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Lyr Req: French sea shanties

05 Jun 08 - 05:04 PM (#2358697)
Subject: Lyr Req: French sea shanties
From: GUEST,Shelly

I am looking for some French sea shanties that can be used with primary school children. They need to be reasonable with not too many words. Can anyone help please?


05 Jun 08 - 07:01 PM (#2358829)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French sea shanties
From: TRUBRIT

Don't know any shanties in French but I do remember very vividly taking French songs in High School (required).....

Il est ne, le divin enfant
Something something something something
It est ne, le divine enfant
Something something something something.

Il etait un bergere, que ron ron ron petit patapon
It etain un bergere
Qui garde ses moutons, ron ron
Que gardes ses moutons

Frere Jacque
Frere Jacque
Dormez vous
Dormez vous
Sonnez les matine
sonnez les matine
ding dang dong
ding dang dong

Sur le pont
D'avignon
L'on y danse
L'on y danse
Sur le pont
D'avignon
L'on y danse
Tout les mondes

And the rest.............


05 Jun 08 - 07:17 PM (#2358846)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French sea shanties
From: peregrina

If you can find it, get hold of the Best of Hughes Aufray 2 CD set.

On it: Santiano and Le Port de Tacoma are shanties at least, Je reviens (les portes de St-Malo) maybe (though I'm not sure how traditional) and Aufray is very listenable for children.

(You can also find Dylan and Hank Williams turned into French on it and some 'real' French songs. For the last, I especially recommend L'epervier (it's traditional enough so the words are on the web, and is much darker and more dramatic than the usual school French songs. Not a shanty, but I recommend it because I was introduced to it as a kid and still remember it. (L'epervier il faut le dire est petit mais bien voleur...)


05 Jun 08 - 07:31 PM (#2358862)
Subject: ADD: La Danae & Il Faut Chanter
From: Monique

The best-known shanty for kids is "Il était un petit navire".here you have the lyrics, the sheet music, the midi and an mp3 recording of the first verse. It's rather long but you can decide to teach them a few verses and just tell them how the story ends. When you're on this page, click "Back to France" then "A St Malo, beau port de mer", it's another one (long!).

You might want to teach them the first verses of La Danaé. The version I know goes

LA DANAÉ
(Traditional – 18th century)

L'était une frégate lonla
L'était une frégate,
C'était la Danaé
À prendre un ris
Dans les basse voiles
C'était la Danaé
À prendre un ris
Dans les huniers.

À son premier voyage lonla
À son premier voyage
Tout a très bien marché
À prendre…. huniers.

À son deuxième voyage lonla…
À son deuxième voyage
La frégate a touché
À prendre…. huniers.

À son troisième voyage lonla
À son troisième voyage
La frégate a sombré
A prendre… huniers.

Et de tout l'équipage lonla
Et de tout l'équipage
Un gabier s'a sauvé (correct French "s'est sauvé")
À prendre… huniers.

You can stop there with kids, but the song goes on…

Il aborde sur la plage…
Il savait bien nager….

Mais là sur le rivage…
Une belle éplorée…

Belle comme une frégate
Française et pavoisée…

-Pourquoi pleurer la belle…
Pourquoi si tant pleurer…

-Je pleure mon avantage…
Dans la mer qu'est tombé…

-Et qu'aurait donc la belle…
Celui qui vous l' rendrait…

-Lui en ferais offrande…
Avec mes amitiés…

À la première plonge…
L' gabier n'a rien trouvé…

À la centième plonge…
Le gabier s'a noyé (correct Fr. "s'est noyé")

Car jamais avantage
Perdu n'est retrouvé.

M.P.

You can find a midi and two mp3 samples
there. It can be sung with two voices. I have them in midi format somewhere, I'll send them for Joe to post.

As mentioned in another thread, "avantage" means "maidenhead" and sure the poor guy could dive forever before he could retrieve it. So he drowned himself… serves him right, he should have known better!

