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Lyr Req: Ride On (Jimmy MacCarthy)

26 Jun 99 - 10:05 AM (#89953)
Subject: Irish Song; 'Ride On'
From: Alex W. West

Hi all,

I'm looking for the words to an Irish Song called 'Ride On'. I've only heard it a few times but I absolutely love it. The only thing that I can think of to help is it's about a horse named SeaDew. If anybody knows the words please post or email to me.

Alex awwest_98@yahoo.com


26 Jun 99 - 11:38 AM (#89962)
Subject: RE: Irish Song; 'Ride On'
From: Big Mick

Hi Alex,

Welcome to the Mudcat, greatest town in the world. We are glad you are here, now stick around a while and contribute to the threads.

The short answer to your request is CLICK HERE. I would encourage you to use the search features in our town when you are looking for lyrics. There are two of them. The blue box in the upper right corner of the screen will search the Digitrad database. I searched there and didna find what I was looking for. I then did a search on the Forum itself. Often members post lyrics there which have not made there way to the DT. I put "Ride On" in there and voila. Up pops a thread where Alan of Australia very kindly posted lyrics and chords. Happy Mudcatting and remember .......MUD IS THICKER THAN WATER. hahahahahahahahahahaha..........I got to use it first in the threads, pholks.

All the best,

Mick


26 Jun 99 - 07:25 PM (#90048)
Subject: RE: Irish Song; 'Ride On'
From: Susanne (skw)

Can anyone give any info about the song's background - why it was written, whether it refers to a particular story, etc.? Thanks, Susanne


28 Jun 99 - 03:56 AM (#90300)
Subject: RE: Irish Song; 'Ride On'
From: Brian Hoskin

It was written by Jimmy MacCarthy, if that's any help.


28 Jun 99 - 01:10 PM (#90401)
Subject: RE: Irish Song; 'Ride On'
From: Te Burren Ranger.

2 great versions of 'Ride On'...Christy Moore and Mary Coughlan. Check 'em out. make that three....Maura O'Connell too!


29 Jun 99 - 05:04 AM (#90638)
Subject: RE: Irish Song; 'Ride On'
From: alison

I would like to know what people think the lyrics are about...... is it a horse? is it a woman? why does he ask her/it to "run your claw along my gut one last time?"

any ideas.....

slainte

alison


29 Jun 99 - 07:22 PM (#90834)
Subject: RE: Irish Song; 'Ride On'
From: Susanne (skw)

Seconded! - Susanne


29 Jun 99 - 07:53 PM (#90844)
Subject: RE: Irish Song; 'Ride On'
From: Indy Lass

Me,too; me,too!!


29 Jun 99 - 09:34 PM (#90865)
Subject: Lyr Add: RIDE ON (Jimmy MacCarthy)^^
From: Len Wallace

Lyrics to Ride On:

True you ride the finest horse I've ever seen,
standing 16'. 1" or 2" with eyes wild and green,
and you ride the horse so well,hands light to the touch,
I could never go with you no matters how I wanted to.

Ride on, see you.
I could never go with you no matter how I wanted to.

When you ride into the night without a trace behind,
run your claw along my gut one last time.
I turn to face an empty space where once you used to lie
and look for a smile to light the night through a teardrop in my eye.

From "Ride On", Christy Moore.

Len Wallace http://lenwallace.homepage.com/Len.html ^^


30 Jun 99 - 03:16 AM (#90946)
Subject: RE: Irish Song; 'Ride On'
From: Brian Hoskin

Jimmy MacCarthy has a website that's worth a visit. I had no idea that he was responsible for so many great songs

http://www.dojo.ie/jimmymaccarthy/index.html

(Apologies for no blue clicky thingy)

Brian


30 Jun 99 - 06:58 AM (#90969)
Subject: RE: Irish Song; 'Ride On'
From: alison

still no takers for what it's about?


30 Jun 99 - 12:08 PM (#91038)
Subject: RE: Irish Song; 'Ride On'
From: John OSh

I always thought it was about the leaving of a lover or relationship...possibly noble and commoner

One is riding the finest horse, skilled rider (nobility)

and the other could never go with them ever though they wanted.

