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Origins: Reynardine: Info?

DigiTrad:
REYNARDINE
REYNARDINE 2


Related threads:
Lyr/Chords Req: Bert Jansch: Reynardine (8)
Lyr Req: Reynardine (from Pentangle) (15)
Tune Req: Reynardine.tef file (8)


In Mudcat MIDIs:
One Night Upon My Rambles (first published in the Journal of the Folk Song Society (vol. I, number 3, 1904). W. Percy Merrick got it from Henry Hills (c. 1831-1901), of Lodsworth, near Petworth in Sussex. He had learned it from his mother tune used for Reynardine (2))
Reynardine (Donegal tune, as published by Herbert Hughes.)
Reynardine (version sung by A.L. Lloyd, which he had originally from Tom Cook, of Eastbridge, Suffolk. Tune collected by Merrick from Henry Hills, a Sussex farmer." )


Martin Ryan 04 Mar 98 - 05:33 AM
Earl 04 Mar 98 - 01:32 PM
Moira Cameron 04 Mar 98 - 02:09 PM
Bruce O. 04 Mar 98 - 06:04 PM
Susan of DT 04 Mar 98 - 07:20 PM
Lorraine 04 Mar 98 - 07:55 PM
Barry Finn 04 Mar 98 - 08:51 PM
Will 04 Mar 98 - 09:14 PM
Martin Ryan 05 Mar 98 - 04:58 AM
Catfeet 05 Mar 98 - 11:02 PM
Martin Ryan. 27 Apr 98 - 05:53 PM
Bruce O. 27 Apr 98 - 06:48 PM
Barbara 27 Apr 98 - 11:25 PM
Martin Ryan 28 Apr 98 - 04:12 AM
aldus 28 Apr 98 - 07:27 AM
Bo 30 Apr 98 - 05:38 PM
Bruce O. 30 Apr 98 - 05:47 PM
Martin Ryan. 30 Apr 98 - 08:40 PM
Martin Ryan. 30 Apr 98 - 08:42 PM
Barbara 30 Apr 98 - 08:59 PM
Moira Cameron 01 May 98 - 12:48 AM
Bruce O. 01 May 98 - 02:54 PM
Barry Finn 04 Jun 98 - 09:03 PM
Martin Ryan. 04 Jun 98 - 09:13 PM
dick greenhaus 04 Jun 98 - 10:15 PM
Bruce O. 04 Jun 98 - 10:59 PM
Bruce O. 05 Jun 98 - 12:06 AM
05 Jun 98 - 07:42 AM
Garry Gillard 27 Feb 00 - 09:45 AM
kendall 27 Feb 00 - 12:44 PM
GUEST 28 Feb 00 - 07:51 AM
GUEST,aldus 28 Feb 00 - 09:59 AM
Lady McMoo 28 Feb 00 - 10:44 AM
Hollowfox 01 Mar 00 - 03:43 PM
Peg 01 Mar 00 - 04:21 PM
Elektra 01 Mar 00 - 05:18 PM
pavane 10 Aug 01 - 04:02 AM
AllisonA(Animaterra) 20 Oct 01 - 10:14 AM
weepiper 20 Oct 01 - 09:43 PM
AllisonA(Animaterra) 21 Oct 01 - 07:35 AM
Malcolm Douglas 21 Oct 01 - 08:54 AM
AllisonA(Animaterra) 21 Oct 01 - 12:38 PM
Malcolm Douglas 21 Oct 01 - 03:32 PM
Desert Dancer 21 Oct 01 - 06:57 PM
AllisonA(Animaterra) 21 Oct 01 - 07:11 PM
GUEST,BigDaddy 21 Oct 01 - 08:21 PM
Malcolm Douglas 21 Oct 01 - 09:53 PM
GUEST,Rich-Joy 21 Oct 01 - 10:16 PM
GUEST,Guest 21 Oct 01 - 10:49 PM
Malcolm Douglas 21 Oct 01 - 11:02 PM
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Subject: Reynardine: Info?
From: Martin Ryan
Date: 04 Mar 98 - 05:33 AM

I think the Alzheimer's is getting to me at last! I heard someone singing "Reynardine" the other night and couldn't,for the life of me, remember what the song is "actually" about. Something rattled in my brain about the recent "vampires songs" thread....

