mudcat.org: Origins: Do ye ken John Peel?
Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafeawe

Post to this Thread - Printer Friendly - Home
Page: [1] [2] [3]


Origins: Do ye ken John Peel?

DigiTrad:
DO YE KEN JOHN PEEL?
D'YE KEN JOHN PEEL [parody]


In Mudcat MIDIs:
John Peel ( -W. Metcalfe's version, 1868. This is referred to in more detail above; bear in mind that the tune usually used nowadays is just the third part (refrain) of the original. )
Red House (ancestral to 'Do YOu Ken John Peel' from Playford's Dancing Master (1706). The tune first appeared in the edition of 1695 in a slightly different form. )
Tycoch Caerdydd (The Red House of Cardiff) ( -from Alawon Fy Ngwlad, c.1896. Described as a pib-ddawns (pipe-dance). ancestral to John Peel)
Where Will Our Goodman Laye (from Oswald's Caledonian Pocket Companion for the Flute, vol.II, c.1750. ancestral to 'John Peel')


cstrawn@gte.net 25 Mar 98 - 05:21 PM
alison 25 Mar 98 - 06:38 PM
Ould Bobby Bob 25 Mar 98 - 07:02 PM
Bert 25 Mar 98 - 08:52 PM
MarcB 26 Mar 98 - 02:26 PM
charlotte 26 Mar 98 - 03:47 PM
Bert 27 Mar 98 - 09:52 AM
rich r 27 Mar 98 - 11:04 PM
Ferrara 28 Mar 98 - 07:00 AM
dick greenhaus 28 Mar 98 - 01:18 PM
Bruce O. 28 Mar 98 - 02:09 PM
Alan of Australia 28 Mar 98 - 08:40 PM
Alan of Australia 29 Mar 98 - 06:14 AM
Alan of Australia 29 Mar 98 - 06:17 AM
Bill D 29 Mar 98 - 02:49 PM
Bruce O. 29 Mar 98 - 04:51 PM
Barry Finn 29 Mar 98 - 06:28 PM
dick greenhaus 31 Mar 98 - 07:48 PM
Sasha Nyary 01 Apr 98 - 06:09 PM
charlotte 01 Apr 98 - 07:23 PM
Bert 02 Apr 98 - 12:40 PM
02 Apr 98 - 06:36 PM
Bruce O. 02 Apr 98 - 07:02 PM
S.P. Buck Mulligan 03 Apr 98 - 07:42 AM
Ferrara 04 Apr 98 - 03:00 PM
Bob Bolton 05 Apr 98 - 10:43 PM
Alan of Australia 06 Apr 98 - 12:12 AM
Pete M 06 Apr 98 - 04:38 PM
Bob Bolton 06 Apr 98 - 08:33 PM
Alan of Australia 06 Apr 98 - 11:37 PM
Bruce O. 06 Apr 98 - 11:59 PM
Bert 07 Apr 98 - 09:13 AM
alison 08 Apr 98 - 02:19 AM
Bruce O. 08 Apr 98 - 04:31 PM
Pete M 08 Apr 98 - 04:43 PM
Bert 08 Apr 98 - 05:22 PM
Bruce O. 08 Apr 98 - 06:11 PM
Pete M 08 Apr 98 - 08:15 PM
Tim Jaques tjaques@netcom.ca 11 Apr 98 - 02:40 PM
Bert 13 Apr 98 - 12:50 PM
Ray parker, 24 beaufort avenue, High Harrington, 02 Apr 99 - 08:11 PM
sheryle W.Australia 28 Sep 99 - 10:46 AM
Graham Pirt 28 Sep 99 - 08:16 PM
sheryle.W.Australia 08 Oct 99 - 10:19 AM
Steve Parkes 08 Oct 99 - 10:52 AM
Graham Pirt 14 Oct 99 - 06:41 PM
sheryle western australia 04 Nov 99 - 10:13 AM
Snuffy 01 Apr 01 - 12:45 PM
GUEST,Bruce O. 01 Apr 01 - 03:53 PM
GUEST,SUSIE 02 Apr 01 - 12:37 PM
Share Thread
more
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:






Subject: Do ye ken John Peel?
From: cstrawn@gte.net
Date: 25 Mar 98 - 05:21 PM

There is an old English folk song titled "Do ye ken John Peel?" (ken means "know"). I have the lyrics but I'm trying to find out more about the person John Peel. He hunted with hounds in 19th century England and died in 1854. Would appreciate any additional info I can get.

charlotte


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Do ye ken John Peel?
From: alison
Date: 25 Mar 98 - 06:38 PM

Hi,

Can't remember very much.... but there was something about him (or someone else by the name of Peel) being in the police. Therefore police became known as "peelers".

Slainte

Alison


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Do ye ken John Peel?
From: Ould Bobby Bob
Date: 25 Mar 98 - 07:02 PM

The Peel of the Peelers was Sir Robert Peel, who set up a police force in London.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Do ye ken John Peel?
From: Bert
Date: 25 Mar 98 - 08:52 PM

I used to work with a guy who claimed to be a descendent of his. He come from North West England, somewhere up Barrow In Furness way.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Do ye ken John Peel?
From: MarcB
Date: 26 Mar 98 - 02:26 PM

There is a display on John Peel in the Museum of the Border Regiment in Carlisle Castle in Carlisle, Cumbria, England. He hailed from that quarter though I can't remember what I read about his connection to the Borderers. I have made an inquiry regarding that connection and will pass it on to you all when I find out.

They have original sheet music, manuscipt, etc. for the song. As it's one that I've been doing for a while, and recorded with Morrigan on Folkways, I was very interested to find Mr. Peel's native soil:)

MarcB


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Do ye ken John Peel?
From: charlotte
Date: 26 Mar 98 - 03:47 PM

Wow. Thank you MarcB; that's the most I've found out so far. I'll have to check a map to see if that's the same area Bert's friend is from. I'm looking forward to reading more if you find out.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Do ye ken John Peel?
From: Bert
Date: 27 Mar 98 - 09:52 AM

Just found this


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Do ye ken John Peel?
From: rich r
Date: 27 Mar 98 - 11:04 PM

The following extended quote is taken from "The American Song Treasury: 100 Favorites" by Theodore Raph (Dover, 1986). The book was originally published in 1964 as "The Songs We Sang: A Treasury of American Popular Music"

"This is the song of a fox hunt, a sport originating in the British Isles around 1700 and still quite popular up to the present time. John Pel was a real person, the English novelist John George Whyte-Melville, formerly a captain in the Coldstream Guards. He was an expert hunter during the middle 1800's and was considered the laureate of fox hunting. ON the occasion of his death on the hunting field in 1854, Whyte-Melville's friends attended the funeral after which they went for drinks. Here was the setting for the birth of "D'Ye Ken John Peel". After a couple of drinks one of his close friends , John Woodcock Graves, scribbled some verses in tribute to Whyte-Melville. He used the melody of an old folk song "Bonnie Annie." It is very likely the original "Bonnie Annie" arrived in America shortly after the War of 1812, but only a small handful of people were attracted to it. Years later, when Graves' version appeared, interest picked up to some extent. Many glee clubs and college students adopted the song, and with the aid of folk-song enthusiasts the song was kept very much alive well into this century. However, it was not until the mid-1940's that this melody became nationally popular om the from of the Pepsi Cola jingle frequently played over the radio. After the jingle was discontinued the catchy melody was still remembered and enjoyed by millions, and thus the original "John Peel" lyrics were restored."

