mudcat.org: Review: A Mighty Wind
Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafeawe

Post to this Thread - Printer Friendly - Home
Page: [1] [2] [3] [4]


Review: A Mighty Wind

Related threads:
A Mighty Wind on DVD (77)
Unwigged & Unplugged tour(Spinal Tap-Mighty Wind) (13)
'A Mighty Wind' on Irish TV tonight TG4 (54)
a mighty wind - the film (13)
Folk Music On PBS (179)
Spoof folk documentary (6) (closed)
Review: A Mighty Wind Poll (65)
Review: A Mighty Petomane (17) (closed)
BS: 'It's a Mighty Wind' (5) (closed)
Christopher Guest Film 'A Mighty Wind' (53)


Art Thieme 13 Apr 03 - 09:51 PM
Rick Fielding 13 Apr 03 - 10:16 PM
Muskrat 13 Apr 03 - 11:02 PM
GUEST 16 Apr 03 - 10:37 PM
Amos 16 Apr 03 - 11:17 PM
Peter T. 17 Apr 03 - 08:34 AM
catspaw49 17 Apr 03 - 08:39 AM
Steve Latimer 17 Apr 03 - 08:55 AM
catspaw49 17 Apr 03 - 09:08 AM
Steve Latimer 17 Apr 03 - 09:22 AM
Little Hawk 17 Apr 03 - 10:08 AM
PoppaGator 17 Apr 03 - 10:36 AM
open mike 18 Apr 03 - 01:51 PM
Charley Noble 18 Apr 03 - 04:00 PM
denise:^) 18 Apr 03 - 11:30 PM
GUEST 19 Apr 03 - 09:40 AM
JJ 21 Apr 03 - 08:49 AM
Charley Noble 21 Apr 03 - 08:59 AM
Frankham 21 Apr 03 - 12:05 PM
Peg 21 Apr 03 - 12:29 PM
catspaw49 21 Apr 03 - 03:54 PM
voyager 21 Apr 03 - 05:28 PM
Frankham 21 Apr 03 - 06:51 PM
Melani 21 Apr 03 - 10:36 PM
JJ 22 Apr 03 - 08:51 AM
Steve-o 22 Apr 03 - 12:55 PM
catspaw49 25 Apr 03 - 05:07 PM
WFDU - Ron Olesko 25 Apr 03 - 07:37 PM
JJ 26 Apr 03 - 08:26 AM
GUEST,John Bauman 26 Apr 03 - 04:46 PM
Amos 28 Apr 03 - 02:53 AM
Frankham 28 Apr 03 - 09:53 AM
denise:^) 28 Apr 03 - 12:23 PM
Amos 28 Apr 03 - 12:30 PM
Nerd 28 Apr 03 - 03:49 PM
Nerd 29 Apr 03 - 03:54 AM
WFDU - Ron Olesko 29 Apr 03 - 06:45 PM
reggie miles 29 Apr 03 - 09:25 PM
DonMeixner 09 May 03 - 09:53 PM
Nerd 10 May 03 - 01:11 AM
Mark Cohen 10 May 03 - 08:29 PM
catspaw49 10 May 03 - 09:54 PM
Stilly River Sage 10 May 03 - 11:08 PM
Mark Cohen 10 May 03 - 11:30 PM
WFDU - Ron Olesko 11 May 03 - 12:50 AM
Mark Cohen 11 May 03 - 01:18 AM
Charley Noble 11 May 03 - 11:22 AM
Steve Latimer 11 May 03 - 10:17 PM
Melani 12 May 03 - 12:57 AM
Amos 12 May 03 - 01:48 AM
Share Thread
more
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:






Subject: RE: Review: A Mighty Wind
From: Art Thieme
Date: 13 Apr 03 - 09:51 PM

If ya don't have a sense of humor, it isn't funny.

;-)

Art Thieme


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Review: A Mighty Wind
From: Rick Fielding
Date: 13 Apr 03 - 10:16 PM

Sadly, I have to agree that so many of my folk friends over the years DON'T have (what I'd call) a good sense of humour. Deadly sincere....especially the most political folks. I'm political as well, but Jeez, there is SO MUCH IN OUR LITTLE WORLD NOT TO TAKE SERIOUSLY!

(but Seriously folks), when you go to a Festival and see "Les Barker's" name on the bill, do you not smile a bit, knowing what's in store?

Cheers

Rick


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Review: A Mighty Wind
From: Muskrat
Date: 13 Apr 03 - 11:02 PM

I don't want to use language that would upset any Mudcatters, but Hajdu's head is stuck so far up...somewhere it's dark as a dungeon.