And the "claw along my gut" is, I believe, in reference to "so long" sex.

Just my opinion.

John OSh


30 Jun 99 - 12:19 PM (#91041)
Subject: RE: Irish Song; 'Ride On'
From: MMario

I always pictured the lover of a highwayman off to stage another robbery- and the "claw" being the fear that he wouldn't return.

MMario


30 Jun 99 - 08:55 PM (#91184)
Subject: RE: Irish Song; 'Ride On'
From: alison

I like the highwayman theory... never even thought of it that way

slainte

alison


01 Jul 99 - 03:20 AM (#91277)
Subject: RE: Irish Song; 'Ride On'
From: Brian Hoskin

I'd go along with John's theory. The 'run your claw . . .' line I read as a reflection of the torment of a last encounter between the besotted man and the woman he'll never have again. I'm not sure that there has to be a commoner/nobility division, but she's moved on and he's still desperately in love.

Having said this, I don't believe that the meaning as intended by the writer has any more importance than that which is constructed in the interpretation of both the singer and the audience. This song is undoubtedly emotionally powerful, and all the more so for its ability to bring different images and ideas to different people. So whether you're imagining a highwayman (or woman) or a spurned lover, or a hopeless love across an impossible dividing line, it really doesn't matter; each is just as valid and just as powerful.

Besides, if you think this one's difficult to interpret, what do you make of MacCarthy's songs (also recorded by Christy Moore) 'Mystic Lipstick' and 'Bright Blue Rose'?

Brian


21 Mar 07 - 04:56 PM (#2003458)
Subject: RE: Irish Song; 'Ride On'
From: Declan

Refreshed from the "Name this song" thread.

If its any help to know Jimmy MacCarthy is a former jockey. One of his albums of his own songs is called "The song of the Singing Horseman."

I've been told that Jimmy wrote "run the claw along my gut". The claw being an implement used in grooming horses. Don't know if this helps the interpretation any.


21 Mar 07 - 07:58 PM (#2003615)
Subject: RE: Irish Song; 'Ride On'
From: Murray MacLeod

Declan, I worked for two years in one of the most high profile racing yards in England, (with many Irish employees) and I never heard any of the grooming implements being referred to as "the claw".

And "along my gut" makes me a little dubious as well. Stable hands don't normally run any implement "along the gut" in my experience.

Not to say you are wrong, this could be a usage in Ireland, and I stand prepared to be informed.

I would actually like to know which particular implement MacCarthy meant, if the grooming explanation is correct.


21 Mar 07 - 08:08 PM (#2003630)
Subject: RE: Irish Song; 'Ride On'
From: Murray MacLeod

incidentally, from the opening post

...the only thing that I can think of to help is it's about a horse named SeaDew ...

this has got to rank among the greatest Mondegreens of all time ...


21 Mar 07 - 08:46 PM (#2003662)
Subject: RE: Irish Song; 'Ride On'
From: Effsee

Yup!


21 Mar 07 - 08:59 PM (#2003679)
Subject: RE: Irish Song; 'Ride On'
From: GUEST,Bardan

I read somewhere that the horse was a metaphor for republicanism. (Green eyes anyone?) The idea being she'd sort of got on it and it took her to a mental 'place' he would never want to go to. (Armed struggle, blah bla blah.) Could be complete and utter rubbish of course. Doesn't really matter in some ways. It's a song that touches the emotions rather more than the intellect (for me at least.) Yeah the claw along my gut thing is interesting. To me it seems like an obviously very sensual, loving gesture, but (maybe because it is the last time) it is emotionally agonising, hence the harsh physical imagery. Hmmm, my English, just keep saying stuff and maybe they'll give you a decent mark for trying skills are still sharp. I think I ought to be propping up a bar.


21 Mar 07 - 09:14 PM (#2003691)
Subject: RE: Irish Song; 'Ride On'
From: Declan

I noticed the Sea Dew, and it is a brilliant Mondegreen.

Jimmy Mac used to always sing it as See Ya. Christy made it more of a you sound.