DT has two versions with a reference I don't have access to (sic). My own collection throws up a blank at a first look.

Help?

Regards


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Subject: RE: Reynardine: Info?
From: Earl
Date: 04 Mar 98 - 01:32 PM

I have it on a CD by Robert and Berrand. The liner notes describe Reynardine as "... a sylvan Bluebeard whose bestial cruelty is matched only by his cunning charm."


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Subject: RE: Reynardine: Info?
From: Moira Cameron
Date: 04 Mar 98 - 02:09 PM

I've heard countless different renditions and interpretations of this song. It became quite an obsession with me a few years ago. I've heard it described in books and on album notes as being about a Vampire (that was Buffy Sainte Marie's interpretation), a Highwayman (A.L.Lloyd on an Ann Briggs album), a man with supernatural powers (in a Helen Creighton collection of Canadian folksongs), and the list goes on.

My favourite interpretation comes from a performance John Roberts and Tony Barrand gave at a folk club in Toronto about 25 years ago. They made the connection between the man's name-Reynardine- and the traditional English folk tale, "Mr. Fox." (Reynard is the french wotd for fox.) "Mr. Fox" is similar to the tale Perreault collected called "Bluebeard". I prefer to interpret Reynardine as a very smart-looking, smooth-talking, manipulative man not unlike the classic serial killers of today. Nothing magical about a serial killer.


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Subject: RE: Reynardine: Info?
From: Bruce O.
Date: 04 Mar 98 - 06:04 PM

Maureen Jollife in 'The Third Book of Irish Ballads' give a text of the song followed by Dr. George Sigerson's rewritten version (with music), "The Mountains of Pomeroy".
In the latter Sigerson take Renardine to be (chorus) 'An outlawed man in a land forlorn,/ He scorned to turn and fly/ But kept the cause of freedom safe/ All on the mountains high'.
This may be to some little extent be based on the (real) life of Edmund Ryan, "Ned of the Hill/Eamon o Chnoic", who didn't join the 'Wild Geese' and go to France after 1691, but stayed as an outlaw in Ireland. He was eventually pardoned, but was murdered by a bounty hunter before the pardon was publicized.
Sigerson's interpretation doesn't give Renardine any sinister qualities.


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Subject: RE: Reynardine: Info?
From: Susan of DT
Date: 04 Mar 98 - 07:20 PM

Martin - The first screen on the DT disk version is just some logos that not all systems display properly. Just hit return to get to the search screen.


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Subject: RE: Reynardine: Info?
From: Lorraine
Date: 04 Mar 98 - 07:55 PM

I seem to remember Margaret MacArthur singing Reynardine on one of her concerts in Washington area She enjoyed telling a story of collecting it in Vermont and asking the woman she collected it from who was Raynardine? She had no idea but loved the story--Margaret sings it one of her albums, but I can't remember which-any help out there??


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Subject: RE: Reynardine: Info?
From: Barry Finn
Date: 04 Mar 98 - 08:51 PM

I seem to remember Martin Carthy singing of a Bold Reynold (the Fox), a view from the Fox's eyes. Barry


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Subject: RE: Reynardine: Info?
From: Will
Date: 04 Mar 98 - 09:14 PM

That sounds familiar, Barry. June Tabor also has a version of Reynard the Fox (with Nic Jones on fiddle) on her Ashes and Diamonds recording.


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Subject: RE: Reynardine: Info?
From: Martin Ryan
Date: 05 Mar 98 - 04:58 AM

Susan

Thanks - its the book (Laws) referred to in the notes to the two versions that I don't have access to!

