mudcat.org: Storytelling in a school
Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafeawe

Post to this Thread - Sort Descending - Printer Friendly - Home


Storytelling in a school

Related threads:
Story selection - storytelling to adults (55)
Folklore: Favorite Storytellers? (36)
Folklore: New Scottish Storytelling Internet Radio (8)


Northerner 18 Jul 06 - 04:08 AM
Kweku 18 Jul 06 - 05:21 AM
Liz the Squeak 18 Jul 06 - 05:56 AM
AllisonA(Animaterra) 18 Jul 06 - 07:30 AM
Kara 18 Jul 06 - 07:34 AM
Northerner 18 Jul 06 - 02:56 PM
kendall 18 Jul 06 - 03:48 PM
Northerner 18 Jul 06 - 04:55 PM
GUEST,Russ 18 Jul 06 - 04:58 PM
kendall 18 Jul 06 - 04:58 PM
Jacob B 18 Jul 06 - 05:24 PM
Northerner 18 Jul 06 - 05:45 PM
kendall 18 Jul 06 - 09:29 PM
Northerner 19 Jul 06 - 03:35 AM
AllisonA(Animaterra) 19 Jul 06 - 06:10 AM
kendall 19 Jul 06 - 11:10 AM
GUEST,Russ 19 Jul 06 - 12:30 PM
Northerner 19 Jul 06 - 01:22 PM
LilyFestre 19 Jul 06 - 02:06 PM
Northerner 20 Jul 06 - 05:00 AM
Liz the Squeak 20 Jul 06 - 05:31 AM
Northerner 20 Jul 06 - 11:33 AM
Fliss 20 Jul 06 - 01:43 PM
Northerner 20 Jul 06 - 07:04 PM
Liz the Squeak 21 Jul 06 - 03:54 AM
Northerner 21 Jul 06 - 05:37 AM
webfolk 21 Jul 06 - 06:46 PM
Northerner 22 Jul 06 - 02:12 PM
Anne Lister 23 Jul 06 - 04:07 AM
Northerner 23 Jul 06 - 04:59 AM
kendall 23 Jul 06 - 07:32 AM
Northerner 23 Jul 06 - 08:16 AM
dianavan 23 Jul 06 - 01:53 PM
Northerner 23 Jul 06 - 02:49 PM
Share Thread
more
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:




Subject: Storytelling in a school
From: Northerner
Date: 18 Jul 06 - 04:08 AM

I have good news. I have finally found a local primary school that is willing for me to go in and tell stories to the children. It is Abingdon Primary School, a school right in the heart of Middlesbrough. It has large proportions of children from ethnic minorities - they come from twenty different nationalities. Great for storytelling as stories come from all over the world.

I rang the school yesterday morning and spoke to the headmaster. He was keen to use me. In the afternoon I went for a visit and the headmaster showed me round. The school already has a school choir and a steel band and has a keen interest in performing arts. I was really impressed by the headmaster. It was quickly obvious that he loves the children and that they love him right back. He is a confident and enthusiastic person.

I will start in September and will use the holiday period to work on my material. I am currently amateur but would like to go professional eventually. This will be really good experience for me!!! I'm thrilled to pieces.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Storytelling in a school
From: Kweku
Date: 18 Jul 06 - 05:21 AM

Good for you. Hope the children will also love you. Good luck


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Storytelling in a school
From: Liz the Squeak
Date: 18 Jul 06 - 05:56 AM

Are you planning to use props? You could liase with the art classes and make some of those Indian stick puppets - they're a fantastic way of involving children in any story... and a lot less controversial than Punch and Judy! The technique was used in at least one of the Bagpuss programmes, to illustrate a western story and it didn't seem at all inappropriate or strange.

LTS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Storytelling in a school
From: AllisonA(Animaterra)
Date: 18 Jul 06 - 07:30 AM

Sounds like a wonderful place! Keep us posted once you start!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Storytelling in a school
From: Kara
Date: 18 Jul 06 - 07:34 AM

Hello
just got this email from a friend who is a story teller

"The project I work on - *The Unlimited Company, storytellers with learning disabilities in Somerset* - has amazingly been shortlisted in the regional finals of the national lottery awards competition 2006, out of 340 competitors.

We are in competition with 3 other projects and if we win the region, we will make the national finals. This will not mean more money, but fantastic publicity for the cause of people with learning disabilities and of storytelling. We have to get the votes to get us through. Anyone can vote wherever you live all over the world ( I think this is mad, but there you go).