Not only is he a humorless twit, he clearly doesn't understand what's going on. Didn't in the Farina/Dylan book, either. Maybe he was better on Billy Strayhorn (haven't read that one), but somehow I doubt it.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Review: A Mighty Wind
From: GUEST
Date: 16 Apr 03 - 10:37 PM

refresh


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Review: A Mighty Wind
From: Amos
Date: 16 Apr 03 - 11:17 PM

I seriously expect this to be a hoot and a half-enanny.

As for folkies having no sense of humor, all I can say is this guy has been talking to the wrong folkies!    The position is just untenable by anyone who has skimmed through the threads in our archives here.



A


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Review: A Mighty Wind
From: Peter T.
Date: 17 Apr 03 - 08:34 AM

I really wanted to like this film a lot, but came away from it thinking it was undercooked -- about half a movie. There was so much they could have done with the idea, but really didn't. Many of the Mudcatters here could have written a funnier take on the folk scare. The nicest folkie touch in the film was the brief parody of the backyard scene in the Weavers reunion film. Some of the other kooky bits were funny (Fred and Sure-Florence). (The weird song at the end of the credits, by which time I was the only person in the theatre, was pretty good too). Not remotely in the league of Spinal Tap.

yours, Peter T.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Review: A Mighty Wind
From: catspaw49
Date: 17 Apr 03 - 08:39 AM

Two entirely different takes between Peter and Rick!! Well alright.....good to hear the diversity!

Personal opinion.......Spinal Tap isn't nearly as good as "Best in Show".......so I'm now more anxious to see this one!

Spaw


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Review: A Mighty Wind
From: Steve Latimer
Date: 17 Apr 03 - 08:55 AM

'Spaw,

I can't agree with you on BIS being better than Spinal Tap. Then again, I'm younger than you, I spent my teen years surrounded by "Jimmy Page is God" guys. Guest & crew, absolutely nailed those bands. Nigel Tufnell is one of my all time favourite characters. I just found that there were way more classic lines in Tap. "You can't really dust for vomit", "there's too much dobly", "no, you can't touch it, don't even look at it", "just kick my ass", "of course we have top billing, we're on with a f@#&ing Puppet show", "Hello Cleveland", and of course "this one goes to eleven".

The visuals too, Derek getting stuck in the pod, Nigel on his knees leaning back playing his solo and getting stuck and my absolute favorite, Nigels parody of Jimmy Page's use of a violin bow. Nigel is playing his awful solo, grabs the violin and uses it as a bow on his Strat, then tunes one of the violin strings before doing it again. The first time I saw that seen I almost wet myself laughing.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Review: A Mighty Wind
From: catspaw49
Date: 17 Apr 03 - 09:08 AM

Could be Steve. And also, I'm a "Doggie Person" and grew up going to shows with my Dad. (BTW, didja' know the Weimaraner in BIS is the sister of what was then the top Weim in Canada?) I think too that the characters in BIS were more diverse which would only be natural....a broader cross section. It too had it's share of lines....."We could talk or not talk for hours and still find things to not talk about."

What the hell....I loved them both...and all three.....and I figure I'll love this one too.

Spaw


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Review: A Mighty Wind
From: Steve Latimer
Date: 17 Apr 03 - 09:22 AM

'Spaw,

I did not know that. I was closer to the bad metal band scene, and I have a sister who is an actress, I have gone to all of her plays since she studied Drama in University. I have met so many of the characters from Guffman. I will give BIS another shot, but you being a dog person would get a lot of stuff that I wouldn't.

Funny, I was still playing junior hockey when Slapshot came out, everyone was raving about it. I remember thinking, "Yeah, so?" the first time I saw it. I had seen pretty much everything in the movie in real life. It wasn't until I saw it again many years after I had stopped playing competetive hockey that I really got that they did a great job capturing the wackiness of hockey players, both on and off the ice.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Review: A Mighty Wind
From: Little Hawk
Date: 17 Apr 03 - 10:08 AM

Oh! Oh! Oh!

Sounds great, but it cannot possibly surpass Spinal Tap. Nigel Tufnel remains the most classically hilarious music icon of all time, and there's SOOOOO much to make fun of in heavy metal/progressive rock.

Now that early, early 60's folk stuff (Kingston Trio, Weavers, and all those types of groups...guys in geeky suits, playing guitar & banjo)...well, you know I was really tired of that routine by the time 1963 rolled around, if not sooner. I was rescued by Joan Baez, Buffy Sainte-Marie, and Bob Dylan and carried breathlessly into the glorious realms of NEWLY written songs by totally original young people who actually had something to say about modern life, rather than just rhapsodizing over Uncle Charlie's bentwood rocker for the 800th time. Yeah! We were walking through the Gates of Eden into a social revolution.

