BS: Buzz Words To Thread - Forum Home

The Mudcat Café TM
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=155977
152 messages

BS: Buzz Words

03 Nov 14 - 10:16 AM (#3674148)
Subject: BS: Buzz Words
From: GUEST,#

There are some words that are aggravating, that I have come to dislike in normal conversation. For me, number one is veggies. WTF is wrong with vegetables other than it's hard to say and seem cute saying it at the same time? In fact, it's entirely possible that folks have forgot the word vegetables ever existed. "No, we're not serving those vegetable thingies, we're having veggies instead."

Reading a recipe online and there it is, veggies, soon followed by the insipid yet ubiquitous yum, yums, yummie or some such asinine variant indicating that the food is good, as though the author of the recipe frequently puts cooking tips for shit-tasting swill on his or her page just to beguile the unwary. Yum.


03 Nov 14 - 10:23 AM (#3674150)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: GUEST,HiLo

Signage instead of signs..utterly stupid. Percip instead of rain...really!


03 Nov 14 - 10:56 AM (#3674159)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Jeri

"Empowered" ?

"Due diligence" - This a whole new way for a person to pat hirmself or someone else on the back for just freaking doing their job. 'I did my due diligence and researched the...' instead of just 'I researched the...'"

BTW, it's not "yum, yum", it's "om, nom, nom". I don't have that much of a problem with it, since this past weekend, during which I went on a cat video bender and watched one with a "talking" cat. It was eating, and clearly enunciating "om, nom, nom". I DO think that if a person is going to say it, they should only do it with a mouth full of food.


03 Nov 14 - 11:05 AM (#3674161)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Steve Shaw

I appreciate most Americanisms, and most American spellings, but "normalcy" gets right up my nose, it does. And I was just saying to the missus a few minutes ago how regrettable it is that our railway stations have now all become "train stations". And I've said it before and I'll say it again: use the word "albeit" and you're marked out immediately as a total prat. And it's "before", never "prior to".


03 Nov 14 - 11:17 AM (#3674166)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: GUEST,HiLo

One Americanism that I don't get at all is "erb" instead of Herb. Is there a reason for this . The other american word I don't get is Mom...instead of Mum.


03 Nov 14 - 11:23 AM (#3674168)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Jeri

A lot of people just call it "grass".


03 Nov 14 - 11:29 AM (#3674170)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: GUEST,punkfolkrocker

'Dude'... and the even worse, drawn out whiny 'Doooooooood'

If you are American, ok.. fair enough.. carry on DOOOOOOding as much as you must..

But if you are British, Scandinavian, Eastern European, any European at all...

Please stop now.. immediately...


03 Nov 14 - 11:49 AM (#3674183)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: GUEST,#

A win-win situation: translated to plain English that means one side has a crappy negotiator.


03 Nov 14 - 12:05 PM (#3674194)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Mrrzy

There was a commercial for a car where the only line was Dude! spoken with mounting alarm before the railroad tracks and with admiration after when nobody's coffee had spilled... very effective bit caricaturish use of that dooood thing which, I agree, doesn't belong in adult conversation.

Back to words that make me want to take a buzz saw to the speaker:
Worthiness - what's wrong with Worth?
Healthiness - how about Health?
And other make-up-a-long-word-becuase-I-don't-know-the-short-ones.

Wellness. Health was already there. And well is a declension of good, anyway, and goodness is also already there.

And so on. The exception is "warminess" which is what's left in the blankets you didn't want to get out of. Warmth is a whole n'other thing.

Also phrases from the department of redundancy department or those that are oxymoronic. A TV reviewer on one of those introduce-the-old-movie channels once described performances of the cast as "uniformly outstanding" and I had to turn off the TV and try to picture individuals standing out from the crowd while still being exactly the same as the crowd. It wrinkled my brain, as they say.

On the other hand I like the *subtle* oxymorons like "once again" (if it's again it's at least twice) and "meteoric rise" (don't meteors fall?).


03 Nov 14 - 12:27 PM (#3674208)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: GUEST,Steve Shaw, grammar cop

I have to say that, at the end of the day, I personally always go the extra mile in order to avoid cliches like the plague. And no sentences without verbs! And hyperbole to me is by far the worst thing in the world by a million miles. I believe that one hundred and ten percent.


03 Nov 14 - 12:36 PM (#3674213)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: GUEST,punkfolkrocker

Ok.. non verbal communication,... but the great British "V" sign is now almost completely extinct
due to the perniciously invading middle finger...

