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Help: Pace Egging?

DigiTrad:
PACE EGGING SONG


Related threads:
Pace Egging in London (1)
Folklore: Pace Egging (8)
Wassail/pace egg song (19)
(origins) Origins: Pace egging Song (10)
How old is Pace Egging? (32)
Pace Egg Play (26)
Abram Pace Egg Play (21)


John in Brisbane 15 Nov 00 - 01:12 AM
Margo 15 Nov 00 - 01:15 AM
BigDaddy 15 Nov 00 - 03:05 AM
Wolfgang 15 Nov 00 - 03:18 AM
sian, west wales 15 Nov 00 - 05:09 AM
GUEST,Roger the skiffler 15 Nov 00 - 05:55 AM
GUEST,Roger the skiffler 15 Nov 00 - 06:22 AM
P05139 15 Nov 00 - 06:46 AM
P05139 15 Nov 00 - 06:47 AM
manitas_at_work 15 Nov 00 - 07:24 AM
Bernard 15 Nov 00 - 08:28 AM
Snuffy 15 Nov 00 - 09:05 AM
Malcolm Douglas 15 Nov 00 - 09:18 AM
paddymac 16 Nov 00 - 09:26 AM
bill\sables 16 Nov 00 - 03:09 PM
mousethief 16 Nov 00 - 03:23 PM
John in Brisbane 16 Nov 00 - 05:54 PM
mousethief 17 Nov 00 - 05:38 PM
tradman 17 Nov 00 - 05:49 PM
GUEST,Grandad ,Burscough. 20 Apr 03 - 05:30 AM
GUEST,Desdemona 20 Apr 03 - 10:35 PM
Hester 20 Apr 03 - 11:54 PM
Mark Dowding 21 Apr 03 - 04:13 AM
greg stephens 21 Apr 03 - 06:43 AM
Nigel Parsons 21 Apr 03 - 07:35 AM
belfast 21 Apr 03 - 08:06 AM
bradfordian 21 Apr 03 - 08:11 PM
GUEST,Train Guard 22 Apr 03 - 01:33 PM
TheBigPinkLad 22 Apr 03 - 03:59 PM
Dave the Gnome 22 Apr 03 - 06:27 PM
GUEST,Andrew 23 Apr 03 - 08:32 AM
IanC 23 Apr 03 - 09:50 AM
Bearheart 23 Apr 03 - 10:41 AM
GUEST,Train Guard 23 Apr 03 - 12:34 PM
GUEST,sheildsfolk 23 Apr 03 - 01:06 PM
Dave the Gnome 24 Apr 03 - 04:19 AM
GUEST,Folkmonster 24 Apr 03 - 10:44 PM
Roger the Skiffler 25 Apr 03 - 04:14 AM
Compton 25 Apr 03 - 06:59 PM
bradfordian 28 Feb 08 - 07:11 PM
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Subject: Pace Egging?
From: John in Brisbane
Date: 15 Nov 00 - 01:12 AM

I know the song (it's in the DT) and I understand that it has something to do with Halloween, but I would appreciate please a quick, potted history of the practice. Regards, John


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Subject: RE: Help: Pace Egging?
From: Margo
Date: 15 Nov 00 - 01:15 AM

John, what's Pace? I know pranksters throw eggs on Halloween - Is that what you mean? Margo


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Subject: RE: Help: Pace Egging?
From: BigDaddy
Date: 15 Nov 00 - 03:05 AM

It's not Halloween. Go to http://wwwmcc.murdoch.edu.au/~gillard/watersons/pace.htm Let me know if this works or not. Cheers


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Subject: RE: Help: Pace Egging?
From: Wolfgang
Date: 15 Nov 00 - 03:18 AM

a short explanation is here (same link as BigDaddy has given which doesn't work for me for reasons unknown).

Wolfgang


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Subject: RE: Help: Pace Egging?
From: sian, west wales
Date: 15 Nov 00 - 05:09 AM

There's a version of this at Easter in parts of Wales, notably Anglesey. It's now a (dying) children's custom - going door to door with clappers (bits of wood that you slap together, sort of) and recite a poem asking for eggs.