Thank Dylan, above all others, for that.

I did like Ian & Sylvia a lot, and I remain quite respectful of the Weavers.

I look forward a lot to seeing this movie.

- LH


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Review: A Mighty Wind
From: PoppaGator
Date: 17 Apr 03 - 10:36 AM

That hoky folk scene of the Kingston Trio era was pretty bad, all right, and an easy enough mark for satire. However, embarrassing though it may be, I have to admit that I got caught up in it at the time. I think the same must be true of *many* of us, at least those of a certain age, in the US if not elsewhere.

It wasn't long at all before I moved on to an appreciation of more "authentic" and perhaps less immediately accessibly musical traditions. However, the showbiz hootenanny phenomenon, lame though it may have been, provided multitudes with an introduction to a wide spectrum of musical traditions, which in turn led to exposure to various unfamiliar political viewpoints and unconventional cultures. All in all, a positive development.

Don't ask me why and how it suddendly burst into promience, and then just as quickly was so widely rejected in favor of the several "better," deeper, more honest musical forms to which it served as a precursor. It's a mystery, which makes a rich background for the laughs that "GUEST" [sic] et. al. are sure to provide when "Wind" finally comes too a theater near each of us.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Review: A Mighty Wind
From: open mike
Date: 18 Apr 03 - 01:51 PM

hope to see this soon-
refreshing this thread to keep both
mighty wind threads together at the top!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Review: A Mighty Wind
From: Charley Noble
Date: 18 Apr 03 - 04:00 PM

Sure, we'll get one day, at least, to see this film here in Maine in about a year. I can hardly wait. In the meantime there's always another action/murder/rape/whatever film to watch.

Charley Noble


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Review: A Mighty Wind
From: denise:^)
Date: 18 Apr 03 - 11:30 PM

I hear you, Charley--
I'm trying to keep my eyes open here in Michigan, too, so it doesn't come and go before I find out where it is!

Denise:^)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Review: A Mighty Wind
From: GUEST
Date: 19 Apr 03 - 09:40 AM

My recommendation is to wait until it comes out on video/DVD. It is one of those films I wanted to see, but was disappointing, hence I felt robbed for paying $8.00 to see it, when I could have it for less than half that price when it gets released (which from the way it is bombing at the box office, will be soon) on video.

I think Spinal Tap, Best in Show, and Waiting for Guffman were all about equally good. A Mighty Wind isn't on a par with those three films, IMO.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Review: A Mighty Wind
From: JJ
Date: 21 Apr 03 - 08:49 AM

After seeing A MIGHTY WIND I went over to Rotten Tomatoes to check out the reviews. Most of them were favorable but clueless. A lot of people thought Mitch and Mickey were Sonny and Cher. One compared the Folksmen to the Chad Mitchell Trio, "only more political," which is wrong in so many ways I won't even go into it.

One mentioned that Ed Begley Jr.'s character was Swedish, with a penchant for dropping phrases in a foreign language into his conversation. Yes, that foreign language is Yiddish, and if you don't get the joke, go order a pastrami on Wonder Bread.

Another thought it was howlingly funny that the venue should be named "Town Hall," a brilliant stroke of satire. Uhh, Town Hall's a real place, 123 W. 43rd St., NYC. (Although the interiors in the film were shot at the Orpheum in LA, I believe.)

Most of the reviewers took it for granted that there was no more folk music of any sort being done anywhere, although one allowed that occasionally one of the old-timers would release a CD. I, on the other hand, was dumbfounded to find myself in a theatre in New York City with so many young people in the audience, even though they didn't laugh at Ramblin' Sandy Pitnick.

For those who enjoyed it, visit the website: http://amightywindonline.warnerbros.com/index.php

This features bios, album covers and lyrics, plus music and video clips. I was unable to appreciate the true awful genius of the lyrics without reading them.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Review: A Mighty Wind
From: Charley Noble
Date: 21 Apr 03 - 08:59 AM

Maybe I missed the whole point of The Songcatcher. Was it also supposed to be a satire?

Well, I might as well wait for the video/DVD. That's the only way I ever got to see Cold Comfort Farm, based on a wonderful 1920's satirical book by Stella Gibbons.

