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Hominy grits and collard greens

ossonflags 02 Jun 05 - 12:28 AM
open mike 02 Jun 05 - 01:03 AM
beardedbruce 02 Jun 05 - 01:06 AM
GUEST,Old Bones 02 Jun 05 - 01:27 AM
Jim Dixon 02 Jun 05 - 02:16 AM
ossonflags 02 Jun 05 - 02:58 AM
open mike 02 Jun 05 - 02:59 AM
JohnInKansas 02 Jun 05 - 03:31 AM
Dave Hanson 02 Jun 05 - 04:14 AM
Rapparee 02 Jun 05 - 09:27 AM
Roger the Skiffler 02 Jun 05 - 09:32 AM
GUEST,MMario 02 Jun 05 - 09:34 AM
GUEST,MMario 02 Jun 05 - 09:49 AM
Kim C 02 Jun 05 - 09:53 AM
wysiwyg 02 Jun 05 - 10:11 AM
jeffp 02 Jun 05 - 10:19 AM
mack/misophist 02 Jun 05 - 10:35 AM
GUEST,MMario 02 Jun 05 - 10:36 AM
Stilly River Sage 02 Jun 05 - 10:49 AM
Azizi 02 Jun 05 - 10:57 AM
GUEST,MMario 02 Jun 05 - 10:57 AM
Azizi 02 Jun 05 - 11:32 AM
GUEST,MMario 02 Jun 05 - 11:45 AM
Azizi 02 Jun 05 - 11:48 AM
Rapparee 02 Jun 05 - 11:56 AM
Sorcha 02 Jun 05 - 12:33 PM
Stilly River Sage 02 Jun 05 - 01:02 PM
GUEST,MMario 02 Jun 05 - 01:25 PM
GUEST 02 Jun 05 - 01:52 PM
GUEST,Bee-dubya-ell 02 Jun 05 - 02:12 PM
GUEST 02 Jun 05 - 02:15 PM
beardedbruce 02 Jun 05 - 03:58 PM
number 6 02 Jun 05 - 04:09 PM
beardedbruce 02 Jun 05 - 04:11 PM
beardedbruce 02 Jun 05 - 04:19 PM
beardedbruce 02 Jun 05 - 05:43 PM
number 6 02 Jun 05 - 11:46 PM
dianavan 03 Jun 05 - 12:19 AM
LadyJean 03 Jun 05 - 12:37 AM
Azizi 03 Jun 05 - 12:55 AM
ossonflags 03 Jun 05 - 03:00 AM
beardedbruce 03 Jun 05 - 04:49 AM
beardedbruce 03 Jun 05 - 04:52 AM
Stilly River Sage 03 Jun 05 - 09:48 AM
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Subject: Hominy grits and Collard greens
From: ossonflags
Date: 02 Jun 05 - 12:28 AM

We have explained to our colonial comrades what are "Bangers"

Could they in return please tell us what "Hominey Grits" and "Collard Greens" are? I believe they are some kind of "Soul Food"

- How do you cook them?
- are they freely available here in the UK?


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Subject: RE: Hominy grits and collard greens
From: open mike
Date: 02 Jun 05 - 01:03 AM

hominy is made from corn which is treated with Lye.
the grits are a ground or granular form of these..
sort of like cream of wheat or hot cereal made of
grain....it looks from a distance like mashed potatoes..
as it is white. but more granular almost like tapioca
pudding. i think it may be served on a plate with
butter and maple syrup.

Hominy is also served whole...corn which because it
is processed it always comes canned as far as i know.

collards are sort of like mustard greens i think.
or Poke Salad, or spinach or chard...i think they
are served steamed.

The combination i remember hearing about is
grits and jowls....
now i suppose you are gonna want to know what
jowls are, or is that what jowls is??

i think it is some part of a pig...
perhaps the jaw bone??

i am not form the south, but these things are
foods often found in the south.

maybe someone will tell us what chitlin's are??
i know it is not "children"
maybe some kind of food....peerhaps it (they?) are fried...


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Subject: RE: Hominy grits and collard greens
From: beardedbruce
Date: 02 Jun 05 - 01:06 AM

(shudder)

Grits are served with butter, salt and pepper, or black-eyed pea gravy.


