, that most delicious of all dishes, ad hoc leftovers jazzing up fresh vegetables!


    09 Feb 19 - 02:30 PM (#3975755)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    Yes! And difficult to repeat completely from one time to the next. In season the zucchini, onions, peppers, garlic, tomatoes, and herbs are all likely to have come out of my garden. It is an "organically" developed dish based upon what was picked in the last couple of days.


    10 Feb 19 - 12:17 PM (#3975930)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    It's another cold humid rainy day, so I'm going to bake a couple of things. Starting with a "Dutch Baby" popover for brunch, and then some baking powder biscuits that are rolled out to about 1/4 inch thin, scored into a dozen squares, and each one filled with a raisin/walnut/brown sugar/butter/cinnamon mix. Pinch four corners together, place corners up in the ungreased muffin tin, bake, and they are so good! (I'll come back with specifics after I make them. I'm just dreaming of them now - and they're called "Raisin Bonanzas." It's a recipe from my childhood, no idea where Mom got it. And my kids also love it.)


    10 Feb 19 - 02:26 PM (#3975964)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Jos

    If you were to put the 'Raisin Bonanzas' in the tin the other way up and flatten them a bit, you would have something very similar to Eccles cakes - except Eccles cakes have more currants than raisins.


    10 Feb 19 - 02:40 PM (#3975967)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Jon Freeman

    Then there's Chorley cakes... I don't know the American version but would happily eat either of the UK different versions.

    And I'm pretty sure that in the past, mum has used up scrap pastry with the dried fruit type fillings.


    11 Feb 19 - 04:38 AM (#3976075)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Thompson

    Waiting eagerly for recipes for Chorley Cake and Raisin Bonanza.


    11 Feb 19 - 07:19 AM (#3976105)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Jon Freeman

    Maybe my post was misleading but I'm pretty sure I've never had Eccles or Chorley cakes that were not shop bought, Thompson.


    11 Feb 19 - 11:31 AM (#3976147)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Mrrzy

    I have never made a Dutch baby, I am afraid of things that are supposed to grow in the oven. Shades of I Love Lucy when I was young and fearful. Are they really good?

    Meanwhile I have some ground bison. Ideas? I usually make spags...


    11 Feb 19 - 01:04 PM (#3976178)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: leeneia

    Hi, Mrrzy. I used to be afraid of yeast cookery too. I got started with Rhodes' frozen bread dough from the freezer case at the supermarket. Their directions are very good. Then somebody gave me a bread machine, and I haven't looked back.

    I quit watching Lucy at the age of 9 or 10. Her stupidity was cringe-making.

    How about making meat loaf with the ground bison. Mix in some sausage to add flavor and a little fat. Despite all the old jokes about it, meatloaf is good, and it freezes well.
    ==============
    Question for everybody:
    I investigated a funny-looking box in my fridge. It's Camembert that we got at Christmas-time. Is it safe to eat, do you think?


    11 Feb 19 - 03:50 PM (#3976199)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    There is no yeast in a Dutch Baby, it's a large popover, a very simple concept that perhaps Alton Brown has described on one of his kitchen chemistry programs. And it doesn't grow so large it's a problem unless perhaps you try to do it in a toaster oven.

    I have no idea where my mother found this Raisin Bonanza recipe, I copied it onto an index card when I was probably 10 or 12 years old, as I created my own little wooden recipe box. That box is still the heart of a lot of things I make (that I loved and that my kids are particularly fond of.) In our family panoply of recipes it's up there with baking powder biscuits, pancakes, grilled cheese sandwiches, chicken pot pie . . . a classic comfort food that sometimes one is forgiven for making a meal of.

    Raisin Bonanzas
    Preheat oven to 400; baking time 15 to 20 minutes
    Yield 12 to 16, depending on how much you roll out your dough.

    Biscuit Dough:
    2 cups sifted flour
    1 T sugar
    3 ½ tsp baking powder
    1 tsp salt
    1/3 cup shortening (or butter)
    ¾ cup milk (or water, for lighter biscuits)

    Optional:
    Melted butter
    Granulated sugar

    Sift flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt. Cut in shortening. Add milk/water and mix to moderately stiff dough.
    Roll out on lightly floured surface, creating a rectangle so you can cut it into 4" squares. (At this point, if you wish, you can use the melted butter to brush over the flat dough and sprinkle granulated sugar over it. I never bother.) If you roll the dough out thinner and cut the squares slightly smaller you can make 16 biscuits, but you might want to increase the amount of filling for them.)

    Place raisin filling on each square, then when it is divided equally, proceed to lift the corners together and lightly pinch. Place each biscuit in an ungreased muffin pan cup.

    Filling:
    1 cup light or dark raisins
    ¼ cup brown sugar (packed)
    1 tsp cinnamon
    2 T melted butter
    Walnuts (I use at least 3/4 cup)
    Mix all ingredients until blended.

    I fed this recipe into My Fitness Pal, yield 12, without the extra butter and granulated sugar, and it comes out at 188 calories per biscuit. Sorry no weights on the ingredients for all of you UK folks.


    11 Feb 19 - 05:06 PM (#3976211)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Monique

    Ingredient Conversions Page on "Chocolate and Zucchini" blog to convert American measures into metric. My favorite recipe from this blog is "Very Ginger Cookies".


    11 Feb 19 - 05:12 PM (#3976212)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    Funny - I have that exact same set of measuring spoons, including the scratched up paint showing the amounts.


    12 Feb 19 - 01:38 AM (#3976256)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Jon Freeman

    I think the only “proper” measuring spoon we have is the one for the breadmaker. Its tsp (graduated to its ½ tsp) works well with the machine.

    Rambling on… One place I’d doubt digital kitchen scales as recommend in the blog is for measurements of only a few grams as can be found in bread recipes. Or at least I don’t think our own Salter set would give repeatable results better than within a couple of grams. In a moment of keenness, I did buy a pocket balance that would be better for that sort of task but in practice, they’ve had very little use.


    12 Feb 19 - 03:31 AM (#3976260)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Jos

    I use an old set of balance scales - a dish on one side and a set of weights on the other. There is a little movable metal weight on the arm of the balance which can be adjusted for complete accuracy. It never goes wrong.
    My grandmother had her own measure for a teaspoon of sugar or salt when making bread - the hollow of the palm of her hand.


    12 Feb 19 - 03:36 AM (#3976261)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: BobL

    Postal scales or jewellery scales are the things to use, or so I've heard. Otherwise use volume measurements: some of my breadmaker recipes specify 15g butter, for which I use a 15ml measuring spoon. Butter, like a surprising number of other foods, has a density close to 1gm/ml.


    12 Feb 19 - 09:51 AM (#3976323)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Mrrzy

    I am afraid to try souffles, too, mom made them with a high degree of anxiety.


    12 Feb 19 - 10:19 AM (#3976332)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Charmion

    My grandmother, and my father who learned from her, also measured salt in the palm of her hand or between her fingers and thumb.

    I much prefer to weigh ingredients, especially for bread. I get a much more consistent result, which pleases my neat-seeking soul.

    Today, the plan is to deal with a hunk of lamb neck that looks good for nothing much but stewing, but isn't big enough to make a proper stew. I have never made a ragu, or at least not a proper one, so I think I shall start at the deep end, with this hunk of bony muscles.


    13 Feb 19 - 11:01 PM (#3976591)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    Still clearing leftovers out of my fridge, but today I made a batch of broccoli cornbread to warm up to go with meals. Can't eat much at a time, it's very rich. It's a box of cornbread mix, like Jiffy (this one happens to be a different gluten-free brand), 1 stick of butter (in the US this is a 1/2 cup - I used half butter and half olive oil), half a medium onion chopped and browned in the butter (careful not to burn it). Two eggs, 1 cup of cottage cheese (I used ricotta because that's what I had here), and a small package of frozen broccoli, thawed. Mix everything and put in a greased pan.

    The recipe gave amounts on everything except the package of broccoli - who knows what size they had in mind - so I imagine you'd want to thaw enough that looks good when you submerge it in the mix. I submerged steamed fresh broccoli in the batter.

    This goes in an 8" square pan.

    Bake in 350o oven for 35-40 minutes, though I left it about 45 minutes to get a hint of brown on the top.


    14 Feb 19 - 03:36 PM (#3976718)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Charmion

    The lamb neck did not end up in a ragu, as even Marcella Hazan says to use mince for that. And I failed to disjoint and cut it up, lacking a meat saw, thus blowing a plan to make a hotpot with it. In the end, I pressure-cooked it in the Instant Pot, shredded the meat and dressed it with vinegar and pepper, and served it on rotini with a robust tomato sauce — olive oil infused with chilies, anchovies, garlic, onion, carrot and celery, glug of red wine, defatted dripping from our latest roast chicken, tin of plum tomatoes.

    It was really good, with a bottle of Pinot Noir and a sleet storm blowing a gale outside.

    I may never buy ready-made tomato sauce again ...


    14 Feb 19 - 10:14 PM (#3976772)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: leeneia

    So, Charmion, your ugly duckling neck of lamb turned into a beautiful swan of a pasta dish. A rich, flavorful dish like that is greatly enhanced by a sleet storm.

    My dear husband and I had a new meal the other night - true frankfurters and cabbage steaks. The DH absolutely loved it. You can find out how to bake cabbage steaks on Youtube.

    The frankfurters were shipped in from Milwaukee and were not cheap, everyday hot dogs. They had a mysterious sweet spice to them - not coriander. I couldn't identify it.


    15 Feb 19 - 11:35 AM (#3976890)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    As hot dogs go most of them are the lowest end of the production line, mechanically separated meat parts. If I have a hankering for hot dogs I used to get the Kosher ones, Nathans or Hebrew National. They're probably just as full of nitrates and such, but seem a little healthier. Most recently I bought several packages of an organically produced hot dogs produced by Applegate that were uncured. The grocery had them all in the freezer section (most meats there were bought near the sell-by date so all goes in the freezer to preserve it). They were very good. But probably not as good as the Milwaukee frankfurters. :)


    16 Feb 19 - 11:09 AM (#3977088)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: leeneia

    I don't know what your sausage is like, Stilly, [whether it's raw or cooked, vacuum-packed or loose] but when I buy fresh, uncooked sausage, I cook it immediately. Then we either eat it right away or freeze it. I freeze it in Ziploc bags from which I suck out the air with a straw.

    They keep well, but big batches go into the chest freezer, which is colder than a refrigerator freezer. I think it's -30 F.

    A couple years ago I bought raw sausage from the German store in town. It came from their freezer and was professionally wrapped. I put it straight into the fridge freezer. It all spoiled. They refused to reimburse me. I was just supposed to know!


    16 Feb 19 - 03:58 PM (#3977152)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    The cognescenti in the UK seek out and stay loyal to the local butcher's sausage. I will not buy any branded or supermarket sausage, nor do I want a link that has had silly things added such as garlic, apple or leeks. Moore's butchers in Bude have been making sausages from pork shoulder for over a hundred years, and I will countenance no other sausage. I want a coarse, juicy meaty texture, a lovely salty spicy hit and no more than a hint of the rusk that makes supermarket bangers, with whatever meat they have in them minced to a sludge, seem like you're chewing a soggy dishcloth. His skins are just right, strong enough to hold the thing together but not so strong that only a hacksaw could cut through, the latter useless in a sausage casserole. Beautiful on the barbecue or in a bun as a hot dog with buttery fried onion and (if you really insist) ketchup, and peerless as bangers and mash with onion gravy. .


    17 Feb 19 - 08:27 PM (#3977471)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    Food preparation this evening used as many things as I could manage from the freezer (a mix I can use for nachos/tacos/burritos) and a few gaps will allow the reorganization (so I can see better what all is in there.)

    I baked two large sweet potatoes (large by grocery store standards, not large by what one can actually grow in the garden, which is humongous) to cut into chunks to heat with meals. I bake them to the point of caramelized juices dripping and cooking on the pan to bring out the sweetness. I don't put anything on them, though around the holidays I have a dish that has boiled sweet potatoes mashed with some pie spices, orange juice, and chopped roasted pecans added and small marshmallows on top to add a sweet crust.


    18 Feb 19 - 12:45 PM (#3977602)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: leeneia

    Sweet potatoes and pecans! Now that's a good idea. I like the idea of orange juice, too.


    19 Feb 19 - 04:44 PM (#3977843)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    It's a recipe from my old Fanny Farmer Cookbook, the eleventh edition published in 1965. Page 268, "Sweet Potatoes de Luxe." As far as I could tell this volume had all of the same recipes that were in my mother's edition of the book (probably purchased in the 1950s). Farmer was at the Boston Cooking School, and one of the earliest "scientific" cooks, testing recipes before she published them in her books.

    A note that I offer to my children when using this kind of book is that current recipes tend to include a lot more information about technique, how to mix, assemble, or cook the recipe in question. Fanny Farmer offered recipes to cooks who knew how to do those things: ingredients, order of assembly if needed, and baking temperature if it went into the oven. There are small drawn illustrations throughout, but not on every page. Pages formatted with two-columns had recipes rarely longer than a single column, and many of the pages will have two, three, or four recipes in a single column.

    Julia Child's collaboration on Mastering the Art of French Cooking targeted American cooks who didn't have the French techniques and needed to see directions and illustrations in order to master those dishes. I suspect she set the standard that has been followed by many published and broadcast chefs ever since. Many modern cooks didn't have the advantage of a good Home Economics course or have parents who taught them to cook. My kids learned a lot of cooking at home, so I can usually just send the recipe they want and they figure out the rest.


    19 Feb 19 - 07:47 PM (#3977868)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    No-one ever taught me to cook anything. My countless mistakes have been visited on my poor family for decades, but by now almost everything I cook goes down well. I've learned a few golden rules:

    Keep it simple. Recipes with twenty ingredients are designed to compensate for shortcomings, not for ingredients to complement each other, and every extra ingredient increases the risk of failure.

    Don't be a slave to a recipe. If it says fennel seeds or coriander, and you don't like them, just leave them out. My guacamole is famous, but it has parsley instead of coriander. My idea!

    Timings in cookery books are generally useless. Boil potatoes for fifteen minutes until soft my arse. I won't mash glue. I never time meat. So many minutes per pound and so many over? Recipe for disaster. A big chicken two hours, slathered in butter, all but the last half-hour under foil. An average turkey, three hours. Shoulder of lamb, whack it in the oven as is after breakfast at 110C and forget it until five o'clock. Pot roasts the same, maybe for not quite as long, though ox cheeks can take way over four hours. Never had ox cheeks? Loser! Braised steaks two and a half hours. Shoulder of pork with crackling, as with lamb but give it a very hot blast at the very start and the very end.
    And never buy little joints. Waste of time and they don't cook nice.

    Use the very best ingredients you can find. Insipid chemical golfball tomatoes do not a decent tomato sauce make. In fact, even Italians use canned tomatoes, even in summer. I once read somewhere that the most expensive rice you can find is still cheap. It's true. And a half-teaspoon of sugar in any tomato dish absolutely transforms it. Cheap chicken is not worth eating and it's cruel.

    A tiny splash of Tabasco improves almost everything.

    Never mince garlic. It turns a lovely, mellow ingredient into a harsh near-poison. I never want to think that if I eat this I'll be breathing out garlic for two days, and I do use a lot of garlic.

    Simple Italian pasta sauces are ruined if onion is incorporated. Meaty ragus are the exception.

    Strong herby flavours in a dish mean that you have failed. I love rosemary and sage (fresh, not dried) but they can be hooligans if overused. I don't understand anyone who puts mint in peas, though fresh baby mint leaves sprinkled on pea purée on crostini (with roasted garlic, butter and Parmesan as well as the peas) are fabulous. Dried oregano in a beefy tomato dish is super, but if I find a pot of dried basil in your cupboard that's the last time I eat at your house.

    I enjoy cooking, especially if have have a large glass of white wine on the go, and as long as I can listen to The Archers and everyone keeps out of the kitchen.

    If you have tuna in spring water, throw it in the bin unopened. Don't serve pink salmon to your guests. Don't buy olive oil that isn't extra virgin. It's bullshit that you can't cook with extra virgin. Buy something bog standard such as Napolina extra virgin for cooking but don't heat it too much. Buy a nice Italian estate oil for sprinkling on your pizza (do that in order to not be wrong), for salad dressing and for drizzling on your pasta dish or tostada. If you need to get oil very hot, for home-made oven chips for example, use groundnut oil.

    And in less than ten minutes you can have a fish finger or bacon butty that, when you feel peckish and a bit miserable, outstrips by way of huge enjoyment any Michelin-starred poncy recipe.

    I'm ducking now...


    19 Feb 19 - 08:07 PM (#3977870)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Donuel

    Your last post should be the introduction to every cook book.
    Its all true


    19 Feb 19 - 08:59 PM (#3977873)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    My olive oil is extra virgin and I buy 3-litre bottles at the Halal Import Market. They get oil by the pallet and I never seem to get the same label twice, but I always read them and select oil that comes from one place, usually a town in Palestine or Jordan or Israel. None of this commingled oil from all around the Mediterranean (and probably isn't all olive oil.)

    The same store gets dates by the pallet, Basmati rice by the pallet, you get the drift - they import food for a large customer base, people who cook from scratch with ingredients from back home.

    I tend to buy produce more at the Asian market across the street from the Halal market. They have a lot more to choose from in a lot better condition.


    19 Feb 19 - 09:10 PM (#3977875)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    You're not wrong. But basmati is just a big a minefield as olive oil.


    19 Feb 19 - 10:32 PM (#3977881)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    There are many basmati brands in this store, and I take time reading labels and comparing claims and pricing. Aged, extra long, fragrant, all things to consider. Never get parboiled. Cook it from the beginning yourself.

    You should see the rice aisle at the Asian market - double the size and quadruple the types and brands (all in large bags.) It's a large grocery store, and this part of Texas has large Asian and Middle Eastern populations. Lucky all of us that their stores do such a great job with the import foods.


    20 Feb 19 - 06:17 AM (#3977921)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Jon Freeman

    I don't know the reasons but basmati rice can seem to me to vary a bit. We changed from getting "supermarket's own" a few years ago and these days try to stick with the Tilda Pure. It might sound a bit odd but it's one we know where we are with.


    20 Feb 19 - 11:30 AM (#3977975)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    The rice is usually in 10 and 25 pound cloth bags that zip and have a plastic liner. They're also stitched closed below the zip so you have to pull the string to get into the bag once you have it home. The rice comes from India, Pakistan, and various other nations and principalities in the region.

    The Asian market also has large bags of rice, and while there is *mostly* Basmati at the Halal market, they have a few others such as the fragrant jasmine rice and some yellow rice. I buy a brown Basmati rice to get a bit more fiber from it. The Asian varieties are short, long, round, fragrant, all sorts of types and colors. They have the jasmine rice, pearl type rounder grains, long grains, grains meant for sticky rice, etc. What we see on the shelves in American mainstream grocery stores are maybe three varieties from a crop that has hundreds of varieties from around the world.


    20 Feb 19 - 06:40 PM (#3978026)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Charmion

    We are having spareribs for supper, with brown rice cooked in roast drippings. I cleaned out the fridge today.

    The only kind of white rice I buy nowadays is Arborio for risotto. I’ll eat plain white rice at Asian restaurants, but at home I like the nubbly kind.


    21 Feb 19 - 03:17 AM (#3978050)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Thompson

    Any truly delicious vegetarian main courses, not fatty or salty, for someone with high blood pressure?


    22 Feb 19 - 08:53 AM (#3978359)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Mrrzy

    Ratatouille? Portabello or cauliflower steaks, roasted? I will keep thinking.


    22 Feb 19 - 12:32 PM (#3978392)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Thompson

    Good thinking! I do make ratatouille occasionally but will make it a standard. I make a lentil-rich lamb stew; must find a way to use less or no lamb. No knowledge of roast portobello or cauliflower steaks, though.


    22 Feb 19 - 03:23 PM (#3978417)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Mrrzy

    Take whole cauliflower and slice into 2-3 cm slices (1 inch-ish). Preheat oven to whatever is convenient for whatever else is cooking. Put some oil and any spices/herbs you like on the cauliflower "steaks" and pop into oven on big flat sheet. The time will depend on the temp but they are good under- and overcooked too...


    23 Feb 19 - 09:20 AM (#3978527)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Jon Freeman

    I’ve yet to try one but the Guardian seems to offer quite a few vegetarian recipes these days. One I’m planning on trying next week is a sag aloo with aubergine


    23 Feb 19 - 11:02 AM (#3978538)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Jos

    I'll certainly be trying that curry - but I was a bit surprised that it introduced itself as a vegan recipe and then finished with
    "Serve with chapatis or naan, yoghurt and a little lime or lemon pickle on the side." I thought vegans didn't eat yoghurt.


    23 Feb 19 - 11:18 AM (#3978540)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Jon Freeman

    Vegans would not eat any dairy product but I gather there are so called "vegan yogurts" made using vegetable products.


    23 Feb 19 - 11:24 AM (#3978543)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    You'll find vegan and/or fat-free sour cream, cream cheese, and yogurt on the Spackle aisle in the hardware store.


    23 Feb 19 - 11:34 AM (#3978548)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Jon Freeman

    I had to look Spackle up. It appears Polyfilla is a reasonable UK alternative. So probably a fillers and sealants section over here.

    The vegan alternatives have not sounded appealing to me but, I'm not sure I've ever got as far as trying say a "vegan cheese" to see how a find it.


    23 Feb 19 - 11:11 PM (#3978645)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Thompson

    My most farmer-like friend - “What??? No meat????” was raving about vegan food he recently had in a restaurant on a trip abroad; he thinks it was Korean or Chinese.


    24 Feb 19 - 07:46 AM (#3978707)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: BobL

    According to a recent New Scientist article, the production of cheese is almost as bad for the environment as that of meat. In fact it's worse than chicken or pork.
    Some vegan substitutes were tested, opinions being generally unfavourable and ranging from "inoffensive" to "resembling half-set PVA glue".


    28 Feb 19 - 08:10 AM (#3979556)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Donuel

    The ultimate Strawberry Tart or rhubarb Pie
    The goal is to have a dessert that has a tart bite yet is still semi sweet.

    Ingredients for four pies 1 inch deep
    four pre made graham cracker crusts
    1 pound frozen strawberries
    10 frozen cherries ( for color)
    1 lb. fresh Cranberries frozen
    6 foot long stalks of rhubarb sliced 5-10 millimeters
    10 ounces of strawberry preserves or spreadble fruit
    corn starch to thicken liquid sauce as it boils down

    Directions

    Almost cover with water and boil strawberries in large pot until very soft
    Cover ith water and boil cranberries cherries and rhubarb in another pot until Cranberries swell up and are soft.

    With strainer pour combining contents so you save all the red liquid into a pot.

    Add the spreadable fruit or preserves to the fruit and siimmer.
    Boil the liquid down adding only enough corn starch to reach desired thickness of honey or thicker.

    Place some thickened liqid into pie shells and combine the rest with the fruit. Put the fruit into the pie shells and chill or if you want to bake regular pie crusts se less hick liquid.

    This turned out well for me and is on of my better inventions. For taller pies use three or even two pie crusts.


    28 Feb 19 - 08:23 AM (#3979558)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Donuel

    PS
    If you allow the liquid and the pot of fruit to cool overnight you can be sure of a thick enough consistency of both. If needed simmer more.


    28 Feb 19 - 01:35 PM (#3979597)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    Become peckish after a glass of wine or three.

    Wait 'til the missus goes to bed.

    Seize can of Ambrosia custard and apply can opener.

    Eat furtively straight from can, keeping clanking noises to minimum.

    Rinse can thoroughly (don't forget lid) so that rubbish bin won't smell suspiciously of custard in the morning. Hide can in bin under at least six inches of rubbish.

    Spend ten minutes utterly consumed by guilt and work out ploy to replace can in cupboard undetected at earliest opportunity.

    Clean teeth before retiring. And no custardy belches in bed.


    28 Feb 19 - 02:58 PM (#3979613)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Jos

    And you SHOULD be feeling guilty Steve. That can should have been recycled.


    28 Feb 19 - 03:36 PM (#3979623)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Donuel

    Like Lemon meringue pie can be like a slice of sunshine, my dessert is like strawberry fields forever.


    28 Feb 19 - 05:13 PM (#3979639)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    There's comes a time, Jos, when one has to compromise...


    01 Mar 19 - 11:14 AM (#3979745)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Charmion

    I sympathize, Steve. Ambrosia Custard is not my poison, but I can be summoned from the depths of slumber by a sudden craving for butterscotch ripple ice cream. I'm not proud of this predeliction, but consider it a weakness. Fortunately, the best type of butterscotch ripple ice cream is available only in half-litre containers ...


    02 Mar 19 - 12:39 AM (#3979784)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    The best ice cream hands-down is Kroger's Private Selection Denali Extreme Moose Tracks variety. There's no off switch when it comes to "enough" of that. Alas, the container doesn't recycle.

    We've had springlike weather, but we're about to be plunged into the deep freeze for a few days. Time for more soup. Or stew.

    I made a batch of oatmeal cookie dough that was spreading out too much on the baking sheet on the first batch. I had to kind of peel them off, but the misshaped blobs still tasted great. The rest of the raw dough went into the fridge and I've decided my best bet is to make one large cookie (on parchment paper on the insulated tray) in my toaster oven in the morning to go with my cup of tea. I don't eat too many at one time that way.

