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BS: Getting out of teaching

Rowan 24 Jun 09 - 06:54 PM
Eric the Viking 24 Jun 09 - 12:29 PM
Rowan 23 Jun 09 - 09:58 PM
GUEST,Peace 23 Jun 09 - 08:53 PM
GUEST,guest cadc 23 Jun 09 - 08:08 PM
Lizzie Cornish 1 13 Sep 08 - 03:45 AM
The Fooles Troupe 12 Sep 08 - 11:34 PM
meself 12 Sep 08 - 09:48 PM
Jeri 12 Sep 08 - 02:13 PM
GUEST,Frustrated Lizzie 12 Sep 08 - 01:46 PM
Penny S. 12 Sep 08 - 01:12 PM
Jeri 12 Sep 08 - 12:51 PM
GUEST,Lizzie Cornish (whose cookies aren't working 12 Sep 08 - 12:50 PM
Peace 12 Sep 08 - 12:39 PM
Folkiedave 12 Sep 08 - 12:34 PM
1LizzieCornish 12 Sep 08 - 11:37 AM
AllisonA(Animaterra) 12 Sep 08 - 09:23 AM
1LizzieCornish 12 Sep 08 - 05:47 AM
Big Al Whittle 12 Sep 08 - 05:35 AM
Schantieman 12 Sep 08 - 04:43 AM
Bryn Pugh 12 Sep 08 - 04:35 AM
Jeanie 12 Sep 08 - 04:34 AM
Sandra in Sydney 12 Sep 08 - 03:10 AM
Sandra in Sydney 12 Sep 08 - 03:09 AM
meself 11 Sep 08 - 11:48 PM
The Villan 07 May 08 - 05:01 PM
Sooz 07 May 08 - 03:37 PM
The Villan 07 May 08 - 01:19 PM
GUEST,A Regular 07 May 08 - 12:46 PM
Sooz 07 May 08 - 12:42 PM
GUEST,Vic at work 07 May 08 - 06:58 AM
GUEST,Vic at work 07 May 08 - 06:40 AM
Helen 06 May 08 - 07:33 PM
Victor in Mapperton 06 May 08 - 05:15 PM
Acorn4 06 May 08 - 04:40 PM
The Villan 06 May 08 - 03:00 PM
Big Al Whittle 06 May 08 - 02:31 PM
GUEST,A Regular 06 May 08 - 12:36 PM
Schantieman 06 May 08 - 11:39 AM
Bernard 06 May 08 - 11:22 AM
The Villan 06 May 08 - 03:21 AM
GUEST,dianavan 05 May 08 - 07:53 PM
Acorn4 05 May 08 - 06:44 PM
GUEST,dianavan 05 May 08 - 02:54 PM
Acorn4 05 May 08 - 02:37 PM
GUEST,A Regular 05 May 08 - 02:36 PM
GUEST,Julieann 05 May 08 - 02:27 PM
wysiwyg 15 Apr 08 - 06:33 PM
Acorn4 15 Apr 08 - 01:22 PM
AllisonA(Animaterra) 15 Apr 08 - 01:02 PM
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Subject: RE: BS: Getting out of teaching
From: Rowan
Date: 24 Jun 09 - 06:54 PM

Precisely.

And some of us get out of the education system but still practise the craft of, and enjoy, teaching.

Cheers, Rowan


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Subject: RE: BS: Getting out of teaching
From: Eric the Viking
Date: 24 Jun 09 - 12:29 PM

It's two and half years since I took early retirement. We moved from a busy town life, bought a house on Orkney islands, paid off the mortgage and everything else. We owe not a penny. I earn just over a quarter of my old salary. We love it.Sure money is tight but I get supply work every so often when I get the chance to go back into the classroom and meet eager faces who want to learn. Make no mistake, I loved my job. I hated the long hours, every Sunday taken up with planning no matter what, most nights an hour or two,the last days of the term holiday working a fever pitch to plan,writing reports, case conference reports, rushing round to do the parent bit and take my kids to dance, acting, singing, scouts etc etc. BUT that was nearly always made up for by the kid that "switched on the light" when they knew they knew something.By watching a kid that I'd know for years grow into a young adult, becoming responsible. By watching kids grow in stature when they achieved something new or more complex.The system stinks, no matter what the uninformed say. This scheme, that scheme, new this new that, inspections, assessments, self-assessments, whole school development plans, mission statements, stakeholder statements, etc etc. It has not one jot to do with teaching.It's just words and someone elses agenda. I loved teaching and getting the best for and from my kids is the most important thing.

