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Folklore: Australian magazine online

Valda 21 Aug 03 - 01:01 AM
Billy the Bus 21 Aug 03 - 02:22 AM
Margret RoadKnight 21 Aug 03 - 02:28 AM
Bob Bolton 21 Aug 03 - 02:36 AM
Valda 21 Aug 03 - 03:05 AM
GUEST,Q 21 Aug 03 - 01:13 PM
Kevin Sheils 21 Aug 03 - 01:40 PM
GUEST,Q 21 Aug 03 - 02:01 PM
Margret RoadKnight 22 Aug 03 - 02:22 AM
Kevin Sheils 22 Aug 03 - 05:12 AM
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Subject: Folklore: Australian magazine online
From: Valda
Date: 21 Aug 03 - 01:01 AM

Thought Mudcatters may be interested in this online magazine.
ISSUE 7 of SIMPLY AUSTRALIA is online.

Included are articles on:
- the bushranger Ned Kelly
- Sally Sloane
- North Sydney - documenting childhood through song
- Harry Peckman and the Folk Process
- Belcher Dicks (grandfather of Harry Dicks)
- Irish Australian Flag
- Paul Taylor building bridges of understanding between cultures through music
- Songs and Stories of Australia looks at ghosts and other superstitions

... and there are poems, songs, letters and more.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Australian magazine online
From: Billy the Bus
Date: 21 Aug 03 - 02:22 AM

Pleased to see they include Lawson's "Lights of Cobb & Co" - Cheers - Sam


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Australian magazine online
From: Margret RoadKnight
Date: 21 Aug 03 - 02:28 AM

Great resource.
Thanks Valda


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Australian magazine online
From: Bob Bolton
Date: 21 Aug 03 - 02:36 AM

G'day,
Valda: I have just been mentioning this issue privately to a couple of cyber-friends on MudCat!

Your article on Sally Sloane has some great new information and really 'fleshes out' this great singer and musician. I'll have a draft version of Gay Scott & Dale Dengate's Sally Sloane Songbook up and circulating sometime next week (and must remember to include you in the loop!).

BtB/Sam: Lights of Cobb & Co is firmly in my repertoire - and the songs taught at my Monday Night Music Workshop, at the Bush Music Club. However, we do the tune the way it was modified by the Bush Music Club Concerty party ... or even the original 1952 to 1957 Bushwhackers Band.

The tune is melodically Smoky's ... but the rhythm has a 'synchopated' style, compared to his 'flat' 4/4 (probably courtesy of John Meredith's reworking) - and the verses are somewhat edited for clarity ... and the song is trimmed to a length acceptable to modern audiences!

Regards,

Bob Bolton


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Australian magazine online
From: Valda
Date: 21 Aug 03 - 03:05 AM

I'm glad you like the mag, Margret. Thanks. An article on you would be good in a future issue!

Lawson's poem is a good one, isn't it? We included it because Sally's father and grandfather were coach drivers.

Thanks Bob, I'm glad you have been able to get on with Gay Scott's book. I'd really appreciate being kept informed of its progress. I just didn't have the time to do it as I seemed to head down a totally different path researching Sally Sloane herself rather than the songs she sang. She had an interesting past! I didn't include everything in the artcle ;)


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Australian magazine online
From: GUEST,Q
Date: 21 Aug 03 - 01:13 PM

Thanks for the link. Great source of information. I had seen an earlier issue, but the Archives link fills in what I had missed.

Thread creep on one of the articles- The suggested source of "clink" is probably fakelore. The term "in the clink" already had appeared in print in 1515 and is earlier than the prison.
Barclay, 1515: "Then art thou clapped in the flete or the clinke."
The OED discusses the Clink prison at Southwark, but suggests that the phrase came from the sound rather than the famous prison.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Australian magazine online
From: Kevin Sheils
Date: 21 Aug 03 - 01:40 PM

Not sure where your clink info comes from Q but according to the BBC web site here the prison certainly predates your 1515 quote. hers's an extract from the site for those not wishing to read it all

The Clink Prison Museum is built on the foundations of one of the original prisons owned by the Bishop of Winchester. It is thought it got its name from the clinking of the manacles, fetters, chains and bolts that were used there. It was also the origin of the phrase "In the Clink", to mean in prison.

A short history

There has been a prison owned by the Bishop of Winchester in one form or another since the year 860, although at that time it would only have been one cell in a priests college. By 1076 an Archbishop had listed the type of punishments allowed, scourging with rods, solitary confinement, and bread and water in silence.

The building of a chapel and mansion at Southwark was begun in 1107 by the then current Bishop of Winchester, but was not completed until 1144, by his successor. There were two prisons included, one for men and one for women. It would have been a good source of income for the Bishop, as it was about this time that the whorehouses1 were regulated, bringing in plenty of fines and customers. The whorehouses were closed, reopened, moved and used throughout the life of the Clink, bringing in prisoners at a fairly steady rate. By 1180 the land was owned outright by the Clink prison.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Australian magazine online
From: GUEST,Q
Date: 21 Aug 03 - 02:01 PM

The OED is the source for the suggestion that the term didn't come from the prison. I had in my mind that the term Clink was applied to the prison in the 16th c., but this site says the name has been found in use in 1473 (no source given). That is earlier than the OED quote. I dunno!
Southwerk
www.aaron.atte.southwerk.mcmail.com/AaronFrames/hyst7.htm


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Australian magazine online
From: Margret RoadKnight
Date: 22 Aug 03 - 02:22 AM

Valda,
Happy to be an interviewee..... over to you for when/ where/ how/ who??
Best wishes
Margret


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Australian magazine online
From: Kevin Sheils
Date: 22 Aug 03 - 05:12 AM

You can't trust those Oxford Schloars Q ;-)

The BBC link I gave, actually in the Douglas Adams HHGTTG area of the BBC site, and your link certainly both suggest the prison existed earlier than the Barclay 1515 Quote given above. Certainly the Barclay Quote seems to refer to 2 prisons, Fleet and Clink, in existence at that time. I don't have an OED handy.

That's probably enough thread drift here. This is supposed to be about the Australian online magazine so I'd better have a look at that site....


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