I don't know if Tegwyn is still hanging about - he'd be able to tell you lots more on this.

sian, west wales


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Subject: RE: Help: Pace Egging?
From: GUEST,Roger the skiffler
Date: 15 Nov 00 - 05:55 AM

In Alderney in the Channel Isles they have a ceremony on "jug o' punch Sunday" when by tradition you could help yourself to an egg from anyone's henhouse and a jug of milk from their cow to be turned with rum and spices into a creamy punch. Each pub has its own recipe and devotees travel round the pubs trying them all (though they don't steal the ingredients anymore) until they collapse!
In Greece on Easter Sunday people take boiled eggs dyed red to church and after the marathon Easter service (being Greeks they break it up by popping out for a smoke and a chat while the poor priest carries on)they greet each other: "Christos Anestis" "Anestis Eleftheros" (pardon my poor transliteration) Meaning "Christ is risen" "He is risen indeed". Then you bang your egg against theirs for good luck for the year. Probably your good luck if theirs break. Probably same idea of egg =life, mixture of pagan and Christian tradition.
RtS


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Subject: RE: Help: Pace Egging?
From: GUEST,Roger the skiffler
Date: 15 Nov 00 - 06:22 AM

As usual I've made a cock-up!
The Alderney ceremony is "Milk-a-Punch Sunday" , not "Jug-a-...The folk thing must be getting ingrained at last!
RtS


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Subject: RE: Help: Pace Egging?
From: P05139
Date: 15 Nov 00 - 06:46 AM

Personally, I thought Pace Egging was an Easter practice in which people boil eggs and, once they are cool, roll them along the ground. I could of course be wrong...

Anyway I'm in the college library so I'm gonna check.


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Subject: RE: Help: Pace Egging?
From: P05139
Date: 15 Nov 00 - 06:47 AM

No luck there then!!


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Subject: RE: Help: Pace Egging?
From: manitas_at_work
Date: 15 Nov 00 - 07:24 AM

Perhaps you are thinking of Soul-caking? There are mummers plays associated with Soul-caking which are performed around this time of year just as there are pace-egging plays.

I think it's done mainly in Cheshire. You could do an internet search on Antrobus or Comberbach as these are two of the places its done.


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Subject: RE: Help: Pace Egging?
From: Bernard
Date: 15 Nov 00 - 08:28 AM

Pace (Lancashire dialect for 'Peace') Egging is at Easter, traditionally, Souling (or soul caking) is on All Souls Day (November 2nd), and Mumming is done around Christmas.

All the plays last around 10 minutes (on average), and are basically Knight George slaying the Turkish Knight (or similar), and the Doctor revives him.

See JJ's posting re. Warburton Soulers:

Link


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Subject: RE: Help: Pace Egging?
From: Snuffy
Date: 15 Nov 00 - 09:05 AM

I thought Pace meant Easter (the same same as Paques in France, and the Paschal Lamb).

In the middle ages eggs (being an animal product) counted as meat, so couldn't be eaten in Lent. You ate up all your eggs on Shrove Tuesday (Mardi Gras/Pancake Day).

But the hens didn't stop laying. Instead of throwing these eggs away, you hardboiled them and could use them after Easter - for food or fun as the whim took you.

Wassail! V


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Subject: RE: Help: Pace Egging?
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 15 Nov 00 - 09:18 AM

The following is taken from Charles Kightly's The Customs and Ceremonies of Britain (Thames and Hudson, 1986); not the best reference available, but the only one I have to hand:

"Paste (Pasch: Easter) or Pace Egging was ... popular throughout Northern England and Scotland, and particularly in Lancashire and Cheshire, where it survived until at least the Second World War... In earlier generations, [the song} would have been sung by young men - doubtless more interested in money and "small beer" than eggs - as part of a Pace-Egg Play, a regional variant of the Mumming Play: similar plays were also much acted in West Yorkshire, where revived local versions can be seen on Good Friday at Mytholmroyd, Midgley, Brighouse and elsewhere in the Halifax area.