NOT maple syrup.


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Subject: RE: Hominy grits and collard greens
From: GUEST,Old Bones
Date: 02 Jun 05 - 01:27 AM

Open Mike

If you knew what chitlins were, you'd become vegetarian.They are some part of a pig which any right minded person would leave ina bucket - a bit like tripe!


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Subject: RE: Hominy grits and collard greens
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 02 Jun 05 - 02:16 AM

Wikipedia has several informative articles about soul food:

Black-eyed pea
Chitterlings (chit'lin's)
Collard greens
Cornbread
Grits
Hominy
Okra
Sweet potato


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Subject: RE: Hominy grits and collard greens
From: ossonflags
Date: 02 Jun 05 - 02:58 AM

We can get chittlings !! - with a bit vinegar and white pepper - absolute food of the gods !!! But the only place round here to get them would be Doncaster market.

Aye and nowt wrong with tripe as well, either cooked in milk with lots of uonions and served with mashed spuds and a good dollop of english mustard, or dipped in batter and fried, or eaten in it's natural state with vinegar on top,or beef dripping liberally smeared on hot cakes washed down with pints of tea with sterry milk,it fed generations of us lot and no talk of cholesteral.


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Subject: RE: Hominy grits and collard greens
From: open mike
Date: 02 Jun 05 - 02:59 AM

Gumbo!

and i AM a vegetarian..have been for over 30 years!

since Greg Brown lost his finger in a packing
plant accident...

that's why i don't know too much about hog parts.

i do remember hearing the live stock market reports
on the radio though..Barrows and Gilts...

oink oink


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Subject: RE: Hominy grits and collard greens
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 02 Jun 05 - 03:31 AM

Collard greens are just another leafy veggy (or some say another weed), used much the same way as mustard greens, spinach, turnip greens, etc. Collards are probably closer in flavor to turnip greens than to either mustard or spinach. Prepared without added spices, they're fairly mild in flavor, although some find the flavor a little "odd" if they're used to more conventional leafy stuff.

There are distinct variations in how they're usually prepared, with a canned "Southern Style" widely available in my area that is over-spiced to the exteme. For this particular brand/style, spinach, collards, turnip, mustard, or mixtures of any or all of them are pretty much the same since all you taste is the (same) spices.
If you put them in a colander and run a couple of gallons of water through them you can make them edible, and actually can sometimes detect a "vegetable flavor." Other canned brands are less highly spiced, and to my taste much preferable; but they are less easily found recently.

Authentic Grits are, as has been said, just hominy that's been dried and ground up into something resembling corn meal, and then usually boiled with a little water to serve, sort of like cream of wheat or other hot cereal. The stuff served in many "wannabe Suthern" restaurants is just "corn meal mush." In some areas, the leftovers may be "re-fried" into something vaguely resembling pancakes, and these may be eaten with butter and syrup, like pancakes, by some people. You'll also occasionally find "grit cakes" resembling the little "tater tot" things some chefs like to do to disquise left over mashed - or "riced" - potatoes; packed into little lumps and deep fried or baked. Taste is sort of like a reheated boiled corn muffin(?).

Although it was stated above that grits are white, they can be either white or yellow, depending on what kind of corn they come from and how it was processed, just as you can get yellow or white corn meal.

Chitlins are the intestines of any animal. You have to specify whether you want pig/hog or chicken in my area. Chicken chitlins are probably a little more common and easier to find, but either are available. Hog chitlins, stocked regularly by at least one store here, usually come in five gallon buckets. Traditionally chitlins have been very cheap, but "fad impact" seems to have driven prices up a little.

Favorite chitlin recipes are extremely varied, but the chitlins themselves are almost flavorless, so many recipies include a lot of spices, making it immaterial what "chitlins" taste like.

Chicken chitlins have been a fairly popular fish bait (for catfish) in my area, but the places that sold them for that use just called them "guts." My experience was that they were always more attractive to turtles than to catfish.