    These are particularly good - I made them with chopped dates and walnuts.


    02 Mar 19 - 08:54 AM (#3979841)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Mrrzy

    I made a marvy roast pork loin by disobeying all instructions... Berbere spice, into hot oven, turn down to normal after 15 mn. So juicy!


    02 Mar 19 - 05:22 PM (#3979909)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    Stew it is. Defrosted enough 1-pound chunks of chuck roast (I freeze it that way because I typically use it to make my own ground beef and 1 pound is the amount I usually need.) I'll let it braise for a while and may not eat much today but it'll be ready for tomorrow and Monday when we're down to 21o.


    05 Mar 19 - 01:07 PM (#3980356)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    This week if the freezer died I could move the contents outside and they'd stay frozen. It's cooking weather, though I haven't decided what is for dinner? I don't want to eat stew every day.


    06 Mar 19 - 11:45 AM (#3980556)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    The horrible deep freeze has passed and now we can get on with spring. Perhaps this year I'll get seeds started early enough to get some beans and lettuce. Most of our gardening season is too hot for those tender plants.


    06 Mar 19 - 11:57 AM (#3980558)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: leeneia

    I know what you mean. After a while, you long for something crunchy. Here's a recipe I got from my in-laws, RIP. It's good.

    Chicken Piquant
    Sauce: Whisk together 4 T lime juice, 2T veg oil, 2T dried tarragon, 1 t paprika.

    Put parchment paper on a baking sheet. Put chicken thighs on sheet, spoon some sauce over.

    Bake at 375 for 25 minutes. Turn pieces over and spoon the rest of the sauce on. Continue to bake 25-35 mins more, till well done.

    Remove from oven, set on a rack 10 minutes to rest, serve.
    ==========
    And while you have the oven going, why not cook squash or potatoes on the other rack? If squash, poke a hole in it with a corkscrew to let the steam out.
    ===========
    The parchment paper may not be necessary, but it makes for easier clean up.


    06 Mar 19 - 12:53 PM (#3980568)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Charmion

    It’s Ash Wednesday, the beginning of Lent. Every year, Himself and I undertake some form of dietary discipline during this season, and this year, as well as booze, we’re avoiding meat. So I brought Madhur Jaffrey’s “Vegetarian India” upstairs and turned out the pantry to see what we have in the way of lentils and beans — and it’s lots. We could go till summer.

    On the other hand, I foresee a significant uptick in consumption of coriander leaf, most of 2hich ends up in the composted because Sobey’s sells it only in huge bunches. Parsley, likewise.

    Phooey.


    06 Mar 19 - 02:21 PM (#3980584)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Big Al Whittle

    I've made some really shit meals recently. Really sodding stupid mistakes.

    I just do really stupid things sometimes! Idiot!


    06 Mar 19 - 09:17 PM (#3980640)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    Charmion, wash the cilantro, pull the leaves off of the stems, then fill a heavy-duty ziplock bag with the leaves. Zip it almost completely closed and then press down on the bag to remove as much air as possible and finish the zip close. Freeze that flat green bag, and any time you need some, go through the rapid operation of opening the bag and breaking off a chunk of the leaves. Put the bag in the freezer as soon as possible and before the chunk has thawed, give it a rough crumble with your fingers and palms into whatever you're cooking. It's as close to fresh as you'll get if you don't want to buy fresh and toss out 90% of it each time. The entire operation has to take about 20 seconds or the bag and the broken piece begin to rapidly soften.


    07 Mar 19 - 05:09 AM (#3980691)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    That's a good idea. I do the same thing with parsley, which is just as good out of the freezer as fresh as long as you don't need it for a sprinkly green appearance on top of the finished dish. I just had a breakfast of two mini-piada (Italian flatbreads), heated in a dry pan then used as a sort of sandwich with a squashed avocado in the middle. I didn't think I'd enjoy it as I was just using up excess purchases, but it was very nice. I suppose I could have manned up the avo with some seasoning and lemon. I'd needed two ripe avocados last night but Sainsbury's were selling off all their ripe 'n' readies half price. You do have to be suspicious of avocados at times (stringy, blackened middles) so, considering the cheap price, I bought extra. They are all perfect, so I now have a stash. I can afford another avocado brekkie tomorrow and I might make my chunky guacamole for Friday. Or we could have a tricolore salad, with slices of avocado, halved cherry tomatoes (the southern European ones have been good all winter) and chopped-up mozzarella, dressed with the finest extra virgin olive oil and a dash of freshly-ground black pepper. Tricolore because it has the three colours of the Italian flag. It's a bit like an insalata Caprese but with cojones...

    I rarely bother with buffalo mozzarella. It's expensive and a bit too milky-sloppy for me.


    07 Mar 19 - 06:13 AM (#3980703)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Donuel

    I like to make sweet and hot or sweet and sour chicken stews.
    I start with pre cooked chicken.

    The sweet is crushed and chunk pineapple and the sour is aa little vinegar.
    The hot ingredient is up to you and the rest is all your favorite veggies. I use piquant hot sauce, sausage bits and a touch of ghost pepper.


    07 Mar 19 - 08:53 AM (#3980730)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Mrrzy

    Stilly River Sage, once the cilantro is in the bag, throw that nasty stuff away, bag and all. Parsley I preserve in garlic butter...

    Yes, I have the genetic deficiency of Cilantro Is Repulsive.

    Just kidding for you others.


    07 Mar 19 - 10:07 AM (#3980749)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: leeneia

    Big Al, you say you are making mistakes. The first question is, Are you getting enough sleep? Think about it.
    =========
    I just read a book about the brain, and it said that brain states persist. I find that sleep persists in my brain. That is, after I wake up, I remain foggy for a while. I wait to take a shower (which requires good balance), take medication or drive until I know I am fully awake.

    This would apply to cooking, too.


    08 Mar 19 - 05:50 AM (#3980889)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Big Al Whittle

    I don't know why I'm screwing up.

    1) I left a pasta bake in the oven so long the cheese top was like a frisbee. Couldn't get your teeth into it.

    2) I basted a ham i honey/clove powder and brown sugar. Then to warm it up before serving. I microwaved it. The knife, I'd just had sharpened literally bounced off it. Another recipe that defied humam dentistry.

    that's so far. I'm not sure its lack of sleep. I sleep, but I'm still on 'musician's hours'.. I was still gigging occasionally up to last month. Though its about six years since i did it as a full time job.


    08 Mar 19 - 09:26 AM (#3980927)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Jon Freeman

    I remember when about 19/20, trying to grab every overtime hour on offer. I was setting and operating machines making ball pins for track rod ends then. I made a few mistakes including starting a machine up on myself and figured I was becoming a danger to myself and those around me.

    More recently, my sleep has been erratic with nights with no sleep for quite a while. It does affect me but I don’t think it’s led to mistakes in cooking recently. That’s mum’s department lately. She stuck a load of sauce to the bottom of my favourite pan the other day. Yesterday’s casualty was MaMade and the big pan. A lot of the marmalade was salvageable but a bit discoloured. I think the remaining stuff should clean out of the pot with another go today. I think we put these down to another enemy, stress…

    Onto food. I did try the Sag Aloo last week. A couple of changes: I opted to use a salad (said Jazzy on the packet) potato instead of the Maris Piper and didn’t bother peeling, mild chill powder (fearing the other might be to hot for here) and the whole packet (500 vs 400g) of spinach. The illustration seems to show small chunks of aubergine but mine (not that I mind this) wound up as part of the gravy. It was liked here and is one I’ll do again.


    08 Mar 19 - 10:50 AM (#3980937)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Mrrzy

    Help! Savoury pie for Pi Day ideas? Not sheperd's.


    08 Mar 19 - 06:38 PM (#3980996)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    I told you about that stash of extra avocados I accidentally bought. Well I peeled a couple of them tonight (they were perfect) and mashed them up roughly with a fork. I added a good squeeze of lime juice, a small pinch of chilli flakes and some salt and pepper and mixed it all up. I set that aside for an hour. Then I took a good handful of some particularly nice cherry toms (I bought them in M&S and tried to ignore the fact that they were almost certainly grown in the plasticos in Almería province in Spain), chopped them into little pieces and put them in a bowl with a little bit of my very finest Tuscan extra virgin olive oil and a pinch of salt.

    Next, I took a few slices of panna Pugliese, a lovely, elastic, gluten-rich toasting bread from Puglia (you can buy it in Waitrose). You could use a good ciabatta instead. While the grill was heating, I basted, very slightly, each slice with a garlicky olive oil of my own making (easy - just smash a garlic clove with your fist and soak it in a few glugs of olive oil for a bit). Grill the toast on one side, flip then baste the other side and grill again. Cut the toast into pick-uppable pieces and top some with the avo mix and the rest with the tomato mix. Sprinkle a bit of chopped cilantro or parsley (I used parsley out of my garden) on the avo toasts and, optional, some baby basil leaves on the tomato toasts. An extra drizzle of your best olive oil on the tomato toasts is a sine qua non.

    I'll tell you what. This is SO easy. The whole thing took me twenty minutes (and I've never done it before). It's food fit for a king, it fills you up, it goes great with any wine of a Friday night and it's vegan to boot!


    08 Mar 19 - 11:35 PM (#3981026)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    I wait till avocados are on sale then I let them ripen and make a large batch of guacamole and freeze it in ice cube trays. These are then stored in a freezer zip lock bag, and when needed I one or two cubes and let them defrost at room temperature or carefully zap them a few seconds at a time in the microwave. There is so much oil in them that it doesn't take long to soften. Don't put tomatoes in guacamole you're going to freeze, they are weird when it thaws.


    09 Mar 19 - 11:23 AM (#3981129)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: leeneia

    I love avocados. I don't peel them, however. I scoop the flesh out with a teaspoon. It's easy and leaves only a thin film of flesh behind.

    I like the sound of your recipe for avocado toast, Steve.
    ============

    Yesterday my Dear Husband hoisted himself into the dark, dusty attic of my old church to check for leaks and seal up new holes. I thanked him and asked, "Would you like something special for dinner as a reward?"

    I had some possibilities in mind: roast pork with baked sweet potatoes, steak aux poivre, baked chicken with herbes de Provence... He had his own possibility; he wanted tuna and noodles.

    the DH's tuna and noodles

    Boil up some noodles or other form of pasta
    While pasta is getting ready, drain one can of tuna in water
    Make a cup of cream sauce
    Chop or grate 3/4 cup cheddar cheese or other cheese of your choice Melt the cheese in the hot cream sauce
    When pasta is done and drained, mix the drained tuna, cheesy sauce and noodles in a big serving bowl. Serve.

    We haven't made this in 25 years. To me, tuna and noodles is a recipe for kids. The DH used to make it without the cream sauce. He simple threw the cheese onto the hot noodles, which clumped together in blobs. I like this way better.

    It seems to me that some herb or flavoring ought to be added, but I don't know what.


    09 Mar 19 - 11:24 AM (#3981130)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: leeneia

    Big Al - about that ham. Was it pre-cooked or not? Sometimes it's hard to tell from the packaging.


    10 Mar 19 - 01:43 PM (#3981325)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Jon Freeman

    I did my dad a “birthday treat” on Friday. It had been a long day for him as he had an appointment at the city hospital and (accompanied by mum) was away from about 2pm, getting back a while after 7pm. I suggested that as it was so late that some (deep fried frozen chunky) chips and I for one had snacked might be nice. I then learned that he’d asked on the way home in the ambulance if he could have chips when he got home! Sometimes the simplest of things are the best.


    Another OT thing. One I was pondering a couple of months ago and don't think I've mentioned here... My basic attempts are in a fairly small but I’d think reasonably well equipped kitchen and based around cooking for three. I wonder how people do more of more with less.

    I think the hardest kitchen we had would have been the original (I later managed to move the kitchen out to an existing extension) kitchen in the second house we lived when in N Wales. It was a long thin corridor of a room with a spiral ring radiant electric cooker at one end and the sink at the other. I don’t remember anything in the way of work top space other than a little around the sink side. Microwaves weren’t around (or at least not a common feature of a UK kitchen) then.

    She’d still manage to present a 3 course Christmas dinner with all the trimmings (and touches like glazed carrots, etc. as well as something veggie for herself) probably for ten (six in the immediate family for starters) with everything served perfectly warm.

    Maybe it’s easy to some but the juggling acts I’d think it must involve seem beyond me.


    10 Mar 19 - 08:02 PM (#3981380)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    I had two beautiful organic bell peppers that needed to be used soon so I took ribeye steak out of the freezer, used the rest of an onion in the fridge, and made a batch of fajitas (served in tortillas that I buy from a bakery up the street and freeze a few hours after they were made). I didn't want to set up the grill outside so I added some smoke flavor, a little Hoisin sauce, and salt, pepper, and garlic powder. Saute the beef but take it out still pink, then fry the onions and peppers in the oil the beef seasoned. Add it all back together for a couple of minutes and it's dinner. (The term "fajita" is "skirt" in Spanish, and these are traditionally made with skirt state that is grilled then sliced thin. I didn't have that, but I did slice the steak very thin.) Everything is cut into long strips to cook and it lines up easily in the tortilla. I topped them with some Tapatio hot sauce and a couple of tablespoons of guacamole on each one.


    10 Mar 19 - 11:18 PM (#3981389)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: leeneia

    I think I'll try those fajitas. Thanks.


    11 Mar 19 - 02:49 AM (#3981391)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Jos

    I think I might replace the 'smoke flavor' and the garlic powder (neither of which I have) with smoked paprika and with garlic.
    I can't eat guacamole (much as I would love too) so perhaps a few slices of tomato instead.


    12 Mar 19 - 01:37 AM (#3981578)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Thompson

    I do this with close-to-the edge peppers: cut them up in big pieces, put these under the grill, skin side up. When the skin blackens, put them in a bowl, close covered. When they’re cool, pull off the skin & discard it..put the pepper pieces in olive oil. Delicious as a tasty extra on things like cheese sandwiches.


    12 Mar 19 - 01:44 AM (#3981579)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Thompson

    By the way, Aldi have started selling frozen avocados, very good.


    12 Mar 19 - 05:10 AM (#3981601)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    I do the pepper-skinning trick too, but I rapidly put the hot, blackened peppers into a polythene bag which is then sealed for a few minutes. Keeping them all steamy seems to be the secret.


    12 Mar 19 - 05:45 AM (#3981608)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Jos

    The effect is the same using a covered bowl or a plastic bag - both trap the steam and loosen the skins - but if you are trying to cut down on using plastic, the bowl is the way to go.


    12 Mar 19 - 09:24 AM (#3981640)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    So no clingfilm?

    You can wash and reuse plastic bags...


    12 Mar 19 - 10:22 AM (#3981655)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Jos

    But how many people do wash plastic bags nowadays?
    Though I remember how thrilled my mother was when plastic bags first appeared, probably sometime in the 1950s, and how she washed them and hung them to dry on the rail in front of the cooker.


    13 Mar 19 - 12:23 PM (#3981825)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Charmion

    I have silicone lids that form an airtight seal on a bowl or saucepan. They really help on the cutting down on clingfilm thing.

    I loathe clingfilm, not for environmental reasons (I'm ashamed to say), but because it's expensive and so damnably hard to handle. Waxed paper! Zip-lock bags!

    I wash zip-lock bags. Really.


    15 Mar 19 - 12:54 PM (#3982310)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Mrrzy

    Any salad dressings that have neither sugar nor cream? I make mustard vinaigrette but there must be others...


    15 Mar 19 - 01:59 PM (#3982323)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    Our go-to is one part balsamic vinegar to three parts of extra virgin olive oil. The quality of those two ingredients is paramount: I use the thick syrupy type of balsamic that costs about ten or twelve quid for 500 ml, never that watery cheap stuff, and an Italian EVOO that costs about ten quid. Cheaper extra virgin is for cooking gently with, not for dipping or dressing.


    15 Mar 19 - 09:44 PM (#3982390)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stanron

    I've experimented with salad dressings quite a bit over the years. My current favourite starts with three big table spoons full of plain soya yogurt, a teaspoonful of marmite or propriety yeast extract well mixed in and finely chopped garlic and chili. After that I just chop up whatever salad stuff I have until the bowl is full. I usually include a tomato for sweetness and part of a red or yellow capsicum for colour.


    16 Mar 19 - 05:42 PM (#3982559)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    Last night I made an 8" x 8" pan of cornbread using a gluten-free mix (with other types of flours, like rice and potato, instead of wheat for that part of the recipe). It's a sweet cornbread, and takes a lot longer to bake than the box says, but it's tasty. And a lot for one person, so I cut it in quarters and took a quarter to my elderly neighbors across the street and we visited about various topics, then I took a quarter to the not elderly but older neighbors next door, and we visited about various things. I took her the box so she could see the contents because he is on a diet low in the foods that his kidneys use to make stones.

    I didn't really need to take food to go check on them, but it always makes for a more well-rounded conversation. And I won't be eating the entire pan of bread by myself. (I got home from next-door to find my ex's car in the driveway; since I'd left the door unlocked and the gate open, he'd headed in to visit with the dogs until I got back, and he also had some cornbread with tea.)

    Food (whatever you have on hand) is a great way to initiate and sustain conversations. It's probably how we will eventually achieve world peace.


    18 Mar 19 - 08:29 AM (#3982840)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Mrrzy

    Balsamic vinegar is too sweet for me... Any vinaigrettes with nothing added for sweetness?

    As a separate question, when did everything savory start including sweet?


    18 Mar 19 - 09:06 AM (#3982843)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Jos

    I blame the television chefs: for example, Nigella Lawson said she would excommunicate anyone who used green peppers, because red ones were sweeter and therefore 'better'.
    Even though, from my point of view, the green ones taste more interesting and are better because they are less sweet.


    18 Mar 19 - 09:11 AM (#3982845)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Jos

    For the dressings, just use white wine vinegar, cider vinegar (said to be good for arthritis), or lemon juice (extra vitamin C) instead of the balsamic.


    18 Mar 19 - 09:53 AM (#3982853)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    Yep, freshly-squeezed lemon juice instead of balsamic is good. However, you wouldn't be using much balsamic anyway. You wouldn't notice the sweetness. Don't use bottled lemon juice and only use the finest extra virgin olive oil.


    19 Mar 19 - 02:33 PM (#3983163)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: leeneia

    Two days ago I invented a real taste treat. i made cole slaw with a dressing of vegetable oil and lemon juice. Then I put in some dried spearmint leaves. We had some and I thought, "Meh".

    The next day we had spicy Mexican food, and I got ought the rest of the cole slaw. The spearmint had had time to infuse the entire dish. A mouthe
    ful of that cold, minty cole slaw after spicy, tomatoey meat dish was an absolute treat.

    I feel that sure that finely minced peppermint would taste as good.


    19 Mar 19 - 03:44 PM (#3983181)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Jos

    There are lots of attractive mint flavours - apple mint, pineapple mint, strawberry mint, etc. and plain old garden mint - but the two that I never use in food are spearmint (tastes of chewing gum - horrible) and peppermint (tastes of toothpaste - not what I want in my dinner).


    19 Mar 19 - 10:05 PM (#3983238)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    Last year I made homemade corn tortillas for a taco lunch that friends were coming over to share. When they arrived I put some tilapia fillets into the oven and while those baked I prepared the rest of the toppings for fish tacos. I'd never eaten fish tacos, let alone made them, but as it happened the last friend to arrive brought a cold black bean salad with tomatoes, onion, cilantro, and a vinegar dressing that was PERFECT as the topping to finish our tacos.


    20 Mar 19 - 10:26 AM (#3983363)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Mrrzy

    If one wants to make a vinaigrette without mustard, how does one emulsify it?


    20 Mar 19 - 11:59 AM (#3983388)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: leeneia

    A tiny jot of mayonnaise will do it. Less than half a teaspoon. If you make a small batch and eat it all right away, you may not need it.

    h=Here's my basic recipe:

    Two parts oil of your choice. Corn, canola, olive. I like Smart Balance with omega 3.

    One part of something astringent. Lemon juice, lime juice, juice from a garden tomato, some kind of vinegar. You might want to dilute the vinegar.

    Some black pepper.

    An herb. I like tarragon with lime juice. Basil with lemon juice.

    Put everything in a medium-sized bowl and whisk till the mayo disappears.
    =============
    I'm asking myself how pineapple juice, orange juice or pureed strawberries would do as an astringent ingredient.

    For our small family, I find that 1/4 cup oil plus 2 T of juice makes a useful small batch of salad dressing.


    20 Mar 19 - 12:38 PM (#3983400)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Bonzo3legs

    How do I make myself a sly treacle pudding while my is in hospital recovering from a hip replacement?


    21 Mar 19 - 03:50 AM (#3983504)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: BobL

    You can get microwaveable individual ones in M&S. They're not bad either.


    25 May 19 - 07:21 AM (#3993860)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Thompson

    A vegan coming to lunch or dinner - any good main courses? I'm going to make some ratatouille, and steam fennel over orange juice and white wine, but what's a wow-worthy main course?


    25 May 19 - 09:10 AM (#3993874)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    Orecchiette con cime di rape. It contains olive oil, cherry tomatoes (in my version), chilli, parsley, garlic and seasoning, as well as the main ingredient, which in Puglia is rather stringy turnip tops or similar greens but which I replace with tenderstem broccoli. I leave the florets whole but chop the stems into small pieces.

    Put on the orecchiette pasta (or other short pasta, but I wouldn't use tubes) in boiling salted water in a big pan. Slice the garlic thinly and sauté gently in the olive oil with chilli to taste (I use chilli flakes). You want a bit of heat. When it starts to sizzle (it mustn't go brown), add a handful of halved cherry tomatoes and a handful of chopped fresh parsley. Season. When the pasta has two minutes to go, throw the broccoli into the pasta pan (honest: some recipes have you cooking the greens separately but you absolutely don't need to do that). When the pasta is al dente and the broccoli is cooked but still with slight crunch, drain, retaining a bit of the pasta water. Add the pasta/broccoli mix to the sauce. Stir well, adding a bit of the retained water if needed. There you go. We have this with parmesan but that is completely optional and would typically be served without in Puglia unless you ask for some. A final dressing of extra virgin olive oil is good.


    25 May 19 - 09:31 AM (#3993877)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Charmion

    Like Steve said.

    We have pasta-and-greens for supper sometimes, usually with cheese but sometimes with toasted pine nuts, which would be vegan. I've never been to Puglia and never expect to go, so I have no idea if that's canonical.

    This dish also works with boiled potatoes, especially leftovers. For greens, use literally anything a bit bitter, even kale (which needs steaming before it goes in the pan). Instead of tomatoes, I like to add the juice of a lemon if I have any lying around idle.

    The other vegan dish I like well enough to serve to guests is Madhur Jaffrey's channa dhal with meat spices, served with rice and a cilantro=and-lime chutney. Jaffrey also has a terrific recipe for channas with tomato and spinach. In fact, if you plan to entertain the vegans often, Thompson, "Vegetarian India" by Madhur Jaffrey is well worth buying.


    25 May 19 - 09:45 AM (#3993879)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    A few pasta dishes are vegan until it comes to the cheese on top at the end. I'm thinking of the Sicilian dish pasta alla Norma, which has a delicious tomato and aubergine sauce. You'd normally sprinkle some salted ricotta (ricotta salata) on top, but often in Sicily they would replace the expensive cheese with toasted breadcrumbs on pasta dishes. I haven't tried that on that dish but it could work. It works on pasta con la sarde well enough.


    25 May 19 - 10:29 AM (#3993888)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Thompson

    Thanks! I hadn't thought of pasta!


    27 May 19 - 11:41 AM (#3994186)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    Though it isn't exactly soup weather, I made a small batch of chicken soup last night to use for lunches this week. Soup and salad for warmer summer days.


    27 May 19 - 04:01 PM (#3994239)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Jos

    Apologies if I missed it, but:

    On 14 November last year, Steve Shaw said: ‘I have my own salmorejo recipe but I couldn't possibly post it in November in the northern hemisphere. Ask me again in May.’

    So I'm asking ...


    27 May 19 - 08:33 PM (#3994261)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    Right then, Jos. This is my recipe using the best vine-ripened tomatoes you can get your hands on. They must be fully red-ripe, not green about the gills, but mustn't have started to go soft and squishy. You can use canned plum tomatoes instead, but they must be the best. Cirio is a good brand.

    Salmorejo is a cousin of gazpacho, but it's thicker and is served very cold in small quantities as a tapa, best on a hot, sunny day. The quality of your ingredients is paramount. Any one ingredient that is below par will ruin the dish. Silk purse, sow's ear, etc.

    For four, you need:

    About a pound and a half of vine-ripened tomatoes
    The yolks of two hard-boiled eggs
    At least 100ml of the very best extra virgin olive oil
    A goodly dash of sherry vinegar (essential)
    One smallish ciabatta, slightly stale is best, no hard crusts left on
    Half a teaspoon of sugar
    Two peeled garlic cloves
    Salt

    First step: blend everything except the bread into a rustically smooth paste. Ps. Don't bother to skin the tomatoes!

    Second step: break up the bread and soak it in your paste for ten minutes. Best to slightly underdo the bread if you're not sure how much to use. You can always tweak with a bit extra later on.

    Third step: blend again now that the bread is in. If it seems a bit runny, add a bit more bread. Taste for seasoning, then just chill for a few hours or overnight.

