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Music Practice

GUEST 13 Apr 01 - 10:34 AM
Don Firth 13 Apr 01 - 12:59 PM
GUEST,Roll&Go-C 13 Apr 01 - 01:34 PM
Les B 13 Apr 01 - 03:13 PM
Little Neophyte 13 Apr 01 - 03:23 PM
Justa Picker 13 Apr 01 - 03:36 PM
Murray MacLeod 13 Apr 01 - 04:27 PM
Burke 13 Apr 01 - 05:27 PM
Bernard 13 Apr 01 - 06:29 PM
Mooh 13 Apr 01 - 07:10 PM
Sorcha 13 Apr 01 - 11:34 PM
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Subject: Practice
From: GUEST
Date: 13 Apr 01 - 10:34 AM

I used to play in a Folk Group. I still play and love to find new songs. I wondered if others are faced with my silly little dilema, or is it just silly old me.

The question is. EVEN IF YOU DON'T PERFORM PUBLICLY, do you PRACTICE as though you were on stage or facing an audience?

Despite my 57 years, I'm still passionate about anti war songs and songs about saving our planet.

Sitting in my back room and practicing only for me, I feel a bit silly 'going for it' boots an' all.

I like amusing songs too. You look even sillier doing these as though you have an audience and you are alone apart from the family in the lounge room.

But if you don't go for it boot an' all, I ask myself, then why bother? Just interested in other's views.

BS


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Subject: RE: Practice
From: Don Firth
Date: 13 Apr 01 - 12:59 PM

If you have performed or might perform again, keep an audience handy inside your head. Your imagination can help you become a better performer. It's a form of mental rehearsal. Conjure them up as part of your practice and lay it on 'em! Much more enjoyable than singing to the wall, and if you screw up, no barrage of rotten vegetables!

Don Firth


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Subject: RE: Practice
From: GUEST,Roll&Go-C
Date: 13 Apr 01 - 01:34 PM

Still, there's a whole lot gained if you can find a small group of people to sing your songs with. I don't know how far you are from such people but posting a "request for a local song swap" right here might do the trick. Yes, I can sing to myself and the cats, but singing with other people makes it a lot more fun!


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Subject: RE: Practice
From: Les B
Date: 13 Apr 01 - 03:13 PM

Good question. In thinking it over I see a difference between "practicing" and "rehearsing".

Practice, in my mind, would be running through a song or tune and stopping to iron out the hard parts or search for forgotten words.

Rehearsing would be doing everything straight through, no stops, just like you would for an audience.

When your practicing gets to the point that it sounds like rehearsal, you're ready to find an audience.


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Subject: RE: Practice
From: Little Neophyte
Date: 13 Apr 01 - 03:23 PM

I find when I'm rehearing I get a lot more playing time in than when I am just practicing for myself. Like Roll&Go-C mentioned, it would make sense to find a small group to play with or an audience to play for. Not only is it more rewarding, but in my experience it has kept a fire under my butt to practice more.
The commitment to others makes a wonderful concrete structured goal.

Bonnie


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Subject: RE: Practice
From: Justa Picker
Date: 13 Apr 01 - 03:36 PM

(...for me...)

Practice = taking sections of songs and working them through, or experimenting and noodling around.

Rehearsal = playing every song in its entirety, from beginning to end (no stopping and starting over if you make a mistake or hit a bad note or accidentally mute it.) (Doing this in front of a mirror is optional. Just remember to keep your mouth from dropping open, or any manner or voluntary facial contortions and you'll look fine on stage.)


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Subject: RE: Practice
From: Murray MacLeod
Date: 13 Apr 01 - 04:27 PM

Sorry to get pedantic here but we "practise" (with an "s") in order that our "practice" (with a "c* ) may enable us to become better nusicians.

Verb = Practise
Noun = Practice

Somebody may well tell me that this is only applicable in Britain, in which case I apologize (or apologise) .....

Murray


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Subject: RE: Practice
From: Burke
Date: 13 Apr 01 - 05:27 PM

Thread creep alert!

It is British usage. Mirriam/Webster (the US authority) lists the spelling for both as practice with practise as an alternate spelling for both. All the earliest OED examples use -ise, or -ize, or -yse for both. "The later spelling -ice is conformed to that of the suffix in justice, service, etc."

We now return you to discussion of how Guest might approch playing alone. If you are alone apart from the family in the lounge room, I declare that at 57 you have the right to not worry about if it looks of feels silly. Even if they can see you, so what? Do it in whatever way feels good to you.


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Subject: RE: Practice
From: Bernard
Date: 13 Apr 01 - 06:29 PM

Wot is a nusician?!! ;o)

I'm afraid I never 'rehearse'. I occasionally doodle to work something out, but I prefer the spontaneity of trying out new stuff with a live audience.

If I get away with it, it's a new addition to my repertoire; if I don't, I ditch it.

Okay, it works for me, and I'm not advocating it for everyone!


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Subject: RE: Practice
From: Mooh
Date: 13 Apr 01 - 07:10 PM

It's curious that I get this same question from alot of adult students of guitar who feel odd practicing music as if they were to perform it when they have no such intention. My idea is that it is not just the overt act of performance for others (strangers or otherwise) or ourselves which should be our reason for playing, but the exercising of our brain in an artistic act for self-betterment and the continuation of an enduring human skill and art. There's no reasonable difference to me between hearing music in my mind and playing/singing it out loud.

Consequently, it makes sense to me that to focus our concentration, energy, attention, and intent, on a pretend audience makes us play to a higher level. Many a student, however competent a player, can't play a song from beginning to end because they've never tried to simulate the performer/audience relationship. Their songs often lack form, dynamics, and cohesion as a result.

When I first became known as a guitar player in my parish church, I had this same problem. Suddenly I had to play something completely, for the enjoyment of others and to lead worship. It was terrifying to discover that I HAD to play better all the time, even in private, in order to play well in public. The first thing (and casualty) was my rhythm and timing, then my sloppy fingering. It was humbling to discover I wasn't near as good as I though I was.

So, even if you don't intend to play publicly, practicing as if you do will improve your playing, and give you the self-satisfaction and pride of accomplishment.

That's why bother.

Peace and Happy Easter. Mooh.


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Subject: RE: Practice
From: Sorcha
Date: 13 Apr 01 - 11:34 PM

I don't do any of the above--practise, practice, or rehearse often enough. I have no excuses. It's difficult to "rehearse" alone.......what do you do about the "breaks"? Just stop and count measures while your're bored stiff? Since I call myself an entertainer, I should do lots more of all of it. Prob'ly won't. Nobody to "make" me.......


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