Once collected (or, in recent times, bought) "real" Easter eggs are still often painted, decorated or dyed either by boiling in a coloured cloth or with some natural dye like onion skins (for a golden-brown egg); furze-blossom (yellow); "Pasque flower" (bright green) or cochineal (for the favourite red).  Then (if not eaten for breakfast) they may be concealed about the garden for an egg hunt: or, especially in northern Britain, hard-boiled for egg rolling down a hill or slope - the winner being, according to local preference, the one which rolls furthest, survives most rolls, or is successfully aimed between two pegs.  In many places this ancient sport... takes place on Easter Monday at a site fixed by long tradition.  Such include Arthur's Seat in Edinburgh; the castle moat at Penrith, Cumbria; Bunker's Hill, Derby; and, best publicized of all, Avenham Park at Preston, Lancashire, where tens of thousands roll and then eat both eggs and (latterly) oranges.

Alternatively, the eggs may be "dumped" (another northern habit) by being clasped firmly in the hand and smashed against that of an opponent until one or other breaks: or (as in parts of south-western England) a number may be marked and "shackled" (shaken) together in a sieve, the last to crack being the winner.  All such old egg customs, however, are now in acute danger from the 20th century's principal contribution to the Easter canon, namely the chocolate Easter egg."


Malcolm


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Subject: RE: Help: Pace Egging?
From: paddymac
Date: 16 Nov 00 - 09:26 AM

Three cheers for "Mudcat University". What a great place to learn all manner of things.


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Subject: RE: Help: Pace Egging?
From: bill\sables
Date: 16 Nov 00 - 03:09 PM

When I was a kid in County Durham Northern England we used to dye eggs on Good Friday and called them Pace or Paste Eggs, We would place leaves like lupin or hawthorn on the eggs and then cover the whole egg with onion skins and tie a cloth around the whole thing to keep the skins in place while we boiled them for about 15 minutes. The great surprise was when we took off the cloths and skins to reveal a tan coloured egg with leaf shapes. Sometimes the dye would come out of the cloth to add other colours. When the eggs had cooled down we used to polish them with butter. My brother , who was a very good artist, would paint scenes of the Crucifixion or the Last Supper on hard boiled eggs. On Easter Sunday we would visit neighbors and receive similar decorated eggs from them and other kids would come to our house and get their eggs from my mother. Next day Easter Monday all the kids would take their eggs to a local slope and have egg races down the hill.
We also did what was called "jarping" this was when one of us would hold an egg point up and another kid would strike it hard with his egg trying to crack it without cracking his, If he did not crack your egg it was your turn to try and crack his. Of course once your egg was cracked you had to eat it. Some of the painted eggs my brother did were kept for years and I remember seeing some of them when I was in my early twenties still on display in the homes of neighbors.

Cheers Bill


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Subject: RE: Help: Pace Egging?
From: mousethief
Date: 16 Nov 00 - 03:23 PM

Roger the Skiffler: The egg-knocking thing is quite a contest. At our church (not Greek but once Russian Orthodox, now American Orthodox if you can believe it) we have the red eggs, and say "Christ is Risen" and "Indeed He is risen" in English, and then knock away! The winner is the one whose egg is unbroken at the end of the night. Remember this is after a marathon 4+ hour worship service, and then we stuff our faces with meat, eggs, cheese, etc. and drink wine and vodka (all forbidden during Lent), so by the time we get to the egg-smashing, we're pretty joyful in more ways than one.

A Pascha service at an Orthodox Church is quite a different experience from most "religious" services you've attended -- it's worth a visit.

