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Lyr/Chords Add: Goober Peas

Little Hawk 21 Sep 00 - 09:42 AM
SINSULL 21 Sep 00 - 10:03 AM
catspaw49 21 Sep 00 - 10:09 AM
rabbitrunning 21 Sep 00 - 10:14 AM
catspaw49 21 Sep 00 - 10:29 AM
Jon Freeman 21 Sep 00 - 10:40 AM
kendall 21 Sep 00 - 10:43 AM
catspaw49 21 Sep 00 - 10:45 AM
Jon Freeman 21 Sep 00 - 10:52 AM
Irish sergeant 21 Sep 00 - 11:09 AM
Ely 21 Sep 00 - 12:10 PM
GUEST,Giac, not at home 21 Sep 00 - 12:12 PM
paddymac 21 Sep 00 - 12:23 PM
Mbo 21 Sep 00 - 12:25 PM
Kim C 21 Sep 00 - 12:29 PM
catspaw49 21 Sep 00 - 12:35 PM
Mbo 21 Sep 00 - 12:38 PM
SINSULL 21 Sep 00 - 01:07 PM
Mbo 21 Sep 00 - 01:10 PM
catspaw49 21 Sep 00 - 01:15 PM
Rex 21 Sep 00 - 01:21 PM
Lonesome EJ 21 Sep 00 - 01:24 PM
Ferrara 21 Sep 00 - 01:57 PM
Jon Freeman 21 Sep 00 - 02:23 PM
SINSULL 21 Sep 00 - 03:17 PM
Ely 21 Sep 00 - 03:23 PM
GUEST,Bruce O. 21 Sep 00 - 03:31 PM
Lonesome EJ 21 Sep 00 - 03:48 PM
SINSULL 21 Sep 00 - 03:57 PM
dick greenhaus 21 Sep 00 - 04:21 PM
catspaw49 21 Sep 00 - 05:13 PM
Ely 21 Sep 00 - 05:14 PM
Mbo 21 Sep 00 - 06:02 PM
Lonesome EJ 21 Sep 00 - 07:02 PM
Mbo 21 Sep 00 - 07:15 PM
catspaw49 21 Sep 00 - 07:23 PM
Mbo 21 Sep 00 - 07:34 PM
BanjoRay 21 Sep 00 - 07:47 PM
Little Hawk 21 Sep 00 - 08:18 PM
Mbo 21 Sep 00 - 08:50 PM
Ely 21 Sep 00 - 09:38 PM
Mbo 21 Sep 00 - 09:46 PM
Lonesome EJ 21 Sep 00 - 09:50 PM
GUEST,CLETUS 21 Sep 00 - 10:09 PM
SINSULL 22 Sep 00 - 10:40 AM
Bert 22 Sep 00 - 11:13 AM
Mbo 22 Sep 00 - 11:17 AM
catspaw49 22 Sep 00 - 11:41 AM
Kim C 22 Sep 00 - 12:14 PM
Mbo 22 Sep 00 - 12:20 PM
Bert 22 Sep 00 - 12:31 PM
MichaelAnthony 22 Sep 00 - 12:54 PM
SINSULL 22 Sep 00 - 01:03 PM
GUEST,Mbo_at_ECU 22 Sep 00 - 01:07 PM
mousethief 22 Sep 00 - 01:08 PM
Bert 22 Sep 00 - 01:39 PM
Bert 22 Sep 00 - 01:44 PM
GUEST 22 Sep 00 - 01:48 PM
Jon Freeman 22 Sep 00 - 02:43 PM
mousethief 22 Sep 00 - 02:46 PM
Bert 22 Sep 00 - 03:29 PM
Bev and Jerry 22 Sep 00 - 04:23 PM
SINSULL 22 Sep 00 - 04:48 PM
mousethief 22 Sep 00 - 04:54 PM
catspaw49 22 Sep 00 - 06:16 PM
Mbo 22 Sep 00 - 09:39 PM
Lonesome EJ 09 Nov 00 - 02:23 AM
Melani 09 Nov 00 - 10:48 PM
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Subject: Lyr Add: GOOBER PEAS^^^
From: Little Hawk
Date: 21 Sep 00 - 09:42 AM

I remember a great little humorous song from the American Civil War called Goober Peas. Had it on an old Burl Ives record. It seems that the southern army was short of food, but they had plenty of peanuts to eat. The soldiers soon became heartily sick of peanuts, and somebody wrote this mocking song about the joys of eating them...as follows...

GOOBER PEAS

(E) C F C / C F G7 / C F C / C F C G7 C

Sitting by the road-side on a summer day,
Chatting with my mess-mates, to pass the time away,
Lying in the shadow, underneath the trees,
Goodness, how delicious, eating goober peas.