Yank greys killing off our red squirrels is bad enough,
but please spare us our indiginous traditional 2 finger salute...


03 Nov 14 - 03:44 PM (#3674277)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Mrrzy

One-word sentences? Eliminate.

Also not to be confused with wolf sentences, such as, this is the best salad I ever put in my whole mouth.

I love the 2-fingers thing!


03 Nov 14 - 04:12 PM (#3674287)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Ed T

Pond, for the Atlantic Ocean.


03 Nov 14 - 04:49 PM (#3674302)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Ed T

People who misuse the term liberal, as a buzz word for just about everything they dislike.


03 Nov 14 - 04:49 PM (#3674303)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: GUEST, topsie

HiLo, Americans don't say 'Mom', they only write 'Mom'. What they say is 'Maahm', as in 'haahckey maahm'.

My current hate is 'inspirational' - 'inspiring' is so much better.


03 Nov 14 - 04:52 PM (#3674304)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: GUEST, topsie

. . . and I really despise people who purchase things instead of buying them . . .


03 Nov 14 - 05:04 PM (#3674310)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: olddude

British cheeky still don't get it


03 Nov 14 - 05:05 PM (#3674311)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: olddude

Like is another like we shopping. A new one today is Grey Grey


03 Nov 14 - 05:32 PM (#3674314)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Jeri

"Like is another we like shopping": what's that mean in English? For the other thing, I think you meant "cray-cray" (crazy).


03 Nov 14 - 07:05 PM (#3674341)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: michaelr

Truthiness! (coined by Stephen Colbert)

"veggies" I can stomach, but I abhor the English "vedge".


03 Nov 14 - 07:19 PM (#3674342)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: GUEST,Steve Shaw, grammar cop

I hate the misuse of apostrophe's. And who the hell needs rhetorical questions!


03 Nov 14 - 07:21 PM (#3674343)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: GUEST,#

That's thinking outside the box.


03 Nov 14 - 07:33 PM (#3674347)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: GUEST,DTM


03 Nov 14 - 07:35 PM (#3674348)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Ed T

Or, boxing outside of the think?


03 Nov 14 - 07:36 PM (#3674349)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: bobad

At the end of the day....WTF?


03 Nov 14 - 07:42 PM (#3674352)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: GUEST,DTM

The ones that do me in are ...
"no probs"
"holibags"
"absolutely"

Also (in UK) adding 'ie' to the end of sportsmens'surnames to make them sound cute. e.g. Jonesie, Bestie, Greavsie, etc.


03 Nov 14 - 07:46 PM (#3674354)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: GUEST,Steve Shaw, grammar cop

I should like to emphasise that I stand shoulder to shoulder with those in this hotbed of a forum who, like me, eschew axes to grind which serve merely to play into the hands of those people who would ride roughshod over others in order to get them to toe the line. That practice, along with the needless and excessive use of metaphor in written English, will never be my Achilles' heel. Put that in your pipe and smoke it.


03 Nov 14 - 08:03 PM (#3674359)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: GUEST,#

Stopped in to see what's trending.


04 Nov 14 - 12:21 AM (#3674401)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Mrrzy

Holibags? What you pack, or the amount of fun you have?


04 Nov 14 - 12:28 AM (#3674402)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Mrrzy

Oh, yeah, and another pet peeve is the media failing to distinguish between Injury and Wound.

You aren't *wounded* by a fall down the stairs unless someone pushed you and even then, it's the push that ended up wounding you, not the stairs. The stairs are what injured you.


04 Nov 14 - 12:42 AM (#3674406)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Ed T

Use of the term "that's awesome", when it is clearly not intended as such.


04 Nov 14 - 01:32 AM (#3674415)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: meself

More coffee? - Sure. - Awesome!

________________

How about when journalists tell us that the "suspect" committed the crime - as in, "The suspect shot two men." Um - if you are telling us that he shot two men, why are you also telling us that he is a mere 'suspect'? Isn't he 'the perpetrator', 'the shooter', or 'the criminal'?


04 Nov 14 - 02:55 AM (#3674423)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Musket

✌️dude


04 Nov 14 - 04:11 AM (#3674432)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: GUEST,Steve Shaw, ex-grammar cop

I must say that I did manage to chillax on a couple of staycations this year.


04 Nov 14 - 05:43 AM (#3674447)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Musket

Did you chow any good meal's?


