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Folklore: favorite southern US expression

darkriver 15 Feb 03 - 03:55 AM
Kaleea 15 Feb 03 - 01:54 AM
Mary in Kentucky 14 Feb 03 - 10:50 PM
Mary in Kentucky 14 Feb 03 - 10:06 PM
GUEST,DancingMom 14 Feb 03 - 09:58 PM
GUEST 14 Feb 03 - 09:51 PM
GUEST,Q 14 Feb 03 - 07:39 PM
Mary in Kentucky 14 Feb 03 - 04:33 PM
GUEST,Q 14 Feb 03 - 03:23 PM
Mary in Kentucky 14 Feb 03 - 02:50 PM
Mary in Kentucky 14 Feb 03 - 02:46 PM
Ron Olesko 14 Feb 03 - 02:39 PM
Ron Olesko 14 Feb 03 - 02:29 PM
Sorcha 14 Feb 03 - 02:28 PM
Ferrara 14 Feb 03 - 02:24 PM
GUEST,Tree 14 Feb 03 - 02:23 PM
GUEST,sapote jones 14 Feb 03 - 01:50 PM
wysiwyg 14 Feb 03 - 01:43 PM
Kim C 14 Feb 03 - 12:54 PM
Rapparee 14 Feb 03 - 12:27 PM
Mary in Kentucky 14 Feb 03 - 12:02 PM
chip a 14 Feb 03 - 11:50 AM
Rapparee 14 Feb 03 - 08:01 AM
Neighmond 13 Feb 03 - 11:13 PM
Bev and Jerry 13 Feb 03 - 10:54 PM
sharyn 13 Feb 03 - 09:33 PM
Mary in Kentucky 13 Feb 03 - 07:26 PM
Sam L 13 Feb 03 - 07:11 PM
Walking Eagle 13 Feb 03 - 06:05 PM
GUEST,Claymore 13 Feb 03 - 05:58 PM
Bill D 13 Feb 03 - 05:58 PM
Mary in Kentucky 13 Feb 03 - 05:27 PM
Sorcha 13 Feb 03 - 05:21 PM
Frankham 13 Feb 03 - 05:11 PM
GUEST 13 Feb 03 - 05:00 PM
harper 13 Feb 03 - 04:38 PM
Mary in Kentucky 13 Feb 03 - 04:00 PM
Mary in Kentucky 13 Feb 03 - 03:47 PM
Kim C 13 Feb 03 - 03:17 PM
Bee-dubya-ell 13 Feb 03 - 03:09 PM
Bill D 13 Feb 03 - 01:36 PM
wysiwyg 13 Feb 03 - 12:28 PM
chip a 13 Feb 03 - 12:20 PM
Sandy Creek 13 Feb 03 - 11:25 AM
beadie 13 Feb 03 - 11:21 AM
wilco 13 Feb 03 - 11:13 AM
mack/misophist 13 Feb 03 - 11:10 AM
Kim C 13 Feb 03 - 11:09 AM
Beccy 13 Feb 03 - 11:07 AM
beadie 13 Feb 03 - 10:56 AM
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Subject: RE: Folklore: favorite southern US expression
From: darkriver
Date: 15 Feb 03 - 03:55 AM

I'm surprised no one's yet mentioned tough titty (pronounced "tough tiddy"), meaning "tough luck".
I generally got the idea that no real sympathy was meant.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: favorite southern US expression
From: Kaleea
Date: 15 Feb 03 - 01:54 AM

My grandparents grew up in Arkansas (their ancestors had come from Tennessee before that, & so on back east all the way to Ireland), then after being married, moved to the hills of eastern Oklahoma. They were simple country folks with the wisdom which only country folks have! Some people are ashamed of their simple roots, and get upset at the hint of terms such as "hillbilly" or "redneck" but I take no offense, as I know that my ancestors were hard working people who faced every possible hardship along the way to my generation, and our people may have been called those terms along the way, but I know the truth--we are people who know how to be strong, we know what morals are, and we also know that it is in ignorance that people use such terminology. I'm proud of my simple roots! I also remember much of the knowledge passed on to me about things such as herbs & roots & teas. My family still enjoys some mild kidding with each other about our speech patterns!   My Granny (who had her "snuff" which was absolutely not the same thing as Grandad's "chaw"--snuff was more lady like!) also used to say, "We in high cotton now" and "I'll swan" and "La-a-a-nd a goshen" as well as a few other interesting things such as:

He run faster'n a feller whut bumped intuh a bee hive.
It ain't meye-yun, it mus be yer'un.
Yew'unz otta be purdy hongry bout now.
Yew yungunz git owtta thet barn fore it fallz in on all y'all!