C F G7 C / C F C G7 C

Peas, peas, peas, peas, eating goober peas.
Goodness, how delicious, eating goober peas.

When a horse-man passes, the soldiers have a rule,
To cry out their loudest, - "Mister, here's your mule?"
But another custom, enchanting-er than these
Is wearing out your grinders, eating goober peas.

CHORUS

Just before the battle, the General hears a row;
He says "The Yanks are coming, I hear their rifles now".
He looks down the roadway and what d'you think he sees?
The Georgia Militia cracking goober peas.

CHORUS

I think my song has lasted just about enough.
The subject's interesting but the rhymes are mighty rough.
I wish the war was over so free from rags and fleas,
We'd kiss our wives and sweethearts, say good-bye to goober peas.

CHORUS

This version in Folk Songs for Fun, copyright 1957 by Oscar Brand

Back to me....I was in Hawaii once, staying at an ashram run by one Swami Dayananda. I didn't like him so much, but I liked the place. Anyway, they had a lot of fruit and vegetable gardens which I worked in. I harvested plenty of fresh peanuts, and discovered why they are called peanuts. They taste almost exactly like peas when they are raw. After you roast them, they change color and don't taste like peas anymore. The raw ones are good to eat, and much better for you than the cooked ones. They are very high in protein, and must have been of great benefit to the Confederate soldiers who were so sick of eating them.

Now, who's got some more good Civil War songs?


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Subject: RE: Civil War songs - Goober Peas
From: SINSULL
Date: 21 Sep 00 - 10:03 AM

Most of them are in the DT. I prefer the tearjerkers:
Somebody's Darlin'
The Faded Coat Of Blue
Lorena (Mbo sings a mean Lorena)
Poor Kitty Popcorn
They Have Grafted Him Into The Army(I have the original sheet music for this)
Mister Where's Your Mule?
Tramp, Tramp, Tramp
Just Before The Battle Mother
et al...


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Subject: RE: Civil War songs - Goober Peas
From: catspaw49
Date: 21 Sep 00 - 10:09 AM

Well Hawk...............

First, thanks for the lyrics. They're in the DT of course, but there's nothing like a little extra typing is there? Hey, here's a thought........Why not retype all 8000+ songs in the DT? Have fun!!!

The most popular way to eat peanuts in the south has always been boiled. In THAT state, they have the texture and a similar taste to peas, far more than in their raw state.

I generally throw ashes away, but you are free to ram them somewhere to make the experience more personal for you.

Spaw


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Subject: RE: Civil War songs - Goober Peas
From: rabbitrunning
Date: 21 Sep 00 - 10:14 AM

I think we had that record too, Little Hawk. It was part of a big set of American Folksongs, most of which now echo in my head in Burl Ives' voice...


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Subject: RE: Civil War songs - Goober Peas
From: catspaw49
Date: 21 Sep 00 - 10:29 AM

Tell ya' what runnybunny, if you're hearing voices in your head, treatment is available at the Neil Young Center for the Terminally Screwed.

Other songs............The medley I like on HD also includes Dixie, Yellow Rose of Texas, When Johnnie Comes Marching Home, Bonnie Blue Flag, Marching Through Georgia, John Brown/Battle Hymn along with a few Sisn mentioned like Loreena (which was of course banned on both sides because of the depression it produced).

Spaw


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Subject: RE: Civil War songs - Goober Peas
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 21 Sep 00 - 10:40 AM

Thanks for reminding me of this one Little Hawk. It brings back some fond memories for me. I used to have a book of American Folk songs (I think edited by Alan Lomax) and this one was in there and it became quite a family favourite.

My parents used to have a motor caravan and it was quite common for us to sing songs while travelling on a holiday and I would often accompany on guitar. Seems quite weird really - my parents and 4 kids singing their heads off travelling through the UK singing an American Civil War song!

Jon


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Subject: RE: Civil War songs - Goober Peas
From: kendall
Date: 21 Sep 00 - 10:43 AM

I also do a pretty good job on Lorena. (Folk Legacy 57)


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Subject: RE: Civil War songs - Goober Peas
From: catspaw49
Date: 21 Sep 00 - 10:45 AM

Its beginning to dawn on me why you are the way you are Jon.

Are you enjoying your latest Burl acquisitions?

Spaw


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Subject: RE: Civil War songs - Goober Peas
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 21 Sep 00 - 10:52 AM

I'm not quite sure how to take the first bit spaw! ;-)

Yes thanks, I am loving it. I probably shouldn't say this here as I will embarass her but it was part of a 40th birthday present from Jeri and one of the nicest presents I have ever had - so thoughtful of her to pick up that I loved some of those songs as a kid... She is one of lifes stars to me!