Not prosyletizing, honest,
Alex


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Subject: RE: Help: Pace Egging?
From: John in Brisbane
Date: 16 Nov 00 - 05:54 PM

To all those wonderful people who responded to my simple question ...thank you! Over the last few years I've created my own tradition of learning a new (contemporary mainly) song at Christmas time. It looks like I should pay the same attention to Easter in future. Warmest regards, John


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Subject: RE: Help: Pace Egging?
From: mousethief
Date: 17 Nov 00 - 05:38 PM

John: here's my favorite Easter song:

The angel cried to the Lady Full of Grace:
Rejoice, O pure Virgin! Again I say: Rejoice!
Your Son is risen from His three days in the tomb!
With Himself He has raised all the dead!
Rejoice, all ye people!
Shine! Shine! O New Jerusalem!
The Glory of the Lord has shone on you!
Exult now and be glad, O Zion!
Be radiant, O Pure Theotokos, in the Resurrection of your Son

("Theotokos" means "the one who gave birth to God" -- a title for the Virgin Mary)

Can't hardly sing this without tears in my eyes. Dunno why. It's a beautiful hymn.

Alex
O..O
=o=


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Subject: RE: Help: Pace Egging?
From: tradman
Date: 17 Nov 00 - 05:49 PM

Also related is the Jewish holiday of Passover or Pesach (pay-sakh) which falls around the same time of year as Easter. An egg dipped in salt water is eaten as part of the ritual meal.


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Subject: RE: Help: Pace Egging?
From: GUEST,Grandad ,Burscough.
Date: 20 Apr 03 - 05:30 AM

As children during the mid fifties we would walk round our village in West Lancashire, Pace egging.We carried a basket and would knock on doors, say a poem and receive an easter egg or a gift of money.The
part of the poem I can remember are the last few lines               
IF YOU HAVE NOT A SHILLING,
A HA,PENNY WILL DO,
IF YOU HAVE NOT A HA,PENNY,
THEN GOD BLESS YOU.


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Subject: RE: Help: Pace Egging?
From: GUEST,Desdemona
Date: 20 Apr 03 - 10:35 PM

Heaven help me, I'm the daughter of a Warwickshire mother & a Greek father!

At Easter, the Greeks do indeed indulge in a traditional egg-cracking contest, wherein one pits one's red egg aginst everyone else's until the last one left uncracked emerges victorious.

"Pace-egging", on the other hand, appears to be yet another esoteric activity indigenous to the British Isles, a "begging custom" traditionally performed in the Easter season. In tyhe North of England, pace egging is often conducted by teams or sides, muchg in the fashion of morris dancing, and the classic accompanying song is essentially the one to be found in the Mudcat DT.

Christós Anésti, evryone!

Desdemona (I'm baaaaaack!)


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Subject: RE: Help: Pace Egging?
From: Hester
Date: 20 Apr 03 - 11:54 PM

Here's what historian Ronald Hutton, in his usual long-winded but comprehensive manner, has to say about the origins and development of the custom:

>>>It was in north-west England that the habit of collecting food or money for the [Easter] feast developed into its most elaborate form, whereby an entertainment was provided as part of the solicitation. The actors were young people somewhat older than those who went singing and begging in the southern part of the region or (more rarely) adults. They seem to have been first recorded in the cotton-making district of south-eastern Lancashire, at the end of the eighteenth century, as 'young men grotesquely dressed, led by a fiddler, and with one or two in female attire'. Their performances varied according to their powers and the tastes of their patrons, but usually included dancing and the recitation of 'quaint' verses. They were known as 'peace-eggers', a term which will be discussed below." During the early nineteenth century they were found commonly in the textile-making communities of the Lancashire Pennines and those just over the border in Yorkshire, but also in villages and towns of Cheshire, Westmoriand, and Cumberland. After the mid-century they became rarer and also more inclined to perform on Easter Monday, as the motive for doing so became more purely one of raising money or getting beer, rather than finding food for the festival. They survived into the twentieth century around Blackburn in Lancashire, in the Upper Calder valley of Yorkshire, in the Furness peninsula, and amongst communities in the south-cast fringe of the Cumbrian mountains. For most of this period they were known either as Pace-Eggers or Jolly Boys. // Their repertoire naturally became both more varied and at times more sophisticated in the nineteenth century. At Kendal lads merely blackened their faces and paraded the streets dragginng old tins and buckets and chanting:

Trot, 'errin, trot, 'orn,
Tris Good Friday tomorn."