*To register your vote for The Unlimited Company - Storytellers in Mendips call ***0845 434 9071*** or log on to *_*www.lotterygoodcauses.org.uk* http://www.lotterygoodcauses.org.uk/ and click on National Lottery Awards. Voting lines are open now and close 11 August 2006.*


If you feel you would like to help us win through to the next round, please could you cast a vote - and also pass the message on to all your friends and colleagues! I wouldn't ask, but I know that we are really making a difference to the lives of the folk down here, and it would be wonderful to be in a position to take the message further -

that stories have the power to change people's lives
that stories offer a new way of communicating
that people with learning disabilities can be role models as storytellers.



with good wishes and hoping hard

Jane and all the Unlimited company"


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Storytelling in a school
From: Northerner
Date: 18 Jul 06 - 02:56 PM

Thank you all. Making props such as puppets would be very good fun! I think that would depend on what facilities are available at the school and how willing the other teachers are to become involved. I'm not a particularly art and crafty person myself, but yes, if there was a person at the school who could help me with a joint project this would be a good thing for the children to do. I do have a book that gives instructions on how to make simple puppets, such as the Indian stick puppets.

My hardest task initially is to find a way to become integrated into the school's routines so that I help the teachers and not hinder them. I'll write up some simple notes over the holidays on basic questions that I need to ask the teachers. Finding out if there are any stories that they would really like to hear would be a good start!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Storytelling in a school
From: kendall
Date: 18 Jul 06 - 03:48 PM

Do you know the story, "The Bear that wasn't "? by Frank Tashlin, it's a wonderful story. If you ever read it, I'll tell you a true story around it.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Storytelling in a school
From: Northerner
Date: 18 Jul 06 - 04:55 PM

No, I don't know it (though I've found some references to it by googling). I will be trying to keep to traditional tales though and I'm not sure that this one is traditional.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Storytelling in a school
From: GUEST,Russ
Date: 18 Jul 06 - 04:58 PM

Does the school want to vet your stories?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Storytelling in a school
From: kendall
Date: 18 Jul 06 - 04:58 PM

mAYBE NOT, BUT i SAVED A CHILD'S LIFE WITH IT.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Storytelling in a school
From: Jacob B
Date: 18 Jul 06 - 05:24 PM

Kendall, you can leave us hanging with a line like that. This thread is already about storytelling, and your story is obviously about the power of storytelling. Out with it!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Storytelling in a school
From: Northerner
Date: 18 Jul 06 - 05:45 PM

Hello Russ! They haven't mentioned vetting the stories. But I will consider letting teachers know which stories I will be using so that they can plan their lessons. I do need to consider any religious objections that might occur. This is a strongly multi-cultural school so I will need some sensitivity.

Hi there Kendall! Tell us a story!!!!

/act Diane sits down with a long drink and prepares to listen.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Storytelling in a school
From: kendall
Date: 18 Jul 06 - 09:29 PM

It is a long story, and I'm ready for bed, but I will shorten it as best I can without gutting it.

The story is about a bear that hibernates in a hole under a tree. Next spring he awoke to find that a huge factory had been built on top of his hole. He came out and was trying to figure out what happened, when suddenly, a forman saw him and said, "Get to work and stop gawping about." Bear said "I don't work here, I'm a bear." Forman says "You are not bear, you are a silly man with a fur coat and needs a shave." Bear insisted the he was a bear and did not work there.
Forman takes him to his supervisor...same story...you are no bear etc.

Supervisor takes bear to the owner who also insists that the bear is a silly man who needs a shave and wears a fur coat. Bear insistes that he is a bear.
Owner takes him to the zoo, asks the bears in the zoo what this is, and they say he can't be a bear, if he was a bear he woudn't be outside he would be inside doing tricks.

Finally, after everyone he meets tells him he is not a bear, but a silly man in a fur coat who needs a shave, that he gives in thinks, all those people can't be wrong, I must not be a bear.
They gave him a job and he worked there for a few years until the factory closed down and everyone went home.
The bear was walking through the forest with no place to go. It started to snow, and it got colder and colder. Bear sat down on a stone and he was very unhappy. Finally, he saw a hole under a tree and he said to himself, "I would like to go in there and go to sleep, but that's what bears do, and I'm not a bear."
But, eventually, he stood up and thought "I AM a bear" and he went into the hole and went to sleep as any bear would naturally do.
Down deep he knew he wasn't a silly man who needs a shave and wears a fur coat.

One night I was passing the home of a friend and although it was late, something told me to drop in unannounced.
My friend, Margot was weeping and she said "Again, you have the damndest knack of appearing just when you are needed most". S----, (her daughter) was also weeping and had threatened suicide. They were unable to communicate about it, so I hugged her daughter and in a few minutes, I was able to determine the reason for her great sorrow.
It seems that the poor kid was about to flunk typing, so I asked her why she took typing when she hated it in the first place, and she told me that she only signed up for typing to please her mother, and she was about to let her down. I told her that she was obviously not a typist, and flunking it would not be a disaster.
Then I told her the story of the bear that wasn't, and by the time I was finished, she was in tears, her mother was in tears and laughing all the time!