John


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Subject: RE: Hominy grits and collard greens
From: Dave Hanson
Date: 02 Jun 05 - 04:14 AM

I'll bet our colonial cousins don't know what a ' growler ' is.


eric


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Subject: RE: Hominy grits and collard greens
From: Rapparee
Date: 02 Jun 05 - 09:27 AM

Hominy is corn which has had the outer hull removed by being soaked in lye solution.

Usually it comes canned, but you also get it dried as "pazole seco" in Mexican markets. If you use the dried stuff you have to soak it overnight. A product called "Corn Nuts" is basically dried and flavored hominy.

Parched corn is wet hominy that's been roasted and dried in a skillet -- it was a staple of mountain men and the American Indian on journeys.

Put some water (or better yet, stock) in a large pot and toss in some chopped pork. While it's coming to a boil, pick and clean some collard greens (or turnip, or whatever). Toss the greens into the pot, cover, and simmer for about 3 hours. Salt and pepper to taste.

And dear God, NEVER put long sweetin' on grits! Redeye gravy, butter, salt 'n' pepper, but never any sweetin'! My lord, they'll KNOW you're a Yankee!


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Subject: RE: Hominy grits and collard greens
From: Roger the Skiffler
Date: 02 Jun 05 - 09:32 AM

"Love his collard greens and hash, crazy 'bout his succotash,
I cain't live without my kitchen man"

RtS
(but shrimples and rice are very nice- hold tight!)


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Subject: RE: Hominy grits and collard greens
From: GUEST,MMario
Date: 02 Jun 05 - 09:34 AM

Collards are a brassica, the same family of plants as broccoli and cauliflower and cabbage and brussels sprouts- but selected for large loose heads of leaves.


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Subject: RE: Hominy grits and collard greens
From: GUEST,MMario
Date: 02 Jun 05 - 09:49 AM

BTW - I agree; you can use sweetnin' on corn meal mush and fried polenta; but grits need something savoury.

Most cornmeal/polenta meal includes at least part of the hull and also many contain the germ of the grain. The taste is "sweeter" - and though not *sweet* per se goes well with either savoury or sweet. The sugars and starches are basically the same in the final product as in the grain.

Part of the process of making hominy (which is then processed into grits) removes the hull and the germ. both the sugars and starches in the kernel also undergoe modification due to the processing. The end result is a product that matches much better with savoury flavours then it does with sweet.

YMMV


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Subject: RE: Hominy grits and collard greens
From: Kim C
Date: 02 Jun 05 - 09:53 AM

Grits and greens. Yum! Especially when served up with some fried catfish, and maybe some sweet potato casserole.


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Subject: RE: Hominy grits and collard greens
From: wysiwyg
Date: 02 Jun 05 - 10:11 AM

Redeye gravy is pan drippings from the bacon or ham or sausage, stock if you have it or water if you don't, and a shot of good strong coffee.

The BEST grits I have had are from a steam table where the initial cooking period in the kitchen was augmented by steaming. Cannot describe the texture accurately, but rich and creamy without losing the grain texture.

Sweet or savory saucing depends on what's being served along with it, and I suspect vary by region.

Grits are somewhat like polenta, if you've ever had that.

Now greens-- there's more than collards for greens.

Soul food? Well, if you are in a northern city you might find a place calling it that, but it's po-folks food first and foremost, and SOUTHERN. It's not primarily a color thing. It's like country blues-- cuts across several cultures.

~Susan


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Subject: RE: Hominy grits and collard greens
From: jeffp
Date: 02 Jun 05 - 10:19 AM

The growler that I'm familiar with is filled with beer.

Same one you got?


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Subject: RE: Hominy grits and collard greens
From: mack/misophist
Date: 02 Jun 05 - 10:35 AM

No one has yet mentioned that the primary flavour of grits is that of a well chewed wad of paper. Before seasoning, of course. The bravest (well, one of the bravest) thing I've ever done was to smile while eating a mess of chitlin's I'd extracted and cleaned myself. Don't ask.


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Subject: RE: Hominy grits and collard greens
From: GUEST,MMario
Date: 02 Jun 05 - 10:36 AM

? chitlins ain't nothing but another word for sausage casings.