But, I wouldn't swop the quality time I have had in the last few years for anything. To do what we liked, what we wanted, when we wanted. Mrs viking and I have been together for twenty five years, we enjoy every day together. Maybe not doing very much, knocking around the garden, reading, walking the dog, playing music, what ever we want.

Any teacher that escapes from the system goes for it in my view. I taught special needs for 30 years, complex abused and abusing children, druggies and prossies, muggers,buggers and thieves for 15 years. It was the greatest fun I have ever had.The last 15 years they were a bit less complex but with different special needs, some of them terminal. Unless you have been where I've been, you wouldn't know what the job involved. But of all the things that made it hard, the endless changes, the shifting goal posts, the inspection process etc spoilt it. I've seen good teachers loose all the faith in themselves during the inspection process. I've seen practitioners who are really poor teachers and failures sitting in judgement on good teachers. Crazy.

You can always find children who need you if you look hard enough. So quitting teaching isn't the end, it's not your failure, it's a new beginning.


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Subject: RE: BS: Getting out of teaching
From: Rowan
Date: 23 Jun 09 - 09:58 PM

Article from: The Australian
Aban Contractor, London June 24, 2009

AN independent think tank has condemned Britain's once prestigious A-level examination system, saying it stymies independent study and original thought, and universities should be put back in charge of overseeing the system.

The rise of the "ersatz A-level", after radical changes in 2000, has damaged the exam's intellectual integrity, the report, A New Level, says.

"Ersatz education will only be challenged by much greater openness, transparency and honesty in the system and by the academic world reclaiming its role," it says. "Universities should be responsible for ensuring that the A-level delivers the academic foundations that they need."

The organisation behind the study, Reform, a non-party think tank whose mission is to set out a better way to deliver public services and economic prosperity, said the present A-level system had created a generation of high-maintenance students who struggled to think for themselves.

"The key change was the wholesale introduction of modular exams in 2000 which saw the quantity and cost of exams doubling," says the report, released last week. "Re-sits have created a group of students who always seek a second chance. Mechanised marking has prevented examiners from rewarding clear flows of argument, originality and flair."

The report calls for action to be taken toreconnect A-levels with their strong academic heritage and for universities to take responsibility for the quality assurance of A-levels.

"Universities should quality assure individual subject A-levels, co-operating with examination boards to develop them," the report says. "Universities should be able to veto exam boards' specifications if they are not sufficiently rigorous or do not require the right content or the development of the correct skills."

Universities UK chief executive Diana Warwick said universities would have to consider the report's proposals carefully.

"The A-level result is still one of the best predictors in measuring skills and knowledge, but is only one of a number of factors that universities take into account when selecting students," she said.

"Others include the personal statement, school recommendation and educational context, interviews in some subjects and relevant skills."

But the report's findings suggest that allsubjects have much more heavily directed questions and marking, and the frequency of tests is preventing the study of off-syllabus material.

"Exams allow candidates less scope for using their own mind, thinking through problems and expressing originality. Subject content is questionable or inappropriate in some areas due to a lack of university input."

Reform asked a team of academics to look at four of the top 10 A-level subjects - English, history, chemistry and maths - and analyse examination papers from 1951 to last year. None was involved in the setting or marking of exams.

The group also interviewed heads of department and admissions tutors from a range of universities to establish how well A-levels prepared students for further study.

"The most important change in exams over the period 1951-2008 is that sitting a mathematics A-level paper now is more like using a sat-nav system than reading a map," University of London statistics professor RA Bailey told the report's authors.

"If you read a map to get from A to B, you remember the route and learn about other things on the way. If you use a sat-nav you do neither of those things. The questions inthe 2008 paper are heavily structured in this way and the result is that students will retain very little knowledge and develop very little understanding."

