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Lyr Add: The Troubadour (Jim Brannigan)

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FOUR O'CLOCK IN THE MORNING


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Jim Brannigan - Free Music - Great Song (1)


Jim Lad 04 Mar 07 - 03:17 AM
Jim Lad 04 Mar 07 - 03:41 AM
John MacKenzie 04 Mar 07 - 05:34 AM
GUEST,Black Hawk 04 Mar 07 - 07:53 AM
Jim Lad 04 Mar 07 - 10:35 AM
John MacKenzie 04 Mar 07 - 11:17 AM
GUEST,Cash fan 04 Mar 07 - 12:26 PM
Charley Noble 04 Mar 07 - 01:14 PM
GUEST,Mike B. 04 Mar 07 - 07:29 PM
Jim Lad 04 Mar 07 - 08:36 PM
Jim Lad 04 Mar 07 - 08:49 PM
Beer 04 Mar 07 - 09:16 PM
Jim Lad 04 Mar 07 - 09:42 PM
Charley Noble 04 Mar 07 - 09:52 PM
Jim Lad 04 Mar 07 - 10:10 PM
Jim Lad 04 Mar 07 - 10:12 PM
Beer 04 Mar 07 - 10:12 PM
Jim Lad 04 Mar 07 - 10:24 PM
Charley Noble 05 Mar 07 - 08:00 AM
Jim Lad 05 Mar 07 - 10:39 AM
Jim Lad 05 Mar 07 - 10:55 AM
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Subject: Lyr Add: THE TROUBADOUR (Jim Brannigan)
From: Jim Lad
Date: 04 Mar 07 - 03:17 AM

words by Jim Brannigan
music ,,, Trad. (I took the tune from an old Matt McGinn song) (He took some of the words from the Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam and the tune from somewhere else)
"The moving finger writes and having writ, moves on." ... Rowan & Martin? Or was that the Flying Fickle Finger of Fate?

The Troubadour

On the causeway down below
Bonnie lassies in a row
See them walking to and fro
With their ringlets hanging down and
All the lads as they go by
They try so hard to catch their eye
They'll find a true love by and by let's
Have another round and

(chorus)
Ask the barmaid if you please
Another drink for you and me
Nice to have some company
And to pass the time of day let's
Raise our glasses one more time
Friends like you are hard to find
We'll drink a toast to Auld Lang Syne and
I'll be on my way

People up on Bastion Square
Children playing everywhere
Fiddle music fills the air And echos all around oh
Picture portraits, diamond rings
You can buy most anything
Or listen to the old man sing, let's
Have another round and

(chorus)
Ask the barmaid if you please
Another drink for you and me
Nice to have some company
And to pass the time of day let's
Raise our glasses one more time
Friends like you are hard to find
We'll drink a toast to Auld Lang Syne and
I'll be on my way

When the sun is sinking low
People come to hear my show
Singing with me as I go Oh
What a joyful sound for
Now the sun has gone to rest
Our children safely in their nest
Times like these are Heaven Blessed let's
Have another round and

(chorus)
Ask the barmaid if you please
Another drink for you and me
Nice to have some company
And to pass the time of day let's
Raise our glasses one more time
Friends like you are hard to find
We'll drink a toast to Auld Lang Syne and
I'll be on my way

"The old man"" in this song is Jay Garnett, my friend. He used to busk at the Inner Harbour in Victoria but has gone home to Nova Scotia and can be found on the Waterfront in Halifax. He's a big man, hard to miss. If you see him, ask him to sing "The Garden" for me. He'll know who sent you.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: The Troubadour
From: Jim Lad
Date: 04 Mar 07 - 03:41 AM

You can hear "The Troubadour" on the "Troubadour" album or you can find it on "Jim Brannigan's Favourites" at CD Baby.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: The Troubadour
From: John MacKenzie
Date: 04 Mar 07 - 05:34 AM

Johnny Cash did a song called The Troubador many years ago.
I remember a few lines.

The troubadour the troubadour
Sings with his heart
The song that's the hit of the show
Watch him sing and play the strings
Of his guitar
Alone in the warm spotlight's glow
He song is for someone he loved so true
Who loved him and left him for someone new
But in the crowd, one head is bowed for the troubadour
And oh her heart aches most of all.

It's been years since I heard it, so don't know if those words are anywhere near right.

