mudcat.org: Lyr Req: Back Home in Derry (Bobby Sands)
Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafeawe

Post to this Thread - Sort Descending - Printer Friendly - Home


Lyr Req: Back Home in Derry (Bobby Sands)

DigiTrad:
BACK HOME IN DERRY
THE EDMUND FITZGERALD
THE NERVOUS WRECK OF THE EDNA FITZGERALD


Related threads:
(origins) Origins: Puzzle:Edmund Fitzgerald and Bobby Sands (57)
Lyr Add: New words for Edmund Fitzgerald (2)
Edmund Fitzgerald Anniversary (4)
New clues to Edmund Fitzgerald wreck (37)
BS: Edmund Fitzgerald. Lost in Lake Superior (6)
happy? – Nov 10 ('Edmund Fitzgerald') (21)
Lyr Add: Wrecking Ball Patrick Fitzgerald (1)
Lyr Add: Edmund Fitzgerald parody (6)
10 Nov 1975 -- Wreck of Edmund Fitzgerald (27)
Lyr Add: The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald (6)
Lyr Req: Back Home in Derry (Bobby Sands) (84)
Lyr Req: Back Home in Derry (Bobby Sands) (11)
Lyr/Chords Req: The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald (9) (closed)
Chords Req: The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald (14)
(origins) Lyr Req: The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald (24)
Lyr/Chords Req: The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald (5)
Tune Req: The Nervous Wreck of the Edna Fitzgerald (9)
Info Req: Edmund Fitzgerald / Back Home in Derry (10)


GUEST 20 May 02 - 07:37 PM
Barry Finn 20 May 02 - 07:43 PM
GUEST 20 May 02 - 08:12 PM
GUEST 20 May 02 - 08:19 PM
MartinRyan 20 May 02 - 08:20 PM
Peg 20 May 02 - 08:44 PM
InOBU 21 May 02 - 07:53 AM
Big Mick 21 May 02 - 04:02 PM
Big Mick 21 May 02 - 05:44 PM
Teribus 22 May 02 - 05:33 AM
GUEST,Declan 22 May 02 - 05:39 AM
Share Thread
more
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:





Subject: Edmund Fitzgerald sound-alike
From: GUEST
Date: 20 May 02 - 07:37 PM

I know that there's a song out there that has the same tune as "The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald," but a bit more of a folk-ey sound, as well as a chorus. I just don't remember anything else about it. Anyone know what I'm talking about?

-J


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Edmund Fitzgerald sound-alike
From: Barry Finn
Date: 20 May 02 - 07:43 PM

Search fourm & DT for "Wish I Were Back Home In Derry".Barry
This link (click) provided by Joe Clicker...


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Edmund Fitzgerald sound-alike
From: GUEST
Date: 20 May 02 - 08:12 PM

I just did. Nothing showed. Any other suggestions?

-J


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Edmund Fitzgerald sound-alike
From: GUEST
Date: 20 May 02 - 08:19 PM

Nevermind. Found it. Don't know why it didn't show when I typed it in.

Thanks!

-J


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Edmund Fitzgerald sound-alike
From: MartinRyan
Date: 20 May 02 - 08:20 PM

Try this.

Regards


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Edmund Fitzgerald sound-alike
From: Peg
Date: 20 May 02 - 08:44 PM

Barry beat me to it!!! This is a great song and fun to sing and to listen to.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Edmund Fitzgerald sound-alike
From: InOBU
Date: 21 May 02 - 07:53 AM

Hi Peg!
I have a different take on the song being fun to sing. I have a twin, to whom I am not related, who is so like me, that his sister Liz mistook me for him, so close she has jabbing me in the ribbs, and it took several minutes before she believed that I was not Tony joking with her. Well, Tony and I became close friends, and really like brothers. His brother Patsy O'Hara died on the same hungerstrike as the writer of this song, Bobby Sands. Tony was Bobby's cellmate at the time he wrote the song.
I can't see it as a fun song to sing. It was written while those in Long Kesh concentration camp where held naked in concrete cold cells, in their own filth, as in order to be allowed to clean out the bucket that was their toilet, they would have to put on a prison uniform and acknowelge that the jailing without trial was a legal action.
The words are in no way subtle, when Sands refers to the Irish convicts in their own slime, that, to those of us who intimately know what happened, brings up a host of real horrors which Irish people suffered at the hands of a uncaring colonial power - cavitiy searches used as humiliation and punishment, it would take a book to explain why this is not a fun song to sing, and I shudder when, in Irish American pubs, it is sung causaly with no understanding.
All the best
Larry


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Edmund Fitzgerald sound-alike
From: Big Mick
Date: 21 May 02 - 04:02 PM

I agree, Larry. This song is one of my signature songs and is included on our CD. We open it by reading "The Kings Threshhold" by Yeats. The association is obvious:

He pleaded for his poet's rights. I said that I was the King, and all rights had their original fountain is some King. My Bishops, Soldiers, and Makers of Law, all shouted their approval. But the Seanachan went for, and from that hour until this has eaten nothing. He has chosen to die, refusing eat or drink. Aaach, disgrace upon me. The common people, for all time, will refuse to cross the threshhold, even though it be the King's.