Myself, I use the Mac version on disc. Hope its updated soon!

Bruce

Interesting re Sigerson's adaptation - a song not heard very often nowadays.

Everyone else: Many thanks - keep it coming!

Regards


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Subject: RE: Reynardine: Info?
From: Catfeet
Date: 05 Mar 98 - 11:02 PM

I've actually heard it described as a song of a were-fox who lures young girls to their deaths in the mountains of Scotland.

Catfeet


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Subject: RE: Reynardine: Info?
From: Martin Ryan.
Date: 27 Apr 98 - 05:53 PM

Can we have another go at this one, please?
Hughes (1909) in "Irish Country Songs" gives a version and says "In the locality where I obtained this fragment, Reynardine is known as the name of a faery which changes into the shape of a fox."

P.W. Joyce in "Ancient Irish Music" (1912) gives one verse only of a version under the title "The Mountains High" , with the placename Pomeroy (Tyrone) but also refers to a version with Fermoy in Cork (I think June Tabor used that name).

Petrie (1855) gives tune only as Reynardine - "from a ballad singer at Rathmines Nov. 1852". Coincidentally, Rathmines, an inner suburb of Dublin, is where I spent the first four years of my life.

I have seen a copy of a ballad sheet (Cathnach) of "Mountains High" which is clearly the same song, with no specific place identified and with the name rendered as Randal Rine! No idea of the date - but I imagine its earlier than 1855.

Sigerson, who was born in Tyrone, appears to have adapted the song for the patriotic "Mountains of Pomeroy".

So. Can anyone push it further back or point out European connections?

Regards


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Subject: RE: Reynardine: Info?
From: Bruce O.
Date: 27 Apr 98 - 06:48 PM

I don't have a book by Leslie Shepherd giving dates for 18th and 19th century ballad printers, but my fuzzy recollection is that Jemmy Catnach was c 1825-55.

Hughes' 'fragments' were sometimes bawdy songs that he wouldn't publish. "Next market day" for example. See what he started with for "The Stuttering Lovers" on my website. His version is barely recognizable. I don't trust him at all. The Cathedral Cacophany (known by many here) sing it, but I don't know if they know much about it.
So what's new about Sigerson's version?


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Subject: RE: Reynardine: Info?
From: Barbara
Date: 27 Apr 98 - 11:25 PM

Frankie Armstrong sings an English version of Mr. Fox that incorporates the line `How high the wall?' She says it has to do with the coming of age of the girl, the discovery of her sexuality. Which I suppose is the underlying theme of a lot of Vampire myths, and made Ann Rice much money: once you do *that*, you can't go back. Barbara


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Subject: RE: Reynardine: Info?
From: Martin Ryan
Date: 28 Apr 98 - 04:12 AM

Bruce
You're near enough with Catnach's dates! I have Shepherd's book and he gives them as 1813-40 or so. SO we get that far back for now.
What were you referring to in "Next Market Day"? Start another thread if necessary.

Barbara
Thanks. Haven't heard the Frankie Armstrong version.


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Subject: RE: Reynardine: Info?
From: aldus
Date: 28 Apr 98 - 07:27 AM

I know this is a change of subject...but speaking of Frankie Armstron, does anyone know if her first album is available. It's on the Topic label I believe. I think it came out in the late sixties but I have not been able to find it on tape of cd.


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Subject: RE: Reynardine: Info?
From: Bo
Date: 30 Apr 98 - 05:38 PM

Anyone seriously interested in this thread as culture should deffinately seek out the Renard Society, a literary society dedicated exclusively to tales of Renard the fox.