Charley Noble


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Review: A Mighty Wind
From: Frankham
Date: 21 Apr 03 - 12:05 PM

We saw it yesterday. It brought back memories of The New Christy Minstrels,(early John Denver)(Barry McGuire) Back Porch Majority, Serendipity Singers, Rooftop Singers (yes there was a little sendup in there with the 12 string), Limelighters, KT, Up With People, Brothers Four and a look-alike for Peter Yarrow and Bob Gibson in the Folksmen. Ramblin Sandy Pitnick was there. I have actually heard the diatribe against "commercialism" by one of these types of groups.

I disagree with the reviewer for the NY Times. There was a great political sendup in that Randy Sparks et. al. including many of the folk icons were not political in the least. They were show biz figures who found a way to the market. That was one of the points of the movie. Even "Kwinto"(quinto for Fifth Brigade)by the "historian" in the Folksmen drawn from the Spanish Civil War made that point cleanly.

One hilarious moment is when the Main Street Singers do an intense pseudo-Lonesome Travler type song and end up with the major chord (a hoky arrangment device used ad nauseum in those days) had me on the floor.

Mitch and Mickey were composite Roman-a-clefs which it would not be prudent for me to mention. They were very touching in their innocence. The cult-like call of the performers to the stage to see if Mitch and Mickey would kiss at the end reminds me of the nonsensical discussions people would have in Cambridge about Joan Baez's love life. The question offered in those days was "does Joan really know love?"

There was a peculiar little magazine in the Fifties (a throwaway mimeod thing) called Gardy-Loo floating around the streets of Greenwich Village Washington Square that had a gossipy quality not unlike the mindless banter in the movie groups' rehearsals. I think the film makers did their research well. They might have been there.

I remember Randy Sparks' Ledbetters in LA as well as Doug Westons' Troubador where I was an erstwhile musical consultant for an ill- fated group called the Men which later shrivelled into the Association. I remember a squeaky clean John Denver in the New Christy Minstrels. Irving Steinbloom might have been a sanitized version of the late Al Grossman or a sendup of Harold Leventhal (though both were and are more astute music people then Steinbloom and family. The stage set with it's significant Arch at Washington Square was a nice touch.

There was the obligatory scholar who gave his bearded erudition on the folk scene as well.

The movie caught the innocence of that time. The obligatory reunion concert says much for the drippy nostalgia that many "folkies" have.
There was no malice in the movie though, which I respected. The lyrics for the send-up songs were quite clever. They had a kind of banality that one even hears today in the guise of "folk music". I love this mis-appropriated bad rhyme scheme of "e-qual-i-tee" in the song Mighty Wind.

It seemed to me that I had met all of those people personally in my travels from LA to NY to Boston to Chicago. Love to get my friend Erik Darling's take on the movie since he was a part of that scene for a while with the Tarriers and the Rooftops. The movie could have used Al Arkin who could have put a great comic edge into it.

The picture is a "hoot" in every sense of the word. I liked the audience animal calls lead by the songleading Folksmen. They weren't as funny as Lou Gottlieb, though. i remember Lou's take on the "autonomous C chord". He spoofed himself and the pop-folkie revival while he was taking part in it.

All in all, it was fun. Not as satirical as it could have been had they consulted above mentioned people such as Arkin, Darling and some others. Will Holt, Jean Raskin and others could have added a touch or two. Actually, the practitioners of the commercial folkie scene could have added their own touches. Trav Edmondsen could give them some funny stuff.

They could have Alan Lomax's drunken ranting and raving at Bud and Trav at the Village Gate or Alan and Al Grossman wrestling at Newport like folk sumi wrestlers over the amplification of Paul Butterfield. But these are topics for another film. Maybe they should have a sequel. I'd go. It was Positively Fourth Street.

Frank Hamilton


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Review: A Mighty Wind
From: Peg
Date: 21 Apr 03 - 12:29 PM

thanks Frank for all that wonderful "insider" information!

I had thought of "Up With People" when confronted with he new main Street Singers too...

I think one reason there are mixed reviews about this is that a lot of critics simply may not be familiar with this particular segment of the "folk scene." (I know I'm not, but didn't try to pretend I was in my review either).

I remember the early buzz about this film and people were speculating about which artists wuld be spoofed and for the most part were thinking of people like the Guthries, the Seegers, Leadbelly, Doc watson, Dylan, Baez, Joni Mithcell, Crosby, Stills and Nash, etc. But this bland and white-bready sort of folk, as non-political as one can get, that is sent up in the film, does not have quite the familiarity of the folk-rock stuff...so I also think people who are lukewarm abotu it were expecting something rather different than what they got.