I cannot attest to the veracity of this tale, but it seems too elaborate with precise names to be totally apocraphal. One small inconsistency is the last line stating the original John Peel lyrics were restored when the original lyrics were really Bonnie Annie. Anybody know the Pepsi jingle?

rich r


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Do ye ken John Peel?
From: Ferrara
Date: 28 Mar 98 - 07:00 AM

There's a song, "The Horn of the Hunter," which Ed Trickett sings, that's also about John Peel but is recent.

I've heard (truth or fakelore?) that the words "with his coat so gay" really should be "in his coat of gray." According to my friend (a Mudcat member), John Peel always hunted on foot (?), not being of the upper classes; and always wore a gray (or grey) coat. Maybe he can supply more info.

A bit of the jingle:

Pepsi Cola hits the spot / 12 full ounces that's a lot / ???? and ?? too -- /Pepsi Cola is so good for you.

The last line is different from the tune in John Peel. Bill Day will probably remember the missing line.

In college (early 60's) we came up with variations on this jingle, mostly irreverant and/or indecent. I only remember,

Christianity hits the spot,/ 12 apostles, that's a lot,/ Holy Ghost and the Virgin too,/ Christianity is good for you.

Any more?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Do ye ken John Peel?
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 28 Mar 98 - 01:18 PM

a) anyone can discover Horn of the Hunter---it's in the database.

The original "missing" line for the Pepsi Jingle was:

"Twice as much for a nickle, too"

to note the fact that Pepsi came in 12-ounce bottles while the classic wasp-waisted Coca Cola bottle held 6.

There was once a parody relating to South Africa which started: Do ye ken Jan Smuts..

Anuone remember it?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Do ye ken John Peel?
From: Bruce O.
Date: 28 Mar 98 - 02:09 PM

According to an article by Anne Geddes Gilchrist in Journal of the English Folk Dance and Song Society, 1941, the song was by John Percival Graves. The tune evolved from "Red House" in the Dancing Master from 1695, through "Whaur will our goodman lie"/" "Where will bonny Annie lie", and it was apparently Peel's mother's singing of "Bonnie (or Canty) Annie" to her grandson that gave Graves his tune. Gilchrist cites several subsequent publications of the tune in Scots works, and in John Gay's 'Polly'. She also discuses the fragments of songs seemingly connected with the fragmentary song "Bonnie Annie", of which not much is really known. She gave the 'Dancing Master' tune, one from Oswald's Caledonian Pocket Companion, and a Welsh version of c 1896. The latter, in English, is 'The Red House of Cardiff- a pipe dance.'


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Do ye ken John Peel?
From: Alan of Australia
Date: 28 Mar 98 - 08:40 PM

G'day,
Does anybody know if "Horn Of The Hunter" was originally about John Peel? I've heard it said that it was first written about another hunter (Joe Bowman???) and later changed to the better known (to the world at large) John Peel.

Cheers,
Alan


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Do ye ken John Peel?
From: Alan of Australia
Date: 29 Mar 98 - 06:14 AM

G'day,
Here's another version of "Horn Of The Hunter"

^^
JOHN PEEL

Come listen, you lads that love hunting,
You sportsmen, so gallant and true;
I'll sing of a hero, the gamest
That ever old Cumberland knew;
With him I have often at morning,
Been out on the fells with the dawn;
John Peel was no feather-bed sluggard,
This all who knew him must own.

But the horn of the hunter is silent;
On the banks of the Ellen no more,
Nor in Denton is heard its wild echo;
Clear sounding o'er Cauda's dark roar.

By Caldbeck, by Sebrham, by Welton,
Through Rosley, through Raughton, we've sped;
By Carrick's broad bosom we've halloed,
When o'er it the hunt wildly fled;
John Peel would have outstripped both Nimrod,
And left him long miles to the rear;
The blast of Peel's horn in the morning
Was music no fox liked to hear.

How often from Brayton to Skiddaw,
Through Isel, Bewaldeth, Whitefield,
We galloped like mad things together
Until in the saddle we reeled.
No scarlet, no broadcloth adorned us
No buckskin that rivalled the snow
But plain Skiddaw grey was our garment
We wore it for work not for show.