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Subject: RE: Hominy grits and collard greens
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 02 Jun 05 - 10:49 AM

My neighbor across the street cooks up greens by first cooking some bacon and leaving the drippings in the pan (or to be more heart healthy, uses a cooking oil) and sautees onions and seasonings, then puts the greens in and lets them wilt down and get stirred around in the oil. She also dices up a turnip and stir frys that in with the greens. They're very good and she serves this with cornbread or corn muffins.

Some greens are better for this method than others. Chard that has gotten big is good (don't use the old tough leaves or they can be kind of bitter) but spinach is so delicate that it doesn't behave in the same way. I also use chard to cut into strips and put in soup and such. I've used chard as the green in a middle eastern lamb and spinach recipe (seasoning and lamb sauteed in olive oil, greens added and turned until they're wilted, then sprinkle in a handful of pine nuts. Serve over rice with yogurt sauce).

SRS


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Subject: RE: Hominy grits and collard greens
From: Azizi
Date: 02 Jun 05 - 10:57 AM

I've had 'Greens' for special dinners {like Thanksgiving, Christmas and some Sunday dinners, and African American funerals} ever since I can remember.

I have NEVER had chittlins, and also never developed a taste for grits.

{Maybe it's because I have no Southern relatives}

"Kale" is the type of greens that I prefer. Often kale and collard greens are mixed together. I don't like turnip greens and spinach-yuck!! In my not so humble opinion, spinach isn't what Black folk mean when we say 'greens'.

Traditionally, people put some kind of pork in the greens to season them, but lately when you go to social events, you usually find that greens are made with turkey instead of pork. Since I am an almost vegetarian, I cook greens without any meat product.

Of course, other salt, pepper, and onions are added while cooking the greens {which really have to be separated and CLEANED before cooking.

Some people put a bit of vinegar on their serving of greens AFTER they are cooked and while they eat them. I have never heard of anyone putting vinegar in greens while they are cooking or in the entire pot of greens. You'd have people on a set with you if you did this. That would be a good way to ruin a pot of greens.

I've read that we {African Americans} overcook our vegetables so long that most of the nutrients are no longer there. Unfortunately, that's probably true.

But with regards to greens, they sure taste good {with potato salad or macaroni and cheese and...well don't get me started...!



Azizi


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Subject: RE: Hominy grits and collard greens
From: GUEST,MMario
Date: 02 Jun 05 - 10:57 AM

now CHARD is basically beet greens, but again, selected for the stem and leaf. There is some evidence that the primary use was originally the stems, rather then root or leaf. even today there are some recipes for chard that use only the stem and leaf rib, others that use only the leaf blade, and some that use both.


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Subject: RE: Hominy grits and collard greens
From: Azizi
Date: 02 Jun 05 - 11:32 AM

On another current thread {Bush/Whopper} folks got to talking about holding a gathering to talk about serious matters. Each person said that they would bring some covered dish. I mentioned that I would bring some sweet potato pies.

Robomatic asked about the difference between yams and sweet potato pies and also asked me to share my recipe for sweet potato pie. Since there is a link here {up thread} for sweet potatos, I'll refer Robomatic {and any others} to that online site.

Re: my recipe for sweet potato pie: I confess that I don't use fresh sweet potatos, but take the easy way out and use a large store bought can of sweet potatos. And I will further confess that I was taught to make sweet potato pies from a woman who used an improvised Betty Crocker recipe for pumpkin pie.

Here's that recipe:

Prepare pastry for a 9 inch one crust pie

2 eggs
i can {1 pound of pummkin {2 cups}
1 cup of sugar
1 'dash' of salt
1 teaspoon of cinnamon
1 teaspoon of allspice *
1 2/3 of evaporated milk or light cream

* the recipe for pumpkin pie calls for 1 teaspoon of cloves and 1 teaspoon of ginger instead of the 1 teaspoon of allspice. I don't add cloves and ginger, but you might like it this way ...

And I don't measure a teaspoon of the spices, but just go by taste.   

Heat oven to 425 degrees. Prepare pastry. Beat egge slighty with a rotary beater, beat in remaining ingredients. Pour into the pastry lined pie pan.

Bake 15 minutes. Reduce oven temperature to 350 degrees. Bake for 35 minutes longer or until a knive inserted in the center comes out clean.