Click to play DANAE__b

Click to play DANAE__h

Click to play La DANAE mp3

Click to view sheet music

La Danaé: the beginning is slightly different as you can see on the sheet music and sung together it sounds as La Danaé mp3. They're the two voices I learned though I admit that it doesn't sound as if La Callas and Pavarotti were singing together!
Btw, I resend them because the first note should be an eighth and not a quarter, my bad!


You also have

IL FAUT CHANTER
(Traditional)


Nous partirons vers un nouveau pays
Ohé ohé ohé
Nous ne craignons ni peine ni roulis
Ohé ohé ohé

Refrain :
Il faut chanter puisque la mer est belle
Il faut chanter puisque nous partirons (bis)

Nous voguerons le cap sur le printemps...
Et dans les mats vont chanter nos vingt ans...

Quand l'ouragan balaiera le pont...
Nous maintiendrons bien haut le pavillon...

Et puis un soir mouillant dans le vieux port...
Nous chanterons le dernier chant du bord...

M.P.


I couldn't find a sheet music or midi or recording online for this one. If you'd like this one better, I can make a midi (not tonight, it's 1.30am here!) for Joe to post.

You can also go have a look here

Click to play IL__FAUT__CHANTER


05 Jun 08 - 09:18 PM (#2358946)
Subject: ADD: Jean-Francios de Nantes
From: Q (Frank Staplin)

No better book in print than "Colleu and Couilloud, 2003, "Chants de marins," Chasse-marée.
All chants with music and discussion. It also has a few English chanteys with french translation.
This one was well-known to both French and English sailors:

Jean-François de Nantes

Solo
C'est Jean-François de Nantes
Chorus
oué, oué, oué
Solo
Gabier de la Fringante oh mes boués
Chorus
Jean-François

Solos
Débarque en fin de compagne
Fier comme un roi d'Espagne

En vrac dedans sa bourse
Il a vingt mois de course

Une montre une chaîne
Valant une baleine

Branie-bas chez son hôtesse
Bitte et bosse et largesses

La plus belle servante
L'emmène dans sa soupente

Il bouline la donzelle
Et navigue sur mer belle

En vidant la bouteille
Tout son or appareille

Montre et chaîne s'envolent
Mais in prend la vérole

En revenant de Flandres
Il attrape des chancres

On lui coupera son membre
Tout droit au ras du ventre

A l'hôpital de Nantes
Jean-François se lamente

Et les draps de sa couche
Déchire avec sa bouche

Il ferait de la peine
Même à son capitaine

Pauvre Jean-François de Nantes
Gabier sur la Fringante

p. 46, with score and chords, "Chants de Marins."

See "Boney," DT and thread 84540: Boney was a warrior


06 Jun 08 - 03:49 AM (#2359072)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French sea shanties
From: Monique

Well, I wouldn't want to play "La mère La Vertu" but if Jean-François de Nantes is to be taught to school children, you'd better teach the 4 first verses only because:
- though "bitte" is "bit", if you ask any French speaking person what a word soundind like "bitte" means, s/he'll tell you "cock" and not "bit" in the same way that I suppose that if you ask to an English speaking person what "cock" means, s/he won't answer "rooster"
- the maid takes him in her closet under the stairs where he "boulines" her (bouliner meant to navigate under a slantwise wind)and navigates on a nice sea... ("How could he navigate on a nice sea while he actually was in the closet with the maid, ma'am?")
- he catches the pox ("vérole"), chancres and has his member cut off down to his belly...

So now you know that, whether you want to teach the whole song to school kids is up to you. I wouldn't.


06 Jun 08 - 04:02 AM (#2359078)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French sea shanties
From: Monique

PS, Jean-François de Nantes: there are other versions as can be seen here. The first one is a much spicier version than Q's and below is a soft one. I always sung the song below those ("Chantons pour passer le temps") to my students and I love the last one from that page. As you'll notice if you follow the link, it reads "chansons paillardes" = "bawdy songs" at the top.