Jon


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Subject: RE: Civil War songs - Goober Peas
From: Irish sergeant
Date: 21 Sep 00 - 11:09 AM

What a great thread! I'm currently putting together a Civil War song book for my reenacting pards. I had overlooked "Goober Peas" but will rectify that oversight. I always liked "All Quiet Along the Potomac Tonight." The regiment we recreate was raised in Fort Hamilton (Brooklyn) in May of 1861.(The 12th US Infantry) We made up a parody of "Just Before the Battle, MOther" That one day I may actually post just for giggles. Apparently, making up song parodies was a time honoured tradition even then (Hard Tack and The Siege of Vicksburg being two notable examples) Send me more Ideas here or at my e-mail writer@a-znet.com. (The second dot after com is the period by the way) Kindest reguards, Irish Sergeant (Neil)


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Subject: RE: Civil War songs - Goober Peas
From: Ely
Date: 21 Sep 00 - 12:10 PM

I LOVE this song! My dad's been singing it for years. He also does "Just Before the Battle, Mother" but he never knew the words right (actually, I like his version better--less schmaltzy).

I think "Vacant Chair" is one of my Civil war favorites, too. Partially because I love the tune.


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Subject: RE: Civil War songs - Goober Peas
From: GUEST,Giac, not at home
Date: 21 Sep 00 - 12:12 PM

For another parody of Just Before The Battle Mother, see the DT, here:

Reb version

or, here:

Just Behind The Battle Mother


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Subject: RE: Civil War songs - Goober Peas
From: paddymac
Date: 21 Sep 00 - 12:23 PM

Here's the url for a great site on civil war music.

http://www.civilwarmidi.homepage.com/

Also, there was a thread about a month ago on "Derek Warfields 'Sons of Erin' ", in re his CD by that title which is entirely Civil War songs (with an accompanying 32 page booklet) and a separately published book of his with lyrics and extensive notes for 49 civil war songs. Great stuff.


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Subject: RE: Civil War songs - Goober Peas
From: Mbo
Date: 21 Sep 00 - 12:25 PM

Dang I love Goober Peas. My sister found the lyrics & music in an old elementary school reader that we had found. Since she and I didn't read music (we were 10 and 11 years old, respectively) she made up her own tune...which spookily enough is SO similar to the ACTUAL tune, it sounds like a variant. Anyway, we memorized it and used to sing it together for for family and relatives. BTW this is the same sister who won't sing with me on HearMe because she claims to have a "lousy voice." Sigh. Love the song! Although I only lived there a few months, I WAS born in Georgia, so that makes me an official grinder-wearin'-outter goober grabber!

When I was 11, I began a 3-4 year personal study of the Civil War. I especially loved the music. My favs are:

Cheer Boys Cheer
A Life on a Vicksburg Bluff
Grafted Him Into The Army
Stoneway Jackson's Way
We Are Coming, Father Abram
Marching Along (YES!)
Rose of Alabama (great song for all you banjo pickers)
Marching Through Georgia
Lily Dale
Lorena is good, but I was never into it as much as the others. Usually I was bored by the depressing ones, though I do like "All Quiet Along The Potomac Tonight". The version I had was from an old record, and they combined Taps into the tune at the end. Very moving.

--Matt


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Subject: RE: Civil War songs - Goober Peas
From: Kim C
Date: 21 Sep 00 - 12:29 PM

Marching Through Georgia
Kingdom Coming
Bonnie Blue Flag
Battle Cry of Freedom (there was a Southern and a Northern version)
Poor Soldier
The terminally Un-PC Dixie (actually written before the war; one of Abe Lincoln's favorite songs)
Southern Soldier Boy
Of course, I'll second the motion on Lorena
Hard Tack (parody of Hard Times)
Cheer Boys Cheer
The Homespun Dress
Shiloh's Hill
Virginia's Bloody Soil
Roll Alabama Roll
The Vacant Chair
I Goes to Fight Mit Sigel(parody making fun of German soldiers, probably not PC)
The Invalid Corps
The Army Bean

Songs that predate 1861 but were still being sung:
Annie Laurie
Listen to the Mockingbird
Hard Times
Home Sweet Home
Poor Wayfaring Stranger
Shenandoah
Johnny Is Gone For a Soldier
Minstrel Boy
Endearing Young Charms
Sweet Betsy from Pike
Auld Lang Syne

Hymns:
Amazing Grace, the only hymn ever written
Rock of Ages
On Jordan's Stormy Banks
Stand Up, Stand Up for Jesus
Nearer, My God to Thee
There Is a Fountain Filled With Blood

My favorite post-war nostalgia song: I'm a Good Ol' Rebel. I'm not sure but I think Faded Coat of Blue falls into this category also.