Those days are long past, but they'll never
Pass out of the mind and the heart
They'll be sung the world over forever
As long as men join in the sport;
John Peel was a man like no other
The dearest of all men to me
And John Woodcock Graves I'll remember,
A hunter both happy and free.

'Mongst Cumberland hills Peel is sleeping
Old Skiddaw looks over his dust
In the wilds of Tasmania lies Graves
Whose spirit is with us I trust.
Let's think they are both here tonight lads
And give them the honour that's due;
Tally-ho! Tally-ho! Hark forward!
Hark forward! a fox is in view.

Ho, lads! oft when night draws its mantle,
As back from foxhunting I steal,
My children cry, "Father come sing us
The song about famous John Peel";
Then here's to all hunters forever
Our pledge a pint deep let us seal
Tally-ho! lads, again, Tally-ho!
Remembering the days of John Peel

Cheers,
Alan


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Tune Add: HORN OF THE HUNTER
From: Alan of Australia
Date: 29 Mar 98 - 06:17 AM

Here is a tune:

MIDI file: HORNHUNT.MID

Timebase: 480

Name: HORN OF THE HUNTER
TimeSig: 3/4 24 8
Key: C
Tempo: 120 (500000 microsec/crotchet)
Start
0960 1 67 127 0478 0 67 127 0002 1 67 127 0478 0 67 127 0002 1 67 127 0478 0 67 127 0002 1 67 127 0478 0 67 127 0002 1 64 127 0478 0 64 127 0002 1 65 127 0478 0 65 127 0002 1 67 127 0478 0 67 127 0002 1 67 127 0478 0 67 127 0002 1 65 127 1918 0 65 127 0002 1 64 127 0478 0 64 127 0002 1 62 127 0478 0 62 127 0002 1 62 127 0478 0 62 127 0002 1 62 127 0478 0 62 127 0002 1 67 127 0478 0 67 127 0002 1 67 127 0478 0 67 127 0002 1 65 127 0478 0 65 127 0002 1 64 127 2398 0 64 127 0002 1 67 127 0478 0 67 127 0002 1 67 127 0478 0 67 127 0002 1 67 127 0478 0 67 127 0002 1 67 127 0478 0 67 127 0002 1 64 127 0478 0 64 127 0002 1 65 127 0478 0 65 127 0002 1 67 127 0478 0 67 127 0002 1 67 127 0478 0 67 127 0002 1 65 127 1918 0 65 127 0002 1 65 127 0238 0 65 127 0002 1 64 127 0238 0 64 127 0002 1 62 127 0478 0 62 127 0002 1 62 127 0478 0 62 127 0002 1 62 127 0478 0 62 127 0002 1 67 127 0478 0 67 127 0002 1 65 127 0478 0 65 127 0002 1 62 127 0478 0 62 127 0002 1 60 127 2398 0 60 127
End

This program is worth the effort of learning it.

To download the March 10 MIDItext 98 software and get instructions on how to use it click here

ABC format:

X:1
T:HORN OF THE HUNTER
M:3/4
Q:1/4=120
K:C
G6|G2G2G2|E2F2G2|G2F4|-F4E2|D2D2D2|G2G2F2|
E6|-E4G2|G2G2G2|E2F2G2|G2F4|-F4FE|D2D2D2|
G2F2D2|C6|-C6||

Cheers,
Alan


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: PEPSI COLA HITS THE SPOT
From: Bill D
Date: 29 Mar 98 - 02:49 PM

Not that it's important that anyone remember these things, but you asked...

Pepsi Cola hits the spot
12 full ounces, that's a lot
Twice as much, and better, too
Pepsi Cola is the drink fo you.

or, the parody..