    Salmorejo is always served with a sprinkling of chopped hard-boiled egg and a pinch of finely-chopped Serrano ham on top. A mini-breadstick or two is generally served. It should be served very cold, maybe in a glass that has also been chilled. It will keep and Improve for a day or two in the fridge.


    28 May 19 - 02:32 AM (#3994275)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Jos

    That's great Steve, thank you.


    28 May 19 - 12:09 PM (#3994316)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Thompson

    How's about desserts? And normally I'd make smoothies, but is there any alternative to yogurt? (My go-to smoothie is made in a Nutrabullet with orange juice, almond milk, yogurt, frozen mango, frozen mixed berries including blackcurrants and blackberries, and a banana and a couple of passionfruit, oh, and a squish of honey.


    29 May 19 - 09:26 PM (#3994440)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    I weeded one corner of the garden where herbs sprawl through the tall grass, and some mint is drying hanging over the kitchen sink (the strands pulled out by accident with the grass. I'll harvest it for real in a day or two.)

    My garden has oregano, rosemary, bay laurel, cilantro, lemon balm, thyme (though I think it needs replanting, the patch got shaded out and disappeared last year), garlic, onions, and more I'm probably not remembering right now. I'm not seeing basil yet this year (it usually reseeds itself) so I'll have to plant more. I love being able to step outside to pick fresh what goes into my cooking, but I realized this spring that I've been doing less cooking after I went through 18 months of steroid treatment for PMR (finished tapering last fall). After research I was careful about what I ate (avoiding foods that are considered a source of inflammation - since we didn't know why I had this, it seemed wise to avoid foods that might be cuplrits.) I eat less wheat than before, but I'm resuming a more "normal" diet. Now to lose the weight I gained during the couple of years of PMR (it took a while to realize there was a problem and wait on doctors to diagnose it.)

    I love things like focaccia with olive oil, herbs, and Parmesan cheese, made with herbs from the garden. If friends are coming over and that is underway when the arrive, it's one of the most welcoming smells imaginable. I'll probably make it for friends coming for lunch on Saturday.

    On the other side of the driveway are the tomatoes, peppers, eggplant, okra, potatoes, sweet potatoes, and again, more that I've forgotten to catalog. It's going it late, but it's going in, and if I can keep the stink bugs from demolishing my crops, maybe I'll do more cooking this year. Pardon me while I go pour the watering can with added organic Spinosad over the top of things I planted yesterday . . .


    30 May 19 - 10:07 AM (#3994468)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Thompson

    But dessert?


    30 May 19 - 10:59 AM (#3994472)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    I use smoothies for breakfast most times - I use yogurt (only the varieties that are all cultured milk, I like some milkfat in there but will use non-fat if that's all that is available) with really ripe banana and a generous handful of frozen fruit, usually strawberries, but I'll use blueberries if I have no strawberries. A touch of honey or stevia if the bananas aren't super sweet. Into the blender, and there you have it.

    I love bread pudding for dessert, apple cobbler, or quick (soda leavening) breads like banana bread, pumpkin bread, zucchini bread, etc. All homemade. And the breads can be made in bulk then stored in the freezer.


    31 May 19 - 09:08 AM (#3994655)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Mrrzy

    Ew stevia... Tastes like saccharine or aspartame or other artificial sweeteners. I know stevia isn't artificial but ick. I envy those who can eat it. Wonder if it's like cilantro, genetic taster non-taster thing?


    31 May 19 - 10:15 AM (#3994666)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Dave Hanson

    Never heard of stevia, what's that then ?


    Dave H


    31 May 19 - 04:49 PM (#3994716)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    I ate a very small amount of sweets sweetened with Stevia a couple of years ago. They turned my stomach into a fair copy of a cement mixer.


    31 May 19 - 06:02 PM (#3994723)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Joe_F

    Half a can of Hormel's chunky chili, with a slice of onion chopped & mixed into it, zapped, then garnished with cubes of seriously sharp cheddar.


    01 Jun 19 - 01:27 PM (#3994811)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Jos

    I mistakenly tried Heinz 'no added sugar' baked beans, thinking that meant they would be less sweet. How wrong I was. They were incredibly sweet, having been sweetened with stevia, and the sauce had a vile, slimy, jelly-like texture. Totally inedible.


    02 Jun 19 - 08:17 AM (#3994901)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Mrrzy

    Some nondiet pops [sodas] have it now.


    02 Jun 19 - 12:31 PM (#3994943)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    Stevia is a plant in the dandelion family. It contains glycosides in its leaves that are hundreds of times "sweeter" than sugar. You're welcome to it.


    02 Jun 19 - 12:41 PM (#3994945)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Jos

    Another food plant causing sweetness problems is globe artichoke. It affects the taste buds so that whatever you eat or drink soon after eating the artichoke will taste sweet, whether you want it to or not.


    03 Jun 19 - 03:46 AM (#3995026)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: mg

    people vary with response to stevia. i thrive on it...


    03 Jun 19 - 04:39 PM (#3995154)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    Glad to hear that, Mary! I buy bulk jars at the Vitamin Shoppe in town and decant it into a smaller container on my tea preparation tray.

    Smoothie for lunch today, and to appease the taste buds wanted a salty snack, I had a couple of slices of hard salami and a couple of slices (they're all fairly small) of smoked gouda, leftover from lunch this weekend, brought by a friend. I've been making a decaff version of Market Spice Tea (Mary should know that one!) that I use for iced tea. A hint of Stevia in it and it's great instead of soda pop, fruit drinks, and other sugary drinks. (My father would be shocked that I add any sweetener to Market Spice tea, it was his favorite and he drank it without anything added. Mary also knew my father.)


    04 Jun 19 - 10:50 AM (#3995228)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Mrrzy

    Mg, how are you on cilantro (the leaves)?


    04 Jun 19 - 08:36 PM (#3995268)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Charmion

    I like stevia. I also like aspartame, which tastes so much better than that stuff it replaced: saccharine. Now, that was just nasty.

    Last night, I made a really good chicken-and-rice-type dish using farro instead of rice. I browned some chicken pieces (sprinkled with Old Bay seasoning) and set them aside, then added garlic, onion and reconstituted porcini to the pan, followed by farro. For liquid, I used stock, and the water from soaking the porcini, with some lemon juice, seasoned with salt, pepper and thyme. The proportion of liquid to farro is the same as for rice.

    I let the farro cook in the big sauté pan for half an hour before putting the chicken pieces on top of the half-cooked grain, put the lid back on and let it alone until the farro was done. It was just delicious — the grains plump and tender, but chewy. With a cheap bottle of Provençal rose, it was a terrific meal. Definitely a recipe to add to the rotation.


    04 Jun 19 - 09:55 PM (#3995274)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    Charmion, that sounds wonderful. I don't think I've ever eaten farro. I've used quinoa in place of rice a few times.

    Saccharine is my fall-back sweetener if Stevia isn't available. There was a Facebook discussion about sweeteners, and Mudcat's own Max Spiegel popped in to offer his opinion about artificial sweeteners, and it was something like "sphincter leak" - enough of a remark to send me researching these things more. Splenda was quickly dropped off of my "acceptable" list.


    05 Jun 19 - 12:57 AM (#3995276)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: mg

    i rarely encounter cilantro but i don't think i get a bad taste from it.


    05 Jun 19 - 09:07 AM (#3995322)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Mrrzy

    Ok I have a question: I was defrosting some steak for stroganoff, on a plate, and some juice collected on the plate so I thought I'd use it in the sauce, so I put it in the measuring cup. I added hot water but when I came back with my Better Than Bouillon there was something like a jellyfish in my measuring cup. What happened?


    05 Jun 19 - 10:01 AM (#3995327)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Charmion

    The "juice" that leaked onto the plate was watery blood, Mrrzy, and you cooked the protein in it when you added hot water to the cup. Hence the strings.


    05 Jun 19 - 10:35 AM (#3995331)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Mrrzy

    Was it edible? I knew it was blood but I never saw the like.


    05 Jun 19 - 11:39 AM (#3995337)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    If it seems gross don't add it or you won't enjoy the dish as much, no matter how delicious. ;-)


    05 Jun 19 - 05:42 PM (#3995369)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Thompson

    Many thanks for the vegan recipes; I ended up making Pasta Alla Norma, the Ottolenghi version but without ricotta, and will make it again; it was very nice! Smoothies (made fattened with almond butter, in absence of yogurt) went down well as an aperitif.


    05 Jun 19 - 08:39 PM (#3995379)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Charmion

    Yes, Mrrzy, blood is edible, if not particularly palatable to most people without some help from the rest of the ingredients of a black pudding. Nomadic herders such as the Masai get much of their dietary protein from blood at certain times of the year, bleeding rather than killing their cattle.


    05 Jun 19 - 11:14 PM (#3995385)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Mrrzy

    I knew the blood was, that's why I was gonna cook with it. But could I trust the jellyfish zombie?


    06 Jun 19 - 09:12 AM (#3995419)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Charmion

    Absent a contaminant such as E. coli, cooked blood will not make you sick, Mrrzy, but the texture you describe makes it unlikely to integrate pleasantly into most dishes I am familiar with.

    When making a dish that includes blood, such as the really old-fashioned version of coq-au-vin in which the blood of the elderly rooster is used to thicken the sauce, you handle it like raw egg. You don't just dump a beaten egg into hot milk and expect to end up with custard; you add the hot milk slowly to the egg while beating the mixture vigorously to retard the cooking process and, thus, prevent the egg protein from curdling. Likewise, the coq-au-vin is made by stewing an old cock in wine and, when the meat is cooked, beating the winy cooking liquid into a bowl of the reserved blood of the bird, then adding it back to the stewpot. Cook a bit more to integrate the whole, then serve.

    You will notice that this process assumes that you have killed and bled the cock yourself -- not common in this day and age, except perhaps among people who raise poultry in a somewhat nineteenth-century way.


    06 Jun 19 - 09:45 AM (#3995423)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Mrrzy

    Aha, tempering. I just didn't think of it. Thanks all, I had fears of it coming back out of the disposall and doing The Blob on my cat in the middle of the night.


    08 Jun 19 - 01:22 PM (#3995668)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    Not much in the garden yet, everything was planted late so it's still small. But it's time to start thinking about cooking with all of the herbs I have out there and dry some of that mint for tea.


    08 Jun 19 - 02:00 PM (#3995676)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Dave the Gnome

    I discovered a wonderful breakfast the other day. Toasted bagel spread with chopped herring and beetroot and horseradish chutney. Must be my East European heritage coming out :-)


    08 Jun 19 - 03:45 PM (#3995690)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Dave Hanson

    Wow, that sounds great Dave, must try it.

    Dave H


    09 Jun 19 - 01:08 PM (#3995729)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Thompson

    A friend passing through today said she'd found a wonderful way to serve fizzy water on ice: add long slivers of cucumber and shreds of fine-chopped mint. A party in your mouth, she says.


    09 Jun 19 - 05:11 PM (#3995758)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Mrrzy

    That sounds marvy.


    12 Jun 19 - 09:18 AM (#3996070)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Charmion

    Chicken legs on the barbecue! With Old Bay seasoning!

    Green salad, and maybe some boiled patates tossed in butter with black pepper and chopped green onion.

    And a bottle of rosé. The Liquor Control Board of Ontario sent me an email declaring Rosé Day on Saturday, but I was too sick then to take part -- and besides, surely that is a moveable feast? If not, it should be.


    12 Jun 19 - 11:42 PM (#3996158)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    I buy avocados when they're on sale, make guacamole, then freeze it in an ice cube tray, heaped up on each cube space. I store the green "cubes" in a zip lock freezer bag, pulling out one or two at a time. They defrost fairly quickly at room temperature; microwaving them can go from frozen to cooked quickly. Only do a few second bursts at a time if you must defrost that way.

    • Avocados
    • Lemon Juice
    • grated onion (my son used to refuse to eat onion if he could see it)
    • garlic (through a garlic press)
    • salt
    • finely diced seeded jalapeno peppers (I use ~ 1 pepper per 2 avocados)
    • cilantro, chopped small if fresh (I freeze it in a zip lock bag, flatten with the air out, so I can break off a portion and quickly crumble it into what I'm making


    15 Jun 19 - 12:26 AM (#3996496)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    Leftover chicken breast was pulled apart and added to a skillet of sauteed slices of onion and bell peppers, plus a little smoke flavor, resulting in a nice filling for fajitas. Corn tortillas came out of the freezer and were heated then filled. Topped with guacamole and shredded lettuce. Taptatio sauce added a great accent.


    15 Jun 19 - 06:37 PM (#3996579)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: WalkaboutsVerse

    Another thing to do with avocado - after you remove the kernel, fill the cavity formed with honey or, in my case, maple syrup..."My Diet"


    15 Jun 19 - 10:14 PM (#3996591)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: leeneia

    I was surprised to read that Liquid Smoke is actually made with smoke. I had assumed it was just a bunch of flavorings.


    16 Jun 19 - 09:03 AM (#3996652)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Mrrzy

    I heard that yesterday, and was also surprised.


    16 Jun 19 - 10:54 AM (#3996672)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    I've been aware of that for a long time. However, smoke flavor is like smoke - not good for you if you do too much too often.


    01 Jul 19 - 11:15 AM (#3998700)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    This morning a quick breakfast of a square of broccoli cornbread. Here is my recipe, using a gluten-free mix of a brand called Firenza. It's a sweet recipe, and is one of many products I've had in my freezer from when I was eating a pretty exclusively gluten-free diet.

    The full recipe here is meant to be baked in a 9" by 13" cake pan. I half the recipe and bake it in an 8" x 8" glass pan.

    2 boxes Jiffy (popular American brand) cornbread mix
    1 medium onion, chopped
    2 sticks butter (American sticks are 4 oz or 1/2 cup)
    1 carton (16 oz) small curd cottage cheese (I used ricotta)
    4 eggs
    1 small box or bag of chopped frozen broccoli, thawed.

    • Spray 9" x 11" pan with spray oil (Pam is a brand here; I spread on ghee)
    • Saute the chopped onion in the melted butter until just tender. Don't worry about the amount of butter, you need it for liquid in the mix.
    • Combine everything and still until well mixed.
    • Put in greased pan and bake at 350o oven for 43-45 minutes.


    My observations: I fry the onion in a small amount of butter and melt the rest carefully in the microwave so it isn't super warm, just melted. There is so much butter in this that greasing the pan seems redundant. I usually have to bake for about 50 minutes.


    01 Jul 19 - 11:32 AM (#3998702)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Mrrzy

    Sounds yummy. Big fan of cornbread here, don't make it well though. Like gazpacho. Found some single-serve gazp online, delish. But I am ashamed.


    01 Jul 19 - 06:24 PM (#3998764)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Joe_F

    Chili as before, but dessert will be

    F DESSERT

    On a slice of pound cake, pour a capful of brandy or rum. Cover with sour cream. Spread jam or marmalade on top. Sprinkle with Brownulated & cinnamon.


    01 Jul 19 - 08:34 PM (#3998779)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Charmion

    Brown rice pilaf with chicken — onion, garlic, olive oil, sun-dried tomatoes, sauté until the onion is soft, add a cup of brown rice and stir it around for a while until the grains look a bit translucent on the ends, then add about two and a half cups of chicken stock. Bring to a boil, then clap a lid on and turn down the burner as low as it will go. When the rice is about half cooked (try with a fork), brown some chicken pieces — legs are best— and put them on top of the rice. Put the lid back on and cook until all is done.

    I use a large sauté pan for this. If you put Old Bay seasoning on the chicken, it’s extra good.


    01 Jul 19 - 10:18 PM (#3998785)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    Charmion, I make a variety of rice and chicken in my rice cooker that sounds similar. I start sauteing the chicken pieces (thighs, cut up chicken breast, any of it without skin) and let it finish cooking in the rice cooker (I usually use brown Basmati rice). I like to add sliced mushrooms to the chicken cooking then that is also put in with the rice.

    Comfort food. :)


    02 Jul 19 - 09:02 AM (#3998836)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Charmion

    SRS, I make that pilaf often because Himself just loves it. It's easy, savoury and nourishing, and it usually generates a substantial quantity of leftover rice that makes a great lunch when nuked with an egg in it.

    Yesterday, Himself drove all the way home to Stratford from Altamont, NY, a suburb of Schenectady, where he had been camping at the Old Songs festival. A freaky wind that pushed the tent around meant he got little to no sleep, so he was running on fumes. I worry about that man.


    03 Jul 19 - 02:45 PM (#3999033)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Mrrzy

    Bison or venison spaghetti tonight? Bison feels more American somehow... Not that deer-hunting isn't American... But deer are international. Happy 4th to you ex-colonials!


    03 Jul 19 - 05:58 PM (#3999074)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: WalkaboutsVerse

    I do love a peanut butter and jam sandwich and will be packing one for the office tomorrow (4/7/19) morning - the other will have iceberg lettuce, vegan cheese, black olives, butter beans and ketchup (photo here ).


    05 Jul 19 - 08:48 AM (#3999361)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Charmion

    Mrrzy, Poland and Belarus also have bison, known to science as Bison bonasus, but they are too endangered to eat. Here's a Wikipedia article about them.

    I like Zubrowka Bison vodka, which is flavoured with Hierochloe odorata (buffalo grass) harvested from the Bialowieza Forest, home of the last herd of European bison. Both the bison and the forest are very, very protected, if Wikipedia is to be believed.


    05 Jul 19 - 11:31 AM (#3999382)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Big Al Whittle

    Just reading through this thread. Very impressed Steve Shaw with all this posh stuff you know about food.

    I find it all quite hard to relate to.

    I think maybe one's attitude to food says something about your character. I think maybe one chooses ones battles. The thing you tussle with. To me its all about six fucking strings and a lump of wood - a conundrum, I face up to every day - and never seems to resolve itself.


    05 Jul 19 - 11:40 AM (#3999387)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    Big Al, what do you eat when you eat?


    05 Jul 19 - 04:11 PM (#3999443)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Big Al Whittle

    just stuff. nothing clever.

    i fry spanish onions in a wok add curry powder. can of sweet corn uncle bens rice. can of tuna.

    or fry spanish onions in a wok add curry powder. can of tomatoes. can of red beans. two veg oxo cubes. quorn mince.

    or fry spanish onions in a wok add curry powder. shredded cheese. put in 5 minute chef - add whipped up egg.

    or fry spanish onions in a wok add curry powder, add corned beef. add baked beans, serve on toast or baked spud.

    got a pressure cooker, when i feel adventurous. the pressure cooker is good and quick for cassweoles. but you've got to boil off the watery consistency - cos the water can't escape.

    we like oven fish and chips.


    05 Jul 19 - 08:19 PM (#3999476)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Mrrzy

    Don't like curry much, do you...


    05 Jul 19 - 09:47 PM (#3999485)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    . . . or onions.


    06 Jul 19 - 02:00 AM (#3999491)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Big Al Whittle

    I use a medium curry powder. It helps the onions caramelise.


    06 Jul 19 - 11:19 AM (#3999502)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    Fish tacos today for lunch with friends; the corn tortillas are still hot from the Mexican grocery store that has a bakery inside. Cebeche appetizer and guacamole and pico de gallo to go with them.


    06 Jul 19 - 11:57 AM (#3999517)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Big Al Whittle

    you got Mexicans coming round, or do you eat that stuff regularly?


    07 Jul 19 - 12:15 PM (#3999694)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Charmion

    She lives in Texas, Big Al, where that stuff is normal grub.


    07 Jul 19 - 12:24 PM (#3999695)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Charmion

    Big Al, your recipes remind me of my Dad, whose cooking always began with chopping up an onion. I don't honestly remember him making anything that did not have onions in it. That might be a Brit thing.

    Dad made five dishes: beans out of a can with stuff added (starting with onions); omelette; curry according to a British Army recipe; lasagna from the recipe on the side of the pasta box; and coq au vin for when people came to dinner. He could also fry an egg, more or less.


    07 Jul 19 - 12:41 PM (#3999698)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    Charmion is correct&mash;I live in Texas where there is "TexMex" that I'm not particularly fond of (it's a stylized mashup where everything is greasy and topped with gobs of tomato sauce and melted cheese) and then there is the closer to authentic regional food from different parts of Mexico and further south. I lived in Arizona for a couple of years, right at the border. There was a town two miles across the border that had excellent little restaurants (versus the nearest American town 35 miles away that didn't have such great restaurants). So I ate out in Mexico several times a week. And we were about an hour's drive from the northern end of the Sea of Cortez, so there was a lot of fish on the menu along with the typical chicken, beef, pork, etc.

    My side of town here in North Texas has a lot of large grocery stores that serve clientele from South of the Border. Not just Mexico, but Central and South America as well, but I'd say the lion's share of customers are from Columbia northward. The grocery store a couple of miles north of me has a tortilla bakery running every day that has excellent quality flour and corn tortillas and a few other flattened breads I'm not sure what they're called.

    This is in contrast to many Middle Eastern stores near the campus where I worked, where I bought a different array of spices and foods, and the flat breads are pita and tandoori (Iraqi flat bread - the size of a modest pizza).

    There are plenty of American grocery stores here with all of the advertised products and brands, and they try to carry International foods, but really, if you want a better selection and fresher products, you go to the store frequented by that particular segment of the immigrant culture here.

    I didn't grow up down here, I grew up in the Pacific Northwest where the International food at the time was Chinese and Japanese, and then I lived for a while in New York City where you eat just about anything that suited you, you simply needed to travel to the right neighborhood.

    The fastest way to get to know people is to share your food and their food while you speak together and listen. Trump needs to stop going to McDonalds and KFC and eating those tough over-cooked steaks of his and get out into neighborhoods and eat a more International diet.


    07 Jul 19 - 09:43 PM (#3999764)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    I cook a good number of Italian dishes these days. I can't be bothered with a pasta machine so I buy dried pasta. I've found that the bronze-die pasta, especially from Gragnano in Campania, is by far the best (try Tesco!). There are some unwritten rules. First, garlic and onions shouldn't be in the same dish. Mostly, it's onion that is left out. Second, pasta dishes don't need half as much sauce as some Brits think. Third, pasta sauces from jars are invariably way too claggy. Too much onion and tomato. It's so bloody easy to make your own! Fourth, no parmesan with fish, ever. Fifth, do not use a garlic crusher. Use more garlic but slice it up. Even better, use four times as much but just smash the peeled cloves with your fist. Sixth, don't bother skinning tomatoes. If the skin bothers you, just cut the toms up first. But tinned plum tomatoes are brilliant anyway. Seventh, any dish that contains any amount of tomatoes is infinitely improved by the addition of half a teaspoon of sugar. Eighth, ignore the idiots who tell you not to cook with extra virgin olive oil. Use it but just don't let it smoke. Any other oils are simply inferior. Ninth, never use dried basil. Vile. Dried oregano is fine, especially on pizzas. Most Italians use far less herbs than you'd think. We spent a week in Puglia, eating at superb restaurants in Lecce, and hardly whiffed a herb all week. Tenth, any pasta dish is improved in the serving with a goodly drizzle of your best olive oil on top. Eleventh, parmesan absolutely must be freshly grated on top of the dish. No need to give anyone any choice here. Twelfth, there is no such dish as spaghetti bolognese. Use tagliatelle or pappardelle or fettuccini instead, and. mix the sauce with the pasta. A pile of pasta with a puddle of sauce on top is just risible. Last, always conserve a cupful of pasta water. More often then not your sauce will be too dry/thick. The pasta water is used to thin the sauce to the correct consistency.


    07 Jul 19 - 10:05 PM (#3999765)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    We will have to agree to disagree. Not only do onion and garlic go together, they are essential parts of many dishes I make (and the Puerto Rican dishes I learned from my mother-in-law; her sofrito is based on peppers, onion, garlic, and cilantro).

    I picked up ceviche (various spellings - it's a Mexican dish, raw fish marinated in citrus with onions and peppers and cilantro) for lunch with friends yesterday and had the rest for dinner tonight. Mmmmm!


    07 Jul 19 - 10:17 PM (#3999767)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    You can mix onion with garlic in non-Italian dishes, but honest-to-goodness Italian chefs don't mix them. Feel free to check it out. The onion makes pasta sauces too claggy/gloopy. You're not disagreeing with me. You're disagreeing with Italian tradition! And no self-respecting Italian would ever use the abomination which is dried basil...


    08 Jul 19 - 11:08 AM (#3999806)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Charmion

    You get no argument from me on dried basil, Steve, or the onion-or-garlic issue with respect to pasta sauce. Most non-Italians attempting to cook Italian food are using inferior ingredients (well, inferior to Italian standards), especially tasteless tomatoes, hence the effort to boost the flavour any way they can. I like Marcella Hazan's advice to put an onion in whole and fish it out when the sauce is done, thus avoiding the claggy texture.

    I made her tomato, butter and onion sauce the other day to eat with linguine. But I had only Mexican tomatoes shipped all the way to Ontario to work with (they were on special!), so I tossed in a bunch of fresh oregano from the garden to help out. The result was so good I wanted to eat it with a spoon right out of the saucepan -- but not Marcella's classic sauce. So sue me.

    Sofrito, on the other hand, is not Italian, and does require both onions and garlic. I know it as the first stage of paella and a whole lot of other Spanish dishes; I have never been to Puerto Rico and never expect to go, but I'm not at all surprised to learn that PR cooking starts with sofrito.