I still call the grocery cart a "buggy" and my mother will refer to a ladies room with 2 stalls as a "2 holer." Grandad would never say the word "outhouse" nor would he say where he was going. If he saw somebody in the family coming around the house on one side, he would go to the outhouse via the other side. There is not a person among us who did not have ancestors who used an outhouse somewhere along the way! When one is out "camping" it can be very important knowledge to know which leaves to use instead of corn cobs or the sears & roebuck & co catalogue! I just keep my peace when people who look down their noses at some of us develop a horrendous rash from the wrong leaves.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: favorite southern US expression
From: Mary in Kentucky
Date: 14 Feb 03 - 10:50 PM

It flew all over me. (I got mad when I heard what was said.)

as right as rain

come on in and set a spell

spell me while I take a break (take my place, work in my place)

In Alabama I heard a lot of Biblical references in daily language:
add a star to your crown (a compliment for a thankless or self-sacrificing job)
cast you bread on the water (do good deeds and you'll receive back blessings)
get thee behind me Satan (don't tempt me)
waitin' for the trumpets
the Rapture
cross the river Jurden (Jorden)

Today I often "run" to the store or downtown. As a child I would "tote" someone on my bicycle.

run with the big dogs

I eat supper instead of dinner. I have an icebox instead of a refrigerator.

As a 10-yr-old, after "spending the night" with a girlfriend (today they are called sleepovers) when my mom picked me up, I ALWAYS had to tell my friend's mother, "I had a nice time."

Hubby refers to all soft drinks (coca-cola, pepsi, etc.) as pop.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: favorite southern US expression
From: Mary in Kentucky
Date: 14 Feb 03 - 10:06 PM

all stove up (my grandmother said this referring to stiffness from arthritis)

meaner 'n a snake

just like a snake in the grass (sneaky, lowdown person)

hips like a chicken snake (slim)

slicker 'n a minna's (minnow's) dick

more than you can shake a stick at (a lot)

teched in the head (crazy)

I can't talk 'cause I have a lot of chicks out just now. (said by a man with teenagers -- your chickens come home to roost)

rode hard and put up wet (mistreated, or lived a hard life -- originally referring to a horse)


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Subject: RE: Folklore: favorite southern US expression
From: GUEST,DancingMom
Date: 14 Feb 03 - 09:58 PM

"Ugly as a mud fence."
"Butt ugly."
"So crooked they gonna hafta screw 'im in the ground when he dies."
In addition to "fixin' to go to to work" there's "commence to workin'".
"The whole loblolly mess" (my mother-in-law, a wealth of funny Southern expressions)
My Virginia Grandma says, "Can you carry me to my Doctor's office?"
"Colder 'n a well-digger's butt in Alaska".
"'Bout yay high" (holding out a hand to indicate height).
"If I ain't purty enough, there's plenty of other places they can look".
Sharon


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Subject: RE: Folklore: favorite southern US expression
From: GUEST
Date: 14 Feb 03 - 09:51 PM

"Wanna daince?"(would you like to dance?)

"She's just as sweet as she can be!"

"He's afflicted"(usually referring to one who's developmentally disabled or handicapped in some way)

"Oh, take an ol' cold 'tater'n wait!"(usually said to children who were begging to eat before dinner was ready. Then sort of morphed into meaning to possess one's self of patience)

"Shoot, the wood was stacked so poor you could throw a dog through anywheres"(I first ran across this phrase in Hucleberry Finn, but heard my great Uncle Willie use it in conversation years later.

"Hell if I had a dog as ugly as that baby I'd shave 'is ass an' make 'im walk backwards!"(cruel, but funny, nonetheless)

"Pretty is as pretty does"

"If he was mah dawg, Ah'd drown 'im!"(overheard in a laundromat years ago by a woman referring to her friend's no-account husband)


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Subject: RE: Folklore: favorite southern US expression
From: GUEST,Q
Date: 14 Feb 03 - 07:39 PM

Hit don'(t) make no never mind. Common in Texas.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: favorite southern US expression
From: Mary in Kentucky
Date: 14 Feb 03 - 04:33 PM

Where ya goin'? Out. (none of your business)

Where ya goin'? To see a man about a dog. (none of your business)

Where'd ya catch that fish? Farm pond. (none of your business)

How much did that cost? Dollar three eighty seven. (none of your business)

Can't have the biggest piece, don't want none.