We had a thread on this a long time ago. It is very interesting to read as it takes all the twists and turns. Try going to the supersearch and typing BACK HOME IN DERRY into the box and search just the Forum.
This link (click) provided by Joe Clicker...


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Edmund Fitzgerald sound-alike
From: Big Mick
Date: 21 May 02 - 05:44 PM

OOPS! What the hell was I thinking? The last line of the Yeats poem above should read:

The common people, for all time, will raise a cry against the threshold, even though it be the Kings.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Edmund Fitzgerald sound-alike
From: Teribus
Date: 22 May 02 - 05:33 AM

Thanks for the words of the song Martin!

Had a look round and came up with the following in answer to a search for "Convict Ships Australia"

Charles Bateson's "The Convict Ships 1787-1868" is regarded as the definitive guide to Australia's period of transportation. Information is given about the voyages to New South Wales, Norfolk Island, Tasmania, Victoria, Queensland and Western Australia. It ranges from the life on board for both crew and convict, right through to records of deaths, numbers of convicts and the length of each voyage. A comprehensive index of the convict voyages has been extracted from Bateson's text and is presented on our convict shipping pages.
Apart from describing each ship, the index gives the dates of each voyage, the ports they travelled between, the number of male and female convicts embarking and disembarking at each port and the route they took. Discrepancies between the number who embarked and disembarked were often due to deaths on board, transfers to other ships en route, or landing at other ports.

Transported convicts were handed over to the master of a ship at the beginning of the voyage and formally transfered into the custody of the Governor of the colony who was receiving them. Indents, or Indentures, were the documents used to record the transaction on arrival.

Conditions on Board Convicts were housed below decks on the prison deck and often further confined behind bars. In many cases they were restrained in chains and were only allowed on deck for fresh air and exercise. Conditions were cramped and they slept on hammocks. Very little information seems to be available about the layout of the convict ships, but a few books do contain artists' impressions and reproductions of images held in library collections.

Although the convicts of the first fleet arrived in relatively good condition, the same cannot be said for those that followed during the rest of the century. Cruel masters, harsh discipline and scurvy, dysentry and typhoid resulted in a huge loss of life.

After the English authorities began to review the system in 1801 the ships were despatched twice a year, at the end of May and the beginning of September, to avoid the dangerous winters of the southern hemisphere. Surgeons employed by the early contractors had to obey to the master of the ship and on later voyages were replaced by independent Surgeon Superintendents whose sole responsibility was for the well being of the convicts. As time went on, successful procedures were developed and the surgeons were supplied with explicit instructions as to how life on board was to be organised. By then the charterers were also paid a bonus to land the prisoners safe and sound at the end of the voyage.

By the time the exiles were being transported in the 1840s and onwards, a more enlightened routine was in place which even included the presence on board of a Religious Instructor to educate the convicts and attend to their spiritual needs. The shipboard routines on some of the Western Australian transports during the 1860s have been transcribed and are worth reading.

I had a look through the voyage listings mentioned above and came up with a total of 862 (634 from UK mainland ports almost exclusively on the south coast; 214 mainly from the ports of Cork and Dublin; 14 voyages with no port of departure identified). Odd thing was there was no voyage to Australia by a convict ship in 1803 and none at all from Derry or Londonderry as I suppose it would have been called then - mind you there was a war on and Nelson was chasing Villeneuve around the oceans that would have been on their route - so perhaps a bit of artistic license is allowed as he had to find something that would rhyme with "sea".

The other thing that surprised me was how few the number of deaths en-route, but that is explained above.

Another oddity was that transportation to Van Deimans Land (Tasmania) did not start until later and seems to have been used to transport prisoners from English prisons - unless prisoners were transferred which would seem strange, as it must have been easier to take the ship to the port nearest to where the prisoners were being held.

But it was fascinating reading.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Edmund Fitzgerald sound-alike
From: GUEST,Declan
Date: 22 May 02 - 05:39 AM

1803 was the year of Robert Emmet's abortive rebellion in Dublin and fits in with the vision of Bold Emmet dying later in the song. So I think he was taking political rather than poetic licence.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate
  Share Thread:
More...

Reply to Thread
Subject:  Help
From:
Preview   Automatic Linebreaks   Make a link ("blue clicky")


Mudcat time: 24 January 8:45 AM EST

[ Home ]

All original material is copyright © 1998 by the Mudcat Café Music Foundation, Inc. All photos, music, images, etc. are copyright © by their rightful owners. Every effort is taken to attribute appropriate copyright to images, content, music, etc. We are not a copyright resource.