04 Nov 14 - 05:45 AM (#3674448)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: GUEST,Andy

Two that get up my nose are 'sea-change' and 'scoreline'. Whats wrong with CHANGE and SCORE??

Andy


04 Nov 14 - 06:27 AM (#3674456)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: GUEST, topsie

ARIEL

Full fathom five thy father lies;
Of his bones are coral made;
Those are pearls that were his eyes:
Nothing of him that doth fade
But doth suffer a sea-change
Into something rich and strange.
Sea-nymphs hourly ring his knell

Shakespeare, The Tempest


04 Nov 14 - 06:32 AM (#3674457)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Musket

Many years ago, BBC style guide dictated that full time scores were called scores and latest scores could be referred to when relaying a batch of them, as score line.

On a related subject, they are called linesmen, not bloody assistant referees...


04 Nov 14 - 06:53 AM (#3674459)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: MGM·Lion

Absolutely agree re 'sea change'. All Will's Ariel meant in The Tempest, as quoted above, was a change to something connected with the sea: hence bones becoming coral, eyes becoming pearls. Might have gone on to hair becoming seaweed or some such. The misunderstanding of the phrase to mean any great change is very irritating indeed.

Regret we must blame FIFA for 'assistant referee', which they made their official designation a few years ago. I too preferred 'linesman', but you can't fight City Hall!

≈M≈


04 Nov 14 - 06:57 AM (#3674460)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: MGM·Lion

... particularly as the one who could reasonably been called "assistant referee", who takes charge of the substitute board, the behaviour of the bench &c, had to be called "fourth official" when they introduced him not that long ago, coz "assistant ref" had been bagged by then.


04 Nov 14 - 08:30 AM (#3674485)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: G-Force

Gridlock. It has a very specific meaning, not just any old traffic jam.

The BBC recently referred to the M4 motorway as being gridlocked. How on earth can a straight-line motorway be gridlocked?

Enjoy (that's another one).


04 Nov 14 - 09:04 AM (#3674494)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: GUEST,#

It's good to see we're moving forward.


04 Nov 14 - 09:14 AM (#3674500)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Big Al Whittle

without doubt the biggest stream of shit flowing into the English language comes from Simon Cowell and his mates.....

he's nailed it!


04 Nov 14 - 10:21 AM (#3674521)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Jeri

Oh, that is SO random!


04 Nov 14 - 01:12 PM (#3674555)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: GUEST,DTM

Dislike the abbreviating the names of tv shows to make it sound as if everybody loves them.
My biggest loathing is for "Strictly"
Ahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh


04 Nov 14 - 01:51 PM (#3674562)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Mrrzy

Or spellings! Syfy? Really?


04 Nov 14 - 02:15 PM (#3674568)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: MGM·Lion

I recall from my days of mildish fandom that people who were really into Science Fiction disliked the term Sci Fi, and generally would use SF as the preferred abbreviation: esp the actual writers & practitioners (of whom I knew many as I happened to share a Hampstead flat in youth with one, John Brunner, who was a great partygiver so that visiting great US writers like Tom Disch & Phil Heinlein & Phil Dick, & British ones like John Wyndham, Brian Aldiss, John Christopher, Arthur C Clarke, et al, often came by, or were at the regular Thursday SF meet at the Globe in Covent Garden. John Brunner went on to win Hugo Awards & such.}

≈M≈


04 Nov 14 - 02:26 PM (#3674572)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Ed T

prioritise- UK  
prioritize - US
WTF is with priorize?


04 Nov 14 - 02:38 PM (#3674574)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: GUEST,punkfolkrocker

mrs punkfolkrocker has recently started exclaiming "But hey" as an expression of wearied resignation....

Her job brings her in daily contact with young people
so she tends to absorb teen kiddiespeak....


At least she seems to have stopped saying "whatever"...


04 Nov 14 - 03:03 PM (#3674579)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Mrrzy

Priorize = get abbot kicked?

I love John Wyndham, as an aside.


04 Nov 14 - 03:26 PM (#3674582)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Ed T

I used to enjoy the John Cleese answer to just about anything on Month Python, without saying anything-"not as such"


04 Nov 14 - 03:47 PM (#3674584)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Ed T

Wazzup?


04 Nov 14 - 04:59 PM (#3674592)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: MGM·Lion

Indeed Mrrzy -- esp The Midwich Cuckoos, a really creepy bit of spec dystopia. The film version, Village of the Damned, just got it subtly wrong by trying to make what are subtle hints in the book over-explicit, and lost all the atmosphere.