Someone stop me...


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Subject: RE: Folklore: favorite southern US expression
From: GUEST,Q
Date: 14 Feb 03 - 03:23 PM

Ah, yes, high cotton. I remember that one from my Georgia mother-in-law.
Floozie (floozy) is an odd one. H. L. Mencken (The American Language) considered it to be an American invented word. When Carl Sandburg's "Collected Poems" was printed in England, a glossary was added which included the word "floozy."
If you look in the Oxford English Dictionary, the preferred spelling is "floosie," whick strikes an American as funny; the word has been adopted by the English with their s instead of z.
The word first appeared in print in an article on white slavery, as floosie, so the OED could be right. But no one knows its origin.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: favorite southern US expression
From: Mary in Kentucky
Date: 14 Feb 03 - 02:50 PM

Puttin' on airs.

Stepped out of a bandbox. (dressed up)

In high cotton. (rich)

floozie (loose woman)


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Subject: RE: Folklore: favorite southern US expression
From: Mary in Kentucky
Date: 14 Feb 03 - 02:46 PM

She ain't worth shootin'. (a worthless cow)

It's jest up the holler a bit.

Back 'ere.

If it's not worth doin' right, it's not worth doin' at all. (My mother would never say ain't.)

He's aggavatin' me. (My older brother would aggravate me.)

Time for her to freshen. (time for the cow to give birth and come to her milk)

My favorite around here -- There ought to be a Shepherdsville for people. (Shepherdsville is where you send all the worthless, unproductive animals to the slaughterhouse.)


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Subject: RE: Folklore: favorite southern US expression
From: Ron Olesko
Date: 14 Feb 03 - 02:39 PM

Although it is used in a different context as well.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: favorite southern US expression
From: Ron Olesko
Date: 14 Feb 03 - 02:29 PM

I've always been partial to - "what are you doing, loping your mule?" when someone is goofing off. Sounds worse than it actually is.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: favorite southern US expression
From: Sorcha
Date: 14 Feb 03 - 02:28 PM

Well, there ya is Miz Diz.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: favorite southern US expression
From: Ferrara
Date: 14 Feb 03 - 02:24 PM

TNDARLN, my mom also said, "Well, I guess I'd better get back to my rat killin': to mean, "Got to get back to work."

Walking Eagle, you bet, use of vernacular expressions doesn't imply stupidity! In fact, the best expressions often come off the tongues of the smartest people.

Guest, Sapote jones, the Louisians expressions use French syntax as in "J'ai faim, moi!" Neat.

And another of my mom's expressions, I don't think of it as particularly southern, applies to not being too particular about something you're doing: "It'll never be seen from a galloping horse."

Mom was from Georgia.

Rita


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Subject: RE: Folklore: favorite southern US expression
From: GUEST,Tree
Date: 14 Feb 03 - 02:23 PM

Heard these from a guitarist I used to jam with.

Countrier'n (kunt-tree-ern) cowshit

Busier than a cat covering shit on tile.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: favorite southern US expression
From: GUEST,sapote jones
Date: 14 Feb 03 - 01:50 PM

Theres this way of emphasis in southern louisianna,
       "I'm hungry, me!"    or "They left, them"


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Subject: RE: Folklore: favorite southern US expression
From: wysiwyg
Date: 14 Feb 03 - 01:43 PM

Wal, she ain't wrapped too tight, izzall.

~S~


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Subject: RE: Folklore: favorite southern US expression
From: Kim C
Date: 14 Feb 03 - 12:54 PM

Bev and Jerry, there's also teeniny and big-ass.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: favorite southern US expression
From: Rapparee
Date: 14 Feb 03 - 12:27 PM

Ugly enough to fright a haint off a thorn bush.
Ugly enough to haunt a nine room house.
Ugly enough to chase snakes.

Older'n God.

Jesus Christ and little fishes!


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Subject: RE: Folklore: favorite southern US expression
From: Mary in Kentucky
Date: 14 Feb 03 - 12:02 PM

See ya tomorrow God willin' and the creeks don't rise.

(or in Alabama -- unless the Rapture.)