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Subject: RE: Civil War songs - Goober Peas
From: catspaw49
Date: 21 Sep 00 - 12:35 PM

A great site we encountered here awhile back...I think it was kat..........is Poetry and Music of the CW......You'll like his explanation of why he uses "Ashoken Farewell" in the background.....and he's right. It IS an excellent and enjoyable site.

Also, browse the DT "Keyword List"....there are a lot of categories such as "@Confederate" or "@Abolitionist" that you may not think to search under. There's a ton there!!!

Spaw


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Subject: RE: Civil War songs - Goober Peas
From: Mbo
Date: 21 Sep 00 - 12:38 PM

HArd crackers! Hard crackers come again no more! Woo!

I know "Mit Seigel"! Seigel was from Germany and was one of Phil Sheridan's generals during the Valley (Shenandoah) campaign.

Mary, I just HAVE to know what Poor Kitty Popcorn is about!


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Subject: RE: Civil War songs - Goober Peas
From: SINSULL
Date: 21 Sep 00 - 01:07 PM

Neil,
There is a guy named Jerry Ernst on MP3 who writes his own parodies of Civil War songs. Very clever. I will see if I can find any more info. I have one of his CDs.

Mbo,
I will post the lyrics. Kitty is a little black cat from the south who, being loyal to the Union, follows the northern troops. When her master dies, she freezes to death on his grave. Guaranteed to draw a few tears.

On a lighter note, I can't help but smile thinking of Jon and family singing Goober Peas with that great Welsh accent. thanks, I needed that!
Mary


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Subject: RE: Civil War songs - Goober Peas
From: Mbo
Date: 21 Sep 00 - 01:10 PM

Thanks Mary! I do love cats & cat-related things! BTW I also showed the sheet music to my uncle who is a musician (2-time U.S. Accordion Champion, 2nd place in World Accordion Championship) and he loved it. It was entirely new to him, and for the better part of an hour played around with it on his piano, trying different rhythms, and laughing and singina all the time!

--M


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Subject: RE: Civil War songs - Goober Peas
From: catspaw49
Date: 21 Sep 00 - 01:15 PM

Yeah Sins....that's what I meant by "understanding Jon a little better."(:<))

And I have never encountered "Poor Kitty Popcorn" either. Sounds like a real tearjerker.

Spaw


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Subject: RE: Civil War songs - Goober Peas
From: Rex
Date: 21 Sep 00 - 01:21 PM

I haven't seen "The Fall of Charleston" (Whack, Row De Dow) listed yet. It's a particularly nasty jab at the Confederacy. A good "one-stop shopping" book that has all the popular songs and their parodies is "The Civil War Songbook" by Irwin Silber. (I said it before and I'll say it again.) Go to any library and it will be there. Or get one yourself on the cheap at Dover books.

Rex


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Subject: RE: Civil War songs - Goober Peas
From: Lonesome EJ
Date: 21 Sep 00 - 01:24 PM

Try this thread for a pretty comprehensive discussion of Civil War music...Civil War


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Subject: RE: Civil War songs - Goober Peas
From: Ferrara
Date: 21 Sep 00 - 01:57 PM

Did we get "Richmond is a Hard Road to Travel"? It's in the DT. Written by a confederate parodist and a very clever writeup of the (pre-Grant) Richmond campaigns.

There's a great song called "Will They Miss Me in the Trenches," a parody of a tear jerker called "Will They Miss Me at Home." Also in DT with tune. Silber says that J.W.Naff wrote it during the siege of Vicksburg and was supposedly killed in battle the next day. Publishers in that era made up their "true facts" as they went along, in order to sell sheet music, so this could be fakelore.

Irwin Silber says Faded Coat of Blue was "written in the waning days of the war." After singing it for years, I've started wondering whether the young man who "died faint and famished, among the vanquished brave" died in a southern prison camp. Has anyone else ever considered that?

Kendall, I also sing Lorena (all six verses). Bill loves it and considers it one of the best written songs around. Every once in a while I get lucky, and Bob Clayton and Ron Davies back me up on guitar and viola (don't knock it if you haven't tried it.) Pure schmaltz. Lovely.

Recently heard arguments in favor of pronouncing it "Lo-RAY-na." Have been considering starting a thread: "Lo-REE-na or Lo-RAY-na?" Any opinions?