Around Blackburn young men also blackened their faces, but put on animal skins in addition to increase their disguise. More commonly in Lancashire and Yorkshire the groups, which numbered from three to twenty, wore ribbons or coloured paper, masks, or 'fantastic garbs'. Some bore wooden swords. In the cotton district in the earlier part of the century it was common for groups to fight each other if they collided on their circuits; in 1842 one youth was killed in such a brawl. The most ubiquitous character among them was an individual with a blackened face called Tosspot, who carried a container which in the earlier decades was used to collect eggs, and in later times money, by way of reward. His comrades sang, usually patriotic ballads, and danced (or 'capered'). // Most colourful were the customs adopted from winter pastimes of the same period. One was the carrying of a horse's head on a pole, very similar to the Old Horse or Old Ball of the Derbyshire Christmas players. This one, likewise named Old Ball, went about the industrial towns on either side of the Forest of Rossendale, taken by about six men with blackened faces or masks. It consisted of an actual horse's skull with bottle-ends for eyes, clashing jaws, and a sackcloth body to cover the performer, and followed the practice of its winter cousins in cavorting and chasing onlookers. A more widespread borrowing was of the southern English Mummers' Play, versions of which were performed by Pace-Eggers across their nineteenth-century range from Cheshire to Cumberland. The only distinctively regional touches to the surviving texts are the presence of Tosspot and the common addition of a song referring to 'Pace-Egging Time'. Unlike the Christmas presentations, these tended to occur in daylight. In the Calder valley the boys would start out early enough to earn money from engineers on their way to work. Perhaps the most distinctive tradition was that evolved by the youngsters of Far and Near Sawrey, two villages nestling among the oak woods beyond Lake Windermere in Westmortand. The chief literary fame of this community is that it became the home of the children's writer Beatrix Potter, and in view of this it is wholly appropriate that in the twentieth century the actors were all girls, who opened with a chorus of

Now we're jolly pace-eggers all in one round,
We've come a pace-egging, we hope you'll prove kind;
We hope you'll prove kind with your eggs and strong beer
For we'll come no more near you until the next year
Fol de diddle ol, fol de dee, fol de diddle ol dum day.

Individual verses were then sung to introduce the characters: Old Betsy Brownbags, Jolly Jack Tar, Lord Nelson, Old Paddy from Cork, and (of course) Old Tosspot. A standard hero-combat play followed. The reference to 'strong beer' and the complete lack of any local identity to the characters indicate how far the play had travelled across boundaries of age-groups, gender, and communities to reach this form. // Pace-Egging would make an admirable subject for a monograph of the sort recently devoted to wakes, northwestern morris, and rushbearing, all pastimes carried on in the same communities at the same time by much the same people. The same social changes, of growing affluence and wider horizons, which sapped the vigour of these, also put paid to the Pace-Eggers. By the 1920s the custom was moribund. Only one part of it, the plays, was easily susceptible to a revival, and this occurred in the Calder Valley in 1931-2, produced by a request for readings of the texts for radio broadcasts upon folk culture. Schoolteachers duly set their pupils to work performing versions from Brighouse and Midgley, and they are still presented by schools and children's theatres in the villages on either side of Halifax upon Good Friday. Although almost certainly derived from a winter custom, the plays' central actions of death and resurrection were equally well suited to the Easter season. // Pace-Egging, however, had a much broader context in the nineteenth- century north, sharing its name with a very common children's custom which derived in turn from an ancient seasonal pastime of ruling elites. This has been referred to above, and consisted of the decoration of eggs and their use as presents, adornment for homes, and items in competitions. It became practicable for commoners as soon as standards of living reached the point at which the eggs were no longer essential as foodstuffs. None the less, northern Britain was the region in which this practice became most firmly established, under the various names of peace-, pace-, pacs-, paste-, or pasch- eggs. All were probably based upon the adjective 'paschal', from the Latin name for Easter. The term 'pace egg' is first mentioned in early eighteenth- century Lancashire and dyed or gilded specimens were first recorded as popular in Northumberland in the 1770s. In the 1950s they were still made by or given to children in many areas of north-western England and in a few communities in south-cast Wales." In between those two periods they were observed as customary in all the six northern English counties and in Nottinghamshire, up the east coast of Scotland and in the Shetlands, and (apparently as an outlying example) in Somerset. They were also found in County Down, a part of the north of Ireland which has easy communications with north-western England. Rural and urban communities of all kinds enjoyed them. Often the simplest means of colouring the eggs was to boil them with onion skins, which gave a rich yellow hue to the shells; at the Durham port of Hartlepool in the 1920s, they were wrapped in gorse flowers before going into the pot, and emerged with delicate yellow and brown patterns.<<< [Stations of the Sun, pp 200-202.]