The report found that specific changes in the nature of A-levels had turned the qualification into a series of limited and discrete challenges rather than overall analysis of a subject.

"The result is the creation of qualifications that have the same superficial contents but an ersatz version of deep academic study," it says.

With the introduction of mechanised marking students were now examined for meeting prescriptive criteria and reproducing what the examiner was looking for, not for demonstrating a high level of skills.

The report found there was nothing to be gained from looking beyond the checklist of assessment objectives, or thinking originally.

"Markers' judgment is no longer considered necessary or even desirable."

Might explain some teachers' dissatisfaction with the context in which they work.

Cheers, Rowan


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Subject: RE: BS: Getting out of teaching
From: GUEST,Peace
Date: 23 Jun 09 - 08:53 PM

A teacher is explaining biology to her 4th grade students. 'Human beings are the only animals that stutter,' she says.


A little girl raises her hand. 'I had a kitty-cat who stuttered.'


The teacher, knowing how precious some of these stories could become,
asked the girl to describe the incident.


'Well', she began, 'I was in the back yard with my kitty and the Rottweiler
that lives next door got a running start and before we knew it, he jumped
over the fence into our yard!' That must've been scary,' said the teacher.
'It sure was,' said the little girl.


'My kitty raised her back, went "Ffffff! Ffffff!, Ffffff," but before she could say 'Fuck!,' the Rottweiler ate her!


The teacher had to leave the room.


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Subject: RE: BS: Getting out of teaching
From: GUEST,guest cadc
Date: 23 Jun 09 - 08:08 PM

I know where you are coming from perhaps you could look at being a homebound/ hospital teacher. I got a few speech language courses and qualified as a speech therapist aide( a speech teacher who doesn't write lesson plans or IEPs-- just does ther therapy under the direction of the Slp. These are used in both schools, hospitals, and private clinics.
thought it might help


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Subject: RE: BS: Getting out of teaching
From: Lizzie Cornish 1
Date: 13 Sep 08 - 03:45 AM

A path to why so many teachers want to get out of teaching, these days.

A very interesting view on our Education Systems and why they are going so very wrong for our children, but so very right for our Governments. Governments who happily carry on creating a society that no longer has the natural instinct to want to learn, to disobey, or to ask questions. Orwell knew why, and so does John Gatto.

John Taylor Gatto - State Controlled Consciousness

Here is the speech which was removed yesterday, for some reason, perhaps it was deemed too long to be on the board, so I'll link to it via the site itself, and when John talks of 'my' children, he is talking about his students:

Why Schools Don't Educate

"A former New York teacher of the year, Gatto is the most interesting writer on education today. He shows that our bureaucratic schools and our bureaucratic society get in the way of learning, and he often contrasts modern America with 19th century America, where family, work, and democratic self-government let people educate themselves."

Some of John's speeches


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Subject: RE: BS: Getting out of teaching
From: The Fooles Troupe
Date: 12 Sep 08 - 11:34 PM

My elderly 7th grade teacher used to to get out of teaching us by setting us some problems to do, then falling asleep in his chair...


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Subject: RE: BS: Getting out of teaching
From: meself
Date: 12 Sep 08 - 09:48 PM

Thanks for the good wishes. I'm really looking forward to living something like a normal life ...


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Subject: RE: BS: Getting out of teaching
From: Jeri
Date: 12 Sep 08 - 02:13 PM

Your Mudcat name is Lizzie Cornish 1, if that helps. That account is open. You'll be re-united with all your PMs.

Otherwise, I'd suggest e-mailing Joe Offer, or I can let him know you need help. He can have your password sent back to the e-mail address with which you registered, or you can work things out.


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Subject: RE: BS: Getting out of teaching
From: GUEST,Frustrated Lizzie
Date: 12 Sep 08 - 01:46 PM

From Jeri "Lizzie, please do not join AGAIN. Go to the Login page and log in."

Sorry to take this off course, everyone, but I can't PM Jeri.

It won't let me log in, Jeri. It says I'm not a member etc. So, I join again..and then...it er..says I'm not a member. I'm a trifle baffled.