I don't claim any expertise in horse grooming whatsoever, I was just relaying a story that I had heard, could be as accurate as Sea Dew. If I get a chance I'll listen to Jimmy's recorded version again and try to make out whether he said "your claw" or "the claw".


22 Mar 07 - 01:15 AM (#2003782)
Subject: RE: Irish Song; 'Ride On'
From: Bonnie Shaljean

Any Irish or British equestrians on board? Isn't "ride on" a standard phrase they use in hacking/hunting which means (more or less) "let's go"?

I played music every week (in Cork) with a guy who used to sing this song regularly, and he definitely put a sarcastic twist on the "run your claw" line, so I've always interpreted it much the same as John OSh above does - a farewell roll in the hay. You know it's the last time ever with this person, hence the image of deep visceral pain.

Mary Black sings this song too. I think Jimmy still works with and/or owns horses up in Kildare (prime horse country). Great song - good on yas for resurrecting this song, Declan.

Happy Vernal Equinex everybody -


22 Mar 07 - 01:19 AM (#2003784)
Subject: RE: Irish Song; 'Ride On'
From: Bonnie Shaljean

I meant EquiNOX. That's what I get for Mudcatting at 5:20 in the morning (Irish time) -


22 Mar 07 - 08:02 AM (#2003935)
Subject: RE: Irish Song; 'Ride On'
From: Morris-ey

I think the republican metaphor theory is correct in the sense of no longer being able to support the more extreme para-military activities


22 Mar 07 - 08:28 AM (#2003951)
Subject: RE: Irish Song; 'Ride On'
From: Den

Its about a the break-up of a relationship with all the pain and angst associated.


22 Mar 07 - 08:33 AM (#2003953)
Subject: RE: Irish Song; 'Ride On'
From: GUEST,Chris Murray

Sea Dew!   I've just got it! Brilliant!!!!


22 Mar 07 - 09:09 AM (#2003981)
Subject: RE: Irish Song; 'Ride On'
From: GUEST,SeaDew

Just got the "Sea Dew" too... i'm in stitches.
I've got the "Ride On" MacCarthy's book at home, very interesting kind of Autobiography through his songs, very similar in the idea to the unique "One Voice" by Christy. I will copy what he says about the song tonight for you guys. From what i remember, it's about parting love and there is a bit about the "claw" thing too. Hang on... SeaDew...


22 Mar 07 - 09:26 AM (#2003993)
Subject: RE: Irish Song; 'Ride On'
From: GUEST

Googling sea due came up with rosemary. So perhaps that's his sweetheart that he was breaking with!


22 Mar 07 - 12:19 PM (#2004132)
Subject: RE: Irish Song; 'Ride On'
From: MikkinNotts

When I have sung this in the past. I have always assumed (rightly or wrongly)
that it was about the relationship between man and beast,
The horse being near to death. "The claw" being the man's hand.
That's what in my mind anyway when singing it..

Mikk


22 Mar 07 - 03:05 PM (#2004265)
Subject: RE: Irish Song; 'Ride On'
From: Murray MacLeod

I have the most awful premonition that this could become another Raglan Road - type thread ...


22 Mar 07 - 10:30 PM (#2004610)
Subject: RE: Irish Song; 'Ride On'
From: Girl Friday

I like the man / dying horse theory. It straightaway made the words sensible.


23 Mar 07 - 06:29 AM (#2004783)
Subject: RE: Irish Song; 'Ride On'
From: Bonnie Shaljean

What's that little sideways-hook thing called that you use to prise muck out of the horse's hooves? Whatever its name is, it certainly looks like a claw. The song line could be referring to both the grooming implement AND the girl's hand - nice bit of symbolism (if there is any such tool).