And Chocky, tho not a particularly impressive one, has one brilliant feature. I had never understood binary -- and tried looking it up again on Wikipedia the other day & found my head spinning in two seconds. But then I go back to Chocky, where in about 5 lines & using Y & N [for yes & no] instead of 1 & 0, the concepts of binary are explained with hyaline clarity by one character to another -- and even to innumerate boobies of readers like me!

≈M≈


04 Nov 14 - 06:29 PM (#3674603)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Steve Shaw

"A raft of measures".

And "blah de blah de blah de blah, going forward..."

"Hard-working families who are doing the right thing..."


04 Nov 14 - 07:00 PM (#3674605)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Bill D

Nouns as transitive verbs:

"My staff has surfaced some interesting facts."


04 Nov 14 - 07:09 PM (#3674608)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Steve Shaw

"But she failed to medal at the 2012 Games"


04 Nov 14 - 09:19 PM (#3674629)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Joe_F

abuse, agenda, blockbuster, brand, collection, contradiction, deconstruct, define, denial, disorder, dysfunctional, excellence, existential, feature, feel, foundation, genocide, highlight, icon, identity, impact, incredible, international, issue, legacy, legendary, meaningful, multicultural, narcissism, personality, potential, product, quality, reinvent, relatively, resolve, showcase, signature, total, wellness, who.

Those words all have legitimate uses, but you should have no trouble telling the buzzy ones.


04 Nov 14 - 11:35 PM (#3674639)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: MGM·Lion

Some worthy precedents, tho --

"Grace me no grace, nor uncle me no uncle"
Richard II II iii


05 Nov 14 - 02:16 AM (#3674650)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: DMcG

Wyndham is perhaps my favourite SF writer of all, and perhaps the one with most dreadful film adaptions. Just because Triffids has monstrous plants that does not mean it is about monstrous plants. Chocky may not be his greatest but it is a great illustration of how to write SF with no gunfights, BEM, or other standard set pieces


05 Nov 14 - 03:26 AM (#3674660)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Musket

"I dare you."
"No"
"Ok. I double doggy dare you."
"That's not fair, I have to do it now."

I mention this because double doggy dare seems to be making a comeback. I last came across it in circa 1983 as a mate had to be photographed from the street by two of us on Bridge Place in Worksop, showing his arse in Burtons window.

Using buzz words over a pint can have consequences. Boots gave us the negatives but not the prints.


05 Nov 14 - 05:52 AM (#3674683)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Ed T

Annoying use of words:
-Hung, when hanged is meant.(you know, the plastic surgeon who hung himself)
-Went for gone
-Using few when less is appropriate, and vice versa


05 Nov 14 - 05:53 AM (#3674684)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: G-Force

I had never understood binary -- and tried looking it up again on Wikipedia the other day & found my head spinning in two seconds.

There are 10 kinds of people in the world - those who understand binary and those who don't.


05 Nov 14 - 07:56 AM (#3674715)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: GUEST,#

This one ranks in the top five:

The bread/stew/potatoes were to die for, to DIE for!


05 Nov 14 - 08:10 AM (#3674720)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Ed T

It means everything to me.


05 Nov 14 - 08:34 AM (#3674726)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: GUEST,#

Damned paid-for ads from government that tell us to eat healthy. Eat healthy whats I ask, but to no avail.


05 Nov 14 - 09:08 AM (#3674737)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: MGM·Lion

The vicious ads for drinking yourself to death or gambling your family into penury always contain the irritating small-print injunction to "drink/gamble responsibly".

Not doing either at all -- that's 'responsible'.


05 Nov 14 - 09:12 AM (#3674739)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Firecat

One I'm guilty of using, and always get cross with myself for, is "D'you know what I mean?"

I keep using it as a filler, potentially to elicit some form of attendance indicator. It's fine if the person you're talking to is looking confused, because then they've got the chance to say "No", mind you.

"At the end of the day" annoys me as well. No idea as to why.


05 Nov 14 - 09:20 AM (#3674744)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Big Al Whittle

okay guys....?


05 Nov 14 - 09:40 AM (#3674754)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: GUEST,Steve Shaw

Yes, Al, that one. I knew a female PE teacher who used that expression all the time to her all-girl classes!