I would agree the humor is not as accessible and universal as Best in Show or Spinal Tap...but to me this shows these filmmakers and actors can achieve great things even with more obscure material. Seems to me they had a soft spot for this particular era...

I think they should do a film on the pagan community next!

peg


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Review: A Mighty Wind
From: catspaw49
Date: 21 Apr 03 - 03:54 PM

Outstanding review Frank...and Peg's post following is an excellent piece as well. Both lead me to say something that I think Guest is absolutely sure of.

I don't think he believes he's making films for the masses nor does he think he's in the art film business with a tiny market either. I think he views his audience as he probably see himself. People of above average intelligence who appreciate subtle humor as muc as a belly laugh. He knows it's necessary to have some knowledge of the subject being lampooned, but at the same time knows that only a limited knowledge is required. He walks a fine line in the subject matter knowing that while many may recognize something for what it is, others see it only as he presents it nd are still capable of getting the joke. Hence the non-use of folks like Doc Watson.

It isn't needed to be a serious rocker to grin, chuckle, squirm, and laugh at Spinal Tap. Community theatre isn't a prerequisite for "Guffman." Many of my friends wished he's done deeper stuff with Best In Show yet to do more would have required an audience knowledge much higher than he wanted to rely on. I think he relies on the intelligence of the audience to take in the jokes and the only slighly overdrawn characters. Those characters are often people we KNOW to some degree or another and the improv/build your own character style and dialogue is what makes the stuff so damn funny! Someone mentioned Fred Willard's "usual schtick"......Although I agree it's a well used persona of his, it fit well into the bozo he played in Guffman and it was perfect for taking the piss out of Joe Garagiola in Best In Show. Many were familiar with Joe G's narrations of the Westminster Kennel Club show and Fred really did one helluva' job!

I figure this will hit the HBO/Showtime circuit within a few months as did BIS.

Spaw


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Review: A Mighty Wind
From: voyager
Date: 21 Apr 03 - 05:28 PM

TOPIC = GUITAR ENSEMBLES
Frankham's Remarks --
"It brought back memories of The New Christy Minstrels,(early John
Denver)(Barry McGuire) Back Porch Majority, Serendipity Singers,
Rooftop Singers (yes there was a little sendup in there with the 12
string), Limelighters, KT, Up With People, Brothers Four"

This posting has a couple of themes....

   1. Loved "A Mighty Wind" and it made me wonder
       For a 'neuf-tet' like the New Main Street Singers
       would the instrumentalists play the same guitar model?

   2. What models of guitar did anyone notice?

   3. What type of arranging is required for projecting more than
       3 acoustic guitarists in a full-ensemble sound?

   4. Hypothetical answer to #1-3 - OVATION GUITARS?

"Never Did No Wandering" <-- Not!
voyager
FSGW Ghetto.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Review: A Mighty Wind
From: Frankham
Date: 21 Apr 03 - 06:51 PM

A tenor guitar by Folksmen was used ala KT.   Was it Nick Reynolds played it or Bob Shane? (Can't remember). They looked to be Martins which would be consistent. There were two types of banjos, one long neck Seeger style (definitely in the period) and a resonator type.

Got to have a banjo in the Main Street Singers along with the guitars.
The vocal arrangements were actually quite good, nice spread and skillfully done. The voices were good but this is true with the groups that Sparks and others put together. The music was just plain funny in that it caught the musical cliches of the period. The "oohs" and "doohs" in the background while the vocal was in progress were hilarious, I thought. Got the feeling that the soundtrack contained overdubs to suggest larger than life arrangements. Also, the typical hokey endings with a big crescendo and finish ala 1940's pop vocal groups were a nice touch.

THe patter used by the groups was similar to what Gibson and Camp as well as others such as Bud and Trav used to use at the Gate of Horn. You even hear the far-out commentary in the patter used by some contemporary singer/songwriters when introducing their material. The innocent, ludicrous attempts at profundity, cliches about pseudo-humanitarianism and "serious" intimacy was caught beautifully. Every coffee house in the country must have it's own Mitch.

Ovation guitars weren't in vogue then. didn't see 'em.

There were apparently instrumenalist consultants to show the cast how to play the instruments but I'll bet a lot of the sound was pre-recorded or dubbed in.

Frank Hamilton


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Review: A Mighty Wind
From: Melani
Date: 21 Apr 03 - 10:36 PM

I saw Ebert & Roeper's review the other night. Roger said it wasn't as satirical as it might be because it was too close to reality. I gotta admit, some of the guys looked AWFULLY familiar. But then, Garrison Keillor once did a skit about a church youth group doing folk performances that was the story of my teenaged life. Our biggest hit show was at the state mental hospital...