    The other cuisine I attempt that goes in for both onion and garlic in the same dish is Indian -- practically every dal dish in Madhoor Jaffrey calls for both, plus a whole whack of other stuff to add flavour to otherwise pretty well tasteless, if nourishing, legumes and grains. The function of onions in a dal dish often seems to be to thicken the sauce; you chop them so finely that they go into the pan as a mass of aromatic fibre. Garlic, on the other hand, goes in at the end, with the spices fried in oil that make up the tarka.


    08 Jul 19 - 03:29 PM (#3999872)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Mrrzy

    When I was in Ireland in the 90's they hardly ever cooked with garlic, but fed it to their pigs.
    You have taught me a new word: claggy.


    08 Jul 19 - 06:20 PM (#3999898)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    Soffritto is the basis of many an Italian dish, including bolognese ragu (great for lasagne too) and some soups. It includes extra virgin olive oil, onions, celery and carrots. Maybe some pancetta, depending on the recipe. But never garlic. Never. Not in Italian dishes. Marcella's onion and butter sauce is so simple and so amazing. We have it as is on spaghetti with parmesan. The best thing is to buy a white onion. It's easier to remove at the end. I made a large batch two days ago. I'm thinking of using it in gnocchi alla sorrentina. There'll be basil in there and a ton of mozzarella (never buffalo - not worth the money). I never bake that gnocchi dish. Not worth the hassle.


    09 Jul 19 - 09:02 AM (#3999978)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Charmion

    Chicken fricassee. The Monday night supper when imagination has hit bottom and people must still be fed.

    One chicken leg or two chicken thighs per person
    Olive oil
    At least one onion
    Garlic ad lib
    Shallots if you have them
    Dried thyme and oregano, if liked
    Salt and black pepper
    Zest and juice of one lemon, or about half to three-quarters of a cup of wine if you happen to have it lying around.

    1. Slice up the onion, shallot and garlic (note Steve Shaw, above).
    2. Put a tablespoon or so of olive oil in a sauté pan and brown the chicken pieces. Salt and pepper them liberally, and scatter with herbs.
    3. Add the sliced onion, shallot and garlic to the pan around the chicken pieces and scatter the lemon zest over the chicken. Put the lid on the pan and turn the gas to a low murmur. Leave it alone until the chicken is cooked.
    4. Take the chicken pieces out of the pan and add the lemon juice; turn up the gas and reduce the contents of the pan (the onions etc) to a thick sauce. Spoon it over the chicken and serve.


    09 Jul 19 - 11:05 AM (#4000004)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Mrrzy

    Chick fric. A fave but the skin is never crispy.


    09 Jul 19 - 06:41 PM (#4000078)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    My point was that Italian dishes rarely if ever contain both onion and garlic. Non-Italian dishes may differ. I don't see the point of using both onions and shallots in a dish. Shallots are onions. In fact, I use banana shallots instead of onions in most dishes. If you like crispy chicken skin, which I do, you'll like this one-tray dish. And it has garlic AND onion, but not as you know it.

    Per person, you need either two large or three smaller free-range chicken thighs, bone-in, skin on. Not legs, which, unless part of a whole roast chicken, are cat food. You also need some best-quality salad potatoes, about 250g per person, scrubbed (not peeled) and cut into small chunks. You also need a few shallots OR onions, cut into big chunks or wedges. That'll do for now, but later you'll need one bell pepper per person cut into four large pieces, a generous amount of fresh parsley and two heads of garlic broken into unpeeled cloves.

    Get one, two or three large oven trays. Your stuff needs to be spread out. Slick the chicken, onion and potatoes with extra virgin olive oil. Season. Chicken skin side up. That goes into a 200C oven for fifteen minutes. After that time, throw in the unpeeled garlic cloves and the pieces of red pepper. Slick them with the oil in the trays. You may need to loosen the spuds and onion pieces. Put the trays back in the oven for another 25-30 minutes.

    Your chicken will be beautifully cooked and will have crispy skin. Sprinkle the whole lot with chopped parsley and serve up. It's gorgeous but will stink out an unventilated kitchen all the next day. Thanks to Nigella Lawson for the inspiration. Make sure everyone gets a fair share of the garlic cloves. You can suck out the incredibly sweet, soft middles with gay abandon. Now THAT'S how to eat garlic. And chicken skin, Mrrzy.


    10 Jul 19 - 02:31 AM (#4000104)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Big Al Whittle

    The thing I never understand about Italian cooking is those sachets of pasta they sell in the supermarket. They all reputedly have things in them that I like - but I can never taste what its supposed to be.

    I have a friend who lived in Italy a number of years and she eats the sachets with a bit of olive oil.

    Mind you, she is a weird cook - she made me a fish pie once and I swear to God, I reckon there was maybe one fish finger in the whole bloody thing.

    That lasagne thing in Goodfellas that they did in prison looked good.


    12 Jul 19 - 07:59 AM (#4000435)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Charmion

    Steve, that sheet-pan chicken thing looks like a cousin to half a dozen recipes in any given Jamie Oliver collection. I make it without the slices of red pepper; next time, I'll toss those in, too. Roasted red pepper is always good. (Except, of course, when I burn it a bit too much. But hey.)

    Yes, shallots are onions, but they taste slightly different from yellow onions, and they caramelize faster -- presumably because they are sweeter. I like the combined effect, which I'm sure is lost on others. YMMV. By the way, what's a banana shallot? I have never seen anything of that name in an Ontario supermarket.


    12 Jul 19 - 09:03 AM (#4000451)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Mrrzy

    That sounds great, with all that garlic. Would be good with cauliflower, ya think?


    12 Jul 19 - 10:03 AM (#4000464)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Charmion

    Why not, Mrrzy? With enough olive oil, most anything will roast nicely.

    Stronger-tasting members of the cabbage family might not be so successful, however — oh, wait. Perhaps Brussels sprouts?


    12 Jul 19 - 10:12 AM (#4000467)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Dave Hanson

    I buy Pakistani/Indian ingrediants at the Halal Supermarket in Bradford and Chinese ingrediants at the Chinese Supermarket in Leed, NEVER EVER buy British supermarket oriental sauces [ Tesco etc ] I once ran out of preserved black beans so to save a trip to Leeds I got a sachet of black bean sauce from Tesco's, it tasted like it was made with 4 ounces of sugar in it, bloody awful, so sickly sweet it was unpalatable to me.

    Dave H


    12 Jul 19 - 10:55 AM (#4000474)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    The tomato plants in my yard are large but producing zero, so I bought some "vine ripe" tomatoes a while back. Didn't get around to using them all for slicing, so now they're simmering for sauce. And I realize this is a summer smell I've missed - cooking tomatoes as I prepare for canning.

    The grapes across the road survived the clear-cut by bulldozer, but they're still not ripe. It's a late year for them, mostly because of the overcast and extra rain. They're usually ready around the Fourth of July. I make mustang grape jelly, and the house smells wonderful with the steam juicer perking away.


    12 Jul 19 - 02:24 PM (#4000515)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: leeneia

    Long ago, the newspaper had a recipe for Alabama white sauce. It's delicious on chicken. Some people use lots of ingredients, including hot sauce, but I don't.

    Roast, saute or grill some chicken
    Mix the following:

    one-half cup good mayonnaise (serves 2-3 people)
    about 4 tsp apple-cider vinegar
    12-15 grindings of black pepper
    Stir till smooth. Consistency should be that of gravy.

    Serve the chicken and spoon the Alabama white sauce over it.

    Since measuring mayonnaise in a measuring cup is a pain, I just take a big spoon and eyeball approx half cup. After that, amounts are a judgment call. Cooks here can handle it.

    We had this on the 4th of July with a tossed salad and carrots with butter and ginger. Watermelon for dessert.


    13 Jul 19 - 12:44 PM (#4000589)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    Banana shallots are also called echalions. They're bigger then typical shallots and are elongated. The traybake chicken idea comes from Nigella's book How To Eat. She puts everything in at the start. I found that if I do that the peppers and garlic cloves burn. That's why I delay putting them in for the first 15 minutes.


    13 Jul 19 - 01:56 PM (#4000601)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Charmion

    Thanks, Steve. I’ll try that next week.

    Echalions are unknown to me, at least by that name, but I have noticed that the shallots sold around here are much bigger and longer than shallots (échallottes) we’re back in the day. Maybe what Sobey’s Is peddling as shallots are actually the other thing.

    Dave H’s point about Chinese sauces is spot on. There’s the real stuff, and then there’s the imitation made for non-Asian Americans and Canadians who want to believe they’re cooking a bit on the wild side without running any risk of an unfamiliar flavour. I find that a good way to identify the real stuff is to look for Chinese or Japanese characters on the label. Fortunately, North American cuisine has integrated enough Asian dishes that a basic range of real Chinese, Indian and Japanese ingredients is available in most supermarkets, alongside the fake sugary American version.


    15 Jul 19 - 09:40 PM (#4000902)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    Copper River salmon - sockeye salmon from a particular river drainage in Alaska. They're running now, so get them while you can. A rich red meat, and usually very expensive. It came in today at Costco for a modest $12 a pound, so I bought a couple for myself, called my ex and bought a couple for him and tomorrow I'll get two for my daughter and one for a friend. They're about 2.5 - 3.0 pounds per package. I have three fillets cut into pieces and brining overnight. I'll smoke them tomorrow. And my ex will use the same brine for overnight tomorrow and I'll smoke his on Wednesday. Repeat for daughter. Friend wants to freeze what she can't eat.

    The high end grocery store up the road will have the larger fish whole or in larger fillets, and it will be half again or double the price per pound. I wish Costco had the larger fillets, you really get the good fat flavor out of those.


    16 Jul 19 - 10:33 AM (#4000921)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Charmion

    Wow, SRS. Bounty indeed. We don't have a Costco membership, mostly because I find the place profoundly intimidating, but occasionally I regret that policy.


    16 Jul 19 - 10:53 AM (#4000926)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Mrrzy

    You can go with a friend, Charmion. I do that every coupla years. And echalion is a great word. Makes me think of the onion knight... A shallot escutcheon. On a stallion.


    16 Jul 19 - 11:08 AM (#4000931)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Jon Freeman

    Wiltshire Farms tonight as neither mum or I (both had bad nights and a few daytime things to deal with) feel like cooking. These frozen meals aren’t brilliant but pretty acceptable all the same and I think are used a fair bit particularly amongst elderly and other groups that might find cooking difficult. We order 10 meals at a time and that stock probably lasts a month and I suppose we regard them as a useful standby.

    Hopefully I’ll do a Quorn mince “cottage pie” tomorrow.


    16 Jul 19 - 11:17 AM (#4000933)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    Jon, I found some Lean Cuisine Chile Lime Chicken with rice frozen meals at my local discount grocery (2 for $3) and loaded up as long as they had them. I figure $1.50 for a 250 calorie lunch or dinner is pretty good, and they were actually quite good. Up until this point I never bothered with frozen meals. Now I glance into that frozen food section to see if anything interesting turns up.


    16 Jul 19 - 03:17 PM (#4000966)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Mrrzy

    Last year at the beach I suddenly found that I had eaten the last shrimp I ever wanted to.
    I got over it. Off to beach tomorrow! Yum!


    17 Jul 19 - 02:08 PM (#4001048)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    My first batch was in longer than needed—because this is a fairly lean salmon it dried out and is a little jerky-like. The next batch spent only about 3 hours in the smoker and is perfect and quite moist. Another batch is in now, and I have one more scheduled for the day. I smell like fish for some reason.


    18 Jul 19 - 11:02 AM (#4001072)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    So what are you all eating when the weather is really hot?


    18 Jul 19 - 01:32 PM (#4001097)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Charmion

    Pasta, with fresh tomato sauce. It involves a fair amount of boiling and simmering, but it's light and savory.


    18 Jul 19 - 04:30 PM (#4001136)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    I like chef's salads - the combination of a lot of ingredients on top of a bed of torn or chopped lettuce. It usually involves at least one form of julienne-type cut up meat (ham and chicken are my favorites), chopped green onion, grated (using the big holes for long strips) cheese, and around the outer rim alternating segments (depending on the size of the tomato) of tomato and halved hard boiled eggs. Usually one or two tomatoes and two boiled eggs. I have a mix of sesame seed, pepitas, sunflower seeds and sliced almonds called "Tours mix" that is roasted briefly then stored in the fridge for salads. Zesty Italian goes on top. Yes, I know, store bought, but it is pretty good.


    18 Jul 19 - 06:23 PM (#4001147)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Mrrzy

    Hot soup (spicy hot and temperature hot) is my go-to hot weather food.


    19 Jul 19 - 12:22 PM (#4001199)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: leeneia

    I have a new cooking approach that saves energy. My energy. When I bring home a package of meat, I cook it all, freeze it in portions, and finish prep on the day we eat.

    Recntly I bought a package of pork steak. The DH grilled it all over a wood fire. That night, we had the pork steak, corn on the cob and cole slow. (There's a hot-weather menu for you.)

    Two weeks later, we used some for Grampa's Pork and Beans. Cut the pork steak into strips. (Kitchen shears work well for this.) Flavor a jar of B&M beans with onions, ketchup and maybe brown sugar. Add the pork and heat gently.

    One day I thought, why not be more natural and add real tomatoes instead of ketchup? The DH was so upset, you would have thought I had given his puppy away. Now I let him flavor the pork and beans himself.

    A couple more weeks passed. We had the pork with an Indonesian flavor. Sizzled the strips with onion, made a sauce with peanut butter, lime juice, soy sauce, garlic, ginger root, black pepper. Served with fried sweet potato, avocado, salad.

    I get tried a lot. I find that cooking meals in steps this way makes mealtime more fun.

    When I cook pasta, I cook the whole package, eat some and freeze some in plastic bags. It is so much easier to pull out the package and heat it with the sauce than to cook up a small batch from scratch.


    20 Jul 19 - 09:47 AM (#4001287)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    I cooked ahead for breakfast this week by making a batch of buttermilk pancakes, then freezing them two at a time. They're better if they defrost on their own, then 30 seconds in the microwave. I know, for purists this is probably an abomination, but homemade warmed over is better than anything you can buy (horrors!) but it's a quick way to pamper myself. I'll make more soon to use up the rest of the buttermilk.

    Often buttermilk is sold in quart or half-gallon containers that means all but a cup or two goes to waste. There is a local high-end grocery that has a pint bottle. It isn't my favorite brand, but it is package for my kind of use. (I prefer to buy cultured dairy products without gelatin, guar gum, etc. I want it cultured to reach the proper consistency and without the various additives.)


    20 Jul 19 - 12:36 PM (#4001297)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Bonzo3legs

    Friday night desert is Vanilla Swedish Glace ice cream with a sticky toffee or blueberry muffin!


    21 Jul 19 - 02:30 AM (#4001333)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Thompson

    I want Steve Shaw for a wife. Though I'd be in trouble when he caught me sneakily crushing garlic. Wait - what am i saying? Would I ever cook with Steve for a wife? No, I'd be out gathering roses to present to him!

    Leeneia, thanks so much for the handy tip about cutting meat in strips with the kitchen shears!

    Do people have any tips on cooking aubergines? I imagine myself like Nero, sending the legions toiling across Africa, Palestine, Judea, Spain and Italy with amphorae of oil enough to supply me every time I cook an aubergine.

    We're increasingly skipping meat on various days; Steve will flinch, but I love Aldi's vegan bangers (cauliflower- or pepper-based).


    21 Jul 19 - 05:44 AM (#4001363)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    Good heavens, you really know how to charm a chap! :-). See you at the church gate...

    I've got nothing against bought stuff every now and again. I cheated with some lasagne last week by using cheap jars of M&S bechamel instead of making my own, and I've just devoured three Warburtons crumpets for breakfast. I did buy some shop burgers and "chicken flatties" for an emergency barbecue last week and was very disappointed with both. Short cuts don't always do the trick. Ready meals are nearly always terrible but I make an exception for M&S moussaka, which is very nice with a bit of salad and garlic bread.

    As for aubergines/egg plants, they consistently defeat me. They always look great and feel plump, but I can never seem to get the skins tender enough to eat. And there's so much conflicting advice as whether to salt or not, how to oil them... Last September we found a taverna on Kefalonia that served gorgeous wafer-thin battered aubergine slices deep-fried. I put about ten pounds on that week.


    21 Jul 19 - 11:16 AM (#4001412)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    I know people eat the skin, but I never do, it seems to have a bitter taste. If I'm cooking a homegrown eggplant (none in the yard this year - the garden is a hot mess) I don't bother with the salt and sit and rinse step because I don't let them grow huge, I pick them around 12 to 16 ounces.

    If you're making babaghanouj, then roast them in a medium oven (350 - 375) for 45 minutes to an hour until you can see the skin starting to slip. Sometimes they'll burst (warning!) but usually once they've baked enough you can pierce it and start pulling and the skin will slip off. Do your mashing and add ingredients from there.

    If you're making eggplant Parmesan, peel it, leave them in a bowl of water, and take them from there to a plate of white flour then a bowl of egg then a plate of seasoned bread crumbs, using the "wet hand, dry hand" approach. I thought I'd invented that myself, but it seems some of those cooks on TV talk about it also. :)

    Use shallow corn oil (1/2 inch) and add a generous pat of butter for great flavor. As much as I love olive oil, it isn't for frying.


    21 Jul 19 - 11:22 AM (#4001414)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Jon Freeman

    I prefer our home grown aubergines when we have them. I choose a small variety called Hansel. I usually pick them at about 3 – 4 inches long.


    21 Jul 19 - 12:06 PM (#4001423)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    Funny you should say that about olive oil. In this weekend's Guardian Rachel Roddy, one of my very favourite writers on Italian food, blows the myth that you shouldn't cook with olive oil right out of the water (sorry, Maggie!). For years now I've kept two types of extra virgin olive oil in the house, one of them usually the bog-standard Napolina/Berio type and the other a superior Tuscan oil. The first is used for most of my cooking and the second for salad dressings and sprinkling on pizza or pasta dishes at the end. Only ever extra virgin. I won't use the over-refined non-virgin stuff. The only rule is to avoid letting the oil smoke, so stand with it and go gently. If I need really hot oil, say for frying a steak or for making my oven chips, I use groundnut oil, which has a high smoke point and a neutral flavour. Eggs and salmon are fried only in butter in my house. That's about the extent of my frying armoury. If I'm making a soffritto or if I'm sautéing sliced garlic and dried chilli flakes at the start of making a pasta sauce, for arrabbiata for example, a good trick is to put the garlic and chilli flakes, or the chopped veg, into the pan of cold oil. You can do that hours in advance if you stir it around a bit. We purists who make life tough by refusing to mince garlic save time later by doing that. Usually, you can then make your sauce in the time it takes to get the pasta al dente. An unspoken rule of Italian cooking in any case is to never leave the kitchen while the pasta is boiling. And always save a bit of pasta water when you drain, in case the sauce needs loosening.


    21 Jul 19 - 12:42 PM (#4001434)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Bonzo3legs

    Sainsburys delivered a vegan pasta source last week, not ordered by us I might add, and I have never tasted anything so vile in all my life.


    21 Jul 19 - 02:22 PM (#4001446)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Thompson

    What is wet hand dry hand?


    21 Jul 19 - 02:24 PM (#4001447)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Thompson

    Oh, and that church gate? Something old will be some aged cheese, something new a fruity little prosecco, something borrowed, perhaps a particularly nice traybake, and something blue…?


    21 Jul 19 - 02:25 PM (#4001449)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    Bought pasta sauces are generally claggy and terrible overcooked mush. Make your own!


    21 Jul 19 - 02:58 PM (#4001459)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    I'm fruity enough, a little ripe perhaps, but blue? Don't tempt me...!


    21 Jul 19 - 03:03 PM (#4001462)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    Steve, I wouldn't use that much olive oil to fry the eggplant, just like I don't use it if I'm breading and frying fish. It uses too much of it. Corn oil is cheaper for that kind of use.

    If I'm frying eggs or cooking pancakes or just about anything that just requires a splash of oil, then I do cook in olive oil.


    21 Jul 19 - 05:44 PM (#4001474)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    I think it comes down to flavour. In Italian cookery I want olive oil, or butter if it's a northern Italy recipe. For really hot frying, an oil that doesn't easily smoke. I'm happy with groundnut oil but I'm sure there are others. I've tried the received-wisdom method of frying eggs in an olive oil/butter mixture. But with eggs I want butter, and, once I remove the eggs to a warm plate I can quickly whack up the heat and use the residual butter to fry my bread, on to which I can then dump my eggs. Breakfast in four minutes flat. My God, it's good...

    Pancakes, butter. Nothing else will do for me. As for fish, some olive oil is a bit too assertive for delicate fish flavours. I tend to use butter. Jayz, I love butter.


    22 Jul 19 - 03:43 AM (#4001511)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: BobL

    Eggs? Bacon fat!


    22 Jul 19 - 06:05 AM (#4001525)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    If you have any bacon fat! I have bacon butties but for some reason I seldom cook bacon and eggs at the same time. Could be because I have this predilection for the occasional all-day full-works breakfast in The Lounge when I visit my daughter in Truro. Can't have heart-attack-on-a-plate TOO often! But I concur...


    22 Jul 19 - 09:43 AM (#4001553)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Charmion

    Funny, as I get older I've rather gone off bacon, at least as a breakfast item. My stomach wants a gentle introduction to the day, and bacon is a bit abrupt. An orange and a bowl of muesli is about my limit, plus coffee.

    The other day, I bought a couple of trout fillets at the supermarket, on special. They were a bit on the thin side, and just a shade too long to fit in our larger non-stick skillet, so I put them under the broiler.

    Gas-fired cookers sold in Canada traditionally did not have broilers, so I never developed that skill. But then we renovated our kitchen and bought an up-to-the-minute cooker with a broiling burner, and now I'm having regular flashes of the culinary obvious.

    So the fish fillets. I laid them skin-side-down on a cookie sheet, sprinkled them with a comparatively subtle barbecue rub (supermarket trout needs all the help it can get, such as a tasty crust), and very gently misted them with olive oil from a spray bottle so they would not dry out. Then I popped them under the broiler for maybe seven minutes. No turning.

    Effing delicious.


    22 Jul 19 - 10:09 AM (#4001558)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    We eat lots of fish but I won't buy farmed fish of any kind. A couple of weeks ago we had black bream from our local fishmonger. Several times in the spring we had dabs. All lovely. Anything I've never tried before gets fried in butter, as with sockeye salmon fillets, which never fails. A very good fish for the barbie is John Dory. I get the fishmonger to render the beasts into two skin-on fillets which I grill with the two halves put back together. I do like to taste the actual fish so I never overdo the marinade/baste. Maybe a bit of olive oil and a squeeze of a lemon and a whiff of garlic. Only a whiff. Maybe a sprinkling of fresh thyme leaves. I season it just before cooking. Delicate fish on the barbie can go on one of those perforated alumin(i)um trays. I think the best way to cook a thick piece of fillet, something like hake, cod, haddock or pollack, skin on, is to open-bake it, well basted, skin side down, on your oven tray just after you've done your oven chips, which you keep warm after decanting on to another tray. Getting the timing right is always fun, but better slightly underdone than overdone. Skinless and boneless fillets can go in the oven wrapped in foil with some butter and salt, or poached on top in milk. The latter is very nice with mashed potato, green beans and parsley sauce, which I make using Delia's all-in-one method. Easy enough.


    22 Jul 19 - 11:32 AM (#4001565)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Thompson

    I've never tried (consciously) oven chips before, but on a lone night last week got oven sweet potato chips in Aldi. They were ace!


    22 Jul 19 - 11:59 AM (#4001575)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    Buy some salad spuds such as Charlotte or Nicola. Cut them into wedges. Don't peel. Par-boil in well-salted water for seven minutes then drain in a sieve. Let them dry off for a minute then return to the pan and rough them up, as with roasties. Put on an oven tray and coat with groundnut oil. They need about 20 minutes in a very hot oven, around 230C. Turn them around just once. Better by miles than any oven chips you can buy in shops and a healthy way to eat spuds as they don't take up too much oil.


    22 Jul 19 - 12:32 PM (#4001582)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: punkfolkrocker

    "what are we eating? give peas a chance..."...


    22 Jul 19 - 12:47 PM (#4001584)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    I don't eat bacon often enough to go through the package before it gets old, so I buy it and re-wrap it in plastic wrap, two slices at a time. I suppose I could freeze it on waxed paper first then put it in a single container (for the person bound to protest the use of so much plastic.) I get the thick-sliced variety so that's enough to go with eggs or to break and fit onto a sandwich that benefits from bacon.


    22 Jul 19 - 01:41 PM (#4001590)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Mrrzy

    I did not see an answer but wet hand dry hand is, use one hand to dip in milk/egg and the other hand for flour etc. Keeps your hand(s) from getting all eggy/floury. I am bad at this technique as I forget in the middle and just use my right hand which ends up looking as if it needs to be fried... Also this is for dipping multiple things; if it's just one thing, who cares.