23 Mar 07 - 08:55 PM (#2005500)
Subject: RE: Irish Song; 'Ride On'
From: GUEST,Sea Dew

From "Ride On", a fantastic book by Jimmy Mac. Reissued by Town House, Dublin, in paperback, this year and highly recommended :

quote
Page 31 :
"
Ride On
People often ask me about this song but, purely and simply, it is a song of parting. The parting of lovers, the parting of emigrants from their homeland and friends, the parting when illness or accident takes the life of a loved one. I have been asked to sing this song at many funerals services and, somehow, it always feels right.
Christy Moore recorded this song on his Ride On album in 1984 and it was my first hit. I will always be grateful to him for giving me the start with what would have been then regarded as a most unlikely song-writing voice.
Christy obviously recognised "Ride On" as a song of parting when, on its release, he dedicated it to the memory of the great Luke Kelly.
I am often asked about the line "Run the claw along my gut one last time" (in the same way as i'm asked about the line "I am the geek with the alchemist's stone", from my song "The Bright Blue Rose"). These dramatic lines jolt the listener into a deeper engagement, or at least this was my intention in employing such devices. That is not to say that they were not a natural part of the flow of expression but, while most writers would edit them out, i feel that a song, like llife, depends on the decisions one makes and these decisions were not taken lightly. Some people may think that i just throw paint at the canvas, but there is exactitude and detail in the placing of every word and phrase until i am satisfied that the lyric is absolutely watertight. It has always bothered me that the previously mentioned line from "Ride On" has often been changed to "Run YOUR claw along my gut one last time", which clearly denotes an intention to cause pain, when the pain i envisioned is simply the pain of living life. The pain of parting and separation that no life can escape. Life is hard. Ride on.
"
End of quote

Hope this helps...


24 Mar 07 - 04:34 AM (#2005619)
Subject: RE: Irish Song; 'Ride On'
From: GUEST,teachers pest

I always thought the song was about love and regret.Wanting to be with someone,but for whatever reason was unable to go away with them.It is a very passionate song and always brings out a flood of emotion.Who cares what it is about,just enjoy the great writing.


24 Mar 07 - 07:25 AM (#2005686)
Subject: RE: Irish Song; 'Ride On'
From: Mo the caller

The implement is a hoof pick.
I liked the thought of a 16'1" high horse, too 16 hands surely.


24 Mar 07 - 09:59 AM (#2005786)
Subject: RE: Irish Song; 'Ride On'
From: GUEST,teachers pest

Standing 16 one or two with eyes wild and green,is how i sing it.


25 Mar 07 - 08:29 AM (#2006575)
Subject: RE: Irish Song; 'Ride On'
From: GUEST,Bardan

But that must be hands rather than feet. I mean sixteen hands is common enough I think. (No expert or anything). I find it hard to imagine a sixteen foot horse. You'd have to climb out the bedroom window to get on its back.


25 Mar 07 - 11:01 AM (#2006659)
Subject: RE: Irish Song; 'Ride On'
From: Declan

Getting your hands and feet mixed up could lead to all sorts of complications.


25 Mar 07 - 01:26 PM (#2006759)
Subject: RE: Irish Song; 'Ride On'
From: GUEST,Chris Murray

I love Jimmy MacCarthy's songs but he is a bit away with the fairies.


25 Mar 07 - 02:29 PM (#2006806)
Subject: RE: Irish Song; 'Ride On'
From: Declan

Interestingly, Sea Dew's quote confirms that Jimmy wrote "Run the claw along my gut".

So if it isn't a grooming implement, what is it? Anyone got any ideas?


26 Mar 07 - 07:42 AM (#2007368)
Subject: RE: Irish Song; 'Ride On'
From: GUEST,Chris B (Born Again Scouser)

Awful song. 'Danny Boy' for hippies.


26 Mar 07 - 12:46 PM (#2007633)
Subject: RE: Irish Song; 'Ride On'
From: GUEST,Chris Murray

I think JMac's lyrics don't always make much sense because he likes the sound that they create, rather than the meaning. The phonemes in "Run the claw along my gut" create a harsh cruel sound. The meaning is irrelevant.

Rather like those Japanese t-shirts that just have words on because people like the shape of the words. The meaning doesn't matter.


26 Mar 07 - 08:01 PM (#2007982)
Subject: RE: Irish Song; 'Ride On'
From: GUEST,Bardan

Ah no Chris B, it's a lovely song. A seriously overplayed song and an occasionally butchered one, but you can't deny it stirs some emotions up. (Having said that, I'd tend to have a similar opinion of Danny Boy.)