I played the Kingston Trio's version of "Santy Anna" for my daughter, who learned traditional chanteys at the Hyde Street Pier Chantey Sing. She rolled on the floor in hysterics. But the other night, as I was singing it, I realized that that was where I learned "The Greenland Fisheries", and I'm still using the same words. Oh well, I guess we can't escape our past.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Review: A Mighty Wind
From: JJ
Date: 22 Apr 03 - 08:51 AM

My Swedish friend Birgitta writes:

"Hur aer laeget lilla gumman" (How's It Hangin' Grandma) is colloquial Swedish and idiomatically correct. So much so that the Guest/Levy writing team must have asked someone who grew up in Sweden to give them the wording.

But Ed Begley pronounces it so badly that it took me several viewings of the trailer to get it. That's my only beef with the movie -- couldn't they have taken the trouble to get him to say it right? I mean, he's an *actor*, surely he took Dialects and Accents 101 or whatever in college...


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Review: A Mighty Wind
From: Steve-o
Date: 22 Apr 03 - 12:55 PM

I agree- it was a "charmer", but not enough bite for me. They missed a whole bunch of characters that should have been there- for example, where was the guy who dressed up in his business suit and went down to some big office building to spend his day writing "folk songs"?? Anyway, as Frank said, Guest and Levy sure did a great job of both writing and playing the music. The insipid, knuckleheaded Main Street Singers (playing the part of the group we used to call the "Crusty Nostrils") were quite perfect. Most of the instruments were correct, as noted, with the glaring exception of the Ovation. Nick Reynolds played a 4-string Martin- I couldn't see clearly if that was the type in the movie. Fun, really well-done movie, but I wanted a lot more satire.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Review: A Mighty Wind
From: catspaw49
Date: 25 Apr 03 - 05:07 PM

refresh


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Review: A Mighty Wind
From: WFDU - Ron Olesko
Date: 25 Apr 03 - 07:37 PM

JJ - Begley's mispronunciation was probably part of the joke. Think of all those crappy songs that were sung in other languages by such folksingers. Do you think they took the time to learn the proper pronunciation?

Remember the story of Wimoweh - Pete Seeger misinterpreted the field recording he heard of the original.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Review: A Mighty Wind
From: JJ
Date: 26 Apr 03 - 08:26 AM

Well, Ron, maybe... But Begley's character supposed to be from-Sweden Swedish!

"I would love to see Crabbetown in the autumn..."


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Review: A Mighty Wind
From: GUEST,John Bauman
Date: 26 Apr 03 - 04:46 PM

I thought "Best of Show" was a riot! Funny thing...

I'm REALLY into the "dog world" -- I participate in agility and obedience and am a member of two obedience/training clubs.

Interesting observation -- the "dog people" all seemed to think the movie was as funny as I......

......but they failed to see themselves in it.


hmmmmmmm.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Review: A Mighty Wind
From: Amos
Date: 28 Apr 03 - 02:53 AM

I gotta tell ya folks, it has been 6 hours since the movie got out and I am STILL laughing. The sound track music started playing int he theater 20 minutes before the film, the screen still dark, and I was in stitiches by the time the movie started just listening to the lyrics. It is one dry, subtle take-off, rip-off, twist and spoof after another from end to end and I was glad I was sitting alone so I wouldn't be embarassing anyone with the spontaneous chortles I kept springing. It was a pure hoot and I am very glad I went.

"Gee -- when you put it like that, it's almost like poetry!"

Guest is purely amazing, amazing. I love his ass.

A


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Review: A Mighty Wind
From: Frankham
Date: 28 Apr 03 - 09:53 AM

Ron, I don't think Pete misinterpreted "Wimoweh". He did change the words though so that people could sing the song easier. "Mbumuba" would be harder to sing. He even made sure that the royalties reached Johnathan Linder, the source for the song.

Frank


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Review: A Mighty Wind
From: denise:^)
Date: 28 Apr 03 - 12:23 PM

I can't wait for it to finally show up around here...

I missed the folk music scene the first time around, basically because I wasn't born yet...
Still, I'm thinking it must be some prescribed course of study: first Kingston Trio, then on to the next, and the next... I went the whole way through all the groups, right up to the present! (I picked them all up at used record stores when I became interested in folk music. Funny how they sounded okay at first, and then started sounding hokey, and I'd move on to the next--kinda like my own personal "folk scare!")
Reading these posts reminded me of one of those old Kingston Trio albums. I can't remember what song it was, but one of the guys was introducing it, and he says, in quite a serious and scholarly tone of voice, "It was ORIGINALLY a love song, and possibly a lullaby BEFORE THAT..."
Guest could have lifted that line right off the album and put it into the movie!
Gotta see it...