Its a pretty dry web site but that would be the beginnings of the 'high road' to researching this background. http://www.hull.ac.uk/Hull/FR_Web/fox.html

Bo


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Subject: RE: Reynardine: Info?
From: Bruce O.
Date: 30 Apr 98 - 05:47 PM

Martin, "The next market day" is a fragment in Hughes' Vol. I of Irish Country Songs. Frank MacPeake sang a fuller version (Maid going to Comber). It's derived from "Carman's Whistle (2 versions of 16th century)/ Comber's Whistle" (17th century) on my website.


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Subject: RE: Reynardine: Info?
From: Martin Ryan.
Date: 30 Apr 98 - 08:40 PM

Bruce

Gotcha. I thought it might be somethibng else. "Comber" in the two senses is interestiong - I'll have a look atyour site,

Bo
Thanks! I'll have a look in detail later - pity about the French!

Regards


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Subject: RE: Reynardine: Info?
From: Martin Ryan.
Date: 30 Apr 98 - 08:42 PM

Sorry about the typos in the last message - that's what I get for replying at 2 a.m. after a few songs and as many pints!

Regards


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Subject: RE: Reynardine: Info?
From: Barbara
Date: 30 Apr 98 - 08:59 PM

aldus, I don't have a recording of Frankie Armstrong singing it. I do have a Sierra Briar recording - late 60's, early 70's? of hers called 'And the Music Plays So Grand'. Could tape you that. I may have heard her sing it in person. I was a BIG fan of hers back then and went to everything in the Bay Area, and Sweetsmill to hear her. Barbara


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Subject: RE: Reynardine: Info?
From: Moira Cameron
Date: 01 May 98 - 12:48 AM

My favourite rendition of "reynardine" is one recorded by Fairport Convention on their album Leif and Leige. The wobbling electric guitar makes the song very eerie and disturbing.


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Subject: RE: Reynardine: Info?
From: Bruce O.
Date: 01 May 98 - 02:54 PM

Re: "Maid going to Comber" etc. I suspect both "Carman's Whistle" and "Watkin's Ale" were inspired by "Malkin was a country Maid" which was earlier. All that survives is on my website, with what I think is a later reworking, "Down in the North Country", in turn condensed to "The Farmer's Daughter of Merry Wakefield". There's a cruder 17th century drollery song that's similar, and survives as a traditional song sometimes called "All Fours".


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Subject: RE: Reynardine: Info?
From: Barry Finn
Date: 04 Jun 98 - 09:03 PM

refresh


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Subject: RE: Reynardine: Info?
From: Martin Ryan.
Date: 04 Jun 98 - 09:13 PM

I finally got hold of the article referred to in the notes to the DT version of this. As I understand it, it argues that the basic source from which all current versions of this come is a broadsheet (probably "The Mountains High", of which several early 19th c. versions are known). The "supernatural" bit, suggesting vampires, werewolves or whatever, may come from verses written by the Irish Poet Joseph Campbell at the beginning of the 20th cent. Given that Bram Stoker was Irish, this may even be right! The idea was suggested by an informant of Hughes who said that "Reynardine" was the name of a "faery" which changed into a fox.

Not sure I believe this, yet...

Regards


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Subject: RE: Reynardine: Info?
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 04 Jun 98 - 10:15 PM

Mark Twain (in another context) commented about being able to: "...reach such a rich harvest of speculation from such a meager collection of facts." Or words to that effect.

I really haven't encountered any supernatural aspect to Reynardine. A were-banjo-picker, maybe?


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Subject: RE: Reynardine: Info?
From: Bruce O.
Date: 04 Jun 98 - 10:59 PM

Thomas Campbell, the poet who wrote "The Exile of Erin", "Lore Ullin's Daughter" and a few other peoms that were set to music was born in Glasgow in 1777. The only Joseph Campbell in O'Donoghue's 'Poets of Ireland' is Seosamh MacCathmaoil, who wrote 'Songs of the Uladh', written to old Irish airs, 1904, (arranged by Herbert Hughes) and later works.