05 Nov 14 - 09:46 AM (#3674758)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: GUEST,#

YouTube has lots of that: Hey, guys, . . .


05 Nov 14 - 09:48 AM (#3674759)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Ed T

I never "axed" him to come over.


05 Nov 14 - 10:20 AM (#3674776)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: meself

Any adult who uses "axed" undoubtedly grew up in a sub-culture in which "axed" was/is the usual form. No intrinsic reason why they shouldn't continue to use it.


05 Nov 14 - 10:41 AM (#3674784)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: GUEST,punkfolkrocker

This Thread Is Closed.......😜


05 Nov 14 - 10:48 AM (#3674787)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: frogprince

Constitutional


05 Nov 14 - 12:28 PM (#3674812)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: GUEST,DTM

From above ... <"At the end of the day" annoys me as well. No idea as to why.>

A bloke in the office says that all the time.
His nickname is Sunset. ;-)


05 Nov 14 - 12:46 PM (#3674820)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: GUEST,#

The end of days/the end times. Gag.


05 Nov 14 - 12:52 PM (#3674821)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: GUEST,punkfolkrocker

"His nickname is Sunset" - alternative nickname.. "bellend of the day"...???


05 Nov 14 - 01:19 PM (#3674831)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: MGM·Lion

I am relieved that old Ron Atkinson's "If you like" seems to have gone out of fashion. I never did.

≈M≈


05 Nov 14 - 01:51 PM (#3674839)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Ed T

"No intrinsic reason why they shouldn't continue to use it."

That type of reasoning has quite a broad application...ummm?


05 Nov 14 - 01:53 PM (#3674840)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Richard Bridge

I hate "going forward".
I hate "take ownership"


05 Nov 14 - 02:05 PM (#3674846)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: GUEST,Steve Shaw

"If you will." Bloody yanks...


05 Nov 14 - 02:12 PM (#3674849)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Musket

Probably the best manager we ever had.


05 Nov 14 - 03:38 PM (#3674870)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: GUEST,Guest from Sanity

Richard Bridge: "I hate "going forward".
I hate "take ownership"

Sorta like, being 'progressive' but not wanting any of the responsibility for it....
Blame the 'other guy'.

GfS


05 Nov 14 - 03:47 PM (#3674871)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: meself

"That type of reasoning" ... ?


05 Nov 14 - 04:45 PM (#3674880)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Ed T

"That type of reasoning" ... ?

Take the time and think it out. I am sure you will get it.

Hint:
Most "buzz words", and language varients, noted through the op, comes from one subculture, or another.

;)


05 Nov 14 - 04:46 PM (#3674881)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: MGM·Lion

Where is Oxbridge?!


05 Nov 14 - 05:48 PM (#3674883)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: GUEST,HiLo

Best one I have heard. Read it in the paper today with regard a a tax on sweet drinks. "The tax may " incentivise" people to drink fewer sweet drinks." I don't think this can be bettered.


05 Nov 14 - 06:11 PM (#3674885)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Richard Bridge

What is the moron Goofball on about now? PLEASE give him a much needed brain transplant (or, even, brain).


05 Nov 14 - 06:15 PM (#3674887)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Ed T

bran transplant?


05 Nov 14 - 06:31 PM (#3674889)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: meself

Of course, one is perfectly free to dislike any usage; no rhyme or reason required.


05 Nov 14 - 06:37 PM (#3674892)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Ed T

I guess you now get the op, meself.


05 Nov 14 - 06:42 PM (#3674893)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: GUEST,punkfolkrocker

one I do quite like the sound of is "sharted"...


05 Nov 14 - 07:02 PM (#3674900)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Steve Shaw

Diving commentator at the 2012 Olympics, talking about Tom Daley: "So far, the other divers are out-degree-of-difficultying him...if there is such a term..."

A couple of minutes later the same commentator, eulogising about a dive by a Chinese bloke, comes up with "Oh, it's nine-and-a-half all the way now, baby!"


05 Nov 14 - 07:38 PM (#3674905)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Steve Shaw

This ain't really apropos, but I couldn't resist it. Also heard at the 2012 Olympics, during the women's weightlifting (and it's true, honest): "This is Gregoriava from Bulgaria. I saw her snatch this morning, during her warm up, and it was amazing!"


05 Nov 14 - 07:53 PM (#3674909)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: GUEST,DTM

"Where is Oxbridge?!"

As far as I know it's near Camford, Mr Lion :-)


05 Nov 14 - 08:24 PM (#3674914)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: GUEST,mauvepink

Nice one!