Yowza! Hutton sure doesn't skimp on the geographic detail.

I'm mystified that people get a deep yellow colour from boiling the eggs with onion skins. When I've tried this, the eggs simply turn brown, and look exactly like undyed brown eggs. However, I've had excellent luck with adding two teaspoons of tumeric and 1/4 cup white vinegar to the water used to boil eggs - that DOES give a bright yellow colour. My other favourite way of naturally dyeing Easter eggs is to boil them together with finely chopped red cabbage. When the eggs are cooked, I drain them, and roll them while still hot against the cooked cabbage, which gives them a mottled mauve/blue pattern (although this will wash off, so you have to keep them dry afterwards). I've had very minimal luck using pureed parsley to impart a green dye, though. For mottled pink, I daub the still hot eggs with a mashed strawberry (this gives a shiny glaze once dry).

Love to hear others' experiences with natural egg dyes.

Cheers, Hester


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Subject: RE: Help: Pace Egging?
From: Mark Dowding
Date: 21 Apr 03 - 04:13 AM

To Grandad, Burscough

Do you remember Bill Gibbons and Emma Vicars going round with a group of people doing the Pace Egg play. I helped Sara Grey with a thing she was doing in Ormskirk at Cross Hall school in 1991 where the kids had to go and meet people who had a story to tell about the traditions of West Lancashire. I took someone to see Bill's sister and nephew (Bill had died by then) to have a chat with them. We also got in touch with Emma's daughter. The culmination of the project was a concert at the school where I sang the Pace Egg song, playing the tune on Bill's anglo concertina that was kindly loaned to me for the concert. We had a hundred or so kids on the stage joining in the chorus. It was a great moment and Bill's nephew came up to me later on thanking us for doing it. He said tears were streaming down his face as it brought so many memories of his uncle back to him.

Please get in touch as I wouldn't mind having a chat with you.
Cheers

Mark
mark@markdowding.co.uk


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Subject: RE: Help: Pace Egging?
From: greg stephens
Date: 21 Apr 03 - 06:43 AM

My grandfather used to talk to me about Pace Egging in Millom, Cumberland(Cumbria). This would be c1900. As children they rolled eggs down a hill on Easter Saturday. I have a photo of him as a late teenager(I would guess) with a friend, blacked-up(smeared roughly, rather than uniformly black), in old clothes, looking rough rather than costumed. Alas, I dont know whether this was to perform a play, sing a song to collect money or just to fool around. He did refer to a play once, but I was only young and didnt interrogate him as deeeeply as I should have! So I dont know if the photograph directly relates to the play or not.


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Subject: RE: Help: Pace Egging?
From: Nigel Parsons
Date: 21 Apr 03 - 07:35 AM

Guest;Grandad, Burscough:
The lines you quote seem to be a little out of season. Apart from the use of 'Shilling' with a sudden drop to halfpenny, it looks like the Christmas begging song:

"Christmas is coming,The goose is getting fat.
Please to put a penny in the old man's hat.
If you haven't got a penny a ha'penny will do,
If you haven't got a ha'penny a farthing will do,
If you haven't got a farthing, God Bless You!"