06 Jun 08 - 05:33 AM (#2359123)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French sea shanties
From: GUEST,old git

Oh the hazards of teaching seasongs,in any language,to schoolchildren, unless one is completely au fait with the nuances of meaning!!
When one things back to the halcyon days of "Singing Together" ,one wonders whether Miss ever understood the full implications of what was being taught.   Maybe she thought that innuendo was a japanese suppository.....
I'll get me coat....
geoff t


06 Jun 08 - 05:35 AM (#2359125)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French sea shanties
From: peregrina

yes--I looked up the verses I didn't remember (or was never taught) of l'epervier, quite unsuitable...


06 Jun 08 - 05:53 AM (#2359133)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French sea shanties
From: GUEST,Suffolk Miracle

As tu connu le Pere Lancelot?
Cho. Goodbye fare the well, goodbye fare thee well
As tu connu le Pere Lancelot?
Cho. Goodbye fare the well, we're homeward bound.

Il boit du vin; à toi de l'eau.

Il mange la viande; à toi les os.

Et si tu grumes, il te jete à l'eau.

Il a trois filles qui font la peau.


06 Jun 08 - 06:52 AM (#2359168)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French sea shanties
From: Monique

You can check bmarcore French shanties page. There's "Matelot puisqu'il fait bon vent" suitable for kids. Also Hugues Aufray's Santiano or Le port de Tacoma as Peregrina mentioned.
My kids at school loved Anne Sylvestre's "Veux-tu monter dans mon bateau?" but they were 1st graders so depending on the age of those you want to teach it, it'll sound childish. It's no traditional shanty, it's a kid song about a boat. You can find the lyrics and an mp3 here but hurry up to do whatever you see fit about it before the blogger being requested to remove the recording since it's under copyright.


06 Jun 08 - 04:31 PM (#2359602)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French sea shanties
From: Q (Frank Staplin)

Oh, well. I thought I was being amusing.
And one may define verole as smallpox and chancre as canker and bitte as bollard, as they are in the little Collins French-English Dictionary used in school French classes.
Most of what sailors sang would be taboo in today's neopuritan society.

I dunno. The kids I grew up with knew one hell of a lot that their parents didn't think they knew. I remember the little Popeye-Olive Oyl comics that circulated in grade school showing every position that 2-4 people could get into, and another showing what what one could do to Little Orphan Annie out behind the barn or in the closet.

Kids don't seem to have secret literature like that anymore. Anyone bringing it to school now probably would be sentenced to juvenile detention.

(A google add at the bottom of this thread advertises Frere Jacques at Great Prices. On a trip back east I saw some of the old nursery rhymes in revised form at a collectors' bookstore in Montreal.)


06 Jun 08 - 05:08 PM (#2359638)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French sea shanties
From: dick greenhaus

Q-
They don't have to. It's on the Net.


06 Jun 08 - 05:11 PM (#2359644)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French sea shanties
From: Monique

Oh sure Q, I also knew things and songs my parents didn't think I knew and I suppose that's the case for a very big lot of people. But they weren't taught to me by my teacher(s), and as a teacher, I never taught them at school either. As for songs, I never taught my students "Jeanneton prend sa faucille larirette..." (usually the first naughty song kids learn) -though the lyrics are pretty innocent compared to Jean-François de Nantes, but I would sing "Sur la route de Dijon" to them until I finally realized what the whole battalion consoling Marjolaine really meant as the advice "Si vous passez par Dijon, allez boire à la fontaine" follows. Nobody ever complained I did but maybe the kids never mentioned it.


06 Jun 08 - 08:24 PM (#2359748)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French sea shanties
From: peregrina

Okay.... just don't teach them 'Mon père m'a donné cent sous'!


06 Jun 08 - 09:04 PM (#2359778)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French sea shanties
From: CupOfTea

I believe Pint & Dale out in Seattle have some French songs on their albums (which tend to be sea oriented) My three years of French are far behind me, so I'm not so sure of the content.

There may be some nice things from the French-speaking parts of the Canadian maritimes, but then, they're going to be very Quebecois, and not Parisian sounding.