Denise:^)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Review: A Mighty Wind
From: Amos
Date: 28 Apr 03 - 12:30 PM

Denise:

Don't let it bother you love -- I can't count the number of things I missed because I basically wasn't born yet -- everyone's got some....

:>)


A


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Review: A Mighty Wind
From: Nerd
Date: 28 Apr 03 - 03:49 PM

Re: A Mighty Wind: It's great, and the soundtrack CD equally hilarious!

Re: Mbube, Pete Seeger did not intentionally change the words; he had no idea what the words were. He was brought a 78 of Solomon Linda (not Jonathan Linder) singing the original, which was essentially improvised in the studio. He couldn't make out the words, which are in Zulu and essentially mean "Hey Lion, you are a lion," and therefore sang "a wimoweh" instead. The original was not a field recording, but a very early South African pop recording (which is, of course, a minor distinction), but the song was definitley composed by Linda. Actually, the Weavers' version has very few words, and is mostly swooping wordless vocals of the "OOOHHH-AAAHHH" sort. The familiar "Lion Sleeps Tonight" words were added later.

Pete instructed his publisher to send his half of the royalties to Linda, but didn't really verify that the latter had done so; he did not, therefore, "make sure" that the royalties reached Linda. Moreover, because the rights to the original had been bought by the publisher and not by Pete, Pete was only entitled to royalties from the Weavers' version; the publisher, under the assumed name "Paul Campbell" took the rest, and may have swiped most of Pete's share, too, though the legal proof of this is damnably hard to establish (Linda's South African lawyer may have feathered his nest too). The bottom line was that Linda and his children got a few thousand bucks, and they all died relatively poor--though Linda made decent prize money singing competitively until shortly before his death.

Sorry to be a downer, but the story is pretty sordid. None of it, though, was Pete's fault; it was the unjust roll of the dice that most Black South Africans were given.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Review: A Mighty Wind
From: Nerd
Date: 29 Apr 03 - 03:54 AM

It may be true, by the way, that the movie is not sharply critical enough. But the lyrics are. Listen to "Never Did No Wanderin'"; it's all about not having had any of the iconic experiences folksingers sing about. By using such evocative imagery as "the dance of the telephone poles" and "the singing of the driving wheel," it just underscores how easy it is to put such imagery in songs and still be totally clueless about the lives you're singing about. Basically, this song points out how empty of authentic experience such "folksinging" is. Other songs, too ("Old Joe's Place," "Skeletons of Quinto," etc) make explicit mention of not having actually had the experiences they are about, so much so that it becomes a unifying theme to the soundtrack.

BTW, the soundtrack album is worth it just for their cover of "Start Me Up"; listen to the end, it's a riot!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Review: A Mighty Wind
From: WFDU - Ron Olesko
Date: 29 Apr 03 - 06:45 PM

Nerd, my mistake for calling it a field recording. It was a 78 that Alan Lomax received and gave to Seeger to listen to. While Seeger did have trouble making out the words, I'm not sure why he didn't read the record label!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Review: A Mighty Wind
From: reggie miles
Date: 29 Apr 03 - 09:25 PM

I saw the song that the trio performed on Mad TV and I'm sorry, but I failed to see or hear a great deal of humor there. I wanted more than just passable folk music and sixties costuming. I recognized two of the three guys from that group from their work in other films. I've seen them in better roles. I read a review/interview posted in a local paper the next day that explained that much of the character development and humor was improvised by the individual actors and not part of any team writing effort. The actors explained in the article how much fun they had doing it that way. While I'm certain they did indeed have fun working together that way, I don't think their efforts were effective. While watching the Mad TV spot I found myself waiting for something really funny to happen and it never showed. If the spot on Mad is any example of what takes place during the rest of the film I don't think I'll be joining some of the rest of you at the movies for this one.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Review: A Mighty Wind
From: DonMeixner
Date: 09 May 03 - 09:53 PM

Just saw this film. Liked it a lot. My only complaint: Not enough of the stage performance.

Don


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Review: A Mighty Wind
From: Nerd
Date: 10 May 03 - 01:11 AM

Ron, He could have read the label, but even though the word Linda is singing is a declension of "Mbube," which is the Zulu word for "lion," it doesn't sound like it. It sounds more like "Wimoweh."