Though I've heard my children come back from school having learnt this without the fourth line. Possibly their teachers can't remember farthings!

Nigel


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Subject: RE: Help: Pace Egging?
From: belfast
Date: 21 Apr 03 - 08:06 AM

This is what I recall from the streets of Belfast (but no mention of eggs and we'd never heard of pacing).

Halloween's comin' on,the goose is getting fat.
Will you please put a penny in the old man's hat.
If you haven't got a penny a ha'penny will do,
If you haven't got a ha'penny, god bless you!

We knew what a farthing was but it wasn't part of our chant.


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Subject: RE: Help: Pace Egging?
From: bradfordian
Date: 21 Apr 03 - 08:11 PM

A pace egg mumming play is still maintained by school students in the Hebden Bridge area of Yorkshire, and is performed on Easter Monday in several locations. The small hillside village of Midgely gets absolutely packed (I was thers in 2002) but there's not many "eggs" seen around anymore though.

last verse:-
Come ladies and gentlemen sat by the fire
Put your hands in your pockets and give us our desire
Put your hands in your pockets and treat us alright
If you give nowt, we'll tek nowt, farewell and goodnight
chorus:-
Here's one, two three jolly lads all in one mind
We come a pace eggin', and we hope you'll prove kind
And we hope you'll prove kind with your eggs and strong beer
For we'll come no more neigh (near) you until the next year.

In the DT I believe
Brad.


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Subject: RE: Help: Pace Egging?
From: GUEST,Train Guard
Date: 22 Apr 03 - 01:33 PM

Hopefully, Alan Seymour and his gang still perform the Pace Egging play at several locations around Bury in Lancashire. He wrote a book (which may still be available) about the Bury tradition.

   Regards,
    Train Guard


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Subject: RE: Help: Pace Egging?
From: TheBigPinkLad
Date: 22 Apr 03 - 03:59 PM

Like Bill, I too hail from County Durham (Witton Park) and we used to either roll the eggs down a bank (called appropriately the Rolly Bank) or bash them together, called 'jarping.' We dyed the eggs by boiling with onion skins or with crepe paper left over from Christmas decorations.


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Subject: RE: Help: Pace Egging?
From: Dave the Gnome
Date: 22 Apr 03 - 06:27 PM

Train Guards are all b!"£$%^s!!!

(Sorry TG of this cafe - couldn't resist it in context)

Just finished doing the Pace Egg play in Lancaster. Full of good cheer and Pussers rum. Got on the platform at Lancaster with half a dozen like minded idiots. Went for a wee. Came back. Train is at the platform, stationary. I press the button to open the door, nothing happens. I press it again, Lancaster train guard (or platform operative to be correct) comes running up saying

"You can't get on that train. It is moving!"

"No it's not" says I.

"Ah, but the flag has been shown and the driver cannot open the doors now", says he.

The train actualy moved about a minute later. He didn't use the jobsworth phrase but I suspect he was getting pretty near.

I was pretty restrained considering, but when the Glasgow to Plymouth intercity appeared about two minutes later (stopping at Preston where I could change) and he said "You can't get on that - It's an intercity!" I did tell hime where he can shove his flag...

I arrived at Salford Crescent about 6 minutes after the others. Not bad considering:-)

Cheers

Hector the Pace Egger aka Dave the Gnome


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Subject: RE: Help: Pace Egging?
From: GUEST,Andrew
Date: 23 Apr 03 - 08:32 AM

Another place in Northern Britain where they still do egg rolling is Ulverston, Cumbria. I took part once. Have no idea what you had to do to win but I certainly didn't.

There has also been mention in the thread of jarping. Thats a tradition my dad of North East family origins carried into our family. A tip - let the other person do the smashing - I reckon the passive egg usually comes off the best.