27 Mar 07 - 04:25 PM (#2008809)
Subject: RE: Irish Song; 'Ride On'
From: GUEST,cobra

"I love Jimmy MacCarthy's songs but he is a bit away with the fairies."

Well, fair play to you, Chris Murray!

I also happen to think he is a bit "away with the fairies" but, unlike your insinuation, I think that in a good way.

He is a very spiritual sort of an individual. Someone above made reference to his book "Ride On" and I would commend that to anyone. In it he write about his life and about his lyrics.

The fairies were lucky to have him for company and I, for one, feel lucky to have been exposed to his exquisite poetry.

Chris Murray, I am sure you did not mean any offence to the man. BUt I would encourage you to listen to (and read) the man's own words. It may just help you to offer a rather more informed opinion.


28 Mar 07 - 04:25 AM (#2009225)
Subject: RE: Irish Song; 'Ride On'
From: GUEST,Chris Murray

JMac is one of my idols. It was his songs that got me into Irish music. I've got all of his CDs and love his songs very much and rather resent your assumption that I don't know what I'm talking about.

'Away with the fairies' isn't an insult where I come from. I do, however, think that he uses words he likes the sound of and the meaning is often secondary. Nothing wrong with that. It wasn't meant as a criticism.


28 Mar 07 - 04:29 AM (#2009227)
Subject: RE: Irish Song; 'Ride On'
From: GUEST,Chris Murray

One of my favourite songs ever is 'The Bright Blue Rose'. Christy Moore will occasionally sing it but it's a very special song to him and I think he'll only play it if someone from the audience suggests it. Read what he says about it in his book.


28 Mar 07 - 08:46 AM (#2009360)
Subject: RE: Irish Song; 'Ride On'
From: The PA

Yep, this one of my favourite songs too.

Been involved with horses professionally and competitively for almost 50 years.

''16.1 or 2''   Height of horse, 16 hands - 1 inch, 16 hands - 2 inches. A hand being a measurement of 4 inches.

In all 50 years of owning horses a hoof pick has always been known as a hoof pick and nothing else.

Never heard of sort of equestrian equipment at all referred to as a 'claw'.

'Walk on' is a common term used to ask a horse to walk from a standstill. Often used when schooling and backing a young horse.
Never heard of the expression 'ride on' used in this connection.

I just thought it was a song about some bird on a horse and a bloke who fancies her but cant have her for whatever reason. Do you think we sometimes try to make things more complicated than they are.


28 Mar 07 - 08:53 AM (#2009366)
Subject: RE: Irish Song; 'Ride On'
From: Bonnie Shaljean

Probably, but it's such FUN! Thanks for the info -


28 Mar 07 - 09:03 AM (#2009373)
Subject: RE: Irish Song; 'Ride On'
From: The PA

No problem, glad to be of help. Now, everybody - walk on!!


28 Mar 07 - 09:14 AM (#2009385)
Subject: RE: Irish Song; 'Ride On'
From: Big Mick

Thanks for saying what I have been fighting off saying since this thread started, PA. The reason I didn't was the one Bonnie Shaljean gave. Folks just having fun, that's a good thing. But it has been said a number of times by the author, and by Christy Moore. It's just a song about a guy and a gal. Claw along the gut is just vernacular, and pretty sexy vernacular at that.

Love the song. And I really love singing it in the right setting.

Mick


28 Mar 07 - 09:19 AM (#2009391)
Subject: RE: Irish Song; 'Ride On'
From: The PA

Bob Dylan was once asked about the 'hidden meanings' in his songs, his reply was that there was none, they were just words. I suppose he should know, he wrote them?
Who cares anyway, if something sounds nice, just enjoy it - life is too short and already too complicated. But that's just my opinion.