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Subject: RE: Folklore: favorite southern US expression
From: chip a
Date: 14 Feb 03 - 11:50 AM

My wife says "she's so ugly, she'd make a freight train take a dirt road!"
Also, old as dirt
broad as an axe handle
I done done it
it's already done and done
yaller janders (yellow jaundice) as in "his janders is yaller"


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Subject: RE: Folklore: favorite southern US expression
From: Rapparee
Date: 14 Feb 03 - 08:01 AM

Havin' gone an' got me a couple or four pieces of paper sayin' I got me an eddycashun, I shure don't know why in hell I write like this here. Usually don't talk like it, less'n I want to make a point or jist fool with folks. Perhaps it's because I find that "conventional" or "televsion" speech is so ubiquitous, or perhaps it's simply because I can. What fascinates me is that the metaphors, etc. contained herein (geez, I'm sorry about those two words!) disseminate so quickly around the country. It certainly seems as if an expression is created within the folk unconscious and appears all at once. I would puzzle more over it, only it don't mean any more'n a fart in a hurricane.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: favorite southern US expression
From: Neighmond
Date: 13 Feb 03 - 11:13 PM

he fell in the river and they skimmed "ugly" for three days!


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Subject: RE: Folklore: favorite southern US expression
From: Bev and Jerry
Date: 13 Feb 03 - 10:54 PM

Seems to us that, if'n yore from de souf, there are only two sizes of thangs - little bitty and big ol'.

Bev and Jerry


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Subject: RE: Folklore: favorite southern US expression
From: sharyn
Date: 13 Feb 03 - 09:33 PM

My favorite: I've enjoyed about as much as I can stand (Texas)

And some variations:

Let me lie where Jesus flang me
Leave me lie where Jesus flang me

Also Rick Bragg, who was a mountain boy, says great things like "a cheeseburger 's big as God."


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Subject: RE: Folklore: favorite southern US expression
From: Mary in Kentucky
Date: 13 Feb 03 - 07:26 PM

My friend taught elementary school in Mississippi. One young boy came to her complaining that another boy was "mellin' him." Not understanding what he was saying, she shushed him up until she could ask someone what it meant. Meddling. as in quit meddling with me.

Also when I supervised college students at an Alabama university, one fella asked to be excused from the exam because he was traveling with the wrazzlin' team. (wrestling team) I was 28 years old and had 18 year old boys saying "yes ma'am" to me.

The son of my friend in South Carolina had to run laps in the gym for not saying "yes ma'am."

My grandmother used to say, "Save your pennies for a rainy day, and it's a gwine a rain someday."

Then there's "sweatin' like a whore in church."


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Subject: RE: Folklore: favorite southern US expression
From: Sam L
Date: 13 Feb 03 - 07:11 PM

Friend of mine from Alabama gets Journey Pride--nervous before a trip.

Swarpin'. One grandmother talked about them that went around adrinkin', and aswarpin'. I asked my mother what swarpin' meant, and she did not know, had never thought to find out. That's a difference between generations, because if my mother had often said it, I would've made it my business to find out and aquire some expertise. My greatest fear is that it may be a really fun sin that could become a lost art, and I briefly tried to rouse a society for the preservation of Swarpin'. But it's hard to generate a lot of support without knowing exactly what it is--damn! That's the whole problem. As best I can tell, it seems to involve a swinging motion--which sounds full of wicked promise! Sorry to go on, but I get a little keyed up thinking about it. I also have a young seminary student looking into it--there may be a lost commandment or something like Thou shalt not swarp, which could make a big thesis thing for him. I tried to help him out, giving him the lead, but also hoped there might be some inadvertent clues in Hebrew or Latin, a how-to, helpful tips for the swarpin' that one shalt not do, some old diagrams, anything.
    Any strange wicked or wild thing y'all may know of, come upon behind the barn, in tall grass, through a window of a neighbors house--and especially if something was sort of swinging, let me know, it may have been some swarpin' going on there.      Fred


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Subject: RE: Folklore: favorite southern US expression
From: Walking Eagle
Date: 13 Feb 03 - 06:05 PM

"I've a mind to," as in I'm going to do something. "I've a mind to go to the mall today." "I've half a mind to," as in I might do something. "I've half a mind to work on my cross stitch."


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Subject: RE: Folklore: favorite southern US expression
From: GUEST,Claymore
Date: 13 Feb 03 - 05:58 PM

A couple of others, which are a bit more pungent:

"So randy he'd screw a snake if someone held it straight"
"Smelled bad enough to knock a buzzard off a shit wagon"
"She could suck the chrome off a trailer hitch"
"She could suck the creme out of a Twinkie and not get crumbs on her lips"
"She could suck a golf ball through a garden hose"
"Such a bad shot he couldn't hit the inside of a barn with the doors closed"
"Sick enough to shit through a screen door and not touch wire"
"So ugly I wouldn't screw her with YOUR dick"
"Coyote ugly" (A woman so ugly, that if you woke up in the morning with her head lying on your arm, you would chew it off rather than pulling it out and chance waking her.)