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Subject: RE: Reynardine: Info?
From: Bruce O.
Date: 05 Jun 98 - 12:06 AM

I misread Martin Ryan's note above. His Joseph Camppell and the one I noted were evidenly the same, and the song is probably in the 1904 collection. The song is Laws P15, and Laws says that Mackenzie gave detailed references in 'Ballads and Sea Songs from Nova Scotia'. Mackenzie cites many broadside and songbook printings. The earliest is a Boston broadside of c 1813. The song is also in 'The American Songster', 1836.


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Subject: RE: Reynardine: Info?
From:
Date: 05 Jun 98 - 07:42 AM

Dick

Needless to say - I forgot to post the puzzling verses - which are not in the DT version! The reference is to "his teeth did brightly shine", or thereabouts. I'll dig it out when I get home!

Apologies

Regards


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Subject: RE: Reynardine: Info?
From: Garry Gillard
Date: 27 Feb 00 - 09:45 AM

I've just put four versions of Reynardine on my site: by Martin Carthy, AL Lloyd, Anne Briggs and Coope Boys & Simpson, including stanzas with teeth!

HTH, Gaz

Reynardine


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Subject: RE: Reynardine: Info?
From: kendall
Date: 27 Feb 00 - 12:44 PM

Joe Hickerson, the folk singers folk singer, recorded this for Folk Legacy, and, did a very good job on it.


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Subject: RE: Reynardine: Info?
From: GUEST
Date: 28 Feb 00 - 07:51 AM

I think my favorite recorded version was by Green Fields of America. The version has a chorus made up of the last lines of the verse.

Linn, the Bat Goddess


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Subject: RE: Reynardine: Info?
From: GUEST,aldus
Date: 28 Feb 00 - 09:59 AM

My Favourite version is June Tabors, although I see what you mean about the Fairport Version. I have made numerous inquiries about her topic albums. Apparently they are unavailable. However, she did one in 97 or 98 called "The Grass Oergrew The Corn" . this contains a number of the same songs and an especially good version of Little Duke Arthurs Nurse....no Reynardine However... I always thought the song was about the revenge of the fox for having been so badly trated by "sporting" humans.


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Subject: RE: Reynardine: Info?
From: Lady McMoo
Date: 28 Feb 00 - 10:44 AM

I also like Shirley Collins's version of this.

mcmoo


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Subject: RE: Reynardine: Info?
From: Hollowfox
Date: 01 Mar 00 - 03:43 PM

Louis Killen tells the Mr. Fox story, and follows it with a nice, four verse version of the song "Reynardine", but I don't know that he's ever recorded it. However, in performance he credits (to the best of my memory) A.L.Lloyd with getting one or both in the east of England. in his version of the story, th ending has the heroine's brothers kill Mr. Fox with their swords, "while he stood there, howling like an animal." I've always taken this to be a broad hint at the supernatural, making the story much more interesting to me than your average neighborhood serial killer.


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Subject: RE: Reynardine: Info?
From: Peg
Date: 01 Mar 00 - 04:21 PM

and me, I vote for the John Renbourn Band version, and am also fond of une Tabor's version, which incidentally appears to have inspired a song called The Harvest Lord and the Corn Maiden...many of the same lyrics at any rate...


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Subject: RE: Reynardine: Info?
From: Elektra
Date: 01 Mar 00 - 05:18 PM

I also know of a version by Bert Jantzen (sp?) recorded mid-60's or so(?).

The most beautiful rendition I have ever heard was a duet performed in a local pub by Paul Geremiah on guitar (see also Kill it Kid thread) and Walter McDonough (formerly of The Reprobates, best known around Block Island) on fiddle.

I have begged Walter to record this many times since I heard them play it, but unfortunately he has refused thus far. (He and Paul are pals from way back.)