07 Jun 08 - 12:29 AM (#2359857)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French sea shanties
From: Dead Horse

Have a look at This lot
If there isnt one in there, then it is a rarity :-)


07 Jun 08 - 12:40 AM (#2359858)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French sea shanties
From: Monique

Short and easy Pique la baleine


07 Jun 08 - 05:00 AM (#2359924)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French sea shanties
From: Monique

Midis to "La Danaé": "Danaé-b" means "bas" = "low" and "Danaé-h" means "high", the two first musical phrases slightly differ, one is higher than the other and you can sing the song with these two voices the chorus being sung to the same tune. It's the way I learned it.


08 Jun 08 - 02:39 AM (#2360516)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French sea shanties
From: Monique

Mind you, the midi to "Il faut chanter" starts by the chorus while the lyrics as posted here start by the 1st verse.


08 Jun 08 - 05:17 PM (#2360942)
Subject: ADD: Passant Par Paris & Au Port de Toulon
From: Monique

Passant par Paris:
The French version is said to be a drinking song from the 18 and 19 th cent. in Florilège de la chanson française, Jean-Claude Klein, Bordas, Paris (1990) while the Provençal version (below) is said to be a Toulon traditional song from the 18th century in Diapason turquoise, volume 2, Les Presses de l'Ile de France, Paris (2004).. So which is actually the original version? That is the question.


PASSANT PAR PARIS /(TOULON)

Passant par Paris /(Toulon) vidant la bouteille (bis)
Un de mes amis me dit à l'oreille, bon, bon, bon

(Refrain)
Le bon vin m'endort, l'amour me réveille
Le bon vin m'endort, l'amour me réveille encore.

Un de mes amis me dit à l'oreille.
Jean, prends garde à toi, l'on courtise ta belle, bon, bon, bon

Jean, prends garde à toi, l'on courtise ta belle.
Courtise qui voudra, je me fie en elle…

Courtise qui voudra, je me fie en elle
J'ai eu de son cœur la fleur la plus belle…

J'ai eu de son cœur la fleur la plus belle
Dans un grand lit blanc, gréé de dentelles…

Dans un grand lit blanc, gréé de dentelles
J'ai eu trois garçons, tous trois capitaines…

J'ai eu trois garçons, tous trois capitaines
L'un est à Bordeaux, l'autre à La Rochelle…

L'un est à Bordeaux, l'autre à La Rochelle,
L' troisième à Paris, qui courtise les belles…

L' troisième à Paris, qui courtise les belles
Et l' père est ici, qui hale la ficelle…another version goes "qui tire la ficelle"


Going through Paris (Toulon), drinking (lit. emptying the bottle), /one of my friends tells me in my hear, well, well, well, (Chorus): the good wine makes me sleep, love awakes me, the good wine makes me sleep, love awakes me again/ John, beware, your beloved is being courted/ Court may whoever wants to, I trust her / I got from her heart the most beautiful flower / in a beautiful bed rigged with lace/ I had three boys all three captains / one is in Bordeaux, the other in La Rochelle / the third one in Paris courting the girls / and the father's here, pulling the string.

Provençal version (Traditional Provençal spelling):

AU PORT DE TOULOUN
(Traditional)

Au port de Touloun secant la boutilho (x2)
Matalot gabié m'a dich à l'aurilho, boun, boun, boun…

(Repic)
Lou boun vin m'endor,
L'amour me revilho
Lou boun vin m'endor
L'amour revilho moun cor, boun, boun, boun…

Matalot gabié m'a dich à l'aurilho
"Jan, paro-à-vira, calignon ta migo"…

"Jan, paro-à-vira, calignon ta migo"
"Me n'en garce ben, qu' vous la caligne…

Me n'en garce ben, qu' vous la caligne
De sa roso en flour ai proun fa la pilho…

De sa roso en flour ai proun fa la pilho
M'a fa très pichoun que soun de boun drilho…

M'a fa très pichoun que soun de boun drilho
L'einat très vaissèou coumando à Marsilho…

L'einat très vaissèou coumando à Marsilho
L'autre es capitan di mar de Turquio…

L'autre es capitan di mar de Turquio
Lo jouine a Cadis caligno lei filho…

Lo jouine a Cadis caligno lei filho
Ièou lou paire eici à fauto d'arbilho...