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Subject: RE: BS: Getting out of teaching
From: Penny S.
Date: 12 Sep 08 - 01:12 PM

I have been going back into the school where I taught school as a volunteer to teach swimming, and done a few supply days. For these, I do have lessons set up - I make sure I do by going in in advance! And I mark, and can take ICT lessons. (Agency staff are usually untrained in this).

My sister has been driven into resignation. I can't go into details, but while someone is going through bereavement, pastoral care would suggest a duty of care which has not been shown. Another good teacher lost.

Penny


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Subject: RE: BS: Getting out of teaching
From: Jeri
Date: 12 Sep 08 - 12:51 PM

Lizzie, please do not join AGAIN.

Go to the Login page and log in.


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Subject: RE: BS: Getting out of teaching
From: GUEST,Lizzie Cornish (whose cookies aren't working
Date: 12 Sep 08 - 12:50 PM

"..I may be in the minority, but that's at the crux of the problem today. I am convinced that television is the great mass hypnotist- instead of having time out of school to explore, create, swing on a swing, mess with paints or books or boats, children's minds are being taken over by the thoughts of others in a far more mind-killing way than 6 hours of schooling can do..."

Oh...I was going to comment on Allison's post, regarding my post earlier on, but...it's been removed for some reason.

So I guess there's no point.


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Subject: RE: BS: Getting out of teaching
From: Peace
Date: 12 Sep 08 - 12:39 PM

That is too much TV. But then I thing five minutes is too much TV.


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Subject: RE: BS: Getting out of teaching
From: Folkiedave
Date: 12 Sep 08 - 12:34 PM

I got out of teaching by the simple expedient of retiring.

And despite requests - have refused to go back.


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Subject: RE: BS: Getting out of teaching
From: 1LizzieCornish
Date: 12 Sep 08 - 11:37 AM

Hi, Allison, John Gatto is a teacher. He's talking about the children he teaches, when he uses the term 'my'......

"..But here is the calculus of time the children I teach must deal with:

Out of the 168 hours in each week, my children sleep 56. That leaves them 112 hours a week out of which to fashion a self.

My children watch 55 hours of television a week according to recent reports. That leaves them 57 hours a week in which to grow up..."


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Subject: RE: BS: Getting out of teaching
From: AllisonA(Animaterra)
Date: 12 Sep 08 - 09:23 AM

Thanks, Jeanie, I'm doing very well. Getting married a week from tomorrow is taking up much of my time, but I'm also having time to practice, exercise, and sleep a full 8 hours!

Lizzie, I skimmed part of the above article, but got stuck on the comment that the writer's children watch 55 hours/week of television. I may be in the minority, but that's at the crux of the problem today. I am convinced that television is the great mass hypnotist- instead of having time out of school to explore, create, swing on a swing, mess with paints or books or boats, children's minds are being taken over by the thoughts of others in a far more mind-killing way than 6 hours of schooling can do.

Allison


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Subject: RE: BS: Getting out of teaching
From: 1LizzieCornish
Date: 12 Sep 08 - 05:47 AM

This was supposed to be in my post above (Sorry, having severe computer problems at present, hence new, slightly changed name, had to re-join)

The speeches and wisdom of John Taylor Gatto


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Subject: RE: BS: Getting out of teaching
From: Big Al Whittle
Date: 12 Sep 08 - 05:35 AM

Sandra this post set off a powerful load of memories off:-
'Someone here had a brilliant idea to deal with the teacher shortage in under-privileged schools.

Send the best of the newly graduated teachers to these schools!

Someone else commented that it would be the way to send these folks straight out of the school system, & that it would be far better to send them to the "good" schools, & move highly experienced teachers to the difficult schools. Tho as we have had lots of resignations, I dunno if that would work, either.

sandra'

I was a teacher in the 1970's in a several large city schools.

There was a theory, current at the time, that senior teachers were a bit like bloodstock. You had to improve the bloodline, by importing senior teachers from 'good' schools. Show the scufflers and footsoldiers what it was about.

We ended up - with a headmaster who spent all his time gong out addressing various august bodies; a deputy who spent the entire year on a mysterious activity called 'doing the tietable'; and a second deputy who never ventured out ofhis office and spent his time growing a beard - we couldn't really see if he did anything else. They all avoided contact with the kids like the plague.