Let cool.

This can be served with whipped cream {though I usually don't}.

****

Also see these two online recipes for sweet potato pie. The first one is from a John Lee Hooker music website, which I thought was very fitting for a Mudcat thread...

Sweet Potato Pie Recipe 1

Sweet Potato Pie Recipe 2


Enjoy!


Azizi


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Subject: RE: Hominy grits and collard greens
From: GUEST,MMario
Date: 02 Jun 05 - 11:45 AM

in the US people usually distinguish between yams and sweet potatos by colour; but BOTANICALLY they are all sweet potatoes. a true yam is a very different beastie - of OLD WORLD origin rather then NEW WORLD, woodier, starchier.


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Subject: RE: Hominy grits and collard greens
From: Azizi
Date: 02 Jun 05 - 11:48 AM

Hmm, well the 2nd recipe for sweet potato pie is from that John Lee Hooker site.

There's alot of other recipes for sweet potato pie online.

Like baked macaroni and cheese and potato salad, no person's sweet potato pie taste exactly the same as another person's.


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Subject: RE: Hominy grits and collard greens
From: Rapparee
Date: 02 Jun 05 - 11:56 AM

Now, you can either dig up or sometimes buy dandelion greens. Wash them and pick 'em over. While that is going on, fry up some bacon ends with onions. When the bacon is crisp and the fat in the pan, add vinegar and sugar to make a sort of sweet and sour sauce -- thin it with water if you want. Now toss in the dandelion greens and cook 'em 'til they wilt, stirring them around as they cook. You can do this with endive, too.

Kale, collards, turnip greens, dandelion dug from the front yard, spinach, mustard greens -- they're poor folk food and color doesn't matter. They're also delicious and very healthy.

Fiddleheads in butter are also great....


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Subject: RE: Hominy grits and collard greens
From: Sorcha
Date: 02 Jun 05 - 12:33 PM

I got all excited a few weeks ago. Restaruant in Ft Collins had grits on the menu! I ordered them.....well, it was a dissapointment. Consistency was like soup. Oh well.


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Subject: RE: Hominy grits and collard greens
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 02 Jun 05 - 01:02 PM

MMario, I use the chard stems in place of celery regularly. It's great in soups and stir frys.

SRS


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Subject: RE: Hominy grits and collard greens
From: GUEST,MMario
Date: 02 Jun 05 - 01:25 PM

It's not too shabby steamed and served with hollandaise, either.


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Subject: RE: Hominy grits and collard greens
From: GUEST
Date: 02 Jun 05 - 01:52 PM

Beardedbruce: Pray tell, what is Black-Eyed Pea gravy? Is that the liquid that results from boiling the peas?

DougR


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Subject: RE: Hominy grits and collard greens
From: GUEST,Bee-dubya-ell
Date: 02 Jun 05 - 02:12 PM

Collards, as MMario pointed out, are of the brassica (cabbage) family. Of all cultivated brassicas, collards are the most "primitive", meaning that they most closely resemble the wild ancestor of our modern cabbage family crops. They are particularly well-adapted to the southern US climate, being more heat-tolerant and disease-resistant than most brassicas. They are usually planted in the fall and grown over the winter for an early spring main crop. Home gardeners usually pick individual leaves from several plants instead of harvesting entire plants, which provides a longer harvest.

Here's how I cook 'em: Chop up a few slices of bacon and cook them in a large pot to release the magic ingredient, bacon grease. While the bacon is cooking, remove the tough central leaf vein from the collards. When the bacon grease is ready, wash the collard leaves and toss 'em, still wet, into the pot. That should provide all the water you'll need to steam 'em well. As you cook them, they'll turn a bright green (from the heat causing cell walls to rupture which releases chlorophyl) and then fade to a more subdued color. I turn the heat off at that point. They're still a bit crunchy, but that's how I like 'em. Cook 'em longer if you like collard mush.


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Subject: RE: Hominy grits and collard greens
From: GUEST
Date: 02 Jun 05 - 02:15 PM

They're still a bit crunchy, but that's how I like 'em

HERESY!

*grin* I've seen recipes that ask you to simmer them for 4 or 5 hours.