    22 Jul 19 - 04:32 PM (#4001618)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    I just love getting my hands into food. Much better than stirring with spoons, etc. I make huge amounts of stuffing for freezing. Get yer hands in there! You can make far better burgers if you do the mix by hand. You get the feel of gently combining and forming by hand without crushing. Tossing a salad? Only hands will do a proper job! If I need to squidge canned plum tomatoes, my hands are by far the best tools. Squeeze a lemon through your fingers to catch the pips. You can even separate egg yolks and whites through your fingers. A fish pie mix is best when you get your hands in there. If I'm doing stuffed jacket potatoes with cheese, only your hands can get the blend right. Enjoy your cooking!


    22 Jul 19 - 05:21 PM (#4001624)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    I'm not hands-on quite so much, but a friend taught me that trick for making baking powder biscuits, and I also do that for pie crust. It breaks the butter into the flour perfectly, better than a wire pastry blender.


    22 Jul 19 - 07:36 PM (#4001639)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    You are intimately touching the food that you're about to cook and give people. Won't it be so much better for your caresses? What's more erotic than that!

    Well, I can think of....


    23 Jul 19 - 10:05 AM (#4001731)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Mrrzy

    I have salad servers-tossers that work- but most definitely don't.


    23 Jul 19 - 10:24 AM (#4001740)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Charmion

    I spent a bunch of years working in hospitals, so I developed a bit of a thing about keeping my hands clean. Also, I'm the person who cleans everything in this house, and I'm keenly aware of how often one is interrupted when up to the elbows in something really messy -- Sod's Law is always at work. Consequently, I'm not crazy about hand-mixing wet and/or sticky foods, preferring to use a silicone spatula. For tossing salad, I have a pair of large, long-handled serving spoons. They work just fine.

    I'm not shy about kneading bread or cleaning a fish, so it's not a phobia or nothin'.


    24 Jul 19 - 02:42 AM (#4001843)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: BobL

    The "Clean hand, messy hand" method can come in useful, in my case usually when jointing a chicken.


    24 Jul 19 - 09:58 AM (#4001874)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Charmion

    "Clean hand, messy hand" is also the thing to do when wrapping servings of meat -- such as chicken pieces -- for the freezer. Around here, we can get "portion-size" bags (actually the right size for three to four portions); I like to turn the bag inside-out over my clean left hand, stack the contents in the palm, then turn the bag right way round.


    24 Jul 19 - 01:10 PM (#4001903)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: punkfolkrocker

    Several years working in photographic dark rooms
    left me with ingrained methodical discipline regarding keeping my bare hands out of bad stuff,
    and avoiding cross contamination...

    Handy transferrable kitchen skills...

    My mrs however, is a food poisoning disaster waiting to happen...


    24 Jul 19 - 04:33 PM (#4001927)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Thompson

    Request from a friend. Anyone have any recipes for sweet-and-sour that taste all sticky like those in Chinese takeaways?


    24 Jul 19 - 10:24 PM (#4001942)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Mrrzy

    Try this? I liked both... https://dinnerthendessert.com/sweet-sour-sauce/


    24 Jul 19 - 11:47 PM (#4001944)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    I note that Mrrzy visited the Roadkill Thread right before she came here - leaving me wondering if she had a flattened squirrel recipe. :)


    25 Jul 19 - 04:35 AM (#4001966)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    Gosh, I've assumed for years that Mrrzy was a bloke! Deluded I have been by those first two letters...


    25 Jul 19 - 06:35 AM (#4001979)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: BobL

    "...visited the Roadkill Thread right before she came here"

    Using the other hand I hope.


    25 Jul 19 - 09:30 AM (#4002002)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Charmion

    I went shopping yesterday and bought two kinds of fish that are sorta new to me.

    The first is tilapia, which Steve Shaw would presumably reject outright because it is widely farmed. I assume these fillets were not from wild-caught fish because I could buy them without feeling a deep pang in the wallet. I have read that tilapia is very popular with people who make (and, presumably, eat) fish tacos, so I plan to cook them à la Méxique (or my idea thereof), with lime juice, garlic and cilantro.

    The other is a big packet of frozen fillets -- it was on special, of course -- of a species marketed here as "basa", which Wikipedia tells me is Pangasius bocourti, a catfish native to the delta of the Mekong River. Now, I know that our neighbours to the south consider catfish to be a staple food and, often, a great treat, but I have a hard time overcoming prejudice against the species that thrives in the Ottawa River and its tributaries. I was brought up to consider catfish (called barbotte where I come from) to be dangerously inedible because of its bottom-dwelling, scavanger nature -- but then, when I was young, the Rideau River was but a step up from an open sewer. Thanks to public health efforts and stern regulation, things are better now.

    Back to the basa. Anyone out there with a good catfish recipe they'd care to share?


    26 Jul 19 - 05:04 AM (#4002103)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Thompson

    Tilapia were a hippie thing - the ideal life included a conservatory with a fish pond in it, in which tilapia would be raised as food, and the water regularly used for enriching the vegetable patch and renewed from a clean water supply.

    How to eat them is another question; I've never actually met one. The BBC has a bunch of recipes; the coconutty one sounds nice. I wait in anticipation for news…


    26 Jul 19 - 10:13 AM (#4002142)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Charmion

    Thompson, I was very interested to read the Wikipedia entry on the species, from which I learned that, as a food fish raised in captivity, tilapia has literally millennia of history. As a cook, I am here to tell you that tilapia has nothing much to offer in the way of flavour, and seems to function best as a proteiny backdrop to whatever seasonings and veg with which one cares to cook and/or serve it.

    The lime juice, garlic and cilantro version worked, but only because we were hungry and we like cilantro. I should have used rather more garlic and lime juice, and started with a reduction to intensify the flavours before putting the fish in the pan. It now occurs to me that tilapia would work well in a curry sauce ...


    26 Jul 19 - 10:20 AM (#4002143)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Charmion

    Thompson, I just looked at the BBC recipes, and they seem to have drawn the same conclusion I did: tilapia is so bland that it can take literally any combination of flavours, the more assertive the better. In future, I will definitely go the curry route.

    You may find tilapia in both fresh and frozen form at your local supermarket. Here in Ontario, frozen tilapia is about as cheap as fish gets, but the fillets run very, very small. The fillets I cooked yesterday were fresh, and ran about half a pound each. I cooked them as I would sole, without flour or bread crumbs and in an open pan.


    26 Jul 19 - 11:26 AM (#4002158)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    Tilapia is a mild-flavored white fish that is sustainably raised, as is much of the catfish sold in the marketplace these days. I cook it much as I might red snapper, it can be baked, sauteed, fried, etc. I've used it in fish tacos (which are filled with so many other flavors that the fish is essentially like Charmion said, the protein base for the layered meal.)

    Catfish is something I've always eated fried, when it was breaded in a seasoned cornmeal. Whole-skinned or filleted. With lots of lemon.


    27 Jul 19 - 09:46 PM (#4002341)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: leeneia

    At last I am getting homegrown tomatoes from my garden, so tonight we had a Chinese dish, tomato beef. It has other vegetables as well - green pepper, onion, snow peas. We had it with "rice blend", (a whole grain food similar to rice). Watermelon for dessert.

    It's a delicious dish, but it takes a lot of prep. I had help.


    27 Jul 19 - 10:41 PM (#4002343)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    I finally pulled the three large tomato plants when I realized the grower must have started them from seeds harvested from a hybrid. They were sterile, large plants and not a single tomato. Even with blossom set (that forces fruit without pollination.) I'm hoping for a fall garden but I doubt I'll get any tomatoes this year.


    28 Jul 19 - 09:41 AM (#4002407)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    White peaches are in the grocery store now; when they're ripe they have a more intense peach flavor. I tend to look for freestone peaches, whatever variety I buy, just because they're easier to eat or cut up for cooking, though I'll eat the others if that's all that is available.


    28 Jul 19 - 11:20 AM (#4002414)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    White peach juice + prosecco = Bellini. Mmmm!


    28 Jul 19 - 06:48 PM (#4002462)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Mrrzy

    I am not a female. Just fyi. Given the choice I prefer They to He but She does not apply. Luvs. Feed me something yummy now! I've been traveling and nothing was truly delish except one salmon-on-a-salad...


    28 Jul 19 - 07:44 PM (#4002464)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Charmion

    Mrrzy — chicken off the barbie. Split up the back and flattened, laid out on the grill over a pan of water set on the tiles (gas barbie, BTW), skin well dressed with the same spice rub as for Memphis-style pork ribs. Smoker. Gas up high until the smoke starts to roll, then whack the chicken down. After about fifteen minutes, turn the gas low. Leave it alone with the lid down for as long as it takes.

    Hack the cooked chicken into quarters and serve with crusty bread and good beer.


    28 Jul 19 - 07:48 PM (#4002465)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Charmion

    The first peaches of the summer appeared in the Stratford market yesterday, very early cultivar. Freestone varieties usually come in late August, and these are, indeed, a cling-ish peach. But deee-licious!

    After eating three over the sink, I put in some quality time with the dental floss. Worth it.


    28 Jul 19 - 08:13 PM (#4002466)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: leeneia

    You're so perspicacious, Mrrzy, you had me fooled.

    Charmion, thanks for the chicken idea.

    Now I'm all set up to make Nogales chicken stew, a recipe I got from a Hispanic grandmother at church.

    Brown some chicken pieces in a big skillet. (I use thighs)
    Remove chicken, saute chopped yellow onion.
    Replace chicken.
    Add tomatoes, either from the garden or canned, no-salt tomatoes.
    Add the juice from a can of high-quality canned corn. The canned corn taste is essential.
    Cover and let simmer.
    After a while, add chopped zucchini.
    Add chopped green pepper.
    Let cook till chicken is tender.
    Season with chili powder to taste, prob. 1 to 2 tsp.
    Just before serving, add the corn kernels and let them warm up.

    *The idea is not to cook the zucchini and green pepper to death.

    The original recipe called for dredging the chicken in flour, but I don't bother.

    Serve with corn bread, avocados, guacamole, watermelon and other summery stuff.


    28 Jul 19 - 08:52 PM (#4002475)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    That flattened chicken is "spatchcocked." Like this.

    I felt like something for dinner, but not fancy. There was a cup of buttermilk in the fridge that needed using so I made a batch of pancakes. The leftovers are wrapped and frozen for future meals. It didn't take long to make and hit the spot.


    29 Jul 19 - 06:47 AM (#4002515)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    Did I ever tell you about my whore's pasta, spaghetti alla puttanesca? Takes as long as it takes the spaghetti (dried, not fresh - this dish is store cupboard only!) to boil.

    For two people. Get 250g spaghetti on to boil in salted water. No oil. Get a big, heavy, shallow pan and put two big glugs of extra virgin olive oil in it. Add dried chilli flakes to taste (it's supposed to be pretty spicy), two cloves of garlic finely sliced (not crushed) and three or four anchovy fillets out of a tin. Sauté that lot for a couple of minutes then add about 2/3 of a tin of tomatoes, a tablespoon of capers, about 100g of pitted black olives out of a tin (chop them up a bit), a handful of chopped fresh parsley (optional) and some pepper. When the spag is al dente, drain it and quickly throw it into the sauce (it's always worth keeping a splash of pasta water in reserve). Mix thoroughly. No Parmesan. Get it right and it's a masterpiece. Nigella suggests serving it wearing a tight low-cut dress and garish red lipstick with a cigarette hanging out of your mouth.

    We've taken to eating any pasta dish the Italian way. Just a fork, no spoon, no knife, just a lot of slurping keeping over the bowl. Ottimo! We're having gnocchi alla Sorrentina tonight. Lovely long stringy bits of mozzarella, a challenge to the consumer!


    29 Jul 19 - 07:24 AM (#4002520)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Dave Hanson

    It would be better with whole black olives chopped up, pitted olives all seem tasteless to me.

    Dave H


    29 Jul 19 - 10:40 AM (#4002551)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Charmion

    I learned spatchcocked chicken from a book, and it took me a while (and a few nicked fingers) to perfect the technique. The New York Times article recommends pressing down on the centre of the breast to flatten the bird, but this method is unreliable for two reasons.

    First, the flattening manoeuvre is designed to break or dislocate one or both of the clavicles at the sternum, and this always happens at the weakest point -- which may not be at the sternum, where you want the break to be. Second, most fryer chickens (the best size for spatchcocking) are so young that their joints are very flexible, so pressing might not achieve the aim at all.

    So the better method is to take your stiff, very sharp knife (the one you used to cut the ribs away from the backbone) and cut the cartilage that covers the point where the clavicles join the sternum. (Note that shears won't do this job.) Then turn the bird over and press it flat, with your knuckles or the heel of your hand on that joint. The result will be a firm snap, at the sternum.

    Steve, I would love to try your puttanesca recipe, but I would have to do it with somebody else's husband. Mine won't touch it -- or arrabiata, either. One of his few flaws is a prejudice against hot peppers.


    29 Jul 19 - 10:54 AM (#4002555)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    You don't need to cut out the spine and flatten the breast, if you want you can cut down the middle of the breast and flatten it at the spine. The point is to flatten the bird, either way works.

    I agree, Steve's pasta dish sounds good. Maybe I should pick up some anchovies, I think I have the rest.


    29 Jul 19 - 12:31 PM (#4002571)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Charmion

    Stilly, I have tried cutting down the middle of the breast, but the result was much drier breast meat. Also, I found cutting along the sternum to be more awkward than along the backbone. Finally, it looked even more deeply weird than the other way.


    29 Jul 19 - 01:16 PM (#4002573)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Mrrzy

    Charmion... I don't play with barbies. Ha ha ha ha ha! I need to get me one, though- and make that chicken!


    30 Jul 19 - 12:11 AM (#4002630)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Mrrzy

    I grew up eating pasta with a fork only, but slurping was not allowed!


    30 Jul 19 - 08:58 AM (#4002665)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Charmion

    Spatchcocking is a great technique, Mrrzy. With a non-trivial investment of skill and effort in the kitchen before the company comes, you get a faster-cooking, moister bird that you can quarter quickly and efficiently when it's time to get dinner on the table.

    I use a Cutco knife with a sturdy, seven-inch serrated blade for the initial prep, and a pair of poultry shears to quarter the bird when it comes out of the oven.

    Cookbooks focussed on barbecuing are the best source of recipes for spatchcocked chicken. I like Steven Raichlen's "The Barbecue Bible", which introduced me to the whole world of spice rubs and smoke cooking.

    Yeah. You need a barbecue. If you live in quarters where you can use one without risk of burning down the building, what are you waiting for?

    By the way, Raichlen actually favours charcoal as a barbecue fuel; he thinks gas is for wussies. Gas is efficient, however, and I recommend it if cooking is a thing you do primarily to feed yourself and family and not as a hobby activity.


    30 Jul 19 - 10:44 AM (#4002678)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Mrrzy

    I habe great shears for spatchcocking, which always sounds deviant. However, coming back from 10 days at the beach, I find I did not have enough seafood. Moules Mariniere [accent grave] happening tonight but at a restaurant...


    30 Jul 19 - 11:12 AM (#4002682)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: leeneia

    Hold on. I think 2 tsp chili is too much for the Nogales chicken stew recipe I put above.


    30 Jul 19 - 11:13 AM (#4002683)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    I try not to keep onions and potatoes in the fridge, but in the hot time of year, it becomes a necessity to keep them from spoiling fast. This morning I checked out a bag of white potatoes on the counter and found a couple too far gone to save and a couple that needed a bad spot trimmed.

    I have a recipe that originally came from Martha Stewart Living on one of the cards she has in each issue—four items you can make that add up to a nice meal and the cards are perforated so they are recipe cards to keep. The salmon meal she recommended that had grilled fish, steamed asparagus, and potatoes (I don't remember the dessert) is one we eat often.

    The small or new potatoes are simmered until you can pierce them easily with a sharp knife. Let them cool a few minutes (or save them in the fridge to finish later) then heat a small skillet with a generous pat of butter and each potato is put on a work surface and using the heel of your hand gently compress it until the skin splits and some of it extrudes, but the potato is still in one piece. Place these in the gently heated butter and let them cook until they are browned on each side and those little edges sticking out have started to crisp a little. I use salt and fresh ground pepper and that's it. I always thought of them as Martha Stewart's potatoes, but my son and his girlfriend were telling me about a meal they made that included "smashed potatoes" and I asked what that was. Apparently they needed a name for that MS recipe and it works. So I'm making smashed potatoes to use for meals this week.

    I also have some larger potatoes that I cut into chunks (usually about an inch on one side is the largest) and they saute in olive oil and get the salt, fresh pepper, and some seasoning (sometimes smoked paprika) treatment. They reheat nicely. And this is what I use to put in tacos when vegetarian friends come over and can't eat the fish or beef.

    Cooking things in the morning so you don't have to heat up the house during the afternoon or evening is a practice in this hot climate. It's going to be in the high-90s or low 100s (in the 37C range) for the next few weeks. Cooking outside is also popular. See Charmion's discussion of spatchcocked chicken, for starters.


    30 Jul 19 - 12:06 PM (#4002688)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    Gas is a lot cheaper than charcoal and I haven't noticed any lack of flavour. My barbie is a somewhat ancient Weber Q220 job with a lid. Using the best quality ingredients is the way to go. Buy the best butcher's sausages and never buy burgers from a shop. I buy top-quality minced steak from an online Scottish butcher (Donald Russell, Brits) and a pound of that makes four superb, beefy-flavoured burgers that cook quickly. No onion, no mustard, no seasoning, no nothing. Just open the pack and gently form four burgers. I make a big dint in the middle so that they're shaped like a huge red blood cell. I baste them on the grill with something oily and spicy, but that's it. I want to taste beef. I don't baste the sausages at all. Other good things to barbecue are cobs of sweetcorn and halloumi cheese cut into large slices. I use a griddle plate for delicate stuff such as fish (mackerel fillets are really good, with a garlicky and herby marinade of olive oil and lemon juice), best cooked with the lid down. Any fish with skin on. John Dory is brilliant. Tuna steaks aren't the easiest things to get just right. Albacore/yellowfin is much nicer than skipjack, which I find a bit coarse. Swordfish cooks well, if you like its flavour. I found last week that cherry tomatoes on a skewer are lovely and they don't take long. Peppers are good but they take much longer. I don't barbecue chicken very often. Strong barbie flavours override the delicate flavour of the chicken for me, and breast meat dries out way too fast.


    30 Jul 19 - 09:42 PM (#4002733)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    Shish kabobs on the grill are amazing; beef or lamb, small onions that were parboiled before being skewered to speed the cooking, and quartered bell peppers (small enough that they cook with everything else. Small tomatoes or quartered large tomatoes round it out.


    31 Jul 19 - 04:57 AM (#4002758)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Thompson

    I always steam potatoes rather than boiling them, then put a clean teacloth over them to absorb the steam after taking the steamer off the salty boiling water.

    New potatoes are delicious with salty butter and chopped dill.


    31 Jul 19 - 10:57 AM (#4002767)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Mrrzy

    Not a lack of flavor, Steve Shaw, but a quite different flavor. I love gas-grilled anything, but I *LOVE* anything charcoal-grilled.

    The mussels were great. Crab tonight.


    31 Jul 19 - 12:54 PM (#4002800)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Charmion

    Steve Shaw, we eat chicken often, and in summer I always cook it on the barbecue. To prevent that chicken-leather effect, you put a beat-up old roasting tin on the tiles of the gas barbecue -- i.e., under the grids, but over the burner -- and fill it with water. Put the grids back, and light the barbecue. When it's hot enough to do the business, the water in the pan will be simmering. Thus, the chicken is bathed in steam while it cooks -- obviously with the lid down -- and the meat comes out wonderfully moist. The steam does not result in soggy skin; it emerges crisp and delicious.

    Twice recently you've mentioned John Dory. That's a species I have never seen in a shop; is it a strictly European fish, or is it perhaps called something else on this side of the Herring Pond?


    01 Aug 19 - 12:41 AM (#4002886)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: leeneia

    Yesterday I didn't give a thought to dinner until the last minute. Fortunately we had the wherewithal for that summer favorite, the BLT. (bacon, lettuce and tomato sandwich). Homegrown tomatoes made them especially good.

    My dear husband, the DH, loves to cook over a wood fire. Years ago we came across a grill in a county park in Iowa that he really liked. Fortunately, it still had the manufacturer's name on it, and we ordered one for ourselves. (The company acted surprised. They were used to selling to parks.) He makes excellent steaks, hamburgers and pork chops on it.


    01 Aug 19 - 06:17 AM (#4002926)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Thompson

    John Dory, reputedly from jaune dorée, or yellowy goldy, is this. Verra tasty. The BBC has a rake of recipes here. Of course, eating shellfish now that we've poisoned the sea with plastic is probably not a good idea, so some might be avoided…


    01 Aug 19 - 08:55 AM (#4002948)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Charmion

    Thanks for the link, Thompson. That is definitely not a critter I have ever seen laid out on ice in this country.


    01 Aug 19 - 09:30 AM (#4002952)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    I have a feeling that they don't inhabit your waters.


    01 Aug 19 - 09:41 AM (#4002956)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    Leeneia, what is the brand of grill your husband likes?

    It looks like the John Dory is everywhere EXCEPT North and South America.


    01 Aug 19 - 07:07 PM (#4003012)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    It was a perfect barbie night tonight. Normally we have a burger followed by a.n. other but I rang the changes tonight. We had mackerel fillets with skewered veg and a weird but very nice Waitrose "Mexican-inspired bean burger" wot I'd got cheap, froze and forgot about. It was just right. I didn't marinade the mackerel but I just made a baste of olive oil, fresh lemon juice, thyme and seasoning.

    Everything was delicious.


    01 Aug 19 - 10:03 PM (#4003025)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    I'm doing a frugal "No Spend" month this August, so am making meals as much as possible from the cupboards and fridge and freezer. Tonight was a thawed tandoori bread and I used 1/3 of it to make what amounted to three thin-crust pizza slices. I still allow myself to pick up fresh fruit and vegetables, gas for the car, dog food, etc., but am being more resourceful with the materials already here. I'll make a crock pot of oatmeal with chopped dates that will be my breakfast for the next few mornings.


    02 Aug 19 - 10:55 AM (#4003039)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: leeneia

    Hi, SRS. The grill came from the RJ Thomas Mfg Co., which also uses the brand name Pilot Rock.

    https://www.pilotrock.com/userdocs/Pilot%20Rock%20Catalog_250.pdf

    Ours is an infinitely adjustable one with a single shelf. Two shelves might be better.

    You have to dig a big hole and bury the base. It takes a robust person to do that. (Parks don't want people going off with their grills.)


    02 Aug 19 - 12:11 PM (#4003046)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    Thank you - and I agree, that is a good-looking grill. Back in the 1970s I worked for the Forest Service at a station that had a crew house but didn't want to deal with the problems of a kitchen. They put a couple of the standard-issue USFS fire grills in the ground outside the building, expecting we would go to the trouble to build a fire each time we wanted to eat. We got resourceful with hot plates and electric saucepans instead.


    04 Aug 19 - 10:05 AM (#4003285)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Jon Freeman

    I enjoyed the salad visiting (oz again) brother made last evening.

    1 bowl of basmati rice with chopped/cubed tomato, sweet pepper, onion, cucumber, pine nuts, mint, chives and parsley mixed in.

    1 bowl divided into sliced beetroot, sliced tomato and nice small lettuce leaves (from the garden. I’m behind and no tomatoes starting to ripen yet… but could at least supply that, and mum, the herbs).

    Also available, olives, sliced buttered baguette and, for those who can stand them, hard boiled eggs.

    Simple again but I seemed to get lots of different and interesting “mouthfuls”.


    04 Aug 19 - 10:23 AM (#4003288)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    This week I made several small single-serving pizzas using portions of a large tandoori (Iraqi) bread, and each evening I was able to use herbs and sweet banana peppers from the garden.


    04 Aug 19 - 10:46 AM (#4003293)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Jon Freeman

    Nice when your own grown stuff can make some contribution, SRS.

    Mum’s (who deal's with these things) previous main herb area (both sides of the uncovered part of a pigsty and needing access for logs stored in the sheltered part) collapsed last winter so it’s been a rebuild. We got 8ft of metal staging for one side and were able to reuse an old aquarium stand with 2x2 timber on top for the other. All container grown, say up to 10” pots with some space on the ground for 6 larger tubs.


    04 Aug 19 - 11:02 AM (#4003296)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Mrrzy

    I can do hardboiled eggs if I can eat just the yolks. Like the devil part out of deviled eggs (Mimosa eggs, in French). I need a partner who only likes the whites...


    04 Aug 19 - 11:19 AM (#4003306)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Jon Freeman

    Mrzzy, I'm just odd with eggs. I don't remember the event but I believe it stems from me being violently sick after eating a (soft) boiled egg (free range and supplied by my grandmother) when I was very young.

    I'm fine with egg in cooking but the more it resembles an egg, the more I struggle and I can heave at the smell of a hard boiled one.

    As part of a family who has in the past kept chickens, ducks and geese for eggs, maybe that is a shame. But that's how it is.


    04 Aug 19 - 12:59 PM (#4003325)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    I can consume eggs with relish in any shape or form. When I was a student I drank them straight out of the shell for breakfast. Delicious, and no washing up. I hadn't heard of Salmonella at the time.


    04 Aug 19 - 07:11 PM (#4003378)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Mrrzy

    Jon Freeman, look up conditioned taste aversion. One-trial learning, no extinction. In my case it's Bailey's Irish Cream. But also I prefer my eggs hidden.