*elektra*


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Subject: RE: Reynardine: Info?
From: pavane
Date: 10 Aug 01 - 04:02 AM

There are lots of copies in the Bodleian Ballad library, almost all under the name 'The Mountains High' or similar. There are only two which are actually called Reynardine, and the others all have versions of the name, such as Rynadine (1814), Roynel Doine, Randal R(h)ine. One early, copy c1820 , just says meeting Reynard all upon the mountain but most of the text is illegible. It appears from these versions that Reynard(ine) is likely to be the oldest name, the others being later corrupions.

Place names quoted include Pomisa, Pimroy, Pomeroy


Other songs
The snowdrop of the South is given to the tune of Mountains High, and obviously has the same structure.

The song under the names Sly Reynard the Fox and Death of the Fox in the Bodley collection is similar the one recorded by Nic Jones.


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Subject: RE: Reynardine: Info?
From: AllisonA(Animaterra)
Date: 20 Oct 01 - 10:14 AM

Refresh- anyone have new insights?


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Subject: RE: Reynardine: Info?
From: weepiper
Date: 20 Oct 01 - 09:43 PM

The author Neil Gaiman has a version of this story in a book of short stories he did called 'Smoke and Mirrors'. He calls it 'The White Road'. He has a twist though - it's the girl and her brothers who turn out to be the foxes...


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Subject: RE: Reynardine: Info?
From: AllisonA(Animaterra)
Date: 21 Oct 01 - 07:35 AM

I can't seem to find the music for the version mentioned in the liner notes for "Dark Ships in the Forest" which is supposedly "mixolydian" in flavor- both of the tunes int the DT are major and quite cheerful tunes.


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Subject: RE: Reynardine: Info?
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 21 Oct 01 - 08:54 AM

The DT tune presumably belongs to  REYNARDINE,  which is an American version.  The same tune is also linked to from  REYNARDINE 2, which is a transcription from the Roberts and Barrand record.  Unfortunately, no indication is given that this is not the appropriate tune for that version.  The mixolydian one would be the set that everybody learned from A.L. Lloyd, I expect.  I don't think that Lloyd ever said where he got it; it's obviously related to the Reynardine tunes in the Petrie collection, but has a very different flavour.  I rather suspect him of re-making it from one of them into a more "interesting" form.


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Subject: RE: Reynardine: Info?
From: AllisonA(Animaterra)
Date: 21 Oct 01 - 12:38 PM

Yes, Roberts and Barrand refer to the A.L.Lloyd version in their liner notes. Is there a recording of that one? You say "everybody learned it from A.L.Lloyd," but to quote Pogo Possum, "Without me, nobody can be everybody" and I ain't heard it!


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Subject: RE: Reynardine: Info?
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 21 Oct 01 - 03:32 PM

The Lloyd set (sometimes a bit altered) has been recorded by Lloyd himself, and by Martin Carthy, Pentangle, Fairport Convention, Buffy Sainte-Marie, and many, many more.  (Please don't all list your favourites; this thread is long enough already!)  Here is a midi loosely modelled on Lloyd's own singing:  Reynardine (after Bert Lloyd)


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Subject: RE: Reynardine: Info?
From: Desert Dancer
Date: 21 Oct 01 - 06:57 PM

The midi linked to REYNARDINE2 is not the tune that Roberts & Barrand sing on Dark Ships in the Forest. I'll see if I can get it, unless someone beats me to it.

~ Becky in Tucson


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Subject: RE: Reynardine: Info?
From: AllisonA(Animaterra)
Date: 21 Oct 01 - 07:11 PM

Malcolm, you're my hero! Thanks for the midi; I'll have to give it several listens to get it into my head.


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Subject: RE: Reynardine: Info?
From: GUEST,BigDaddy
Date: 21 Oct 01 - 08:21 PM

Anybody have the chords as performed by Fairport Convention?