Occasionally the Head would do a gabbled assembly talk - delivered at speed for his time was precious. The nice kids used to occasionallly remark, what was that about.

Now and then we would be given a new school rule, but we never really knew what the old school rules were - and anyway it was more about which rules you could get away with applying.

Now and then we would get some idiot destined for high office in the teacher strength, and these had to be kept way from the kids at all costs. One was given a playground duty to perform, and caused a riot. He was dragged from the crowd in the nick of time shouting, 'I have my standards....!'

So we took him off the onerous business of standing in the playground and gave him an empty corridor to patrol, where he could be alone with his standards.

Theres a lot wrong with English schools and its unlikely to ever get right. All the executive power resides in the hands of middle class plonkers and hustlers - endlessly coming up with simplistic answers. True professionalism is sneered at. Like the rest of society really.


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Subject: RE: BS: Getting out of teaching
From: Schantieman
Date: 12 Sep 08 - 04:43 AM

I haven't posted on this thread for some time but just happened to see it.

The good news is that I am now an ex-teacher :-D The even better news is that I am starting to earn a little money to satisfy my meagre needs by teaching sailing, in various ways. As a result, I am happier, less stressed and more content than I've been for years. And poorer, but you can't have everything.

Thank you to those on here who provided advice months ago. The power of the Cat!!

Steve


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Subject: RE: BS: Getting out of teaching
From: Bryn Pugh
Date: 12 Sep 08 - 04:35 AM

Rock on, meself - today, I get paid for two loves, gardening and Law, so whatever else it might be, it can't be work.

Good luck, long life and much happiness. They ARE achievable outside the class room and lecture theatre !


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Subject: RE: BS: Getting out of teaching
From: Jeanie
Date: 12 Sep 08 - 04:34 AM

Very best wishes to you, "meself", for your last school term and for the start of your new life in January.

There were a lot of us on this thread: Sooz, 'A Regular', Schantieman, Julieann, Animaterra and me (apologies for any I have left out) who had handed in their notice to leave at the end of the Summer Term. How are you all doing ?

I must say, it did feel rather strange last week (even though my job was only part time) not to be going in to school. I had that odd, persistent feeling of "I should BE somewhere"... The one thing I am certainly going to miss is seeing the same children year on year growing up and moving through the school. The rest (as discussed here) you can keep !

I have a lovely new job as "Victorian School Teacher" in a museum, giving lessons 1880's-style to visiting (costumed) school groups, and next week I start out touring schools doing Shakespeare workshops and have a small speaking part in a film - none of which I could have done if still shackled to a regular school timetable, however part-time it was.

All best wishes to all last term's departing Mudcat teachers. Hope things are going really well for you.

- jeanie


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Subject: RE: BS: Getting out of teaching
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 12 Sep 08 - 03:10 AM

ps. enjoy your new life, meself

sandra


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Subject: RE: BS: Getting out of teaching
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 12 Sep 08 - 03:09 AM

Someone here had a brilliant idea to deal with the teacher shortage in under-privileged schools.

Send the best of the newly graduated teachers to these schools!

Someone else commented that it would be the way to send these folks straight out of the school system, & that it would be far better to send them to the "good" schools, & move highly experienced teachers to the difficult schools. Tho as we have had lots of resignations, I dunno if that would work, either.

sandra


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Subject: RE: BS: Getting out of teaching
From: meself
Date: 11 Sep 08 - 11:48 PM

Handed in my resignation yesterday. Going to go to work for/with a friend doing home renovations, etc., for awhile, see what happens, take it from there ...


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Subject: RE: BS: Getting out of teaching
From: The Villan
Date: 07 May 08 - 05:01 PM

I am so glad that teachers know how to count :-)


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Subject: RE: BS: Getting out of teaching
From: Sooz
Date: 07 May 08 - 03:37 PM

It seems that there are quite a few of us counting!


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Subject: RE: BS: Getting out of teaching
From: The Villan
Date: 07 May 08 - 01:19 PM

Just for you Sooz Days go by

Maybe you can swap Mr Sooz for this guy :-)


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Subject: RE: BS: Getting out of teaching
From: GUEST,A Regular
Date: 07 May 08 - 12:46 PM

34 and 3/4 days left--but who's counting?