Don, I agree. In fact, by cutting between the singers onstage and the backstage antics, but leaving the stage performances audible in the background, they not only short shrift the audience on the stage performance, they also make a disastrous continuity blunder: we hear the entirety of the concert in real time, whether we see the onstage part or the backstage part. It is impossible, with the sound of the concert playing as an unbroken flow, that there were more somgs that we just didn't hear. Which means this was a twenty-minute concert in which each act did an opener and a closer and that's it! Oops!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Review: A Mighty Wind
From: Mark Cohen
Date: 10 May 03 - 08:29 PM

You know, I'm surprised that no Mudcatters have commented on the fact that Guest makes all these movies and stuff and never even signs in as a member. I mean, what's he afraid of?

Aloha,
Mark

PS, Frank, I remember watching the New Christy Minstrels on the "Hootenanny" TV show (I must have been about 8 or 9) and thinking, "Wow, that guy is playing a tambourine on a stick!" Of course, the first time I ever saw somebody playing a mandolin was when I was in medical school and saw a performance by a student/resident bluegrass band. I was familiar with 12-string guitars, so I thought that this must be an 8-string ukulele. Sort of a visual Mondegreen, I guess.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Review: A Mighty Wind
From: catspaw49
Date: 10 May 03 - 09:54 PM

Geez Mark, I bet a tiple put you into the psych ward!!!

Spaw


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Review: A Mighty Wind
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 10 May 03 - 11:08 PM

Mark, you are a hoot all by yourself!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Review: A Mighty Wind
From: Mark Cohen
Date: 10 May 03 - 11:30 PM

Yeah, and you should see what I'm like with help...

Aloha,
Mark


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Review: A Mighty Wind
From: WFDU - Ron Olesko
Date: 11 May 03 - 12:50 AM

Nerd, I think the movie wasn't intending to show the whole concert. That would have ruined the movie in my opinion. Folk music was one element of the movie. Guest couldn't make the movie to appeal solely to folk music fans or it would have been a bomb.

As it exists, there were enough subtle references.   The Weaver's documentary "Wasn't That A Time" was obviously the inspiration for the Folksman "reunion" rehearsal at the picnic.    I even saw elements of "The Ballad of Rambling Jack" documentary when the Folksmen were driving around lost in NYC.   If you saw "Rambling Jack" you might remember the scene where he was trying to find his old home and driving around without a clue. The songs that we heard in film were PERFECT satires on the folk tunes of that era.   "Blood on the Coal" is every disaster ballad rolled into one. Check out the CD - it is a hoot!

I can't wait for the DVD. I am sure there will be more outakes and perhaps entire songs. If you check out A Mighty Wind's website you will find a number of outtakes.

It really was a warm and funny film. Not a sidesplitter like the others, but a film that will make you laugh if you have a sense of humor and don't take things too seriously.

Ron


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Review: A Mighty Wind
From: Mark Cohen
Date: 11 May 03 - 01:18 AM

PS: No, 'Spaw, but that's only because I don't believe they exist. But I confess that I feel a little depressed whenever I see a charango. The poor little feller never had a chance...

And don't get me started on a ukelin.

Aloha,
Mark
(who should probably talk to somebody about this...)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Review: A Mighty Wind
From: Charley Noble
Date: 11 May 03 - 11:22 AM

This flick has finally made Portland, ME, where it will tread water for at least 24 hours before racing off to North Dakota.

Gotta rush!

Charley Noble


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Review: A Mighty Wind
From: Steve Latimer
Date: 11 May 03 - 10:17 PM

I was going to wait for the video, but I heard too many favourable reviews and decided to see it today. I loved it. Levy stole the show, although I thought the Bohners were great too. I'm sure that I missed a lot of the in jokes that Rick and others here got, but still, I thought it was very very funny.

Lars didn't get his Crane shot, he's in good company.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Review: A Mighty Wind
From: Melani
Date: 12 May 03 - 12:57 AM

My favorite part of the concert was when the organizer warned the audience not to eat the flower arrangements.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Review: A Mighty Wind
From: Amos
Date: 12 May 03 - 01:48 AM

Sure hope someone drags Kendall over to see it....


A


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate
Next Page

  Share Thread:
More...

Reply to Thread
Subject:  Help
From:
Preview   Automatic Linebreaks   Make a link ("blue clicky")


Mudcat time: 26 January 3:56 AM EST

[ Home ]

All original material is copyright © 1998 by the Mudcat Café Music Foundation, Inc. All photos, music, images, etc. are copyright © by their rightful owners. Every effort is taken to attribute appropriate copyright to images, content, music, etc. We are not a copyright resource.