The next day, my friend, Margot called me to say that I had saved her daughter's life.Without that story that night, she probably would have killed herself.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Storytelling in a school
From: Northerner
Date: 19 Jul 06 - 03:35 AM

What a lovely story!! Thank you!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Storytelling in a school
From: AllisonA(Animaterra)
Date: 19 Jul 06 - 06:10 AM

<<>>


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Storytelling in a school
From: kendall
Date: 19 Jul 06 - 11:10 AM

I don't often sink to true stories, but this one demanded to be shared.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Storytelling in a school
From: GUEST,Russ
Date: 19 Jul 06 - 12:30 PM

Northerner,

I asked the question because of a story I heard from Sheila Kay Adams.

She was asked to sing traditional ballads at a school. She sang a version of George Collins (I think) in which the bereaved girl friend kisses George's "cold corpsey lips."

The kids loved it but the principal read her the riot act and promised her she would never be asked back.

You might be unpleasantly surprised by what people find offensive these days.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Storytelling in a school
From: Northerner
Date: 19 Jul 06 - 01:22 PM

No, I wouldn't be surprised. One group of lady storytellers suggested I don't do stories about witchcraft. I will be seeing storytellers at Whitby Folk Week; I will try and get a few tips from some of them on do's and don't's.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Storytelling in a school
From: LilyFestre
Date: 19 Jul 06 - 02:06 PM

The kids are going to LOVE you! Lots of animated voices, props, movement, inclusion....they love, love, LOVE it! Have FUN!! TONS OF FUN!!!!

Michelle


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Storytelling in a school
From: Northerner
Date: 20 Jul 06 - 05:00 AM

Thank you LilyFestre. I have a good collection of props and plan on using gestures and movement. Not quite as good on the voices but have plenty of enthusiasm!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Storytelling in a school
From: Liz the Squeak
Date: 20 Jul 06 - 05:31 AM

Brer Rabbit and Spider Anansi are good story-tellers stories - and have the same cultural roots so will cover a whole section of your audience. There is a similarity between them and the monkey Hanuman from Asian literature too.

LTS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Storytelling in a school
From: Northerner
Date: 20 Jul 06 - 11:33 AM

Hello Liz

Yes, I plan on telling quite a number of animal stories. I got myself some hare ears this afternoon while out shopping! A children's playset that I spotted. The ears are long and furry. There's a tail too but I'm not too sure how to attach it to myself. I took the set out of its wrappers when I sat down to have a cup of tea - only to find that the tail was missing. So I "hared" back to the shop for a replacement. The shop assistant gave me a very funny look when I explained that my hare tail was missing.

I wonder if they will understand Anansi?   Rabbits and hares and tortoises may be easier with the younger ones. The monkey tales will be particularly helpful for me as so many of these children are from Asian familiies.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Storytelling in a school
From: Fliss
Date: 20 Jul 06 - 01:43 PM

Hi I listened to Aussi storyteller Mike Jackson's talk at the Festival at the Edge on... How to entertain children.. it was great fun. Check out his website for ideas.

http://www.mikejackson.com.au


fliss


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Storytelling in a school
From: Northerner
Date: 20 Jul 06 - 07:04 PM

Hi Fliss. He's certainly a busy man (just looked at website). I do look for workshops and go whenever I can.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Storytelling in a school
From: Liz the Squeak
Date: 21 Jul 06 - 03:54 AM

I used to read stories at the library I worked in, and kids from 4-14 'got' Anansi. They forget that he's a spider and just want to be as tricksy and cunning.

There was a whole series of books written by someone whose name I cannot recall but was the Swahili for 'My story'.... She retold African stories in a modern way and was very popular.

Hope you do well.

LTS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Storytelling in a school
From: Northerner
Date: 21 Jul 06 - 05:37 AM

Thank you Liz

Yes, animal stories are going to be an important part of my repertoire.

I'm going up to Newcastle later today to go to the A Bit Crack club there, Newcastle's storytelling circle. I should hear lots of good stories there. They have a guest storyteller tonight. Hopefully I will also pick up some tips from some of the other storytellers there.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Storytelling in a school
From: webfolk
Date: 21 Jul 06 - 06:46 PM

I tell stories every week in church, its part of my job, as a minister, but I appreciate your concern about multi-cultural/religiou/ethic sensitivities. Thankfully I don't have them in a church situation, however, I always use inclusive and non gender specific terminology with reference to God when appropriate.
It is a good idea to listen to others tell stories, but my best tip would be to never ever use a script other than for the bare bones of the story, and talk in pictures, focus on the things that your audience can see in their mind's eye.
You never say to a child that is a lovely picture of a 'boat/tree etc' you say, tell me about your picture, and the same is true in story telling, you tel them about your picture so they can see it too.
You take then for a walk, like in a garden, pointing out the sites, the smalls, the sounds as you journey together, then, you leave them to find their own way home, just so long as you don't lead thjem up the garden path.
For what it's worth the guy who is involved in the Solfest ( I can't do links so look it up in the folk roots directory) on the August Bank Holiday called Wizardmarra (a google search) is brilliant
Geoff