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Subject: RE: Folklore: favorite southern US expression
From: Bill D
Date: 13 Feb 03 - 05:58 PM

when I saw the Lewis family years ago, they worked their accent and expressions into their act (high energy gospel music from Georgia).

one favorite was offering a free "tote bag" if you bought records...Little Roy Lewis could do 5 minutes on the differences between "tote bag" and other conveniences for carrying materials.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: favorite southern US expression
From: Mary in Kentucky
Date: 13 Feb 03 - 05:27 PM

When Hubby first started working in a large animal veterinary practice, I often had to answer the phone at home after hours. Many farmers don't like to talk about "delicate" subjects with a woman. I got used to that attitude and just tried to act like I wasn't shocked at anything. But the best one -- one that really had me baffled -- was when a farmer called and said his sow couldn't find her pigs. I relayed the message to Hubby who explained to me that the sow was having trouble giving birth.

Then there were all the times I had to get directions to a farm over the phone. I found it was best to act real dumb and repeat everything several times. I got to know lots of farmers and their wives from phone conversations, but had never met them. Hubby described me to them as, shall we say, not fit for public viewing. When they did meet me, there was a tremendous look of relief on their faces. Then Hubby would tell them that he'd rather take me with him than kiss me goodbye! Oh the stories, many just like in James Herriot's books.

Another expression: Can't see it from my house. (Meaning, I don't care unless it affects me.)


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Subject: RE: Folklore: favorite southern US expression
From: Sorcha
Date: 13 Feb 03 - 05:21 PM

"Pure D" as in pure D ugly.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: favorite southern US expression
From: Frankham
Date: 13 Feb 03 - 05:11 PM

Love this thread. Some that appealed to me were...."Like a glad dog in a meat house" and if it's pretty far away it's a "fur piece".

Traveling through the South one summer when we were in NC and Tennesee at the local store it was " Y'all come back and see agin now ya' hear?" The furthur west we moved it was "C'mon back and see us." and the furthur West we moved it was by the time we got to Oklahoma or Texas..."Come back". When we reached California nobody said nothin'.

I also like when you leave someone or they leave you it's "I'll look for ya'."

Down here in Georgia it's "Hey" rather than "Hi". Some who want to cityfy other's speech say "Hey is for horses". But I like "hey". I also like "You doin' awraht?"

Frank Hamilton

There is a little book out called "How To Speak Southern".


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Subject: RE: Folklore: favorite southern US expression
From: GUEST
Date: 13 Feb 03 - 05:00 PM

I think the phrase when referring to someone or something unattractive it(they) would "Back a houn' off a gut wagon!"

Another when referring to someone leaving an embarrassing scene of sorts, "He(She) ran outta here like a stripe-edd assed ape!"

Overheard in gym class - Bob: "Hey Jim, Ah knew ya smoked, but Ah never knew ya could blow smoke rings outta yer butt."
                                       Jim:   "Uh caint!"
                                       Bob:   "No? Then how come 'ere's nicotine stains on yer drawers?"


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Subject: RE: Folklore: favorite southern US expression
From: harper
Date: 13 Feb 03 - 04:38 PM

My father in law, talking about someone he couldn't stand, would say, "I wouldn't give him air."    And my mother in law is always "crocheting another african."


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Subject: RE: Folklore: favorite southern US expression
From: Mary in Kentucky
Date: 13 Feb 03 - 04:00 PM

Dave, my dad used to give me a Yankee dime for helping wash the car. He was from Arkansas and Texas.

Another from Eastern Kentucky: "Hotter'n a June bride."

And for Spaw, "Dip yourself in shit and go to hell!"


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Subject: RE: Folklore: favorite southern US expression
From: Mary in Kentucky
Date: 13 Feb 03 - 03:47 PM

I've heard most of these too.

Kim, my mother used to say, "Well, I swan." Sometimes "swannee."

In Alabama they really do say "ovah yondah."

From Eastern Kentucky: "You can't prop up agin a crook."
"Are ya trackin'?"
"That's like swimmin' in a mudhole."
"Beat a dead horse or snake."
"Ever what" instead of "whatever"

And my favorite, used around here a lot, "Smartern a hog!"