Ièou lou paire eici à fauto d'arbilho
Sale lo grelin per gagna boutilho...



In Toulon harbor, drinking (lit. drying the bottle)/ topman mate told me in my ear, well, well well (Chorus): The good wine makes me sleep, love awakes me, the good wine makes me sleep, love awakes my heart / John, "about ship", your beloved is being courted (the courting may reach sooooome level)/, I don't care at all that you court her,/ her blooming rose I caught a lot,/ she made me three children (lit. little ones) who're jolly fellows/, the eldest commands three ships in Marseilles/, the other is a captain on the Turkey seas/, the youngest is courting the girls in Cadiz;/ I, the father, here, for lack of money/, pull the hawser to earn my bottle.


You'll notice that the Provençal one doesn't care at all while the French one trusts his beloved. I couldn't find any different version in any book or online but I remember reading on an LP sleeve that "je me fie en elle" was a sanitized version of a former "je me fous bien d'elle" (I don't care at all / I don't give a damn) which has the same meaning as "me n'en garce ben". The French one sounds less rude (no pillaging which "ai proun fa la pilho" is about) but the last sentence can be understood as a double entendre: else he pulls the ropes or he pulls the strings. In French we would say he's a weird kind of fish because as you guys all know, mackerels and pimps are the same French "maquereaux".

The verse about the 3rd son has a spicier variant:

L' troisième à Paris, pilier de bordel
Quand il a cinq sous, il va voir les belles
The third one in Paris, a brothelfly (is that what you'd call someone spending his life in brothels?) / when he gets 5 "sous" (pence, cents…), he goes wenching



Click to play


09 Jun 08 - 12:40 AM (#2361123)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French sea shanties
From: Q (Frank Staplin)

PASSANT PAR PARIS in this version has different verses following the verse about the youngest boy courting in Paris:

Quand il a 5 sous, il va boire bouteille

Quand il en a plus, il a voir sa belle

La vie d'un garçon, Grand Dieu quelle es belle!

Et le père est ici qui hale sur la ficelle.

The refrain is the same, but begins 'bon, bon, bon'

p. 16, with score, a capstan song, "Cahiers de chants de marins," 1, le chasse-marée, new edition 1983, reprint 1995.

These books by le chasse-marée have a number of the English chanteys, including Goodbye fare ye well, Banks of the Sacramento, etc., with both French and English words.

La frégate la Denoé - a variant with different words(?)
1, p. 15 (see above) provides the rhythm of the capstan chantey, "Danaé or "Denoé)- (hope I get this right- if not, see the book, I give up easily).

c'était une frégate lonla
c'était une frégate
nommée la Dan
larguez les ris dans les basses voiles


09 Jun 08 - 12:45 AM (#2361129)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French sea shanties
From: Q (Frank Staplin)

I will post "La frégate la Dénoé" tomorrow. I would like to know how it relates to "Danaé"


09 Jun 08 - 03:47 AM (#2361185)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French sea shanties
From: Monique

I couldn't find anything about La Denoé in any of my books but I haven't any songbook specialized in shanties. But I did find that the Provençal version of "Passant par Paris/Toulon" has been written by the Provençal félibre Pierre Fontan and that this song has been collected all over France (end of my dream of the Provençal version being the original one!). I found that in an old school songbook that one of my colleagues gave me and that belonged to her mother "Trésor des plus belles mélodies de tous les temps et de tous les pays, V. Defolie, Editions EDSCO, Chambéry, 1947" (only one on sale on Ebay right now, around $6, end of sale June 08). Lyrics + sheet music + a lot of information, origins, different versions...)
Btw, if the Provençal one was adapted from the French, "ne n'en garce ben" tends to confirm that earlier versions did go "je me fous bien d'elle" and not "je me fie en elle" (encore un macho!)