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Subject: RE: Hominy grits and collard greens
From: beardedbruce
Date: 02 Jun 05 - 03:58 PM

one recipe...

Red Pepper Black-Eyed Pea Gravy Recipe courtesy B. Smith



Recipe Summary
Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 25 minutes
Yield: 2 cups
User Rating: No Rating




1 tablespoon vegetable oil
1/2 cup shallots (approximately 4 shallots), finely chopped
3 tablespoons red wine
3/4 teaspoon Hungarian hot paprika
3/4 teaspoon Creole seasoning
2 tablespoons clam juice
1/2 cup chicken stock
1 (15-ounce) can black-eyed peas, rinsed and drained
2 bay leaves
2 large red bell peppers, roasted, skin removed
Chopped parsley, for garnish

In a saute pan, heat oil over medium heat. Add shallots and saute for 3 to 4 minutes until soft. Add red wine, paprika, and Creole seasoning. Cook a few minutes until wine has evaporated. Add the clam juice and 1/4 cup chicken stock, black-eyed peas and bay leaves. Bring to a boil and simmer. In a food processor, blend roasted peppers and remaining 1/4 cup chicken stock. Add the peppers; cook 5 minutes longer stirring occasionally. Remove bay leaves, adjust seasoning to taste. Garnish with chopped parsley. Serve warm.


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Subject: RE: Hominy grits and collard greens
From: number 6
Date: 02 Jun 05 - 04:09 PM

I first had grits with catfish smothered in hot sauce when I was in Vicksburg Mississippi a few years ago. Excellent, one of the most memorable meals I ever had!

Can't get grits here in the Maritimes. Brought back some from Atlanta last year .. greatly dissappointed when I opened the box and found weevils in it.

sIx


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Subject: RE: Hominy grits and collard greens
From: beardedbruce
Date: 02 Jun 05 - 04:11 PM

better with leeks, though...


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Subject: RE: Hominy grits and collard greens
From: beardedbruce
Date: 02 Jun 05 - 04:19 PM

sorry, number 6- crossposted. My comment was about my previous post...


Should we send you some grits? PM me an address, and we will see what we can do.


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Subject: RE: Hominy grits and collard greens
From: beardedbruce
Date: 02 Jun 05 - 05:43 PM

To expand on my last post here,


Is there a need/desire/interest in the exchange of regional/national foods between mudcatters? I know shipping costs can be unreasonable, but perhaps...

Can we use the baggage of Getaway bound people to transfer items between countries? I think the cost for an additional bag is a lot less than the cost to ship that weight. Just an idea- Shall we discuss this?

8-{E


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Subject: RE: Hominy grits and collard greens
From: number 6
Date: 02 Jun 05 - 11:46 PM

Sounds like a good idea 'the regional/national food exchange' beardedbruce.

All possible ways in transfering these items between countries sounds like it could be something to discuss.

sIx


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Subject: RE: Hominy grits and collard greens
From: dianavan
Date: 03 Jun 05 - 12:19 AM

Collard greens are the best!

Part of the trick is removing the green from the rib and then slicing them into thin strips. The next step is to chop the bacon and onions and fry them up. Then add the collards and a little water. Steam until soft (about 7-10 minutes).

I love collards and beans and cornbread. And yes - top it off with sweet potato pie (add a little cardamon to the spicing for a nice surprise).

Swiss chard, collards and kale get me through the winter. Easy to grow and they seed themselves. I also discovered a Japanese green called Mizuma that is a terrific early Spring treat.


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Subject: RE: Hominy grits and collard greens
From: LadyJean
Date: 03 Jun 05 - 12:37 AM

My mother was descended from southerners who opposed slavery, and lit out for Ohio, which has always been free territory at the beginning of the nineteenth century.
She served grits for supper, much as one would serve mashed potatoes. They went with chicken or pot roast, and lots and lots of gravy. It came as a bit of a shock the first time I saw grits on a breakfast menu.
Mother had an Austrian exchange student doing some work for her, early in her marriage. She asked the girl if she'd like to stay for supper one night, and asked her if she liked grits. The girl said with horror, "You mean gritzen! Like the farmers eat!"
A Jewish lady we knew went to Williamsburg. She brought me back a strange food that they used to eat in colonial times, that she suggested I could try to cook.
One of the first things I learned to cook was Williamsburg grits.
BLESS YOU Azzizi for posting sweet potato pie recipes. I do love it. The best sweet potato pie I know comes from the Stoop and Bend garden club at the May Market in Mellon Park. I work there every year dipping strawberries for my mother's old garden club. I will be delighted to tell you how it's done if you're interested.