Pepsi Cola hits the spot
Makes you vomit in the pot
Looks like water, tastes like wine
"Oh, my god, it's turpentine"


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Do ye ken John Peel?
From: Bruce O.
Date: 29 Mar 98 - 04:51 PM

I made an error above on "Bonnie Annie". There is a text in Herd's 'Scots Songs', II, p. 110, 1776, and I have another earlier from a mnauscript in NLS.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Do ye ken John Peel?
From: Barry Finn
Date: 29 Mar 98 - 06:28 PM

The tune to the "Horn of the Hunter" is similar to the hunting song "Bellman", is there a connection between all these songs (aside from the hunt)? Thanks Barry


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Do ye ken John Peel?
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 31 Mar 98 - 07:48 PM

Barry- The tune was also used for The Last Revel (Here's to the next that dies.) I suspect that it was just a good tune.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Do ye ken John Peel?
From: Sasha Nyary
Date: 01 Apr 98 - 06:09 PM

I have an early Pete Seeger live concert album where he is talking about how songs change. He sings the John Peel song and then says that he was singing it for some school kids who said, we sing it this way:

Pepsi Cola hits the spot ties your belly in a knot tasts like vinegar looks like ink Pepsi Cola is a stinky drink!

PS -- The English constables take their nickname, a bobby, from Sir Robert Peel.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Do ye ken John Peel?
From: charlotte
Date: 01 Apr 98 - 07:23 PM

Thanks to all who have contributed to the research on John Peel. You have made a believer in computers out of a 96 year old friend who is still avidly collecting antiques and info. She bought a tea caddy spoon with a likeness of John Peel and wanted to know just who this character was. And I've discovered Mudcat Cafe.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Do ye ken John Peel?
From: Bert
Date: 02 Apr 98 - 12:40 PM

Ah, a Tea caddy spoon. Haven't seen one for years. They were a must in every household when I was a kid.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Do ye ken John Peel?
From:
Date: 02 Apr 98 - 06:36 PM

The tradition of hunt songs goes on, whatever we may think of the tradition of fox hunting per se.

One individual with a fine collection and a participant role in the tradition was extremely pissed off when some of his lyrics were "stolen" by someone with an interest in the area. Hunt songs are very private to the hunts for whom they are generated.

The likes of Alan Bell of the Blackpool Taverners was able to get some songs from the Lancashire hunting tradition, but his name was "mud" amongst the traditional sources who were helping to produce the material

Ould Bobby Bob..


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Do ye ken John Peel?
From: Bruce O.
Date: 02 Apr 98 - 07:02 PM

There are about 75 hunting songs in each of the three volumes of 'The Universal Songster', 1825-28.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Do ye ken John Peel?
From: S.P. Buck Mulligan
Date: 03 Apr 98 - 07:42 AM

Slightly off the topic, but I think the song itself has been thoroughly covered - the mention of the tea caddy spoon reminded me that my Gran (a Scot from the Victorian era) had a mug (stirrup cup) with a hunting scene on it, and a music box in the bottom that played "John Peel." Wish I had it now.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Do ye ken John Peel?
From: Ferrara
Date: 04 Apr 98 - 03:00 PM

Barry Finn said that the tune of the hunting song "Bellman" is similar to that of "The Horn of the Hunter." There may actually be a connection; one of John Peel's famous hunting hounds was named Bellman.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Do ye ken John Peel?
From: Bob Bolton
Date: 05 Apr 98 - 10:43 PM

This is a minor postscript to "D'ye Ken John Peel".

When I first roamed from my home in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, down south to the cool climes of Hobart: Tasmania, Australia, I noticed that the iron railing fence around St David's Park was formed in five horizontal lines, like music staves. Into the stave was worked a design of musical notes forming the opening bars of "D'ye Ken John Peel".

I was told that this was because the park had been the graveyard of St David's, the Anglican cathedral church of Hobart and was the burial place of the author of the song "D'ye Ken John Peel"(presumably, John Woodcock Graves).