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Storytelling in a school
From: Northerner
Date: 22 Jul 06 - 02:12 PM

Thank you Geoff. I have just come back from a visit to A Bit Crack, the storytelling circle in Newcastle. The storytellers there suggested that I treat the children as any other British children whatever their background. They also said the teachers would know if any child had special needs. I thoroughly enjoyed my visit. And although I didn't tell a story this time I sang a song instead which was very much appreciated.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Storytelling in a school
From: Anne Lister
Date: 23 Jul 06 - 04:07 AM

I've worked a lot with children from Bangladesh (and elsewhere, come to think of it). They lap up stories of all sorts and there's really no need to steer clear of traditional British stories (in fact, many good reasons to include them). The only time I've had a problem with stories was when a class demanded ghost stories, around Halloween, and one parent complained to the head because their child had re-told one story at home. I think it scared the parent more than it had scared the child!
There's also no need at all to get too "proppy". This can be very patronising to the group of children unless you have things that are genuinely fascinating - the story should really be enough in itself. If you remember that most traditional stories survived by being told around the fireside (not great lighting, necessarily) by non-experts and non-actors without a big bag of bits and bobs that should reassure you!

Anne (who shared a session with Mike Jackson at Festival at the Edge)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Storytelling in a school
From: Northerner
Date: 23 Jul 06 - 04:59 AM

Thank you very much Anne! I only have props for a few of my stories. They are useful me when I am starting out as they act as a memory jogger. However, I would prefer to travel light so will be aiming to tell most stories without props.

I thoroughly enjoyed seeing Philippa Tipper performing up at Newcastle. She was particularly good with the children at Seven Stories; she had some of the children up enacting her stories. Gave me lots of ideas!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Storytelling in a school
From: kendall
Date: 23 Jul 06 - 07:32 AM

If you were to tell stories about witches it would give you the chance to tell the truth about them.A bit of education wouldn't hurt the kids, would it?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Storytelling in a school
From: Northerner
Date: 23 Jul 06 - 08:16 AM

Hello Kendall! If I was going to tell the children stories about witches I would check with their teacher first that stories about witches were allowed. I've been told that some schools are not keen on stories about witches.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Storytelling in a school
From: dianavan
Date: 23 Jul 06 - 01:53 PM

Northerner - Not to worry. Children from every culture love stories and oral language is the root of learning to read and write. Young children especially like stories with repetitive or patterned sequences because they can join in once they get the sequence. Don't let this put you off. Encourage them to join in. If they are involved, they are interested.

Sometimes children (especially if they are just learning English) have difficulty listening for long periods of time so if you see them 'zoning out' don't worry, its not boredom but fatigue from trying to understand every word. Props aren't necessary, they'll just want to play with them.

Yes, its a good idea to present a list of stories you would like to tell but what might be a better idea is to ask the teachers what they are presently teaching. Try to fit your stories into their Science and/or Social Studies themes rather than expecting them to prepare lessons to compliment your stories.

Another idea might be to observe the teacher reading a story to the class to see what her behavioural expectations might be, ie: What to do with a fidgety child, a child that 'calls out' frequently, or a child that is bothering another child. Group management can be challenging. If you are speaking to children sitting on the carpet and a childs behaviour is distracting, ask the child to sit next to you. Its easier for them to pay attention.

Don't worry too much about offending parents. If they are offended, they will let you know. You can't please everyone. Just keep in mind that you may have to answer alot of uncomfortable questions from their kids. The best thing is to consider the age group and then present your list of stories to the head master, he will probably send the list to the teachers. He will guide you as to what is appropriate.

Yes, children love animal stories, especially when the animals have human traits, can talk, or wear clothing.

Good luck! Program extensions are always welcome and students are on their best behaviour for guests.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Storytelling in a school
From: Northerner
Date: 23 Jul 06 - 02:49 PM

Thank you dianavan. I'm guessing that there will be a fair bit of trial and error about this. But everyone stands to gain if I can succeed at this. The teachers by having a section of the lesson provided for them, myself if it leads to work eventually, and most especially the children - who love stories!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate
  Share Thread:
More...

Reply to Thread
Subject:  Help
From:
Preview   Automatic Linebreaks   Make a link ("blue clicky")


Mudcat time: 24 November 3:41 PM EST

[ Home ]

All original material is copyright © 1998 by the Mudcat Café Music Foundation, Inc. All photos, music, images, etc. are copyright © by their rightful owners. Every effort is taken to attribute appropriate copyright to images, content, music, etc. We are not a copyright resource.