28 Mar 07 - 09:32 AM (#2009399)
Subject: RE: Irish Song; 'Ride On'
From: GUEST

Never could get past the 'see you' which is a short, throwaway expression, and just sounds silly stretched over two long notes the way most sing it. 'Ride On' fits the notes fine. 'See' can be the same length, but 'you' needs to be half as long to make any kind of sense.

Try saying it aloud at that pace. Sounds like the end of a game of hide and seek, not a mock-casual, heart-broken farewell.

Now if Jimmy sings 'ya' it could work - but a long 'you' is just lazy interpretation (though Christy, and Christy alone, does pull it off).


03 Apr 07 - 03:15 AM (#2015035)
Subject: RE: Irish Song; 'Ride On'
From: GUEST,boddah

actually most interpretations i've heard so far used christy's version, even with 'your claw'


03 Apr 07 - 03:24 AM (#2015038)
Subject: RE: Irish Song; 'Ride On'
From: GUEST

It was Christy that changed the emphasis to seee youu. He gets away with it because he has superby timing and delivery. But when people copy him it sounds awful. You need to think about the words youre singing, and make them work for your own voice. Not just copy someone else - specially if they are Irish and you are English.


25 Oct 07 - 06:28 AM (#2178718)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Ride On (Jimmy MacCarthy)
From: GUEST,SpannerOtoole

First of all , Try and listen to Jimmy's Version of the Song, It's a lot more Ride On, The lyric is run the claw along my gut one last time, not run your claw. What's the difference I hear you ask?

Run the Claw denotes Emotional Pain and Distress that Goes on.
Run your Claw denotes Physical Pain and Distress that ends quickly,

A lot of people seem to think that this a song about a horsey, it's not, it's a song about the pain of living life and life is hard, Ride on.

I'm surprised that people think the song is about a horse

True You Ride the Finest horse I've ever seen....

This sounds like the song is directed to the person on the horse and not about the horse itself.


25 Oct 07 - 10:30 AM (#2178878)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Ride On (Jimmy MacCarthy)
From: GUEST,Bardan

I don't agree with your interpretation of your vs the claw spanner. I'd see the difference as being the personal vs the impersonal. Run your claw suggests that the woman herself is hurting him whether willfully or not. The claw suggests something more like he is hurting but it's not necessarily her fault. Your claw does more sexually though whether as a corruption of a caress or to suggest she uses her nails a bit in the sack.


05 Nov 07 - 05:46 PM (#2187097)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Ride On (Jimmy MacCarthy)
From: GUEST,Billy Mac.

Yes it is about someone who has lost the love of his life. Something which has sustained him and been a huge comforting presence since childhood,and now he is coming to realise that he can no longer accept
its teachings and it's hurting. 'I could never go with you no matter how I wanted to.' It's his Christian faith that he has lost, and there is an emptiness there 'I turn to face an empty space where you used to lie',and it saddens him. Thats how I would feel anyway.


09 Mar 08 - 12:26 AM (#2283425)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Ride On (Jimmy MacCarthy)
From: GUEST,Inishtrahull

Father ted had a simaliar song for the irish eurovision


05 Apr 08 - 10:37 AM (#2307420)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Ride On (Jimmy MacCarthy)
From: GUEST,GrŠinne

The song is about parting - could be interpreted as the parting of lovers or the death of someone close to you. 'I could never go with you, no matter how I wanted to' could refer to perhaps an illicit affair that has to end because one person cannot give up what they have, or alternatively to somone dying and the other being left behind.
'Run your hand along my gut, one last time' I think could hint at the fact that the person feels hurt or maybe has been hurt by their lover but rather than walk away this person would prefer to stay with their lover and be hurt rather than be without them. The horse is a metaphor for a woman/ person but of course itself has connotations of beauty, strength, intelligence and of something wild that cannot be tamed.
Hope this helps xxx


18 Jun 09 - 02:38 PM (#2659560)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Ride On (Jimmy MacCarthy)
From: GUEST,Thomas

I think that the verse was written as 'See Ya' but most people who cover Ride On sing it as 'See You' because this is how Christy pronounces the chorus.
I went to see Jimmy MacCarthy at the National Concert Hall in Dublin last week. Near the end of the gig he sang Ride On and said 'See You' in the chorus. It may have been when he wrote the song that it was 'See Ya' but everyone has been used to Christy's version over the years because Christy's cover is the most popular.