I am sick to my back teeth of people trying to "touch base" with me

...at the end of the day or even in the end analysis.

mp


05 Nov 14 - 09:43 PM (#3674928)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Jeri

The "outside the box" phrase has always driven me a little nuts for a few reasons. Buzzwords often seem like they're intended to allow people to feel oh-so original, when they're not. Once the phrase becomes part of the collective meme-opolis, it's NOT ORIGINAL.

Another thing is the whole metaphor is screwed up. The problem is not people thinking inside the box, it's that both the "inside" and "outside" thinkers believe there's a box.


06 Nov 14 - 03:25 AM (#3674967)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Musket

Presumably, being "sick to my back teeth" was buzz once?


06 Nov 14 - 04:19 AM (#3674978)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Musket

Jeri, I fully agree that seeing a box in the first place is an issue, but to be fair to the original phrase, the idea of four lines going through a five point grid does make a fair point.

It's just that as a thought exercise, it got lost in the fog, just like draining alligator swamps...


06 Nov 14 - 10:08 AM (#3675062)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Acorn4

"upskilling" "big up"


06 Nov 14 - 10:19 AM (#3675066)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: GUEST,#

You can't be serious. Upskilling? It should have been drowned at birth.


06 Nov 14 - 10:28 AM (#3675074)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: GUEST,punkfolkrocker

"Well done you"...

some people are just so supercilious and patronizing they need to be ...[insert violent retribution of choice]...


06 Nov 14 - 10:58 AM (#3675085)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: GUEST,Steve Shaw cringeing

That's the best of the lot, punkfolkrocker, so well done you! Aw, bless!


06 Nov 14 - 11:10 AM (#3675087)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Jeri

"I threw up in my mouth a little bit"

eeeew. What is it they say? "Don't tell, show". (And then, go away.)


06 Nov 14 - 12:47 PM (#3675118)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Bill D

"at this point in time"
It reminds me of cop-speak--- "at this point in time the intoxicated individual exited his vehicle."
What's wrong with NOW?


06 Nov 14 - 01:35 PM (#3675130)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Don Firth

Bill just beat me to it. "At this point in time" instead of "Now." I have a close relative who is given to this circumlocution.¬ OY!!

The reason that newscasters and reporters use the word "suspect" when it's pretty certain who the "perpetrator" is, is that should there be a case of mistaken identity or mis-identification and someone else did the foul deed, the "suspect"—mistakenly named by the reporter—could sue the reporter and/or his employer for libel. With "suspect," the reporter is off the hook. But naming him as the perpetrator when it hasn't yet been proven in court is risky.

A caution I recall from my days in broadcast news.

Don Firth


06 Nov 14 - 02:05 PM (#3675138)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: meself

You missed the point. If you say the suspect committed the crime, then you are saying that the suspect committed the crime.


06 Nov 14 - 02:43 PM (#3675153)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: GUEST,TIA

I hate the word proactive.


06 Nov 14 - 02:57 PM (#3675158)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Don Firth

No, I'm afraid YOU are missing the point.

In a criminal case, there can be several "suspects," and no matter how certain you may be, if you go around trumpeting that so-and-so, one of the suspects, did the deed and it turns out later that he or she is innocent, that person can sue your socks off for libel and slander.

This is why the police, even if they caught the perpetrator red-handed, refer to him or her as "the suspect" until a judge and jury hears all the evidence and they render a verdict.

"Innocent until proven guilty."

Don Firth


06 Nov 14 - 02:58 PM (#3675159)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Amos

"Sea change" is a fine word with a very different sense to it than mere change.

My pet peever of the day is the use of "great" for anything from birdseed to coffee refills to mediocre performances of "Wagon Wheel" using a fifteen-dollar guitar that has not been tuned and a celluloid flatpick used only as a rhythm instrument. Greatness used to have a meaning in human affairs, but the soul of greatness is gone from our language.


06 Nov 14 - 03:28 PM (#3675165)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Jeri

It's "the subject allegedly committed the crime." What gets me is when someone just throws "allegedly" in hither, thither, and yon. "The bank was allegedly robbed"... no, it was effing robbed! The alleged jerk in the alleged ski mask allegedly did it.


06 Nov 14 - 03:35 PM (#3675169)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: GUEST,Steve Shaw circumspect

You do have to be slightly careful about pinning a crime on someone before they have been through the judicial process. Thus "alleged". You wouldn't really be wanting to compromise the prospect of a fair trial, allowing criminals to get off on technicalities.