I know that fox hunting had appealed to the early colonists - especially down in Tasmania's more English climate and they had imported foxes to release and provide their traditional sport. It was believed that the foxes had died out (or been hunted out) but last year the team investigating claimed sightings of the (presumably) extinct "Tasmanian Tiger" (Thylacine) had followed tracks and spoor - and located a surving family of foxes!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Do ye ken John Peel?
From: Alan of Australia
Date: 06 Apr 98 - 12:12 AM

G'day Bob,
Welcome to Mudcat. As a keen photographer I presume you took a shot or two of this fence? I was in that park about 35 years ago, but my interests were different then and I don't remember the fence.

Cheers,
Alan


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Do ye ken John Peel?
From: Pete M
Date: 06 Apr 98 - 04:38 PM

Hi and all

Couple more points which may be of interest. John Peel hunted in the Lake District where the hounds are followed on foot, nothing like the commonly exported pictures of mounted "unspeakables in the pursuit of the uneatable". His coat so grey note not "gay" as is sometimes recorded refers to the Hoddden grey cloth woven from the fleece of the Herdwick sheep grazed in the area.

Ferrera, "Horn of the Hunter" was *not* anything to do wuth John Peel, it is about John Bownam, another far more recent Lake District huntsman. The Lyrics also chronical the flooding of Mardale in the thirties to provide what is now the Haweswater resevoir for Manchester and other Nw industrial towns. The Dun Bull was the local pub, and Haweswater was the original Lake which formed the basis of the resevoir. The last time I was in the Lakes in about 1985 from memory, the water was so low that the remains of the old village could be seen


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Do ye ken John Peel?
From: Bob Bolton
Date: 06 Apr 98 - 08:33 PM

G'day Alan [not to be confused with "G'day" - Registered trademark of SOCOG, used only on authorised contexts of the Sydney (Copyright) 2000 (trademark, copyright and registered) Games (Trademark registered), etcetera - if we let the greedy bastards get away with it!]

Actually, when I first saw the fence with the "D'ye Ken John Peel" music it was around 1966 and I was whizzing down to Hobart on my motorbike, between 6-day weeks working on the Hydro Dams. I did take a few photographs once I was working in Hobart itself but St David's Park was on my way to Hampden Road and courting, so I guess I ahd other things on my mind as well.

However, I will search through what passes for files from my pre-professional photography days and see if we have a pic of the harmonious fence.

Regards,

Bob Bolton


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Do ye ken John Peel?
From: Alan of Australia
Date: 06 Apr 98 - 11:37 PM

Pete,
You've answered my question, this thread 28 March, where I thought it might have been Joe Bowman. Was it John or Joe? I thought Joe because there is another hunting song titled "Joe Bowman".

Cheers,
Alan


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Do ye ken John Peel?
From: Bruce O.
Date: 06 Apr 98 - 11:59 PM

There's lots of fences in the Lake District, with steps on both sides so strollers can climb over but the sheep can't. Common sight I suppose for an Englishman, but as an American, I was impressed. There's lots of rocks too, all the way up to what the English call mountains. Ambleside and other small towns on the edge of Lake Windemere are built on the side of hills, with very narrow streets. You walk into a building off the street and go to the back of the building and look down and you see that you're on the second or third storey from the other side. Buildings on the other side of the street aren't very deep. Hills and mountains in the way.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Do ye ken John Peel?
From: Bert
Date: 07 Apr 98 - 09:13 AM

....what the English call mountains....

Just to get these mountains in proportion. If you were to take the highest mountain in the British Isles and bring it to Colorado Springs (which is on the plains) you would have to dig down about a thousand feet to get to the top of it.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Do ye ken John Peel?
From: alison
Date: 08 Apr 98 - 02:19 AM

Hi,

The steps over those fences are called "stiles".