Giok


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE TROUBADOUR (Johnny Cash)
From: GUEST,Black Hawk
Date: 04 Mar 07 - 07:53 AM

THE TROUBADOUR
Words and music by Cindy Walker
As recorded by Johnny Cash on "The Fabulous Johnny Cash" (1958)

The Troubadour, the troubadour
Sings from his heart
The Song that's the hit of the show.
Watch him sing and play the strings
Of his guitar,
Alone in the bright spotlight's glow.

The song was for someone he loved so true
Who loved him then left him for someone new.
The troubadour, the troubadour
Smiles as he sings, but his heart is breaking in two.

They beg for more; the troubadour
Sings once again
The song that's the hit of the show.
Watch him sing and play the strings of his guitar
Alone in the bright spotlight's glow.

There is a hush in the darkened hall.
A few hearts are heavy and teardrops fall,
But in the crowd, one head is bowed
For the troubadour and though her heart aches most of all,

Troubadour, troubadour,
Her heart aches most of all.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: The Troubadour
From: Jim Lad
Date: 04 Mar 07 - 10:35 AM

Johnny Who?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: The Troubadour
From: John MacKenzie
Date: 04 Mar 07 - 11:17 AM

Thank you Black Hawk, that takes me back about 40 years.
Giok


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: The Troubadour
From: GUEST,Cash fan
Date: 04 Mar 07 - 12:26 PM

Jim who ?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: The Troubadour
From: Charley Noble
Date: 04 Mar 07 - 01:14 PM

Jim-

That's a really nice song, and I can almost picture you singing it at Bastion Square, just above Wharf Street and the harbour.

Pass on my best to the chantey circle at the Bent Mast Pub if you're swinging by that way.

Cheerily,
Charley Noble


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: The Troubadour
From: GUEST,Mike B.
Date: 04 Mar 07 - 07:29 PM

There's also a Tim Buckley song called The Troubadour that I heard on XM radio, where he does some weird falsetto stuff.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: The Troubadour
From: Jim Lad
Date: 04 Mar 07 - 08:36 PM

Tim who?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: The Troubadour
From: Jim Lad
Date: 04 Mar 07 - 08:49 PM

There's still lots happening at The Bent Mast, Charley although this one was written about The Old Bailie which is where the buskers used to gather for the 2 for 1 specials. If I ever make it into the Mast, I'll shout your name out.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: The Troubadour
From: Beer
Date: 04 Mar 07 - 09:16 PM

Jim, that is one fine song. I have e-mailed my Bro. in N.S. to Jim Brannigan web site. Hill of the Margree still brings a pain in the chest. Thank you once more.
Beer (adrien)


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: The Troubadour
From: Jim Lad
Date: 04 Mar 07 - 09:42 PM

Angina Pectoris, Beer. Walking up hills will do that to you. Who were the folks in Margaree, you mentioned? (on another thread) They probably had no idea that they were ancestors at the time.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: The Troubadour
From: Charley Noble
Date: 04 Mar 07 - 09:52 PM

Jim-

What makes this website fun is the collection of "travelers" who frequent it.

Now if you wash up on the coast of Maine, be sure to look me up. Everyone knows me, even if they can't remember my real name!

Cheerily,
Charley Noble


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: The Troubadour
From: Jim Lad
Date: 04 Mar 07 - 10:10 PM

Charley:
       I thought long and hard about heading down to New England when I was in Cape Breton. Met lots of folks from that neck of the woods. Good people and knowledgeable about folk, a lot of them. Maybe in a year or two, when the whole cross border thing relaxes a bit, I'll head on down. Just for the heck of it!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: The Troubadour
From: Jim Lad
Date: 04 Mar 07 - 10:12 PM

hmmm!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: The Troubadour
From: Beer
Date: 04 Mar 07 - 10:12 PM

Last name was Doucette. Not very Scottish ah! The original chap was a captain on some ship by the name of Germain Doucette. Don't know how we Acadians landed up there but we did as well as a few Aucoin.
Beer (adrien)


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: The Troubadour
From: Jim Lad
Date: 04 Mar 07 - 10:24 PM

"The Hills of Margaree" album was recorded in the "Studio Marcelle Doucet" located at the CKJM radio station in Cheticamp, Cape Breton.
There are lots of Aucoins also. Many of the old Acadian Homesteads were built on low spots, just beyond the clifs so as not to be seen from the sea. The Acadians are wonderful people and came as a pleasant surprise to one who thought that Cape Breton was full of Scots. There are some excellent musicians there by the name of Aucoin. Don't know how they got there? Well lots of Cajuns can look to Cape Breton for their roots.