06 Nov 14 - 03:37 PM (#3675171)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Ed T

I threw up in my mouth, bad language source discussion:

Bad lingo 


06 Nov 14 - 03:42 PM (#3675173)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Don Firth

Same thing, Jeri. News media use "alledgedly" for the same reason they use "suspect." To avoid potential law suits.

But the same potential for law suits holds for anyone who jumps to the conclusion that a particular person is guilty of a crime, says so, and that person is later found to be innocent.

Don Firth


06 Nov 14 - 03:45 PM (#3675175)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Ed T

Locally, I often hear, the person of interest in the crime investigation is known to police.


06 Nov 14 - 05:33 PM (#3675214)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: MGM·Lion

The euphemism I respond a bit adversely to in that context is "helping the police with their enquiries". As a child, when I read that someone was doing that, I used to think: Why, how nice of them. My impression is that that get-out isn't used by the press so much these days.

'Sea-change' may have adventitiously acquired a certain emotive resonance, but it originated from a misunderstanding of what Ariel in The Tempest was actually singing about.

≈M≈


06 Nov 14 - 05:46 PM (#3675223)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: GUEST,Steve Shaw amused

'Sea-change' may have adventitiously acquired a certain emotive resonance

I sincerely hope you don't talk bollocks like this either at home or at your local Monday Club meetings. :-)


06 Nov 14 - 05:50 PM (#3675225)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: MGM·Lion

Delighted to have afforded you some innocent amusement, Steve ---

but its nature entirely eludes me!

:-) ritebak 2U...


06 Nov 14 - 05:55 PM (#3675232)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Ed T

Entirely eludes=really F'n eludes.


06 Nov 14 - 06:55 PM (#3675252)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: GUEST,DTM

I heard a new one today in the context of something to do with work being stalled. "The ball was on the slates"
Eh?


06 Nov 14 - 08:32 PM (#3675283)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Ed T

Repackaged objectives called "strategic" objectives


06 Nov 14 - 08:46 PM (#3675286)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: GUEST,#

Todally. I am not too fond of todally. Like todally not too fond of it.


It might be an interesting turn around to list newer words that we do like.

One that comes to mind is tasked. The verb has been around for near eight centuries, but I've only noticed it's use [They have been tasked with constructing a bridge over the creek.] in the past 25(?) years or so.


06 Nov 14 - 08:49 PM (#3675287)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Mrrzy

Strategic target is a redundancy, no? I mean it's hard to target something without strategy, and it's hard to have a strategy without having a target about which to strategize...


06 Nov 14 - 08:57 PM (#3675289)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: GUEST,#

And I ain't too fond of the apostrophe in it's in my last post.


07 Nov 14 - 12:40 AM (#3675307)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Jim Dixon

It is what it is.

I'm just sayin'.


07 Nov 14 - 02:19 AM (#3675313)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Musket

Strategize (strategise.). Wonderful that it was used in a post to moan about other buzz words.

Turning nouns in to verbs (verbing!!!) has always been a problem.

Although since I went on a course, I no longer have problems. They are resolution opportunities apparently.


07 Nov 14 - 03:15 AM (#3675322)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Musket

As I'm here and just been on an adjacent thread.

How the hell do you have a "puzzling puzzle?"

Only asking....


07 Nov 14 - 03:17 AM (#3675323)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: MGM·Lion

Don't see that verbing nouns is "a problem". On contrary, I have always thought it a very fine feature of our exceptionally flexible language. As have said before, an often-used trope by Will Shax. Others have copied it, so that the French now have the verb weekender (pron 'wee-con-day'), e.g; a double borrowing from us.

≈M≈


07 Nov 14 - 03:18 AM (#3675324)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: MGM·Lion

Ah -- I wondered who'd be the first to spot that, Pike...


07 Nov 14 - 12:17 PM (#3675468)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: GUEST,DTM

Confession Corner here:
Alas, I was guilty of 'verbing' recently when I texted my daughter to say that the grandkids were having fun bouncy-castling.

On reflection, I can now understand why folks want this type of hybriding 'verb'oten. ;-)


07 Nov 14 - 12:56 PM (#3675480)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Penny S.

Gifting, gifted (not when used to describe people with gifts). What's wrong with gave, given and give? And why have so many people picked up on it, after whoever used it first?