    05 Aug 19 - 12:34 AM (#4003407)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: leeneia

    I have a friend who grew up in England and eats strange things like a soft-boiled egg standing upright in a little stand. One morning I saw her dip a piece of toast in the egg, and the oily, glistening, slimy yellow yoke blooped out of the top and gooshed down the eggshell. (At way too early in the morning yet!) At the site, my stomach heaved in its moorings, and I spent the rest of breakfast staring at my own knees.

    So I'm with you if you say you don't like eggs.

    If thoroughly disguised, say in a Quiche Lorraine, I like them.


    05 Aug 19 - 12:45 AM (#4003409)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: leeneia

    What we are eating at my house:

    My brother and SIL sent four packages of Wisconsin cheese, and we are going to have Welsh rabbit made with beer. (I believe the recipe is in the Joy of Cooking.) I will make a round loaf of crusty bread for dipping.

    A friend of mine just sent me the link to this video. He makes good no-knead bread using this recipe:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I0t8ZAhb8lQ


    05 Aug 19 - 09:51 AM (#4003450)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    My mother used to make soft boiled eggs for us and serve them in the little egg cup with the top chipped off by tapping with a spoon. That egg-filled top was left sitting beside the cup for the contents to be scraped out as the first bite.


    06 Aug 19 - 09:53 AM (#4003549)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    I didn't think to make more oatmeal overnight (I use a small crockpot and it comes out so creamy after barely simmering all night) and I don't feel like cooking anything so I had a slice of apple pie for breakfast. There's one slice left and it might make it to tomorrow, but there is no guarantee.

    I love pie for breakfast.


    07 Aug 19 - 07:12 AM (#4003655)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: SPB-Cooperator

    Last night - Lincoln Sausage and chestnut mushroom risotto.


    08 Aug 19 - 11:58 AM (#4003806)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Mrrzy

    Is there a better sauce for mussels than white wine amd butter, with or without onions or even mirepoix, with or without cream? I am a seeker. No beer, no Pernod (gaaah)... Thanks.


    08 Aug 19 - 12:23 PM (#4003813)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Megan L

    Mrrzy I do them a few ways cider (or apple juice for my tt friends) with a finely chopped shallot and a little cream at the end. There is also a nice thai inspired one with lemongrass coconut milk OI found at food republic, Im not great with chillies and couldn't get kafir lime leaves or galangal so I used some grated ginger and lime zest


    09 Aug 19 - 03:16 PM (#4003848)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: leeneia

    Chuck roast was on sale, so I bought a big piece and cooked two dishes in slow cookers - Mexican pot roast and chuck roast stewed in beer. We froze most of it, but tonight we will be having Mexican pot roast, corn on the cob and guacamole.

    What is Lincoln sausage? I see it has its own festival.


    09 Aug 19 - 03:21 PM (#4003852)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Mrrzy

    Thanks MeganL...


    10 Aug 19 - 04:59 PM (#4004049)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    I pulled a package of a half-dozen large organic chicken thighs from the freezer and they're marinating now in sherry, soy sauce, a little sugar, and some grated ginger. Cook it up later in peanut oil and I'll put some basmati rice in the rice cooker and steam some cauliflower or broccoli in the top compartment. This time of year always make more than you'll eat at one meal so you don't have to heat up the house as often.


    11 Aug 19 - 11:51 AM (#4004156)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    Last week I bought a solitary mango from a local large chain grocery store (employee owned, and good prices, but not always the most knowledgeable about how to handle some produce). It is still on the counter waiting to ripen or rot; I suspect it was refrigerated in such a way to mess up the ripening process.

    A few days later I was in a Middle Eastern grocery store (many of the employees barely speak English) that knows exactly how to handle all of it's produce, and I bought a case of mangoes of the typical size, large but not gigantic, and they're ripening beautifully and are sweet and juicy. These were a good price - the case of 9 was $6 and I shared them with a friend (who is Puerto Rican, grew up with his own mango trees, and knows exactly when they're perfectly ripe).

    The same thing happens when I by large avocadoes at the Mexican grocery up the road from my house; again, it's an ethnic store where they barely speak English but they know how to handle the food they carry and you can be sure the aguacate are beautifully ripe and ready to use when they say so (there is a box stacked with the fruit on the counter next to each cash register). Those guacs are expensive, $5 each, but they are large and perfect. The same Puerto Rican friend also had avocado trees, so is a perfectionist about buying them.

    Produce as a category isn't one-size-fits-all like many of the big-box grocery stores treat it. More and more I try to buy from the stores that know what they're doing with their fruit and veggies—and you can often learn from other customers. I was looking at plantains one day in the Fiesta grocery store near me (a chain that serves Mexican/Central American shoppers) and a tall black woman, from Jamaica, and I were talking about them. She reached out and took the green banana from my hand and set it aside, and handed me a different one. "This -look at the skin, those spots on the other one aren't a good sign." When they're green they're cooked like a potato (tostones), when they're ripe, they're baked and have a wonderful sweet banana flavor (a dessert, with butter and a little cinnamon sugar if you like), but if you get a bad one they just dry out and aren't much good for either use.

    This isn't to say that no one who grew up with the typical US grocery-store environment knows how to handle produce, but there's a learning process that many of them seem to have missed, or the system of fruit and vegetable delivery and storage doesn't make possible.

    /rant off/


    12 Aug 19 - 10:45 AM (#4004259)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Charmion

    What am I eating? Not much today; we just returned from a week of restaurant meals on holiday.

    It's high summer in southwestern Ontario, so my shopping objective is corn (maize). In its husk, to be eaten off its cob after steaming on the barbecue.

    Oh, and tomatoes.


    12 Aug 19 - 10:51 AM (#4004263)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Mrrzy

    Avocado: not ripe not ripe not ripe not ripe aha you went to the bathroom so I rotted. But when they are good they are very very good.
    Made a great chicken soup (no noodles) with mirepoix and thighs and a lot of Berbere spice. Leftovers made a lovely noodle dish (no broth).


    12 Aug 19 - 10:09 PM (#4004361)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    I picked up a jar of garlic Alfredo sauce (Aldi's brand) and will use that with the tandoori bread to make some small personal pizzas. Chicken, basil, Parmesan, fresh sliced tomatoes, etc.


    13 Aug 19 - 01:37 AM (#4004372)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: leeneia

    Mrrzy - loved your avocado joke. How true.

    My tomatoes have not been ripening. A website says it's because the weather here is too hot. (Never heard of that one!) But I collected several as a test and have put them on the wide windowsill along with an apple to supply ethelyne gas. They said to put them in a brown paper bag, but if I did that, I would forget to check them.

    Wish me luck. My own theory is that we are going on a trip in two weeks, so they are waiting for us to go out of town, and then they will turn a beautiful ripe red and be devoured by squirrels.

    Maybe tomorrow would be a good day for fried green tomatoes.

    Slice green tomatoes about 1/2 inch thick.
    Melt butter in a skillet.
    Dip tomatoes in corn starch.
    Fry tomatoes in hot butter till outside is crisp and inside is soft.
    Grate a little pepper on top.

    If you have never had them, green tomatoes are tart. They make a nice contrast to mild foods like chicken.


    13 Aug 19 - 11:00 AM (#4004439)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Mrrzy

    Saw the avocado thing on a friend's fridge, who also had a magnet pad labeled Chopin Liszt. How musical and food-related!


    13 Aug 19 - 11:27 AM (#4004446)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    I took my Chopin Liszt to the supermarket and left Mrs Steve a note saying I'd be Bach in a fugue minuets...


    14 Aug 19 - 11:05 AM (#4004511)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Mrrzy

    Steve Shaw: shame, shame.

    I am still craving mussels.


    14 Aug 19 - 02:08 PM (#4004540)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Thompson

    My understanding is that "green tomatoes" in American recipes usually refers to tomatillo(e)s, a thing I've heard of and even tried to grow, but never tasted.


    14 Aug 19 - 02:09 PM (#4004541)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Thompson

    Ooh, avocado soup sounds good!

    If you want them exactly ripe, cheat and buy them frozen; Aldi does them, as does Iceland.


    14 Aug 19 - 02:14 PM (#4004544)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Thompson

    And mussels: for me it's white wine and butter and lots of garlic and finely-chopped parsley, let them release their liquor and cook for a very few minutes till sweet, then remove the mussels (or pour out the liquor) and reduce the liquor/wine/garlic/parsley and add a slosh of cream. Serve with crusty French bread.


    14 Aug 19 - 05:44 PM (#4004565)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    There are recipes for green tomatoes that use just that - green (unripe) tomatoes. I make relish when I have enough green tomatoes in the fall (picked before the first frost). Tomatillos are similar, but they have that husk (calyx) and aren't in the same genus, though they're all Solanaceae family. They're apparently more tart, though when they're quite ripe they're sweeter and similar to the tomato and can be substituted.


    15 Aug 19 - 03:28 AM (#4004582)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: David Carter (UK)

    Green tomatoes are used in some south east asian recipes. They go well with chicken.


    15 Aug 19 - 10:33 AM (#4004635)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Mrrzy

    Fried green tomatoes are too big, I think, to be tomatillos. Here in Virginia, at least. Tomatilloes?


    16 Aug 19 - 09:23 AM (#4004711)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Charmion

    Grilled pork tenderloin.

    Here in Hog Heaven (Stratford in the headquarters of the Ontario Pork Council for a reason), pork tenderloin is often on special at the supermarket. It doesn't taste like much if simply roasted, so it's a good idea to marinate it in something fairly acid, such as fifty-fifty lemon juice and olive oil, and to add lots of garlic and thyme.

    I dislike the fiddly task of stripping the fascia (the silvery skin of connective tissue) off the tenderloin, so I cut it into medallions before putting it into the marinade. After about half an hour of immersion at room temperature (longer in the fridge), take out the meat, shake off the excess marinade, and lay the medallions on a cutting board. Cover them with a sheet of waxed paper and flatten them like schnitzel. I prefer the rolling pin method.

    Then grill the medallions (now more like ovals) either on the barbecue or under the broiler. They cook fast, so don't leave them unattended for a minute. Very good with rosé and a heap of grilled or stir-fried veg.


    16 Aug 19 - 09:55 AM (#4004716)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    Though my recipe calls for a less lean meet, I have an eggplant, tomato, and pork casserole that is a favorite cold weather dish and I use tenderloin because it's relatively inexpensive and very easy to cut up for the dish. I start making it in the fall when the eggplants are still producing and the weather has cooled. I serve it with mashed potatoes. This is a recipe I scanned for someone ages ago and I have it in my Flickr account. I landed on this recipe when I was trying to find a way to use as many things from my garden as possible and I had lots of tomatoes and eggplants. It comes from Tess Mallos' The Complete Middle East Cookbook, a book I have given to all of my family members. My mother liked it and years ago gave copies to her sisters (one who is married to a Turkish immigrant who loved these recipes).

    The funny thing about this book is that the newer editions are expensive paperback, but I go to Bookfinder.com and I search for the book using "The" in the title (my librarian friends scratch their heads on this one - it should drop out and not affect the search, but that isn't how this works) and I choose "used or out of print" then look for the hardcover editions. I can usually get them for under $10; I just ordered another one for under $5. I keep extra copies to use as gifts. I had a copy at the library where I worked and we had lots of international student employees. Sometimes that book was used as the ice breaker, other times it was used to compare recipes, because Mallos has it broken down by country so the same general recipe appears in different forms several times in the book. I gave that office copy to a co-worker when I retired because though it sometimes was a distraction, the bonding that people do over food is one of the fastest methods I can think of.

    BTW: When I have extra eggplants I peel and cut them up and cook and then freeze them, so I always plan for a few for that casserole by cutting them in quarters length-wise, browning all sides, and freezing. Then they're ready for the casserole even out of eggplant season.


    16 Aug 19 - 01:12 PM (#4004746)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Mrrzy

    When you said Use the book as an icebreaker I thought of As an icepick. The visual did not work.

    I am still on a mussel hunt. But I am afraid to cook them myself. So I might go back to the place that tried to sneak in Pernod. Ugh. But I think if they skip just the Pernod it might be quite good...


    18 Aug 19 - 06:58 AM (#4004942)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Jon Freeman

    Wasn’t feeling hungry the other day so I just had a few of the cooked potatoes on a plate with some butter. I don’t know what they were except not Charlotte, planted late here and as our one sample for the year and in a spot we later had doubts about… They were wonderful – firm flesh and great sweet and nutty flavour. Not a great crop (not that we try for much) but say 2/3 a carrier bag left and I look forward to eating more of these “new potatoes”.


    19 Aug 19 - 09:27 AM (#4005098)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Charmion

    We had a feed of corn (on the cob, maize to you Brits) last night, a variety new to me called Trinity Bicolor. Sweet as all corn seems to be these days, and only a bare whisper of true corn taste. The strongly flavoured yellow corn varieties of my youth seem to have vanished, probably because they ripened later and produced fewer cobs per stalk. Sigh.

    Unwilling to set loose a storm of husks and cornsilk in the kitchen, I tried baking the cobs in their husks in the oven. It worked, and now I doubt that I will ever boil corn again.

    Trim the hanging bits of corn husk off each cob, and the top of the silk tassel. Fill the sink or a bucket with water and soak the corn for about 15 minutes. Heat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit, and lay the cobs on the rack in the middle of the oven. Bake for 25 to 30 minutes. Using tongs, lift out the cobs and lay them on a heat-proof surface to cool for a few minutes. When you can handle the corn without pain, peel off the husk (it will come off easily, taking the silk with it) and get busy eating.


    19 Aug 19 - 10:50 PM (#4005170)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    I made cranapple juice last week after steam-juicing cranberries from my freezer. I wanted to use the pulp so I found a cranberry bar online that uses a boxed yellow cake mix for the flour portion of the recipe. Lots of sugar and butter in it - these are rich so cut them small, but they sure are good! I tried making something one time before and it was way too complicated. This was easy, and the house smelled marvelous by the time they came out of the oven. Allrecipes cranberry bars.


    19 Aug 19 - 11:51 PM (#4005174)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Jon Freeman

    back to the corn... I think the only sweet corn we have at home these days comes from a Birds Eye frozen packet where it is mixed with peas – to me it’s not a bad standby to have in the freezer.. Years ago, I remember cans of a “Jolly Green Giant” brand.

    As for it on the cob, it never was common here but we did have a few seasons of growing about 6 plants. From that, I do believe it’s a veg best cooked very soon after harvest (something that wouldn’t be achievable with supermarket produce) so it was worthwhile for a few treats. A problem now though is none of us have the teeth that would enable munching into the cob as I’d like to.


    20 Aug 19 - 03:59 AM (#4005178)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: BobL

    "best cooked very soon after harvest"

    Which gives me an excuse to repeat an old tale about some folks discussing the best way of ensuring their (home-grown) corn was at its freshest when cooked.

    The first said "I get the water on the boil, go and pick the corn and run - not walk - with it back to the kitchen, and put it straight in."
    The second said "I set up a camping stove next to the corn patch, get some water boiling, and can cook the corn the instant it's picked."
    The third said "I set up a camping stove right in the corn patch. When the water boils, I bend the plants over so that the cobs dangle in it. That way, they're cooked even before they're picked!"


    20 Aug 19 - 09:51 AM (#4005224)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Charmion

    BobL, my family practised your first method (run-not-walk-back-to-the-kitchen) of corn preparation when I was young and, since we grew a tender white variety called Country Gentleman (now long disappeared), that was just about right. (My mother would probably have started a grass fire if she had ever been given custody of a camp stove.)

    The corn we eat these days comes from local farmers who bring it to market in great heaps in the back of pick-up trucks. It is picked just after dawn, cooked within the day, and eaten before dark. Not optimum by the standards of true corn purists, but okay for our aging olfactory senses.

    I never buy corn on the cob at the supermarket. That's just sad, and totally unnecessary in southwestern Ontario, where corn has grown since time immemorial. I see it there, all wrapped in plastic, and wonder if the people who buy it come from Mars or Antarctica, or perhaps had their tastebuds (and common sense) shot off in the war.

    Jon Freeman's remark about teeth is very pertinent, however. I thank every higher power there is that I still have a full set of natural-grown, original-to-me choppers, inelegant as they may be, for at the age of 65 I can still gnaw a bone or a corn cob to good effect. Mind you, I have to set aside enough time later for a close encounter with the dental floss, but there you go.


    20 Aug 19 - 10:17 AM (#4005228)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: gillymor

    When I lived near the shore in Delaware during summers we'd catch a bunch of blue crabs and then run out to a u-pick farm and gather up some Silver Queen corn and within a couple of hours they'd both be on the boil (not in the same pot) and I can't imagine corn that tasted any better.


    20 Aug 19 - 11:17 AM (#4005235)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    There was a Nero Wolfe novella in Trio For Blunt Instruments that was made into the TV episode Murder Is Corny. He has specific requirements that the corn be picked and delivered very quickly (and then other information about how to cook it.)

    My Facebook page is messed up so I asked the question about the source of this story in the Wolfe Pack page then had to go there via my pitbull's account to read their answer since my original post disappeared. (This is getting really old!)

    As a kid in Seattle one of my favorite meals every summer was when Mom would get the fresh corn (she grew up on a farm so I imagine had a good idea of what fresh corn was all about) and boil it and keep bringing it to the table. We got one dinner each summer of just corn on the cob, as much as we wanted to butter and salt and gobble down. With six of us I imagine that must have amounted to a case of corn. :)


    20 Aug 19 - 12:28 PM (#4005245)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: leeneia

    I find that corn on the cob from local supermarkets is quite good. We shuck it, pull off the silk, put it on a plate with 2T of water and microwave it on high for 5 minutes. You have to let it cool off before you can eat it.

    Nero Wolfe's instructions (IIRC) were to bake the corn unhusked, in the hottest possible oven for 45 minutes. I would never do it; it's unthinkable to run a hot oven on a hot summer day.

    Cook's Illustrated magazine just had a recipe for country ribs, Spanish style, and we are going to try them today with corn on the cob and fresh tomatoes. "Spanish style" calls for lots of spices from my spice collection.


    20 Aug 19 - 06:02 PM (#4005293)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    Supermarkets here sell corn on the cob that goes by the name "supersweet." It can be very nice, though it's been known to be a bit chewy. Ten or fifteen minutes on the barbecue, not too roaring, renders it delicious. No need to wrap it in foil or anything. Just keep it turning.


    20 Aug 19 - 09:59 PM (#4005305)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Mrrzy

    Them mussels were YUMMY without the Pernod!

    And yet still I crave. Vitamin deficiency or something?


    21 Aug 19 - 11:08 AM (#4005375)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    I froze this year's wild grape juice because so far I haven't gotten around to making jelly. And while I was in there I evicted a gallon freezer bag of mystery meat, probably cooked turkey. I had some turkey legs and thighs from 2016 that were sealed in the Food Saver vacuum bags and they're a different story&mash;stuff saved that way really does last a long time. I think tonight I'll try making some soup with the thighs; if it isn't any good tomorrow is trash day (though I expect it to be just fine).

    This is a "Frugal" month, where I'm trying to spend as little as possible beyond the usual bills and gas and occasionally picking up fresh fruit and vegetables. I'm coming up with some interesting meals with frozen items. I'd forgotten I had a couple of pounds of Jimmy Dean sausage in the freezer so I had a few ounces of that alongside my bowl of oatmeal this morning. All of this cooking is better-aligned with cool-weather, but still delicious.


    21 Aug 19 - 12:53 PM (#4005385)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Jon Freeman

    I found an aubergine “in hiding” today. The other fruit that have formed are much smaller but this one somehow got to about 10 inches unnoticed. I chopped it up together with a courgette and a tub of mushrooms and cooked it it some (in the recycling bin now and I can’t remember what it was) “cook in” sauce. Parents seem to be tucking away happily as I type.

    One thing I’m sometimes in two minds about with this sort of hash up is whether to do rice or some pasta with it. I’m none too sure that some of my “cooking” would go down to well with some here but I’m curious anyway. Rice would usually be preferred here but I think either could be used and wonder about others.


    21 Aug 19 - 03:08 PM (#4005395)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: keberoxu

    One more reminiscence about sweet corn on the cob.

    How my mom found out about
    corn on the cob
    and pressure cookers, I do not know,
    but the two went together, in her kitchen,
    as strictly as white with rice.

    We gobbled it down as though we had all changed into hogs.
    (provided sufficient margarine/butter and salt, that is)

    The pressure cooker, I reckon,
    would shorten considerably the cooking time.


    21 Aug 19 - 03:12 PM (#4005397)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    Margarine will considerably shorten your life. It has not been allowed in our house for 25 years. Butter is the word you're looking for.


    21 Aug 19 - 03:19 PM (#4005400)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Dave Hanson

    My wife left me 20 years ago, not had margerine in the house since.

    Horrible stuff.

    Dave H


    21 Aug 19 - 03:59 PM (#4005404)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    I would think pressure cooking would overdo the corn. One point I took from Nero Wolfe was that "American housewives murder corn on the cob" or something along those lines, by boiling it for 10 minutes or more. I took note and usually only have it in the water long enough to get hot, probably 5 minutes.

    My dogs love corn on the cob and my Labrador retriever is particularly adept at eating it off the ear row by row, human-style. The other dog it's a bit of a wrestling match to keep her from taking the entire cob to consume. Yes, it is possible to have leftover corn, and this is how I dispatch it. You should see those two gobble it down if there is butter on it. (Agreed about margarine, I haven't used it for years. I adopted friend's policy, who once pointed out that she didn't use much to spread, etc., so she might as well use butter. I also cook with it and have stopped using shortening. I use butter or oil instead.)


    21 Aug 19 - 06:59 PM (#4005416)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    Mrs Steve and I have this tradition of not cooking on Wednesday nights. The core of the menu is always cheese with Bath Olivers. We have a repertoire of accompaniments/starters. It could be avocado with prawns and Delia Smith's seafood sauce, or my version of mackerel pate* with toasted Crosta Mollusca Puglian bread (two quid from Waitrose, does us twice, freeze half of it), or just assorted nibbles.

    Tonight it was assorted nibbles. We had a pot of Greek olives with feta and sun-dried tomatoes (M&S), a small pot of habas fritas, a small pot of almonds, half a jar of caperberries, some Sungold tomatoes from my greenhouse and some baby cucumbers, sliced longways, also from my greenhouse. The cheeses were a hunk of Montagnolo (a soft blue triple-creme cheese from Germany) and a hunk of Mrs Kirkham's Lancashire. My God, we ate well. We washed it down with a bottle of Puglian Primitivo (oddly, the label said Zinfandel, genetically identical). Sweet dreams, dearest...

    *The mackerel pate is disgustingly delicious and disgustingly easy. Make it the day before for best flavour. If you have a hand blender it takes about four minutes not counting the washing up. If you haven't got a hand blender, there's something seriously wrong with you...

    You need two cans of mackerel in olive oil, which you should drain and discard the oil, one heaped teaspoon of hot mustard (Colmans English innit, not that grainy stuff), one tablespoon of full-fat creme fraiche, a grinding of black pepper (no salt, please), a dash of Tabasco and the juice of a good half of lemon. Do not use that abomination which is bottled lemon juice. Get yourself a fresh unwaxed lemon. You won't regret it.

    Put the whole lot into a jug and blitz it to almost death with your hand blender. You will have to shove it down the side of the jug a couple of times. It's very quick. Scoop into a nice ornamental pot (I have a lovely collection that I bought in Andalucía). Just before you serve it up to your beloved, coarsely grate some lemon zest on top. You need some really good hot toast and butter to go with it. The Puglian toast is magnificent if you can get it.

    As with many things, I can't tell you how much better this is if you make it the day before and stick it in the fridge...


    21 Aug 19 - 08:18 PM (#4005422)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    That sounds like a wonderful Wednesday tradition!

    I'm still clearing the freezer so I had the last two small pieces of cod, breaded and pan fried with homemade tartar sauce and I'll nibble something more later. I also defrosted half a multi-grain baguette that I toasted for a crostini later in the week. I made some carrot salad yesterday (ground carrots, raisins, mayonnaise) and I baked some sweet potatoes, so it could be something like that. It has been up to or over 100o for the last three weeks and I just don't feel like sitting down to one meal all at once.

    A single malt Scotch (better for me to drink after a meal) finishes the evening.


    21 Aug 19 - 11:36 PM (#4005437)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Mrrzy

    Hee hee that was supposed to be mdash but mash was way more culinary!


    22 Aug 19 - 09:39 AM (#4005492)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Charmion

    I stopped buying margarine when I finally managed to persuade Himself that butter would not take him to an early grave with heart disease. I haven't eaten the stuff myself since I was a child, and my parents bought it because it was cheap.

    I must confess that it took me way to long to learn that, with respect to food, "both good and cheap" typically applies only to what's in season where you live, if you're lucky.

    Yesterday I went out to Canadian Tire and bought myself a Food Saver vacuum-sealer. This is a gadget that vacuum-packs food for storage in heat-sealed plastic bags. As soon as I brought it home, I set it up in the kitchen and promptly packed up two trays of chicken legs bought on special the day before. This task normally takes a great deal of fiddling around with clingfilm, zipper bags and masking tape, with mediocre results. With the Food Saver, time on task was cut by at least half, with much less accompanying mess. The resulting packages look just like the vacuum-sealed items in the butcher's freezer, and I expect them to be as resistant to damage. Himself tells me that vacuum-sealers are very popular with "preppers" -- the people who think they can survive the Zombie Apocalypse if they only pack away enough freeze-dried soup mix in their basements. I hope the Food Saver is the only thing we have in common ...