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE TRAVELLER (C. Fox Smith)
From: Charley Noble
Date: 05 Mar 07 - 08:00 AM

Jim-

As a "troubadour" you might enjoy this poem by C. Fox Smith, an English woman who resided 9 years in Victoria in the early 1900's:

The Traveller

I've loops o' string in the place o' buttons, I've mostly holes for a shirt;
My boots are bust and my hat's a goner, I'm gritty with dust an' dirt;
An' I'm sitting here on a bollard watching the China ships go forth,
Seeing the black little tugs come sliding with timber booms from the North.
Sitting and seeing the broad Pacific break at my feet in foam.
Me that was born with a taste for travel in a back alley at home.

They put me to school when I was a nipper at the Board School down in the slums,
And some of the kids was good at spelling and some at figures and sums;
And whether I went or whether I didn't they learned me nothing at all,
Only I'd watch the flies go walking over the maps on the wall,
Strolling over the lakes an' mountains, over the plains an' sea, —
As if they was born with a taste for travel something the same as me!

If I'd been born a rich man's youngster with lots o' money to burn,
It wouldn't ha' gone in marble mansions and statues at every turn,
It wouldn't ha' gone in wine and women, or dogs an' horses an' play,
Nor yet in collecting bricks and bracks in a harmless kind of a way;
I'd ha' paid my fare where I've beat my way (but I couldn't ha' liked it more!),
Me that was born with a taste for travel — the same if you're rich or poor.

I'd ha' gone bowling in yachts and rolling in plush padded Pullman cars, —
The same as I've seen 'em when I lay resting at night-time under the stars,
Me that have beat the ties and rode the bumpers from sea to sea,
Me that have sweated in stokeholds and dined off mouldy salt-horse and tea;
Me that have melted like grease at Perim and froze like boards off the Horn,
All along of a taste for travel that was in me when I was born.

I ain't got folks and I ain't got money, I ain't got nothing at all,
But a sort of a queer old thirst that keeps me moving on till I fall,
And many a time I've been short o' shelter and many a time o' grub,
But I've got away from the rows o' houses, the streets, an' the corner pub —
And here by the side of a sea that's shining under a sky like flame,
Me that was born with a taste for travel, give thanks because o' the same.

Notes:

A note in THE BRITISH COLONIALIST, a newspaper in Victoria, Vancouver Island, for May 11 1913 lists this poem as having been entered by CFS in their poetry competition. The result is not reported.

This version is taken from SAILOR TOWN: Sea Songs and Ballads, edited by Cicely Fox Smith, published by George H. Doran Co., New York, US, © 1919, pp. 120-122. First appearing in SONGS IN SAIL published by Elkin Mathews, © 1914.

This poet was an expert at writing soliloqies from the viewpoint of a true sailor of the late 19th and early 20th century, the end of the age of sail and the start of the age of steam. This is one of her finest examples showing why a sailor would put up with the hardships of a life at sea and sign on over and over again.

The poet describes this "traveller" in detail in her book SAILOR-TOWN DAYS, © 1923, p. 170:

"The Pacific coast is a great place for rolling stones of every sort and description. I remember meeting what I should say was the very perfection of the type. He was sitting on the edge of the Outer Wharf — it was in Victoria — on a sort of coaming that runs along the edge, very comfortable to sit on, though given to exuding tar in very hot weather. His coat — I don't think there was a shirt underneath — was fastened together with string, being innocent of buttons. His knee showed through his trousers. His boots were ruins. But he spoke with the unmistakable accents of cultivation."

"Bollard" is a large post, wood or iron, on the dock to which a ship would be moored while in port.

"Board School" is an early British school run by a Board of Education.

"Pullman Cars" are luxurious railway carriages.

"Beat the ties" means hoboing or making one's way along the rail line.

"Rode the Bumpers" is another way of hitching unofficial lifts on early railways.

"Salt Horse" is sailor slang for meat soaked in brine to preserve it on long sea voyages.

"Perim" is a British island in the Strait of Bab-el-Mandeb, at the entrance to the Red Sea.

Jim Saville and Charley Noble


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: The Troubadour
From: Jim Lad
Date: 05 Mar 07 - 10:39 AM

"Only I'd watch the flies go walking over the maps"
I like that.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: The Troubadour
From: Jim Lad
Date: 05 Mar 07 - 10:55 AM

Gerry Aucoin would be one of the best known musicians in the French parts. Great guy but he'd have to take one shoe off to count to ten on his digits.


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