18 Jun 09 - 04:54 PM (#2659707)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Ride On (Jimmy MacCarthy)
From: JHW

I couldn't guess how many times I've heard this sung, in sessions more than folk clubs but as much as their meaning is a mystery is the way multitudes merrily join in singing a song they presumably don't understand.
Week after week we joined in with 'The Rybuck Shearer' in Richmond's Black Lion and one night I asked "I'll never open What? Sorbies?" The question was whispered from person to person, each admitting to just muttering something that sounded like everyone else was singing!


19 Jun 09 - 03:34 AM (#2660007)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Ride On (Jimmy MacCarthy)
From: GUEST,Thomas

This song has been sung many times. It is one of Christy Moore's biggest hits, he sings it at most of his gigs and his 1984 album 'Ride On' is one of his best albums yet. You can still see the album in most record stores today because it has been reissued so many times. Jimmy Mac's version is quite different to Christy's though. In Jimmy's version the verse that sticks out would have to be 'Run the claw along my gut one last time' since Christy always says 'Run your claw'.
My thanks to SpannerOtoole for explaining the difference in these lyrics.


19 Jun 09 - 03:56 AM (#2660012)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Ride On (Jimmy MacCarthy)
From: GUEST,Elfcall

From the CM 4711ers website dated 20 May 2009

'An amazing thing happened on Sin … last night.
Jimmy McCarthy told Mick of a new verse he has added to Ride On.
Exclusive to Sin …..... '

And when you ride into the night
Without a trace behind
The silver spur, the stirruped foot
Where the road does part and wind

Elfcall


19 Jun 09 - 01:52 PM (#2660334)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Ride On (Jimmy MacCarthy)
From: GUEST,Thomas

I noticed the new verse that was added to Ride On.
In Michelle Lally's version she sings the extra line. It seemed odd to me at first because the original 'run the claw' verse is so familiar, but I think I am getting used to it now.


09 Sep 09 - 12:12 PM (#2719871)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Ride On (Jimmy MacCarthy)
From: GUEST,Guest Carlo

I just heard this song for the first time. Its simple yet very powerful, like a dream. It tells a plain story, someone left, but what of the horse? On one hand -- a horse is a horse, but they are also mystical, and there's the winged horse, where the 'claw' could mean bird-like feet as the horse takes flight.

I would imagine Mr. McCarthy meant it as a fairly simple, a vision more than a story, a dream of a woman riding off into the horizon or sky, and leaving a simple empty space on the bed. A metaphor like this means many things to many people and nothing at all, which makes it a very fine song.

No Danny Boy(ishnes) at all. Danny Boy (English lyrics) just tries to pull cheap tears. The melody is old, a different song altogether which I've heard sung in Irish by Diedre N' Flynn I believe. Its a fine old Celtic tune. It was a nostalgic song about missing a place.


10 Sep 09 - 02:45 AM (#2720383)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Ride On (Jimmy MacCarthy)
From: Dave Hanson

To JHW, Sorbies are a popular brand of sheep shears.

Dave H


12 Aug 10 - 10:37 AM (#2963603)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Ride On
From: GUEST

Awesome song.
But I love the Cruachan-Version even more just my opinion.You guys, if you love the orginal you really should give Cruachan-Ride on a try ;)


13 Aug 10 - 07:28 AM (#2964226)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Ride On (Jimmy MacCarthy)
From: GUEST,Ride On Hater

Number three in my list of most hated song No.1 Fields of Athenry No. 2. Green Fields of France 9willie McBride)


13 Aug 10 - 07:33 AM (#2964227)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Ride On (Jimmy MacCarthy)
From: RobbieWilson

Guest ROH
You should get out more.


13 Aug 10 - 07:36 AM (#2964228)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Ride On (Jimmy MacCarthy)
From: GUEST,^&*

Guest ROH
You should get out more.