Andrew


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Subject: RE: Help: Pace Egging?
From: IanC
Date: 23 Apr 03 - 09:50 AM

Egg rolling's quite popular throughout England. Useful if you have hills though. Apparently, even the US President traditionally does it on the White House lawn!

In Cambridgeshire and the fens generally, Good Friday was a day for communal skipping. Quite a few places with small hills, though, where egg rolling was done. We use Royston Heath.

:-)


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Subject: RE: Help: Pace Egging?
From: Bearheart
Date: 23 Apr 03 - 10:41 AM

Have been enjoying this thread, and sent it to several friends...

Bekki


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Subject: RE: Help: Pace Egging?
From: GUEST,Train Guard
Date: 23 Apr 03 - 12:34 PM

I don't perform my railway operations for any of the official TOC's - my natural habitat is the East Lancashire Railway. However, Dave, I will comment on your experiences. I don't know who you came upon at Castle Station, but it must have been the village idiot.

The guard is in control of the train...not the driver. (That accounts for the legendary animosity between the two, summed up in a traditional piece of railway verse that I couldn't possibly quote in a family discussion forum.) Anyway, the guard/conductor (I hate that word) says whether it goes or not (by using his signal buzzer, these days). The station staff have no say in when the train goes.(And the driver doesn't operate the doors, either.)The guard can always rescind a 'tip', especially if the train has not departed. He/she would have been standing at their open door. The thing to do was to go there and ask them if you could get on.

An ordinary ticket is valid by an authorised route (or routes) to your destination. Provided that you do not infringe this rule, you could travel to Preston by any scheduled train from Lancaster - including one of Beardie's. (You could even cadge one of the complementary papers from the pile in the buffet.)

By the way, do you know Alan Seymour?

Regards,
Train Guard


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Subject: RE: Help: Pace Egging?
From: GUEST,sheildsfolk
Date: 23 Apr 03 - 01:06 PM

There was a "jarping" competition in the Oddfellows in Shields on Easter Monday!


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Subject: RE: Help: Pace Egging?
From: Dave the Gnome
Date: 24 Apr 03 - 04:19 AM

I don't think I know Alan Seymour TG. I know the East Lancs railway though and don't patronise it as often as I should! My sons Mum-in-Law, Pam (Bromley I think) does some volunteering there.

I did, fortunately, know the bit about traveling by any reasonable route - once haveing traveled London to Manchester via Leeds when the west coast mail line electrics had broke! Thanks for the rest of the info - could come in more than useful:-)

Cheers

DtG


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Subject: RE: Help: Pace Egging?
From: GUEST,Folkmonster
Date: 24 Apr 03 - 10:44 PM

I've just noticed this thread (it being Easter and all)

History: Oddly enough "egg" (aeg) is a scandinavian word (the old english word being "ei", dropped beacuse of confusion between "Ich" and "I").

Now, the Danish word for Easter is "paaske" (are we seeing a pattern here?).

So. In Lancashire and Yorkshire (the Danelaw) we have "paaske aeg" = "pace egg". Aha! :O)

Med venlige hilsen

FM


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Subject: RE: Help: Pace Egging?
From: Roger the Skiffler
Date: 25 Apr 03 - 04:14 AM

Pace 'em and roll 'em, just don't shake 'em or the folk police will come visitin'

RtS


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Subject: RE: Help: Pace Egging?
From: Compton
Date: 25 Apr 03 - 06:59 PM

I had a pleasant day Good Friday "oop north" enjoying the Midgley play around the Hebden Bridge Area performed traditionally by the lads of Calder High School..a tradition unbroken on this day. I visited the nearby town of Heptonstall and saw an equally enjoyable revival play (some 30 mins!!). There is an excellent site about all things "Mumming" edited (I think) by Eddy Cass..Woth a look.


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Subject: RE: Help: Pace Egging?
From: bradfordian
Date: 28 Feb 08 - 07:11 PM

Good Friday 'ill soon be on us agen. Pace eggin' time in both Lancashire & Yorkshire. Here's a few links with some info for those who might like to know a bit more. one, two, three, four, five, six, severn, eight, nine


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