09 Jun 08 - 04:25 AM (#2361208)
Subject: ADD: Trois Navires De Ble
From: GUEST,Timo_Tuokkola

Trois Navires De Ble

Un gros coup de vent de nordet-nous irons jouer sur le bord de l'eau [repeat]
Trois Navires de blé s'en fit rentrer-nous irons jouer sur le bord de l'eau. Nous irons jouer dans l'isle.

Trois filles d'un roi veulent marchander- nous irons jouer sur le bord de l'eau [repeat]
Et les trois filles les voler le couer- nous irons jouer sur le bord de l'eau. Nous irons jouer dans l'isle.

La plus jeune avait le peid leger- nous irons jouer sur le bord de l'eau [repeat]
A bord le barque elle a sauté-nous irons jouer sur le bord de l'eau. Nous irons jouer dans l'isle
Sur le bord de l'eau nous irons jouer dans l'isle.

Combien vendez-vous votre blé-nous irons jouer sur le bord de l'eau [repeat]
Seulement pour vous, six sous le boisseau-nous irons jouer sur le bord de l'eau. Nous irons jouer dans l'isle.

J'entends ma mere m'appeler pour souper- nous irons jouer sur le bord de l'eau [repeat]
Et les petits enfants pleurer-nous irons jouer sur le bord de l'eau. Nous irons jouer dans l'isle
Sur le bord de l'eau nous irons jouer dans l'isle.

Oh, oh la belle vous mentez- nous irons jouer sur le bord de l'eau [repeat]
Jamais d'enfants vous n'avez eu- nous irons jouer sur le bord de l'eau. Nous irons jouer dans l'isle.
Sur le bord de l'eau nous irons jouer dans l'isle [repeat 2x]


09 Jun 08 - 04:43 AM (#2361216)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French sea shanties
From: Monique

Very nice! Sheet music and chords here and translation and chords there.


09 Jun 08 - 03:18 PM (#2361663)
Subject: Lyr. Add: La frégate la Denoé
From: Q (Frank Staplin)

LA FRÉGATE LA DENOÉ
French, traditional.

Y'a une frégate en mer nommèe la Danoé
Y'a une frégate en mer nommèe la Danoé (bis)
s'en va de côte sans jamais rrien trouver.

Serais-je donc toujours malheureuse en amour? (bis)

Elle trouva une pierre la frégate a coulé,
cinq cent hommes d'équipages tous ls cinq cent noyés.

Il n'y que le quartier-maître qui sait fort bien nager
en arrivant à bord trouva fille à pleurer

Lui a demandé: "Belle qu'avez-vous à pleurer?"
"J'ai beau pleurer, dit-elle, et beau m'y chagriner."

"Les clefs d'or de ma mére dans la mer sont tombées"
Je donnerai bien dit-elle qu'irait me les chercher

Je donnerai dit-elle mes amours à moitié
le jeune homme se dépouille dans la mer s'est jeté

Au premier coup de plonge il n'a rien retrouvé
Au deuxième coup de plonge les clefs d'or ont sonné

Au deuxième coup de plonge les clefs ont sonné
Au troisième coup de plonge le jeune homme s'est noyé.

With score, p, 53, Cahiers de chants de marins, 1, Chasse-marée, 1983-1995.

Note: The score text begins with 'Yat'' instead of Y'a. I presume that it is easier to sing this way.

Listed as no. 53, Les chants à danser. The sailors used to dance with each other on board during spare time. Two old photographs from c. 1900 show sailors dancing to a fiddle, and to a mélodéon.

Chasse-marée has issued five "Cahiers de chants de marins, and a hard-cover book "Chants de Marins" (with CD), and some 18 CDs of "Chants de Marins." I have been able to get only two of the 'Cahiers' and couldn't locate any of the CDs, but I haven't checked recently.