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Subject: RE: Folklore: favorite southern US expression
From: Kim C
Date: 13 Feb 03 - 03:17 PM

heheheh Bruce my piece of paper is an English degree too!


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Subject: RE: Folklore: favorite southern US expression
From: Bee-dubya-ell
Date: 13 Feb 03 - 03:09 PM

Please note that the southern-ness of any of the above expressions may be greatly enhanced by inserting a large quantity of smokeless tobacco product into one's mouth before uttering them. That makes it very difficult to say, "I'm going to..." but very easy to say, "Ah'm own..." As in, "Ah'm own be own yore ass lak steenk own sheeit!"

Like KimC, I often intentionally use incorrect grammar for the fun of it even though I know better and have a piece a' paper from one a' them university places (in English, no less). I suspect that there are a good number of people around here who like to play at being hicks, especially that guy that lives up in them West Virginny hollers.

I would also like to second Sandy Creek's recommendation of "A Confederacy of Dunces". IMO Ignatius J. Reilly is right up there with Atticus Finch among southern literary heroes, even though his personal habits remind one more of Spaw. Click here to read Walker Percy's foreward to the novel.

Bruce


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Subject: RE: Folklore: favorite southern US expression
From: Bill D
Date: 13 Feb 03 - 01:36 PM

"sick abed on two chairs" ...from my father, after we had lived in Louisiana and Arkansas and Texas for several years....


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Subject: RE: Folklore: favorite southern US expression
From: wysiwyg
Date: 13 Feb 03 - 12:28 PM

All sicked up. All sicked up in de bed.

~S~


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Subject: RE: Folklore: favorite southern US expression
From: chip a
Date: 13 Feb 03 - 12:20 PM

pretty as red shoes
pretty as a speckled pup
dumb as a sack of dog hair
it's better'n snuff and ain't half as dusty
I wouldn't piss in his mouth if his guts was on fire (spoken of somone that ain't worth a pisshole in the snow)
Boy, you really pissed in your oatmeal this time
He' so tight he squeaks when he walks
steeper'n a mules face


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Subject: RE: Folklore: favorite southern US expression
From: Sandy Creek
Date: 13 Feb 03 - 11:25 AM

For a wealth of Southern Expressions, especially around 'Nawlins (which is in LuzAnna) Read "Confederacy of Dunces" by John Kennedy Toole. But be careful...once you start reading this novel...it is hard to put it down. Ya'll come on back now, ya heah.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: favorite southern US expression
From: beadie
Date: 13 Feb 03 - 11:21 AM

Notwithstanding the opinion of those who do use the ubiquitous hot sauce on grits, and acknowledging that Tabasco is great on the eggs that are set next to them on the breakfast plate, I prefer sausage gravy on my grits.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: favorite southern US expression
From: wilco
Date: 13 Feb 03 - 11:13 AM

Who pissed in your gravy? (What got you upset?)
Even a blind hog roots-up a few acorns. (Any fool gets lucky
    eventually)
Hold your horses!!!! (Slow down).
Ain't that the cat's pajamas. (Not much to it).
Rougher than a cob. (reference to using corncobs in lieu of toilet
    tissue).
All hat. (Big hatted, self-important, pompous person).
Can't find his ass with both hands. (incompetent).


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Subject: RE: Folklore: favorite southern US expression
From: mack/misophist
Date: 13 Feb 03 - 11:10 AM

"Who put tabasco in your grits?" Considering that normal roadside diners have at least two kinds of hot sauce on the table and grist on the menu, that's an odd thing to ask. I put it there.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: favorite southern US expression
From: Kim C
Date: 13 Feb 03 - 11:09 AM

But I like Tabasco in my grits!!!!!! ;-)


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Subject: RE: Folklore: favorite southern US expression
From: Beccy
Date: 13 Feb 03 - 11:07 AM

This from my consummate southern Pater-in-law (Mr. Virignia himself...)

"That's enough to puke a hound off a gut wagon."

(???I think that means that something is icky.???)


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Subject: RE: Folklore: favorite southern US expression
From: beadie
Date: 13 Feb 03 - 10:56 AM

I grew up in Wisconsin, where anything below the Illinoyance state line is "SOUTH." But, my Daddy was from Kentucky, so I am familiar with almost all of the expressions listed to this point.

However, I heard a new one today, from a Texan.

Referring to someone who has an unexplained rant or who appears extraordinarily upset, she asks, "Who put Tabasco in YOUR grits?"


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