    All this was brought on by the discovery of a package of chicken parts damaged by freezer burn. I remember that package, an awkward thing of corners and odd angles, and it was a damnable nuisance to wrap. I hope that's my last freezer-burned item. It would also be nice to reduce our holdings of baggies and clingfilm, which I loathe because it can't be recycled and it always twists into useless clumps.


    22 Aug 19 - 06:28 PM (#4005557)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    I wish to report a culinary failure. I bought a beautiful big cauliflower yesterday for a quid. The weather later on today was unexpectedly benign, so we thought we'd have a barbecue. I found a recipe for barbecued cauliflower steaks. You cut the whole cauliflower into thick vertical slices, baste them with garlicky olive oil and barbecue them gently (I used one of those perforated aluminium trays) for six or seven minutes each side.

    Well what a waste of a good cauliflower. Dry, acrid, ruined. And it took twice as long as the recipe said. Binned it. Never again.


    22 Aug 19 - 07:19 PM (#4005563)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Charmion

    Thanks for the report, Steve. I thought it looked too good to be true.

    Marcella’s cauliflower — the one where you boil the entire head whole, then smush it up with olive oil, Parmesan, salt and pepper — was such a revelation to me that I’ll never eat it any other way again.

    Oh, except for that Madhur Jeffrey recipe where you break a whole cauliflower into florets and cook it in a wok with turmeric and nigella (no kidding!) seed. I could eat the whole thing myself, cooked like that.


    22 Aug 19 - 08:34 PM (#4005569)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    Well as you can imagine, Charmion, I possess Marcella's "bible," and as soon as I saw your post I looked up that cauliflower recipe. It will be next on my cauliflower hit-list and I shall report back. I must have posted our favourite Yotam Ottolenghi cauliflower recipe before, the one with chorizo, sliced olives, pumpkin seeds and paprika. I really must get to bed now but I'll post it tomorrow if I haven't already.


    22 Aug 19 - 10:42 PM (#4005571)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Mrrzy

    Um, cooking things twice as long as the recipe says usually does result in dry/acrid/burned, in my experience. I have had great experiences with grilled cauliflower steaks, oh do try again. Maybe thinner slices? I'd hate for you to miss out...


    22 Aug 19 - 10:43 PM (#4005572)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    I've been tempted to put some links at the top of the thread to various recipes posted here, but there are so many that are casual yet actionable descriptions I wouldn't know where to start.


    23 Aug 19 - 11:03 AM (#4005630)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: leeneia

    We have made the cauliflower steaks with olive oil both fried in a skillet and baked in the oven. Both are good.


    24 Aug 19 - 04:36 AM (#4005710)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    We did a very simple barbecue this evening. Very basic, very delicious. The main player was mackerel fillets, three each, quite large. I had to spend half an hour pin-boning the buggers, but it was worth it. I made a baste of lemon juice (fresh lemons or forget it), a squidge of garlic, a sprig of thyme, a dash of Tabasco and, not least, extra virgin oil. We had salad potatoes, cut in half, coated in extra virgin olive oil and seasoned, baked on a tray in a hot oven for half an hour, and cherry tomatoes skewered and done for five minutes on the grill. It was a beautiful evening too. Lit the fire pit and dotted a few citronella tea lights to ward off the mozzies. Bliss.


    24 Aug 19 - 04:44 AM (#4005712)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    That was yesterday evening. I started the message last night and finished it this morning. Don't ask... :-)


    26 Aug 19 - 06:43 PM (#4005943)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    I've been over to my local one-off gourmet surplus grocery that sells deeply discounted foods, many that came from the grocery store supplier because they weren't sold to the stores, others that are extra after big events (there's a high-end store that does cheese and fish and fruit and chile and other events during the year; the extra ends up here.) I'm concluding a frugal month and the purchases were mostly to restore dwindling supplies of fresh vegetables. I'll be eating a lot of asparagus because I couldn't resist buying two bunches for ten cents each. Green and yellow bell peppers and poblano peppers will be sliced and frozen.

    Yesterday I brought home a rotisserie chicken and I'll be using it this week in various dishes - with these fresh peppers the first thing I'll do is pull a breast apart and mix the shreds in with sauteed sliced onions and poblanos for fajitas. I have frozen corn tortillas that will go with those. I top it with some of my thawed homemade guacamole, lebne (works like sour cream) and a few dashes of Tapatio hot sauce.


    26 Aug 19 - 07:20 PM (#4005944)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    Last night we had a food emergency. I was going to barbecue some rather magnificent cod loins, skin on, but I'd misjudged the amount of time needed for it to thaw. Normally, that wouldn't matter, but I found that pinboning half-frozen cod is impossible without wrecking the fish. I therefore abandoned the fish, returning it to the freezer (discuss...), and we had cheese instead. But what cheese. Aside from the small lump of Mrs Kirkham's Lancashire that we had lying around, we tried a French one that we'd never tried before, namely blue d'Affinois. What a magnificent cheese. With those two to hand, we were in cheese heaven. The d'Affinois is a soft blue, double-cream cheese. You don't need much as it's very rich, but, begod, it's a beauty....


    27 Aug 19 - 05:03 PM (#4006089)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    Tonight we had line-caught pollack from Bude Bay. Our fishmonger prepared it beautifully for us, fresh as a daisy it was. I made some oven chips from "Jazzy" potatoes (cut into wedges, parboil for eight minutes in salted water, drain well, coat with groundnut oil and bake for 20 minutes in a very hot oven). Meanwhile I made some mushy peas from the frozen Morrison's article, 20 minutes' boiling in sparse water. I basted the skin-on fish fillets in olive oil, lemon juice, fresh thyme and a whiff of garlic, plus seasoning, then baked them open for about nine minutes in the hot oven (turned it down a tad first) on the chip tray (I put the chips on another tray first). Nirvana.


    27 Aug 19 - 07:29 PM (#4006098)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    "Groundnut" - would that be peanut on this side of the pond?

    I found some pollack buried in the back of the freezer. It won't be as wonderful as yours, but it makes a great breaded and fried fish to go with pan-fried potatoes (cut into chunks and sauteed in olive oil and seasonings), a homemade form of fish and chips.


    27 Aug 19 - 07:46 PM (#4006103)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    Yep, peanut equals groundnut.

    The hardest bit of cooking skin-on fish in the oven is the timing. Tonight, my pollack fillets, which were quite thick, took about nine minutes in a 200C oven. They tell you to test whether the fish is opaque all through and going flaky. That is not easy! Much better slightly underdone, rather than dry and tough because you've lost your nerve. I nearly always get it right these days.


    28 Aug 19 - 09:54 AM (#4006194)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Charmion

    Tomatoes are in season in Perth County, and therefore cheap, cheap, cheap.

    I bought a three-litre punnet of Romas from down the road yesterday, and spent a messy hour rendering them into sauce with oregano and basil from the garden. A heavenly scent permeated the house, bringing Himself out of his study with a distinctly greedy glint in his eye. Pasta for supper, with grated Parm and chorizo, and a green salad on the side.

    That batch of tomatoes produced enough sauce for four meals, if I don't let myself at it with a spoon.


    28 Aug 19 - 10:40 AM (#4006199)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    Stumbled across a shop selling damsons this afternoon. I'll prick 12oz of them and put them in a jar containing a bottle of vodka and 6oz sugar. By Christmas I'll have a bottle of beautiful liqueur to wash down the Christmas cake.


    28 Aug 19 - 12:44 PM (#4006222)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Mrrzy

    Ceviche. First attempt yummy but not cevichy, more like a salad with yummy fish in it. Advice?


    28 Aug 19 - 12:59 PM (#4006230)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    I've never made it, I buy it from a couple of local sources.


    28 Aug 19 - 03:29 PM (#4006250)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Mrrzy

    Also check the Italy thread if you aren't hungry enough.


    28 Aug 19 - 07:46 PM (#4006293)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Charmion

    Steve, I do that vodka thing with sour cherries or raspberries. Never tried damsons — are they what we call Italian or prune plums?


    28 Aug 19 - 08:06 PM (#4006294)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    I've done it quite a lot with raspberries. I love the end-product but no-one else does. So I have a secret personal supply of raspberry gin unmonitored by Mrs Steve... :-)

    Damsons are like small, dark plums, about the size of a large cherry tomato, quite tart in the mouth but excellent for jam - and for damson gin or vodka. I use them in the same way as sloes, tiny wild plum-like things that ripen in late autumn on blackthorn bushes. They are very astringent in the mouth but they make superb sloe gin. The general formula is 12 oz pricked sloes or damsons to one 70cl bottle of vodka or gin, along with 6oz sugar (you can always add more later). Keep for at least three months in a wide-necked jar, shaking occasionally, then decant into clean bottles. The cloudy residue looks unattractive but is what I regard as "cook's treat"... you can profitably freeze the fruit for a day or two first, which obviates the need for pricking.


    29 Aug 19 - 03:47 AM (#4006314)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: BobL

    Selling damsons? Good grief Steve, they're free for the taking round here (Aylesbury Vale). There were orchards full of them back in the days when their juice was used to dye straw for the Luton hat industry, and they're still to be found a-plenty in the local hedgerows.


    29 Aug 19 - 04:27 AM (#4006320)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    They're pretty rare round here, unfortunately. I remember once picking hatfuls of them from hedges in South Wales. They make glorious jam, and the stones all float conveniently to the top in the preserving pan.


    29 Aug 19 - 04:01 PM (#4006440)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Neil D

    My wife just made low-carb turkey schnitzel using breading made from crushed pork rinds and almond flour. This morning I made a sloppy Joe omelet.


    30 Aug 19 - 01:29 PM (#4006571)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    We had a respite from summer with a couple of rainy days earlier this week, so I pretended it was back to "cooking weather" and made a batch of turkey stock and later a batch of chicken stock (from the carcass of the rotisserie chicken). The chicken stock will go into the freezer but I'm planning to make a very small batch of turkey soup. Just because it's so long since I've had soup.


    30 Aug 19 - 06:21 PM (#4006601)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    Must confess that I'm a winter soup man mostly. In summer I've rarely made gazpacho, but I've often made salmorejo, the Andalucian thick tomato bready stuff that's probably more a tapa than a soup, served cold with breadsticks and a topping of chopped hard-boiled egg and scraps of Serrano ham. I'll hang on for colder weather before telling y'all about me hot soups...

    But keep making that real stock. Utterly paramount...


    31 Aug 19 - 12:26 PM (#4006690)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    Dunno whether you Americans can get the BBC News website (not the TV one), but there's an interesting item on there today entitled "American cheese: does it deserve its bad reputation?"

    Because of tariffs it's unlikely that we'll be tasting each other's cheeses any time soon, but I'd be interested to hear your comments about the item and the cheeses mentioned, or not mentioned, therein. Don't worry, it's quite sympathetic!


    01 Sep 19 - 08:15 AM (#4006767)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Jon Freeman

    Here’s a link to the BBC article.

    Drifting a little… Cheese came in briefly in conversation with brother in oz (a bit NE of Brisbane) on his last visit. Apparently he can find some very nice cheese but he’s never managed to find something along the lines of a simple Cheshire.


    01 Sep 19 - 09:57 AM (#4006781)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    There is a long-lived cooking show on Public Television here in the US called Cooks Country and it's companion America Test Kitchen. They ditched the host who established the program a few years ago; too bad. But they still make some pretty interesting dishes, and on a repeat program yesterday they did a pretty interesting Eastern North Carolina Fish Stew.

    I logged in to the free part of the site but this recipe isn't appearing. The description is:

      Locals have loved this hearty, tomatoey, bacon-infused stew for decades. For our version, we staggered the cooking of the onions and potatoes instead of dumping them both in at once. In a handful of tests we found that any mild, firm whitefish worked as long as it was cut into chunks of equal size and added toward the end of cooking. An oddball addition to this dish is poached eggs, which are layered atop the stew and cooked in a covered pot over medium-low heat until silky in texture.


    You can set up a free account, and once you're in, try navigating to the recipe via the search box. I couldn't get to the video or recipe I first landed on, I had to log on and search again to get to it, and with a free account I can only see the video. Take notes if you want to try cooking it.

    This is the video if you already have an account.


    01 Sep 19 - 10:06 AM (#4006786)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    Steve and Jon, my favorite sharp cheddar is a UK import they sell in the Costco warehouse club here. Coastal Rugged Mature English Cheddar Cheese. Even better than this is one of the aged blond cheddars that comes out of the Ag school at Washington State University. Cougar Gold is my favorite. Since it's so hot here right now they let you know they won't ship until it's cooler weather.


    01 Sep 19 - 10:27 AM (#4006792)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    Well whaddya know, SRS: your Rugged Coastal is made at the same dairy, Ford Farm, as our very favourite cheddar, Wookey Hole cave-aged. I don't recall seeing it anywhere but I'll be looking out for it from now on.


    01 Sep 19 - 10:58 AM (#4006800)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Jon Freeman

    It's available from their online shop

    It's one I'd considered trying if (not yet done...) also ordering a bit of the Cave Aged Cheddar.

    (A small order of 2 or 3 online makes more sense to me with our transport limitations than say trying to get to Aylsham M&S).


    01 Sep 19 - 02:24 PM (#4006833)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    They only deliver to England and Wales, but I think the fact that they show the Coastal cheese in the wrapper means they load it up and send it abroad. That's the same wrapper we get here. That producer has some very nice varieties - I hope you all enjoy sampling them! That ballcap looks nice, but it is a bit pricey, though they say they ship free.

    Costco buys things in bulk to sell in their warehouse clubs and they don't buy every brand that's out there, they try to get the best value for what they charge and this cheese is (so far) always in stock. That can't be said about everything they carry.

    Two small loaves of banana bread are in the oven since I had three very large bananas one step away from the compost and I already have at least three pints of frozen bananas already. I'll freeze one of these and use the other for breakfast for a couple of days. A slightly warmed up slice of banana nut bread with a cuppa tea is a very nice way to start the day.


    01 Sep 19 - 02:42 PM (#4006837)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    How odd that, despite the planetary gulf between us, we both relish cheddar cheese from the same dairy. Also, for the record Mrs Steve makes banana loaves all the time, and we freeze them too. I'll pass on the tip for breakfast but I fear we'll be sticking to that "healthy" rabbit food with wood dust in the bottom of every box that goes by the name "muesli..." :-(


    01 Sep 19 - 11:43 PM (#4006884)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    As close as I get to rabbit food is cooking oatmeal for breakfast. Slow cooking, in a small crockpot so it's creamy. I use Old Fashioned rolled oats or steel cut (Irish) oats. And add raisins or cut up figs or cut up dates.


    02 Sep 19 - 11:28 AM (#4006975)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Jon Freeman

    Porridge, for which Flahavan’s is chosen, is a quite popular winter breakfast food for my parents. At the moment though, dad is on Weetabix and mum on Mini Shreddies. Jordans Original Crunchy was once a favourite of mine but I don’t have the teeth for the stuff or the breakfast appetite at least not usually – if I was (almost never) away and someone offered me a cooked bacon and sausage meal I’d likely jump at it...


    Made another aubergine mess the other day. This time a bit of stock and basil together with sweet pepper and courgette..


    I’ve got (and it’s probably my lot) about a guess of 3lb of Roma plumb tomatoes coming up to ripe. Not sure yet whether they will become a soup or a ketchup.


    02 Sep 19 - 01:59 PM (#4007000)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Raggytash

    Murghi Badami tonight. Just need to add a touch of cream and a tad of butter, served with various accompniaments, flat bread, lime pickle, mango chutney etc .............


    03 Sep 19 - 10:10 AM (#4007134)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Charmion

    I think I'm due a change in dietary tone, and the postings about South Asian-style grub are giving me ideas.

    The other day I did pork ribs, and my digestion is still a little stunned from the experience. Himself asserts that my ribs are "the best", but if we ate them more often bad things would happen.

    But they are very delicious.

    This recipe requires an entire pig's worth of back ribs and a barbecue. I have a gas-fired one.

    Lay out the racks of ribs on a large platter or tray, and pat them dry. Using a shaker and the back of a spoon, rub into every surface the following mixture:

    1/4 cup sweet red paprika
    1 1/2 tablespoons freshly ground black pepper (this is tiresome)
    1 1/2 tablespoons packed dark brown sugar
    1 tablespoon salt
    1 1/2 teaspoons celery salt
    1 1/2 teaspoons cayenne pepper
    1 1/2 teaspoons garlic powder
    1 1/2 teaspoons dry mustard
    1 1/2 teaspoons ground cumin

    Let the ribs sit for a while: an hour or two on the counter, or up to eight hours in the refrigerator. (Who has that much space in their refrigerator? Not I.)

    When it's time to cook, set up the barbecue with a large pan under the grill, laid on the tiles that cover the burners. Edge the pan over to one side and fill it with water. In the space beside the pan set a smoker, which in my case is a half-open packet of aluminum foil containing wet wood chips. Light the barbecue, close the lid, and heat it until the first puffs of smoke appear.

    Then lay the racks of ribs on the grill and turn down the gas as low as it will go. Depending on the efficiency of your barbecue, you may choose to turn off one burner completely -- not the one under your smoker. Go away and leave it be.

    At this point, make the vinegar-based "mop sauce" that is essential to this style of barbecue. This sauce consists of either a large spoonful of American-style ballpark mustard and about a teaspoon of salt, or a spoonful of the spice mix, dissolved in about half a cup of cider vinegar.

    When the ribs have been cooking for about an hour, take a small mop or pastry brush (I have a silicone one that does the job perfectly) and slop the mop sauce over the ribs. Cook for about half an hour longer, until you see the meat pulled away from the ends of the bones.

    To serve, lift the racks off the barbecue and lay them on a platter or board. You can bring them to the table whole, for maximum effect, or cut the racks in half. I prefer to cut all the bones free so the diners can eat as many or as few as they want.


    03 Sep 19 - 01:18 PM (#4007167)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    I cooked my last lot of ribs, in their marinade (which must have something in it that will go sweet and sticky), wrapped tightly in foil in a very low oven for about two and a half hours, then barbecued them fairly gently for a few minutes, with a bit of baste that I'd reserved. They were grand, and I saved money by not using all that barbecue gas! They do need long, slow cooking, whatever you do.


    03 Sep 19 - 04:20 PM (#4007188)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Charmion

    Our barbecue uses gas from the house supply, by way of an outside tap. It is an almost unspeakably better arrangement than the bottled kind, which always gives out at the most inconvenient time.

    The sticky sauce version of pork ribs is most common in Canada, but once I had tried the dry rub technique I could never go back. It’s less messy, and far less likely to scorch.

    That said, I never turn up my nose at barbecued ribs, however they’re dressed. That would be beyond foolish.


    03 Sep 19 - 07:02 PM (#4007221)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    Heartily agreed. I have this strange historical agreement, lost in the mists of time, whereby I have TWO propane cylinders at any one time within my contract, therefore I can't run out of gas.


    03 Sep 19 - 09:32 PM (#4007230)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    My parents had an oven version of ribs that was very good, it was a specialty Dad cooked for some of the Song Circle meetings held at his house. I wonder if I have a copy of that recipe somewhere? (They were divorced in 1970 but had joint custody of that recipe.) Now I'll have to go poke around in the cook books and boxed files I have from their houses.


    03 Sep 19 - 09:35 PM (#4007231)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Mrrzy

    I have found oven-cooked ribs have a preferable texture to me if cooked dry then slathered at the end, say, last 15-20 mn.


    04 Sep 19 - 05:46 AM (#4007282)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    I think tightly-wrapped in foil and very slow-cooked is well worth a try. I've only done it the once and we had lovely, tender meat falling off the bone: just a few minutes on the barbie at the end. You can do the oven-cooking part well in advance too, then all your mates at the barbecue will think you're a genius.


    05 Sep 19 - 11:47 AM (#4007464)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Charmion

    Unfortunately, Steve, that oven method works only with sticky sauce. Dry-rub technique means barbecue all the way, with all the nuisance pertinent thereto, but the results are GREAT.

    I have also heard of pre-cooking ribs in an electric pressure-cooker, such as the Instant Pot, and finishing them under the broiler with a coating of the aforementioned sticky sauce. I'm not sure it's worth the trouble -- the photographs posted on Facebook by fanatic Ipotheads look kinda grim to me -- but there is a large segment of the North American population that considers pork ribs just one step short of ambrosia. I'll leave the pressure-cooked version to them.

    Last night we dined out at one of Stratford's better eateries to celebrate my birthday (I turned 65 yesterday and am still slightly stunned at the very thought). For the first time in recorded history, I turned down not only the six-course tasting menu but also the port and the post-prandial brandy in favour of a clear head and co-operative digestive system in the morning. (It worked.) Himself was gobsmacked, and was still shaking his head when we got home. Sad to say, I might finally be growing up a little.

    Tonight's supper is baked fish with wax beans and sliced tomatoes. Earth has not anything to show more fair than an Ontario tomato in the last couple of weeks before the first frost.


    05 Sep 19 - 02:39 PM (#4007489)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Dave Hanson

    Remember Charmion, growing OLD is compusory, growing up is optional.

    Dave H


    05 Sep 19 - 04:58 PM (#4007509)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    Today my daughter was describing a grilled or fried cauliflower with tahini sauce that she's enjoyed recently. That sounds like a great way to eat it, and I have a recipe to test. I will report back.


    06 Sep 19 - 12:08 PM (#4007589)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Jon Freeman

    I got today’s tea, an attempt at a flan, a bit wrong. I don’t think I baked the case I made first from frozen pastry long enough and perhaps my filling (sliced shallots and mushrooms softened in the pan, a bit of lemon thyme, some of our salad tomatoes sliced added uncooked and topped with a cheese sauce) was a bit wet. It looked good coming out of the oven and tasted nice but was spoiled a bit by the pastry having a soggy bottom.


    06 Sep 19 - 12:24 PM (#4007593)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    Over the last couple of years I've been making quiche in a non-stick bundt pan instead of a pie pan with a crust. It comes out great, was gluten free when I was avoiding such things, and looks really pretty. (We dish it out of the pan, we don't turn it out.)


    06 Sep 19 - 12:27 PM (#4007594)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Charmion

    Jon Freeman, you will have soggy-bottom problems any time you put raw tomatoes -- or, indeed, any other fruit -- into a pastry case without something to either absorb or thicken the juice. Tapioca does the job nicely with berries, stone fruit, apples or pears, but I've never tried to put tomatoes in a pie (other than pizza) so that one's a bit of a poser for me. Perhaps a tablespoon of seasoned flour would work ... or just live with the sog, since it tastes good.

    Major kudos for extempore cookery, though.

    Can something be a flan if it doesn't involve custard? Colour me Canadian, and consequently ignorant.


    06 Sep 19 - 12:56 PM (#4007596)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Jon Freeman

    I think others might call that meal a tart but it is a (savoury) flan at home.

    Today’s was a bit of a “use up” job. Shallots had hung in the porch for months, mushrooms needed using and the number of ripe tomatoes in the kitchen has been increasing.


    06 Sep 19 - 07:05 PM (#4007635)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    Quiche??

    I can only do simple cooking. I can't do stuff with big lists of ingredients. If I have a piece of fish, or a steak, I need to know how long it needs, not what esoteric additives might enhance it (unless I can do them in advance). That doesn't mean I'm timid. Far from it. I always try to get the best quality ingredients and I want to keep the cooking simple.

    Tonight we had some thick skin-on fillets of wild Alaskan sockeye salmon. It isn't river salmon, the preserve of the hooray Henrys this end, but it's pretty good. For me, it's gentle pan-frying in butter for ten minutes, with a quick flip with two minutes to go. I don't know what that white stuff is, but it's easy enough to gently scrape it off.

    We had that with tenderstem broccoli and a tangy tomato sauce made from my own Sungold tomatoes. And salad potatoes (the bigger ones cut in half) baked for half an hour with extra virgin olive oil and seasoning in a hot oven.


    07 Sep 19 - 07:11 PM (#4007735)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Charmion

    Last night, we had a Russian friend in for dinner and gave him a completely American meal — the ribs I wrote about a few days ago with corn on the cob, a big green salad and cornbread (which is indissoluble from barbecue), followed by mixed berry cobbler.

    Himself and our guest, who is young and therefore sturdy of digestion, ate themselves into a shared food coma.

    It’s been a while since I fed a man in the prime of his life, and it ain’t half amazing to watch the groceries vanish.


    08 Sep 19 - 12:47 PM (#4007809)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Jon Freeman

    Not cooking yet but might be tomorrow. Dad said he a got me a nice birthday cake yesterday. I didn’t feel like the cake, perhaps as I’d eaten too much chocolate, but took a look at the cake today. What he thought was a cake is a packet of “Betty Crocker Supermoist Triple Chocolate Fudge cake mix” he must have found on Amazon!

    I’m not 100% sure I fancy something that says “Partially Produced with Genetic Engineering” but I’ll give it a whirl and should be able to persuade mum to make some chocolate butter icing to go with it (possibly easy but I’ve never made it).


    08 Sep 19 - 03:02 PM (#4007828)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    That "white stuff" is some of the fat from the salmon and is very healthy for you if you eat it, but there should be plenty more in the meat. Depending on how thick that fillet is, you may be cooking it a bit too long. Let it be flaky but it doesn't need to turn completely solid pink from being well-done.