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Subject: RE: Hominy grits and collard greens
From: Azizi
Date: 03 Jun 05 - 12:55 AM

Greetings, Lady Jean!

You wrote:

"The best sweet potato pie I know comes from the Stoop and Bend garden club at the May Market in Mellon Park. I work there every year dipping strawberries for my mother's old garden club. I will be delighted to tell you how it's done if you're interested."

-snip-

Being a 'fellow' Pittsburgher, I know Mellon Park, but Ive never heard of the May Market. Please share more information with me {and others} here about that market, the pie recipe, and what you mean by "dipping strawberries".

Thanks!!

Azizi


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Subject: RE: Hominy grits and collard greens
From: ossonflags
Date: 03 Jun 05 - 03:00 AM

Well I did stir up a mess o' chittlins did'nt I? thanks to every one who contributed you have certainly given me some ideas for my next little candlelit supper.


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Subject: RE: Hominy grits and collard greens
From: beardedbruce
Date: 03 Jun 05 - 04:49 AM

another good grits recipe- with shrimp. Close to what the local N'orleans place serves.

Shrimp and Grits Recipe
From Diana Rattray,



Shrimp and grits, with shrimp, cooked grits, and bacon and tomatoes.
INGREDIENTS:

2 to 3 slices bacon
grits, for 4 to 6 people
1 to 1 1/2 pounds shrimp
1 small onion, finely minced
1 can (14.5 ounces) crushed tomatoes with juice
1/2 teaspoon ground cayenne pepper, or to taste

PREPARATION:

Cook 2-3 slices bacon until done but still tender, set aside. Prepare grits per directions, adding a small finely minced onion before starting cook time, clean shrimp, when grits are almost done, chop shrimp into halfs, crumble up bacon and toss both into grits. Continue cooking until grits are ready. Add crushed tomatoes (juice and all), then add hot pepper.
I serve this with scrambled eggs and hash browns.


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Subject: RE: Hominy grits and collard greens
From: beardedbruce
Date: 03 Jun 05 - 04:52 AM

and the basic recipe, for plain grits.


If your family likes grits but every time you cook them they come out either too watery or too dry and gritty, try this recipe. If you follow the recipe exactly, you will end up with a pot full of perfect tasting grits.



4 cups of water

1 cup of grits

1 heaping tablespoon of butter or margarine

˝ teaspoon of salt



Use a 2-3 quart pot that has a lid.

Add the water, salt and butter to the pot, cover with the lid and bring the water to a boiling roll.

Watch the pot carefully because it will begin boiling quickly with the lid on.

Once the water, salt and butter mixture is boiling add the grits.

Carefully stir the grits breaking any clumps apart that may have formed when you added the grits.

Boil hard for 2-3 minutes, carefully stir the grits and then reduce the heat to low.

Place the lid back on the pot and continue cooking on very low heat.

Stir and check the grits often so that they do not stick to the bottom of the pot.

When the grits are becoming thick, not runny or soupy anymore, about 10 minutes or so, shut the heat off, stir the grits and set the pot of grits off to the side.

Add another tablespoon of butter or margarine to the top of the grits, do not stir the butter in, place the lid back on and leave the grits alone.

Leave the grits undisturbed for 5 to 10 minutes.

When you are ready to serve the grits, blend in that last tablespoon of butter you placed on top of the grits earlier that is now laying all across the top of the grits.


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Subject: RE: Hominy grits and collard greens
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 03 Jun 05 - 09:48 AM

I usually refer to this not as brassica but by the larger group cruciferous because the mustard family contains all of these plus broccoli, cauliflower, kale, etc. And the entire genus is considered to have cancer-fighting properties.

SRS


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