Slainte

alison


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Do ye ken John Peel?
From: Bruce O.
Date: 08 Apr 98 - 04:31 PM

That's 'steell' in 17th century Lancashire dialect in "Robbie and Granny" on my website in the Scarce Songs file.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Do ye ken John Peel?
From: Pete M
Date: 08 Apr 98 - 04:43 PM

Bruce O and Bert, - you're treading on dangerous ground mate. Mountains, like folk music are in the eye of the beholder. Altitude above sea level has nothing to do with it.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Do ye ken John Peel?
From: Bert
Date: 08 Apr 98 - 05:22 PM

Pete,

Yes mountains can really get to you, I didn't mean to put down anyone's special mountains.

I worked for about a year in Tehran where the mountains are to the North. Then I moved to Colorado Springs and it took me years to get oriented to the mountains being in the West. People would say "head North" & I would go driving off towards the mountains every time.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Do ye ken John Peel?
From: Bruce O.
Date: 08 Apr 98 - 06:11 PM

I once saw the top of Mt. St. Helens (c 10,000') from the top of Mt. Adams (c 12,000'). That was when St. Helens still had a top. Mt. Rainier (14,000') proved beyond me, however (maybe if our amateur guide hadn't forgotten how to get around the back side of Gibralter we might have made it. But looking down of the top of Nisqually Glacier from a quarter mile up didn't encourage experimentation.) Ever seen an avalanche up close, or jumped over a crevasse? Looking down, it's white at the top, turns greenish further down, then to blue-black, then just black. It's a little nerve racking the first time.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Do ye ken John Peel?
From: Pete M
Date: 08 Apr 98 - 08:15 PM

Thanks Bert, I know exactly what you mean. Bruce O, I envy you your Mountains, I do have access to 10 -12,000 footers glaciers etc here in New Zealand, but the Lake District was where I learned about mountains and climbing. Cornices, white outs, and long drops with sharp rocks at the bottom demand the same respect where ever you are.

Happy climbing

Pete M


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Do ye ken John Peel?
From: Tim Jaques tjaques@netcom.ca
Date: 11 Apr 98 - 02:40 PM

I have a tea caddy, an ancient pewter thing, but I was not aware that there is a special spoon that is supposed to be used with it.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Do ye ken John Peel?
From: Bert
Date: 13 Apr 98 - 12:50 PM

Yes, there is a special spoon, but I've not seen one for years. The bowl is usually just a little smaller than a tablespoon and is more rounded, sometimes the bowl is decorated or fluted, somewhat like a fruit spoon. the handle is very short, often about half the length of the bowl and even more often with the logo of some seaside town on it. A one tablespoon measuring spoon would make a good substitute, you know, one of those cheap aluminum ones.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Do ye ken John Peel?
From: Ray parker, 24 beaufort avenue, High Harrington,
Date: 02 Apr 99 - 08:11 PM

My mother was Anne Beatrice Hayton, brother of John Peel Hayton. Son and Daughter of Jack who lived and hunted in Clifton, Nr Workington, Cumbria. Jack died around 1976. Anne passed away in 1978 John Peel Hayton lives on.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Do ye ken John Peel?
From: sheryle W.Australia
Date: 28 Sep 99 - 10:46 AM

I stumbled over these notes from your newsgroup and found them very interesting. My mother believes her family was connected to John Peel. Her immediate family came from Gateshead UK. I read with interest a note from Bert 25 Mar 1998


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Do ye ken John Peel?
From: Graham Pirt
Date: 28 Sep 99 - 08:16 PM

Just caught this thread - Where have I been? - I've sung John Peel for over thirty years using the second tune for it, not John Woodcock Graves'. This was written by the organist at Carlisle Cathedral. The tune that you usually hear it sung to is actually only the chorus tune to this version. The verse tune is quite different. Sorry not got my notes to hand and my memory fails! I'll try and find them for you tomorrow!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Do ye ken John Peel?
From: sheryle.W.Australia
Date: 08 Oct 99 - 10:19 AM