09 Jun 08 - 06:45 PM (#2361864)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French sea shanties
From: Monique

Y'a vs Yat: usually, this "t" is between two dashes, it's indeed to add a consonant sound between the "a" and the "u". It's the same as when we say "combien y a-t-il..." or "Malbrought s'en va-t-en guerre".
Le chasse-marée presently has 4 "cahiers" on sale (4 for €19.80), Coop Breizh has some stuff too.
Do you have such stupid sailors in shanties in English? I mean the guy who dives again and again till he gets drowned because he wanted to find any thing the girl said to have dropped in the sea? Because quite a few of ours were pretty idiots!


09 Jun 08 - 07:12 PM (#2361892)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French sea shanties
From: GUEST,Dave MacKenzie

You should maybe try getting a copy of "Chants de la Mer et des Marins", presentes par Rene Abjean, Le Telegramme, ISBN 2-909292-39-8.
Its version of "La Margot" has no mention of roustands.


09 Jun 08 - 08:10 PM (#2361920)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French sea shanties
From: Q (Frank Staplin)

"Le Margot" in "Chants de Marins" has no mention of roustands (Les chants à virer).

"La Danaé," version in "Cahiers de chants de marins," has different lyrics to those given above. Only the first verse is similar. It sinks in the 5th verse, but the song goes on to 16 verses.


09 Jun 08 - 09:20 PM (#2361965)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French sea shanties
From: Artful Codger

"The boy stood on the burning deck"--that's a pretty stupid thing to do. ;-}


10 Jun 08 - 08:16 AM (#2362199)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French sea shanties
From: Mr Red

A LA ROCHELLE thread

and on an LP c1992 Chris Roche et al singing - can't remember their Shanty group.


10 Jun 08 - 03:13 PM (#2362525)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French sea shanties
From: Dead Horse

Chris Roche's group was/is called The Shanty Crew
Chris is at present recruiting after one of those unfortunate political splits.
My favourite shanty that they do is Jeune Genes Rouler (or something like that)


10 Jun 08 - 05:10 PM (#2362614)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French sea shanties
From: curmudgeon

Boney Was a Warrior?





Seriously, Stan Hugill's collection, "Songs of the Sea" contains at least fifteen French maritime songs. I've only had time to skim the ToC, so don't know if any are shanties as opposed to forebitters, or just nautical songs - Tom


10 Jun 08 - 06:53 PM (#2362730)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French sea shanties
From: Monique

"Roulez, jeunes gens, roulez" is another title for "À la Rochelle est arrivé". It's the same theme as "À St Malo beau port de mer" though the latter is suitable for kids at school. Out of school... they do as they wish.


12 Jun 08 - 03:09 PM (#2364442)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French sea shanties
From: Joe Offer

Corrected MIDI files and a new MP3 and sheet music above for LA DANAÉ (click) and MIDI for Passant par Paris (click).


26 Jan 09 - 02:27 PM (#2549573)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French sea shanties
From: Q (Frank Staplin)

My spyware has identified the bmarcore French marine songs site as high risk.
I have taken their suggestion that I block it.

Current experience, anyone? It was useful when I didn't want to get the chasse-marée "Chants de marins" books off the shelf, and they have some not in these books.


26 Jan 09 - 02:43 PM (#2549588)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French sea shanties
From: Steve Gardham

Monique,
I'm not an old romantic but I find 'The Diver' perfectly charming and one of the best-known French songs in many different versions. Il est tres triste mais charmant.


26 Jan 09 - 03:30 PM (#2549632)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French sea shanties
From: Q (Frank Staplin)

Available from amazon.ca (not from amazon.com):

Cahiers de chants de marins 1, 2, 3, and 4. Price about $Can.29.00 each. These books have words and music, French only. Chasse-Marée publications.
Chants de Marins by Colleu, same series, is also available; mine has a cd but the current blurb doesn't mention it.

Many cds also issued by Chasse-marée but amazon.ca lists most as unavailable.

Many French books and cds not stocked by amazon.com may be found at the Canadian warehouse.


28 Dec 10 - 04:19 PM (#3062795)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: French sea shanties
From: Q (Frank Staplin)

Just a note on Amazon sites. Amazon.com, .ca., .fr, .uk are all linked to my registration, so 'one-click' ordering applies to all.

Makes it easy to spend above your budget.