    Quiche isn't a whole bunch of ingredients, just a few. I saute and crumble bacon that is combined with chopped and sauteed onions, add it to the pan, then it's the usual custard mix of eggs and milk. I usually sink some kind of vegetable in there, like small florets of broccoli. You could make them with all sorts of stuff, but those are the basics. You could make a crust and bake it like a tart or a pie, but I make it in a non-stick bundt pan.


    09 Sep 19 - 12:12 PM (#4008089)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    Friends are coming over for an informal dinner this week (we alternately talk about everything in the world and bitch about our old employer) so the challenge of making things that a vegetarian can eat that doesn't make him feel like an afterthought. The quiche will be made without bacon (he is okay with eggs and milk) and other things will have meat options (if we have pizza we make them each ourselves and the toppings are various.) Usually this time of year I would be using the copious tomatoes and eggplants from the garden, but the garden just never took off this year. I'm lucky I have herbs.


    09 Sep 19 - 02:21 PM (#4008157)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: open mike

    For pizza i like the various vegetarian pepperoni options avaialable.
    the weather is turning cchilly....nearly frost time....and the house could use a warming from the oven being on...I plan todo a Mock Mince Meat pie with green tomatoes, apples and raisins today. A traditional fall recipe....my mom often made it for her uncle.

    Also i will be making a sauce from strawberries and rhubarb...maybe even a pie from that too.

    A couple of days ago i made a cheese cake....to take to a memorial for a friend who has passed away. It was a Kentucky Derby Cheese cake with graham cracker crust, and a topping of caramel with nuts and bourbon.    i added cocoanut to the topping, too. sort of llike german cake frosting.


    10 Sep 19 - 09:16 PM (#4008299)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    I never overcook my fish, Stilly...

    We had my somewhat unconventional chicken arrabbiata on Sunday. For two of us I used about 300g of skinless, boneless free-range chicken breast cut into bite size, a can and a half of Italian plum tomatoes (or skin your own ripe ones), two cloves of garlic, sliced (not minced, not ever!), a good pinch of chilli flakes, or chopped up chillis, to taste (I like it hot), four tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil and some chopped fresh parsley. The pasta we had was bronze-die pennone (big tubes). I don't care for those slippery little penne pasta tubes. I want more bite. 200g is more than enough.

    Sauté the chilli and garlic gently in the oil in a big heavy frying pan for a couple of minutes. Turn the heat up a bit and add the tomatoes, parsley and some seasoning. At this point, put on the pasta in loads of salted boiling water and set the timer for what it says on the packet. No self-respecting Italian cook EVER adds oil to the pasta water. Keep stirring that sauce to break up the tomatoes and simmer it gently uncovered. When the pasta has about seven or eight minutes to go, stir-fry the chicken in a bit of hot oil in a separate pan (don't let olive oil smoke though). When the chicken is nicely coloured all over (two minutes) stir it into the tomato sauce. Let that simmer gently for a few minutes until the pasta is ready. Drain the pasta, retaining a mug full of pasta water just in case (I usually need a little bit for this). Throw the pasta into the sauce and turn off the heat. Mix thoroughly: you want the sauce to coat the tubes inside and out. Add a splash of pasta water if you think it's a bit too dry. Serve on warm bowls, sit on the sofa, lean over your bowl and devour with a fork whilst watching Strictly Come Dancing.

    I got the idea of adding something proteinaceous to arrabbiata from Gino D'Acampo. He uses raw skinless salmon, cut up into small cubes, instead of the chicken. You just throw the fish into the sauce at the end, one minute before adding the pasta. The salmon cooks perfectly in the hot mix in less than two minutes. Trust me!

    No cheese needed either. I suppose you could add Parmesan or pecorino to the chicken version, but in Italy it's a mortal sin to put Parmesan anywhere near fish.


    10 Sep 19 - 09:44 PM (#4008301)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    I have a casserole thing I make with zucchini or yellow squash or calabash, any of the type where you don't seed or peel them; onions, peppers (bell peppers of whatever color is available - there are some beautiful jewel colors, not just green any more), a cut up link of Italian sausage, tomatoes (usually home canned or a store-bought can), cut up squash, some cheese (provolone, mozzarella, etc.) melted into the mix, a little wine if I have it, and at the end add a little water if I need so I can add some pasta to simmer. Parmesan cheese is good added also, at the end. Today I had a little container of crumbled goat cheese a friend had left here on her last visit and she's coming again tomorrow so I figured I ought to use it up. It's different, it melted into the juices and it's creamy; I wouldn't do it again intentionally but I'm not throwing it away either.

    I don't object to goat cheese, I just don't have much experience with it. It comes in things and I eat it, but I haven't learned enough about it to really know what to do with it other than crumble on salad.


    11 Sep 19 - 02:07 AM (#4008317)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: BobL

    Try it (goat cheese) melted it on mushrooms - big flat ones - under the grill.


    11 Sep 19 - 05:49 PM (#4008435)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    "I don't object to goat cheese, I just don't have much experience with it. It comes in things and I eat it, but I haven't learned enough about it to really know what to do with it other than crumble on salad."

    It could have been me saying that. In my case I wouldn't even crumble it on salad, but I wouldn't crumble any cheese on salad...


    11 Sep 19 - 06:16 PM (#4008438)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stanron

    St Helen's Farm mild goats milk cheese, as sold by Tesco, melts nicely for cheese on toast and makes a very good cheese sauce for cauliflower cheese. I'll be nibbling thin slices with a glass or two of port tomorrow night.


    11 Sep 19 - 11:42 PM (#4008459)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    Is that Mt. St. Helens in Washington State? We seem to be having a lot of cross-pollination of our cooking cheeses in this thread. (I grew up near there, even climbed that one before it blew it's top.)


    12 Sep 19 - 01:05 AM (#4008467)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: The Sandman

    if god had intended us to follow recipes, He wouldn't have given us Fanny Craddock.”


    12 Sep 19 - 03:13 AM (#4008475)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stanron

    Stilly River Sage wrote: Is that Mt. St. Helens in Washington State? )
    This is a UK cheese. There's a place called St Helens, note no apostrophe, near Liverpool UK but this product is labelled made in York. YO42 4NP. Nice cheese, soft and crumbly, a bit like Cheshire cheese.


    12 Sep 19 - 04:23 AM (#4008485)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    Supermarkets here invent suitably rustic-sounding fake names to make it sound like their produce comes from rural idylls. In truth, much produce comes from dozens or hundreds of farms. There are names like Willow Farms, Ashfield Farm, Oakham Chickens, Birchwood Farm, Farm Stores, Lochmuir Salmon. These places simply don't exist, and the names are used to fool us into thinking that their produce ISN'T produced on an industrial scale in locations they'd rather we didn't see. Cathedral City cheese is produced not far from us, an hour's drive from the nearest cathedral city, and its milk comes from around 300 farms, arriving in massive articulated tankers. A few years ago its advertising included lovely photos of the Cornish coast at Bedruthan Steps and made great play of the association with the wild Atlantic Ocean. Well it would take you a good hour to drive from the cheese factory to Bedruthan Steps, and the extremely ugly factory, owned by Dairy Crest, is close to a disused airfield miles from the nearest seaside and certainly not within sight of it.


    12 Sep 19 - 04:31 AM (#4008487)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    And I know that there IS an Oakham, but the M&S chickens bearing that name come from nowhere near the real Oakham.


    12 Sep 19 - 09:55 AM (#4008539)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Charmion

    We have that same "farms" branding in Canada and the U.S. I assume that the corporate behemoths behind most of the cheese we see in supermarkets (such as Kraft in this country) want us to be so distracted by nostalgic visions of milkmaids and farm wives meditatively turning cheeses in breezy creameries that we don't ever bother to look at, let alone think about, their real production methods.

    This summer I added frittate, learned from the famous Marcella Hazan, to our rotation of supper dishes. It's not exactly low-cal, but what really good dish is?

    Frittata is an Italian egg dish that includes grated Parmesan or Pecorino Romano cheese and rather a lot of cooked veg. For two people, four to six eggs (depending on appetite and what else is to be served), 20 to 30 grams of cheese, and a substantial heap (250 to 300 grams) of steamed broccoli, blanched haricots verts, blanched asparagus or what you will, as long as it's not what I think of as a wet veg -- i.e., not tomatoes. (I often use a mix we call "veg haché", which includes cauliflower, broccoli, zucchini (aka courgette) and red onion, all sliced fairly fine and sautéed fast with olive oil and garlic.)

    First, turn on the broiler so it's good and hot when you want it.

    Then beat the eggs in a large bowl, add the grated cheese and then the cooked veg. If the veg has cooled, good for you for thinking ahead. If not, add it gradually while beating so the egg doesn't curdle.

    Use a skillet than can go under the broiler. Put it on the hob, add a substantial knob of butter, and let the butter foam and get a bit brown, as for omelette. Add the egg-and-veg mixture and cook as for omelette.

    When the sides are cooked but the top is still runny, pop the skillet under the hot broiler and leave it there until the entire top of the frittata is brown and puffy.

    Frittate can be served either hot or at room temperature, as the main dish with bread, or cut in wedges as part of a selection of antipasti.


    12 Sep 19 - 10:56 AM (#4008547)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    You can also slip the frittata on to a large plate, then invert it back into the pan to cook the top. Most times when I've tried that I've failed abysmally. So I resort to your grilling-the-top method. I always worry about how "done" the underneath is. Good grub though, even if you've managed to wreck it!


    12 Sep 19 - 11:48 AM (#4008553)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    That sounds amazing, Charmion! I had to pull up a conversion table to figure the proportion of the veg to the eggs (we don't do grams down here very often.)

    We also had eggs last night. I made a modified Quiche Lorraine for friends - no crust, baked in a Bundt pan. And I decided I wanted to increase it from 2 cups of milk to three, adding an extra egg. I realized I had only 2 1/4 cups of milk after I'd added the extra egg, so I scooped some whole milk yogurt into the cup, thinned with a little water, and mixed it all into the milk. Onions had been sauteed and small florets of broccoli added (I have a vegetarian friend so no bacon). The Swiss cheese was in a stack of slices so I ran them over the slicing edge of the grater and ended up with long thin strips that I spread around.

    The resulting quiche was delicious, and interesting, but probably not typical. The cheese wasn't really mixed around much so there was a stringy layer in there, so we had to pull each serving loose from the rest like a stingy piece of pizza or lasagna.

    I winged it for the rest of the meal - I'd picked up some small (but not new) red lasoda potatoes and simmered them to the point where I could easily pierce with a knife, then cooled. When it was close to time to eat I put a couple of tablespoons of butter (and kept adding as needed) into a skillet, took each potato and leaned on it just enough until the skin was split and it was a bit smashed but not broken apart. They were lowered into the butter and sauteed on both sides, and ground pepper and salt over the top. These went so nicely beside the quiche, and the rest was a fruit salad a friend bought. Various types of iced tea (we are in Texas!) accompanied it.

    Dessert was cranberry bars that I have probably describe before in this thread. Weeks ago I used my steam juicer to get the juice from several pounds of frozen cranberries and kept the pulp sweet/tart complement to the meal.


    12 Sep 19 - 02:45 PM (#4008589)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Jon Freeman

    I suspect the naming extends beyond supermarkets. I’d doubt that Buttercup Farm (from whom we got some quite reasonable outdoor furniture), Farbrook Farms (sometimes used for bird food) or Wiltshire Farms (frozen meals, probably targeted at the less able) have much to do with farming.


    12 Sep 19 - 06:11 PM (#4008627)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    Tonight I cooked Mrs Steve and me a simple steak dinner. The steak was thin-cut sirloin, which I trimmed of most of its rim of fat and carefully removed the veinings of that translucent connective tissue that doesn't render with flash-frying. I don't understand that stuff on a rare-to-medium-rare steak. It doesn't render at all in that short cooking time and I'm not up for chewing rubber. Anyway, I put the fatty trimmings in a small saucepan, heated it gently for half an hour and ended up with enough lovely beef fat to cook the steaks in my best frying pan. No flavour of the fat lost, and a decent cook's nibble for me... Don't tell her...

    Before I cooked the steak I got my accompaniments sorted out. First, the chips. I had some lovely salad potatoes which I cut into chips (skin on). They were par-boiled in well-salted water for seven minutes, drained, roughed up then coated in hot groundnut oil on a baking tray. They went into a very hot oven for about 20 minutes. The veg was tenderstem broccoli, which was boiled for about six minutes in salted water (I don't believe in steaming). I also chopped up a big handful of my home-grown cherry tomatoes, adding a tablespoon of capers, seasoning and a good pinch of dried oregano. Stand by...

    The steaks were fried in a very hot pan (my best one) in a smearing of that beef fat I mentioned. 60 seconds per side, then on to a hot plate which I covered up and then put into a warm oven to rest. The tomato mix went straight into the frying pan with the meaty juices, and the broccoli went on.

    Six minutes later, chips went on warm plates, then the steak, then the broccoli then the tomato sauce. Bejaysus, we ate well tonight...


    13 Sep 19 - 10:37 AM (#4008659)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Jon Freeman

    Well our plumb tomatoes have gone to tomato soup, some for freezing. Not tasted yet as mum is still working on it but feel confident will come out nice.

    I’m not sure what it is with me and tomato soup but I’d go as far as to say that I've had some (including the Heinz tins) that I either don’t think much of or actively dislike. The simple Delia recipe (or the combination of that and the fresh ripe Roma?) she’s using is however one I’ve enjoyed in the past.


    13 Sep 19 - 12:54 PM (#4008688)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Charmion

    Tomato soup is surprisingly challenging, Jon Freeman, largely because its success depends entirely on the quality of the tomatoes. (Fresh, ripe Romas are the best.) Do too much to a tomato soup, and it fails because it's not actually tomato soup; it's a something-else soup with tomatoes in it. But if you do too little, the taste is off unless you're very lucky. Tomatoes need salt and sometimes a touch of sugar to get the flavour right.

    It's cream of tomato soup that I loathe. Even when made lovingly from scratch by a kitchen expert, its flavour often has an undernote of library paste, and the texture is awful unless you purée it perfectly and strain out every seed, which is way more work than it's worth. In restaurants, the "home-made" tomato soup never is.


    13 Sep 19 - 02:40 PM (#4008698)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    Admittedly not a pure tomato soup, but Gino D'Acampo's tomato, onion and pancetta soup is as good as soup gets. I could give the recipe but I'm in a bit of a hurry right now. Then, for a different take, there's pappa al pomodoro, a lovely thick Tuscan tomato soup made with stale bread.

    Just one thing: if you use good quality canned Italian plum tomatoes, your soup will be as good or better than soup made with fresh. "Good quality" is paramount. Here in the UK I've used Cirio, Napolina and Waitrose own-brand to good advantage. No canned tomatoes should contain salt or herbs or garlic. If you want any of that, use plain canned tomatoes and add the other stuff yourself. A half-teaspoon of sugar added to ANY tomato sauce or soup is a touch of magic. All right, don't believe me...


    13 Sep 19 - 07:34 PM (#4008726)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    Here's Gino's amazing soup. Apologies for the fact that it's not exactly a pure tomato soup, but it's so good...

    For four people, you need half a pound of pancetta (not smoked, and it can be little cubes or, as I prefer, snipped-up thin slices), a pound and a half of finely-sliced onions (he sez white, but I use banana shallots), peeled weight, two and a half pints of chicken stock (feel free to use organic stock cubes), and a 400g can of good-quality tomatoes (or use your own) and a big glug of extra virgin olive oil.

    Gently fry the onions and bacon in the oil for a good fifteen minutes until all is soft and squishy. Throw in the tomatoes and stock. Season, bearing in mind the saltiness of the pancetta. Simmer for a good half-hour. At the end, check the seasoning again.

    Serve this with some parmesan shavings on top together with a few torn basil leaves. Keep the EV olive oil bottle to hand. Given a huge hunk of crusty bread with abundant butter and you have a meal, not just a starter. If there's a better soup, I've yet to meet it.


    13 Sep 19 - 08:57 PM (#4008731)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Charmion

    Steve Shaw, I’m a-gonna make that this week.

    I have chicken stock in the freezer and a bowlful of tomatoes on the sideboard, but pancetta requires a trip to Kitchener, 40 km away. I also want pignoli, so the trip won’t be wasted.

    I’m always in the market for a great soup recipe.


    14 Sep 19 - 03:25 AM (#4008748)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    You could use streaky bacon, which I suppose is what pancetta is anyway. Go easy on the olive oil at the beginning, as you'll get a fair bit of fat from the bacon/pancetta, and you'll get more still if you use your home-made chicken stock. Chef's instinct!


    15 Sep 19 - 03:16 PM (#4008969)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: WalkaboutsVerse

    Out of vegan butter today, I drizzled rapeseed oil on toast, topped with mushrooms, beans and rice plus, as ever, plenty of tomato sauce. My poem "My Diet".


    15 Sep 19 - 03:46 PM (#4008974)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    "Vegan butter"? Call it sommat else! I can't believe it's not not butter!


    15 Sep 19 - 03:51 PM (#4008975)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: WalkaboutsVerse

    What would you call it then, Steve?! Vegan margarine? Vegan spread (but that could other spreads). The brand Vitalite call it Dairy Free Spread.

    I drink soya milk...is that okay?!


    15 Sep 19 - 09:28 PM (#4009016)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: leeneia

    I looked up what pancetta is. Raw pork belly, salted and hung for at least three weeks in a cool place. That is not going to fly in my house.

    Walkie, I have cracked-wheat toast with walnut oil on it for breakfast every weekday morning. That's similar to your toast and rapeseed oil. (Walnut oil is said to be good for the heart.) A friend of mine learned to do it on a trip to France and shared the idea.


    15 Sep 19 - 09:39 PM (#4009017)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Mrrzy

    Does a flank steak marinade have to have a salt component? I find oil, vinegar or lemon, and spices/herbs to be just ducky. Am I missing something?


    15 Sep 19 - 10:39 PM (#4009020)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    I have also printed up Steve's tomato soup recipe to try soon. I'll work out something to use instead of pancetta (I don't know if I've seen it around here, I'll have to look.)


    16 Sep 19 - 05:18 AM (#4009051)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    There's nothing weird about pancetta. It's the Italian take on streaky bacon, and many an hotel restaurant in Italy will serve it fried for breakfast. Delicious. You can occasionally buy it in the piece, but generally it's sold either as a small dice (cubetti) or as very thin slices, which look just like a fine version of streaky bacon. Pancetta is cured pork belly (as is streaky bacon) with no rind. Drape a slice or two over your baked chicken pieces for the last ten minutes for a lovely salty crunch. I can't imagine a meaty ragu, or a meaty risotto, that doesn't start with some sautéed pancetta that adds flavour depth as well as some lovely rich fat to fry your onions. I generally use the unsmoked version. Like most cured meats, it carries that baggage of nitrites/nitrates that worry some people. Not me. Streaky bacon is a good substitute though it may need a bit more cooking.

    For me, pork belly is the tastiest part of the pig with the possible exception of guanciale (cured pig's cheek). You can use pancetta cubes instead of guanciale in carbonara, though the latter is more traditional (and even more delicious). I've even used sliced pancetta when the shops are closed and I've felt the urgent need for carbonara. It works. If you put cream in your carbonara, though, I may never speak to you again...


    16 Sep 19 - 08:37 AM (#4009078)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Charmion

    Steve, the first carbonara I ever ate, made by my Norwegian first husband (aka Mr Wrong), had streaky bacon, rather a lot of frozen peas, bechamel sauce, and no egg. I liked it then, but have since learned better.

    Of course, Norwegians would put bechamel sauce on a peach Melba if you let them.


    16 Sep 19 - 10:18 AM (#4009099)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Mrrzy

    Man I saw an article on whiskey versus whisky and now can't find it.


    16 Sep 19 - 11:03 AM (#4009103)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    Mrrzy, it's probably in this thread somewhere. We covered just about every aspect of the topic in 400+ posts.


    16 Sep 19 - 12:09 PM (#4009112)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: WalkaboutsVerse

    Thanks Leeneia - when my bottle of rapeseed runs out I will look to give walnut oil a go (a few years ago, I spent quite a while looking for rapeseed oil in a supermarket, before realising it was labelled vegetable oil).

    And, sorry Steve, I still can't think of a better term than "vegan butter"...maybe not Full Monty Margarine?!


    16 Sep 19 - 12:13 PM (#4009114)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    Well it's not butter, in the same way that a Linda McCartney sausage is not a sausage and a nut cutlet is not a cutlet.


    16 Sep 19 - 01:13 PM (#4009124)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    Rape seed oil is labeled "Canola" in the US - an abbreviation for Canadian Oil Association


    16 Sep 19 - 04:21 PM (#4009158)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: WalkaboutsVerse

    Never been to Canada, SRS, but I imagine some of the land and climate there would be similar to where it is grown here.

    Also, whatever you spread your toast with, next time you make beans on toast, try dabbing in some mint sauce.


    16 Sep 19 - 05:42 PM (#4009180)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    The only oils I use these days are groundnut oil for really hot frying, everyday extra virgin olive oil such as Napolina for general cookery and a top-quality extra virgin olive oil for salad dressing and sprinkling on a finished pasta dish or pizza (a bottle lasts for ages). For certain dishes it has to be butter, for example in risottos, and for frying eggs it's butter for me every time. There are some shortcuts I simply don't take. I don't use tomato or garlic purée. The only dried herb I will ever use is oregano. If a recipe calls for lemon juice, it comes out of a real lemon, never a bottle, and cheap watery balsamic vinegar has no place in my house. An expensive bottle of that lovely, thick balsamic lasts for ages, and it's great for mixing with olive oil as a salad dressing or to dip your bread into (which they never do in Italy) or sprinkling on a bowl of strawberries, though round here it has to compete with good old Cornish clotted cream.


    16 Sep 19 - 07:51 PM (#4009196)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    Canola is controversial in the UK. Last time I heard, most canola grown in Canada was GM, enabling farmers to use glyphosate weedkiller on the growing crop. Well we don't allow GM crops here. Oilseed rape is lovely and yellow but it is environmentally unfriendly, requiring lots of pesticide input, and it requires heavy nitrogen fertilising. I haven't researched the other oils as much in these regards, but I won't be buying canola/rapeseed oil any time soon.


    17 Sep 19 - 03:10 AM (#4009222)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: BobL

    Vegan butter is in good, or at any rate acceptable, non-dairy company: peanut butter, apple butter, shea butter.


    17 Sep 19 - 04:48 AM (#4009241)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    I suppose so. Grunt.


    17 Sep 19 - 10:03 AM (#4009285)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Charmion

    "Vegan" butter is margarine, renamed by today's cool kids.

    Corn-oil margarine was what my Jewish classmates had on their all-beef salami (Shopsy's, with the rabbinical seal of approval on the wrapper) sandwiches back in 1965. Parev, so okay with meat. Roll the calendar forward about half a century and lo! it's being marketed to a new dietary minority.

    That's fine, as long as I don't have to eat it.


    17 Sep 19 - 10:37 AM (#4009293)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    I stopped using Canola a dozen years ago when I discovered the Middle Eastern grocery (Halal) where I buy olive oil. I get peanut oil across the street at the large Asian market. In each instance they sell so much that what they have on the shelves is so fresh it will last once I take it home (and I buy the 3-litre bottle of olive oil). I only posted the name in case it was something that WAV was seeing in his store.


    17 Sep 19 - 05:51 PM (#4009349)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: WalkaboutsVerse

    Frankly, I have not looked into how environmentally unfriendly growing rapeseed oil is...I have only thought the opposite because it grows locally.

    I have heard that soya has resulted in a lot of slash-and-burn of virgin forest in South America.

    Thanks, SRS, but to again be frank, I don't like halal or kosher due to the cruelty involved - even though I majored in anthropology, I think some customs should be outlawed by the UN.

    Some anthropologists would rationalise that you have to take a part/whole approach etc. - I hate such unnecessary suffering, as suggested in my poem from WalkaboutsVerse "A Good Life"


    17 Sep 19 - 06:41 PM (#4009354)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw

    Not wishing to inject too much controversy into this lovely thread, but I find more than a little hypocrisy in the criticism of the slaughtering methods of other cultures from denizens of those western countries that tolerate industrial-size abattoirs which terrorise soon-to-die animals, battery-egg or barn chickens with hardly enough room to move and which have to endure the stench of their dead compatriots, not to speak of treading over their dead bodies, pigs reared "intensively" in what John Seymour called Belsen-houses, and all manner of animals transported hundreds of miles packed like sardines in huge trucks to slaughterhouses. Speaking of killing animals for food, and John Seymour, I remember reading in one of his books that the kindest way way of killing a pig for food is to have have the animal peacefully rooting around in a field one minute, then dispatched unsuspectingly straight to heaven the next via a shotgun to the head. You're a veggie, grand, so we let you off. But why focus on the one culture whilst ignoring your own?


    17 Sep 19 - 07:15 PM (#4009363)
    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage

    Beyond offering the name of the oil to round out information in a remark, I always ignore WAV. I don't read his poems and I don't bother with his weird philosophy on anything.

    I have a chicken breast baking in the toaster oven, that will probably go into something like fajitas or sliced and used on top of a pizza. Cooking a whole chicken when you live alone is rarely practical.