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Subject: RE: BS: Getting out of teaching
From: Sooz
Date: 07 May 08 - 12:42 PM

I have forty seven more days to go.


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Subject: RE: BS: Getting out of teaching
From: GUEST,Vic at work
Date: 07 May 08 - 06:58 AM

Can some one teach me how to use a computer?

    2]On both sides of the pond there are organisations who will offer help and advice to those wanting to change their careers.

Vic
In several parts.


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Subject: RE: BS: Getting out of teaching
From: GUEST,Vic at work
Date: 07 May 08 - 06:40 AM

Sorry - abberant computer.

Two things 1]See SOS thread, this explains why teachers want out. CYA, make the figures look good, tell the boss what they want to hear but don't ever try to be an Educator!


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Subject: RE: BS: Getting out of teaching
From: Helen
Date: 06 May 08 - 07:33 PM

If you want some black humour regarding the new style of top-down management by school principals, watch the tv cartoon show called Daria. The principal is exactly as described in this thread, even down to the smart suit.

Daria & her similarly intelligent, creative friends are a joy to watch, and the humourous juxtapositions of Daria to her sister Quinn & friends (members of The Fashion Club) is funny. It is a very clever show, much more intelligent than many of the other tv programmes on offer, cartoon or live performance alike. A lot of the scenes are at Daria & Quinn's high school, and there are teachers with quirky personalities who have various ways of dealing with the stress. I wish I had the whole set to watch over & over. I love it!

I didn't realise until I just read this whole thread through that the school situation in Daria is one of the reasons I relate so much to the show.

Helen
(still happy as a reconfigured ex-teacher)


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Subject: RE: BS: Getting out of teaching
From: Victor in Mapperton
Date: 06 May 08 - 05:15 PM

Children will openly defy teachers and quote their human rights if they do wrong. On top of that parents are always willing to take the children's side.

In my day the role of the teacher was respected, in school and out of it. I never went home and said I misbehaved because I would of got disciplined there too !

Political Correctness has went too far. Most teachers are responsible people. I never received discipline I didn't deserve !


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Subject: RE: BS: Getting out of teaching
From: Acorn4
Date: 06 May 08 - 04:40 PM

Don't believe the myth that people in their fifties are unemployable - it is harder to get a full time permanent job, but then again not many who have kicked teaching into touch would want that -the portfolio approach "a leetle beet of thees and a leetle beet of that" (to quote Clouseau) can top up nicely where you've been robbed of part of your pension.

Or of course, just put your feet up if you can afford it!


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Subject: RE: BS: Getting out of teaching
From: The Villan
Date: 06 May 08 - 03:00 PM

nice one Al LOL


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Subject: RE: BS: Getting out of teaching
From: Big Al Whittle
Date: 06 May 08 - 02:31 PM

take better aim


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Subject: RE: BS: Getting out of teaching
From: GUEST,A Regular
Date: 06 May 08 - 12:36 PM

I will miss the kids. And that is all I will miss.


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Subject: RE: BS: Getting out of teaching
From: Schantieman
Date: 06 May 08 - 11:39 AM

Go for it, Julieann

I resigned a couple of months ago nad am counting down the days to the end of term. Sailing, Cadets stuff, and NO MARKING! ;-)

Steve


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Subject: RE: BS: Getting out of teaching
From: Bernard
Date: 06 May 08 - 11:22 AM

Couldn't agree more!


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Subject: RE: BS: Getting out of teaching
From: The Villan
Date: 06 May 08 - 03:21 AM

You are dead right dainavan.
We need to get back to the old basics.
Secretarial Pools
Matrons in charge of hospitals

I see little point in a qualifies teacher who is very good wasting half their time on paperwork. Just think how many more children they could help.

As you say its too simple for pompous ivory tower bosses to understand.


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Subject: RE: BS: Getting out of teaching
From: GUEST,dianavan
Date: 05 May 08 - 07:53 PM

If the secretary required seven years of post-secondary education, it would be fair to give him the same pay. Of course the secretary would also have to know how to teach.