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Subject: RE: Reynardine: Info?
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 21 Oct 01 - 09:53 PM

The set recorded by Barrand and Roberts was taken from Stephen Sedley's book The Seeds of Love (1967), with an additional verse tacked on at the end.  Though popular 30 years ago, Sedley's material isn't much used, now, as most of the songs were "mix and match" collations from all manner of disparate sources, with hardly a single genuinely traditional song among them.  Reynardine, for example, was described as "Text collated from two 19th-century broadsides (The Mountains High) by Such and Pitts, plus sets collected in Ireland by Joyce and Hughes and the version sung by A.L. Lloyd, which he had originally from Tom Cook, of Eastbridge, Suffolk.  Tune collected by Merrick from Henry Hills, a Sussex farmer."

A bit of a Dog's Breakfast, in short.  The information about Lloyd's source is useful, and I'm grateful to Animaterra and Becky for making me think of checking that reference.  I may as well tie a few loose ends, here; the Such and Pitts broadsides can be seen at  Bodleian Library Broadsides:

The mountains high  Printed between 1849 and 1862 by H. Such, 123, Union Street, Boro' S.E., London.

The mountains high  Printed between 1819 and 1844 by J. Pitts, Wholesale Toy and Marble Warehouse, 6, Gt. St. Andrew Street, Seven Dials, London.

The final verse added by Roberts and Barrand is found in both the above.  The tune mentioned was first published in the Journal of the Folk Song Society (vol. I, number 3, 1904).  W. Percy Merrick got it from Henry Hills (c. 1831-1901), of Lodsworth, near Petworth in Sussex.  He had learned it from his mother, and had only a partial text, as follows:

One night upon my rambles an Irish girl I spied;
Your beauty so enticed me, I could not pass you by.
So it's with my gun I'll guard you all on the mountains high
So it's with my gun I'll guard you all on the mountains high.

She said, "Kind sir, be civil, my company forsake,
For in my own opinion I think you are some rake,
For if my parents they should know, my life they would destroy
For a-keeping of you company, all on the mountains high."

The set published by Herbert Hughes in Irish Country Songs (vol. I, 1909) has a tune fairly close to Lloyd's Sussex one; the text, again, is fragmentary, and described by Hughes as "Fragment of an Ulster Ballad: Donegal version".

If by chance you look for me
Perhaps you'll not me find,
For I'll be in my castle,
Enquire for Reynardine.

Sun and dark I followed him,
His eyes did brightly shine;
He took me o'er the mountains,
Did my sweet Reynardine.

As has been mentioned earlier, Hughes noted, "In the locality where I obtained this fragment Reynardine is known as the name of a faery that changes into the shape of a fox".  This is the only piece of evidence that supports the modern, widely-held assumption that this is a supernatural song; in common with some others, I rather suspect that Hughes' informant was just winding him up.

Midis of these tunes will go to the  Mudcat Midi Pages;  until then, they can be heard via the  South Riding Folk Network  site:

One Night Upon My Rambles  Henry Hills' tune, as recorded by Barrand and Roberts.

Reynardine  Donegal tune, as published by Herbert Hughes.


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Subject: RE: Reynardine: Info?
From: GUEST,Rich-Joy
Date: 21 Oct 01 - 10:16 PM

Funny that no-one seems to have mentioned Archie Fisher's (he of the mellifluous Scots voice!) great version of the eerie REYNARDINE in the mid to late 60's, complete with SITAR (a pre-Beatles acquisition!)- on his XTRA 1070 record "Archie Fisher" (is this available on CD, does anyone know??). Cheers.


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Subject: RE: Reynardine: Info?
From: GUEST,Guest
Date: 21 Oct 01 - 10:49 PM

There is a euphemistic 'kiss' in full traditional versions of the song (she faints and then he has sexual intercourse with her).
This is in a very few of the broadside versions, but not in those broadside texts where his name is given as 'Randal Rhine'. The latter is an expurgated text, and not ancestral to traditional versions.


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Subject: RE: Reynardine: Info?
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 21 Oct 01 - 11:02 PM

Hi, Bruce!  Do you happen to know if Lloyd ever published the set he got from Tom Cook?


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