Hello Graham Pirt I am wondering if you found your notes


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Do ye ken John Peel?
From: Steve Parkes
Date: 08 Oct 99 - 10:52 AM

Just to set the record straight on the intrusive British policeman who keeps getting into this thread, I'd like to point out that the modern Police Force was created by the sometime MP for Tamworth, Staffordshire, Robert ("Bobby" to his friends, e.g. Edward, Prince of Wales, and Lily Langtree) Peel - to give him his full name: Robert "Bobby" Rozzer Cozzer Copper Scuffer Bluebottle Pig Filth Tit-head Peel; whence the popular nicknames for our gallant Lads in Blue (well, black, actually ...). There is speculation as to whether he was related to the Copper Family of Rottingdean.

Steve


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Do ye ken John Peel?
From: Graham Pirt
Date: 14 Oct 99 - 06:41 PM

Sheryle

Can't find the article - great shame. I'll keep looking. I was interested in your Gateshead connection as I am from Jarrow only a few miles away and my family originally lived in Bassenthwaite (John Peel country)from about 1590 up to 1830.

Graham


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Do ye ken John Peel?
From: sheryle western australia
Date: 04 Nov 99 - 10:13 AM

thanks for your information graham I've not been able to use my internet facility for a few weeks now but back on track now my grandmothers maiden name was Sanderson, her mothers maiden name was Vint


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: D'YE MIND JOHN PEEL
From: Snuffy
Date: 01 Apr 01 - 12:45 PM

Here's a completely different set of words that I've never heard anywhere else. It was recorded for Transatlantic by Dave and Toni Arthur ca. 1970, and uses the "normal" John Peel tune. It is rather too bloodthirsty for our current climate of opinion. Does anyone know where these words came from, and how old they are?

D'YE MIND JOHN PEEL

D'ye mind John Peel in the days gone by
How he cheered on the hounds with his jovial cry
And the blast of his horn echoed loudly and high
As it rang o'er the fields in the morning

CHORUS
Bright Phyllis he rode like a brave man and true
With his hounds on ahead and the fox full in view
While the green valleys rang with his loud whoop-haloo
And the blast of his horn in the morning.


Then away through the gorse-break, o'er moorland and fell
O'er swift-rolling rivers and deep craggy dell
John Peel was the foremost, that Reynard could tell
With his horn sounding shrill in the morning.

Oh, blithe was his heart when the death drew nigh
And cheery the glance of his bright blue eye
As he bore off the brush and waved it on high
With his horn sounding shrill in the morning.

Then a bumper, a bumper we'll swell in acclaim
And drain it with pride at the shrine of his fame
For long may each hunstman remember his name
And the blast of his horn in the morning.

@hunting @english
VRH

Wassail! V


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Do ye ken John Peel?
From: GUEST,Bruce O.
Date: 01 Apr 01 - 03:53 PM

"Where wad Bonnie Annie lie" (in the goodman's bed) is given in the Scarce Songs 2 file on my website. Also given are its tune from 'The Scots Musical Museum" and "Red House" from 'The Dancing Master', (9th ed), 1695, as ABCs.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Do ye ken John Peel?
From: GUEST,SUSIE
Date: 02 Apr 01 - 12:37 PM

John Peel is buried in the graveyard at the church in Caldbeck (in the northern Lake District). I believe he was born within just a few miles from where he was buried and the song you asked about was written in a house opposite The Oddfellows Arms in Caldbeck - there's an ancient plaque over the doorway to the relevant room to commemorate the event.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate
Next Page

  Share Thread:
More...

Reply to Thread
Subject:  Help
From:
Preview   Automatic Linebreaks   Make a link ("blue clicky")


Mudcat time: 20 November 10:53 PM EST

[ Home ]

All original material is copyright © 1998 by the Mudcat Café Music Foundation, Inc. All photos, music, images, etc. are copyright © by their rightful owners. Every effort is taken to attribute appropriate copyright to images, content, music, etc. We are not a copyright resource.