The point is, guest, that I can do secretarial work but it is a waste of my skills and training. In addition, it is doubtful whether or not a secretary has the skills to teach, especially those students who require alternate methods of instruction. If a secretary wants to teach, they can earn their degree the same way I did and get a teacher's pay.

I doubt very much if parents would want their children taught by secretaries but if the public school system continues to mis-use their teachers, that is exactly what will happen. I want to teach. If I wanted a secretarial job, I wouldn't have removed myself from the work force to get a teaching degree.


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Subject: RE: BS: Getting out of teaching
From: Acorn4
Date: 05 May 08 - 06:44 PM

I recently read a book on the Tudors and there was a section on how they chose to educate their children. There was a debate going on even then about methods/philosophies. I haven't got the exact quote but one of the most respected teachers of the time said that the current trend in education seemed to be that children were like an empty jug that you filled with water and even though it spilled out of the top, you carried on filling it. We haven't really got very far in 500 years , have we?


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Subject: RE: BS: Getting out of teaching
From: GUEST,dianavan
Date: 05 May 08 - 02:54 PM

I love teaching but have to go. The paperwork (and I don't mean marking) is more than I can take. Being 'accountable' and communicating with so many others requires about 50% of my time. I would rather be teaching. I have the skills and my students are very successful. Unfortunately, most of my time is spent doing what a secretary could do.

Wouldn't it be far more effective if Special Ed. teachers worked as a team and had a secretary (at half the pay) to do all of the scheduling for meetings, phone calls, letters and filing? I would then be free to do what I was trained to do. Of course it will never happen because it makes too much sense.


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Subject: RE: BS: Getting out of teaching
From: Acorn4
Date: 05 May 08 - 02:37 PM

Go for it!

I've never met anyone who has regretted it. You won't have that huge black cloud gathering over your head on a Sunday afternoon!


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Subject: RE: BS: Getting out of teaching
From: GUEST,A Regular
Date: 05 May 08 - 02:36 PM

My resignation was in last week. I am very pleased.


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Subject: RE: BS: Getting out of teaching
From: GUEST,Julieann
Date: 05 May 08 - 02:27 PM

Have just picked up this thread as I am at the point of giving up teaching. I am 54, teach in special ed and just about hanging in there.

I had some time off work two years ago due to stress. I went back to work but I no longer have the energy to be creative in the classroom as paperwork takes up so much of that time. I now do the job that two teachers used to do. More assistants to manage and more children with highly complex needs.

Teaching has become obsessed with meeting government targets and I feel as a society we are creating more problems than solving them by being driven this way as parents and teachers of the future generations.

I am disillusioned and feel swamped by state intervention and meddling.

Three weeks to make that decision.


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Subject: RE: BS: Getting out of teaching
From: wysiwyg
Date: 15 Apr 08 - 06:33 PM

WAY TO GO ALLISON!

~S~


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Subject: RE: BS: Getting out of teaching
From: Acorn4
Date: 15 Apr 08 - 01:22 PM

Good on you, Animaterra, you won't look back!

To those of you still feeling hopelessly stuck and getting on in years, the survival technique is to go into "hibernate" mode, like a computer during staff meetings, etc, when(if) the class are getting on quietly and just use bursts of energy when you need it.

A number of years ago there used to be a magazine called "Escape" produced especially for teachers who wanted to dig that tunnel; not sure what happened to it.

The powers that be will never learn until there are no teachers left!


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Subject: RE: BS: Getting out of teaching
From: AllisonA(Animaterra)
Date: 15 Apr 08 - 01:02 PM

Well, I submitted my resignation letter yesterday. For the past several years I've wondered how I could keep up the pace that public (government-run) teaching requires, how I could keep up the energy, maintain the schedule, and also have a life outside of the classroom.

Now my husband-to-be is helping me make it possible. After this school year is over, we are going to spend more time making music together, savoring life, and finding new ways to slow down while living happily and frugally ever after!

We'll still teach, go into schools, work with kids (and grownups) and share the music. But I'm so tired of the warehouse style of education. I'm so grateful to be given the opportunity to go my own way.


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Mudcat time: 27 October 9:03 AM EDT

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