- or just be more careful where you go when you do get out! ;>)


13 Aug 10 - 07:37 AM (#2964229)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Ride On (Jimmy MacCarthy)
From: GUEST,Ride on Hater

I do get out Robbie but I still keep hearing these f*cking songs.


13 Aug 10 - 08:13 AM (#2964250)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Ride On (Jimmy MacCarthy)
From: Bernard

Who is this impressive 9willy McBride RoH refers to?!

I believe Whistling Willie Johnson has been cured...


12 Dec 10 - 01:32 PM (#3051871)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Ride On (Jimmy MacCarthy)
From: GUEST,lightheart

I'd agree to meanings are in the eye of the beholder.
I do love this song and when I sing it I think of an old sweetheart that had gone quite numpty in the upstairs.
I couldn't go with him no matter how I wanted to because I have my obligations and duties as a mum, couldn't leave, live a life wild and free.. and dangerous. 'Run your claw along my gut' is the hurt, hurt of impossible love, the worry when he's away, his agony I couldn't take away, the need to run off and do crazy things. It's agony to be with someone like that, even more not to be. Still if I had the choice I would. But I don't have that choice. And all I could do was let him go, wish him well on a dark path.
..and I enjoyed the Cruachan version too.


19 Jun 11 - 10:48 PM (#3173185)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Ride On (Jimmy MacCarthy)
From: GUEST,Robert

I'm 58 and never seen a horse with green eyes so I'm assuming it's the horses rider the song is about. I'd say 16 + 1 or 2 is about 5'6" tall with green eyes. Sounds Irish to me.
Every reference I hear is to the horses rider, not the horse itself.

Robert


01 May 12 - 12:23 PM (#3345713)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Ride On (Jimmy MacCarthy)
From: GUEST

It's about the IRA. True you ride the finest horse = IRA. Hands light to the touch = bomb making hands. Standing 16 (1916) 1 0r 2 (1921). And so on. Hope this is off some help.


01 May 12 - 12:53 PM (#3345732)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Ride On (Jimmy MacCarthy)
From: s&r

Oh dear guest - it's May not April...


02 May 12 - 02:32 AM (#3345992)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Ride On (Jimmy MacCarthy)
From: GUEST,Allan Conn

"It's about the IRA" I'd heard that before too but earlier in this thread there is a post which quotes a passage from the song's creator in which he states it is simply a song about parting! People will see meanings in songs that they want to see but it doesn't mean that the composer saw the same thing.


02 May 12 - 05:24 AM (#3346017)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Ride On (Jimmy MacCarthy)
From: Leadfingers

So often people seem to ave a need for an explanation of EVERYTHING -
Poetry and Literature is about IMAGES , not Black and white definitions

And the Dylan quote covers it completely ! "Theyre just words!" though
they ARE words that make a REALLY nice noise !!


02 May 12 - 09:32 AM (#3346082)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Ride On (Jimmy MacCarthy)
From: Dave Hanson

Does anyone really give a shit what it's about, it's good to sing and play along with, thats all that matters.

Dave H


04 Nov 12 - 08:08 AM (#3430771)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Ride On (Jimmy MacCarthy)
From: GUEST,Mary

Your comment dated 2007 says that you love the reference to that line in Jimmy McCarthy's song "Ride On" where someone mis-heard "see you" as "sea dew" and assumed that it referred to a horse. You used the term "Mondegreen" and I can't find a dictionary reference to this word. Could you give the meaning of this please? Thanks.


29 Jan 17 - 11:15 PM (#3835628)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Ride On (Jimmy MacCarthy)
From: GUEST,David Aguirrez

Hi guys, my experience is kind of different.
It was the year 2000, I came across this song for it was part of an assignment, to look into the comparison chart of planets, it was a astronomy class, and so I went to see this youtube link and to learn about astronomy. However, the song, which is only the music going on in the background while the comparison of the planets was been compared, enchanted me. Really, I felt in love, it really open up something spiritual for me. Ever since I became very much invested into looking for a "spiritual" journey, honestly, that background son, of Ride on, lead me to my Christian faith more strongly.
I am thankful for this son. It is as if something was "open up", as if I was free from something.