Mind you, "The government gove the schools a great deal of hassle" might be a satisfactory alternative.


07 Nov 14 - 01:08 PM (#3675483)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Musket

Huge difference between flexibility allowing "verbing" of nouns and a limited vocabulary meaning you have no other option. It's an import, this verbing everything and when you can't verbalise, stick a -wise on the end.

To be fair, I have made good beer money out of bullshit bingo games at public sector conferences and presentations. If it weren't for such terms, especially as mumbled in revered tones by management consultants, many of us would be bored as we couldn't play bullshit bingo any more.


07 Nov 14 - 01:36 PM (#3675496)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Jack Campin

Thanks to Thatcher, "reform" meaning "fuck it up beyond repair and make sure that as many of my pals as possible get their snouts in the trough".


07 Nov 14 - 02:02 PM (#3675503)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: GUEST,Steve Shaw language militant

Deteriate.
Pryminister.
Febry/Febyouerry.
Dawn tomorrow morning (a particular affliction of the BBC Spotlight weatherman).
6am in the morning.
Various different...
10 items or less.
(from a long time ago...) Sir Frawncis Chishhter
Superstar (esp. when intonated by that unspeakable professional tyke Michael Parkinson).
Any bloke called Ralph who does not insist that it's pronounced "Ralph".
Sekertry.

Christ, I feel better for that.


07 Nov 14 - 02:04 PM (#3675504)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Ed T

Whatever


07 Nov 14 - 02:42 PM (#3675517)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Mrrzy

Liberry


07 Nov 14 - 02:46 PM (#3675520)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: GUEST,Steve Shaw man of less words

like


07 Nov 14 - 07:17 PM (#3675570)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: GUEST,DTM

Canada, eh?


07 Nov 14 - 07:52 PM (#3675574)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: GUEST,Mrr

Ya, you betcha, I've been to MinnesOta


07 Nov 14 - 08:12 PM (#3675578)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Ed T

"I"ran


07 Nov 14 - 08:55 PM (#3675584)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: GUEST,Mrr

Why O why is the "ouster" the fact that someone got ousted, and not the person who did the ousting? Shouldn't it be an "ousting" if you've been ousted?


07 Nov 14 - 09:50 PM (#3675592)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Bert

...but I abhor the English "vedge"...

Michealr, The term comes from WWII, when cans (tins) of M & V, (meat and vedge) were an important part of wartime diet.


07 Nov 14 - 09:51 PM (#3675593)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Bert

HiLo 'erb is just the French pronunciation. It is very common it the Southern States.


07 Nov 14 - 09:53 PM (#3675594)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Bert

Mrrzy, if warmth is a word then why isn't there a word coolth?


08 Nov 14 - 05:29 AM (#3675621)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: GUEST,Bizibod

I've always felt warmpth is warmer than warmth.Much more nest-like :)


08 Nov 14 - 06:14 AM (#3675629)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: GUEST, topsie

1.   'erb is NOT the French pronunciation (which sounds more like 'airbe').

2.   If a puzzle wasn't puzzling, would it be a puzzle?

3.   'It reminds me of cop-speak--- "at this point in time the intoxicated individual exited his vehicle."'
I don't know about US cop-speak, but in the UK they would say 'at this point in time the intoxicated individual has exited his vehicle'. I don't know why they do this but it does irritate me.


08 Nov 14 - 09:11 AM (#3675664)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Jack Campin

if warmth is a word then why isn't there a word coolth?

There is. Google for it.


08 Nov 14 - 09:26 AM (#3675667)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: GUEST,#

"Mrrzy, if warmth is a word then why isn't there a word coolth?"

Don't let Bert foolth you :-)


08 Nov 14 - 09:47 AM (#3675671)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: GUEST,#

Eyetalian.


08 Nov 14 - 09:54 AM (#3675672)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: GUEST,HiLo

Hello Bert, thanks for the response. I assumed it was an attempt at French pronouniation, but dropping the h dosen't quite do it. I just wondered why the attempt at french rather than just saying it in English.


08 Nov 14 - 09:59 PM (#3675781)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Mrrzy

That wasn't me!

I have a friend that has a sign above his sink that says, THINK! Then he has one over the stairs, it says THTAIRS!


09 Nov 14 - 02:55 AM (#3675825)
Subject: RE: BS: Buzz Words
From: Musket

Your friend wallows in ignorance.

Surely its THTAIRTH

😇