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Subject: RE: Civil War songs - Goober Peas
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 21 Sep 00 - 02:23 PM

Sorry about the thread creep but the only thing is Sinsull, I don't have a Welsh accent - I have said it before but mine is a mixture of Shropshire, North Wales and Kent. It is one of those mixtures that doesn't belong anywhere.

Accent wise, my father is Norfolk although not too strong and my mum is Shropshire.

If you have never heard a Norfolk accent, have a listen to The Singing Postman Sorry about the sound quality.

Jon


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Subject: RE: Civil War songs - Goober Peas
From: SINSULL
Date: 21 Sep 00 - 03:17 PM

And I don't have a NY accent - it's NW Queens just like the "Nanny". Gotta get sum gawfee. Seeya.


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Subject: RE: Civil War songs - Goober Peas
From: Ely
Date: 21 Sep 00 - 03:23 PM

"I'm A Good Old Rebel" ("Old Unreconstructed") was also written by a parodist--an ex-Confederate officer making fun of the sympathies of poor Southerners who had served under him as enlisted men. Anyway, nobody rode with Lee--Lee was an infantry officer.


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Subject: RE: Civil War songs - Goober Peas
From: GUEST,Bruce O.
Date: 21 Sep 00 - 03:31 PM

Dale Rose and MMario both pointed out the Levy sheet music collection on the other thread as a source of songs about the civil war. You can search it by date, but there are a lots of songs to look through. "Goober Peas" and H. C. Work's "Kitty Popcorn" (traditional in Sandburg's 'American Songbag') are of 1866, however.


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Subject: RE: Civil War songs - Goober Peas
From: Lonesome EJ
Date: 21 Sep 00 - 03:48 PM

Ely,Stuart served under Lee,so technically anyone who rode with Stuart rode with Lee. Lee also had several sons who served the South in the conflict...could any have been cavalry officers? Nit-picking,I know.

I always like the line

"When a horse-man passes, the soldiers have a rule, To cry out their loudest, - "Mister, here's your mule?"

I believe the shout was a self-deprecating reference to the footsoldiers themselves as the foot-sloggers who carried everything on their backs.


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Subject: Lyr Add: KITTY POPCORN (OR THE SOLDIER'S PET)^^^
From: SINSULL
Date: 21 Sep 00 - 03:57 PM

Poor Kitty Popcorn


Did you ever hear the story of the loyal cat
Meow
Who was faithful to the flag and ever followed that
Meow
How she left her happy home beneath the southern sky
And she packed up her belongings when the troops came nigh
How she followed in the column with a gladsome cry
Meow.

Poor Kitty Popcorn
Is buried neath a snowdrift now
Never more to hear the music of her gladsome cry
Meow
Never more to hear the music of her gladsome cry
Meow


Round her neck she wore a ribbon; she was black as jet
Meow
Very soon a dandy chose her as a soldier's pet
Meow
All the sorrows of the battle and the war she bore
Riding on her master's shoulders when her feet were sore
Whispering in his ear in wonder at the cannon's roar
Meow

Poor Kitty...

Now the cruel war is over and the troops disband
Meow
Kitty follows as a pilgrim to the northern land
Meow
Ah, but sorrow overtakes her and her master dies
As she sadly sits a-gazing in his dim blue eyes
'Til by strangers driven from him in the dark she cries
Meow

Poor Kitty Popcorn...

Kitty waits alone and shaking 'til she sees his form
Meow
Carried forth and buried roughly in the driving storm
Meow
Ah, her slender form it shivers in the northern blast
As she seeks the sandy mound on which the snow falls fast
And alone amid the darkness there she breathes her last
Meow

Poor Kitty Popcorn...

From memory. i will have to find the lyrics when I get home. Needed a break at the office.
Mary


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Subject: RE: Civil War songs - Goober Peas
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 21 Sep 00 - 04:21 PM

LeeJ:

Mister, Here's Your Mule is a song: also in DigiTrad


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Subject: RE: Civil War songs - Goober Peas
From: catspaw49
Date: 21 Sep 00 - 05:13 PM

Also, we just ran a thread about chamberpot lye. I need to go find that and the song.....Pretty entertaining story.


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Subject: RE: Civil War songs - Goober Peas
From: Ely
Date: 21 Sep 00 - 05:14 PM

Yes, fellow officers rode with Lee, but the song is supposed to be the viewpoint of a "common" Southerner, not an officer or a "privileged" Southerner. I could have phrased that more clearly.


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Subject: RE: Civil War songs - Goober Peas
From: Mbo
Date: 21 Sep 00 - 06:02 PM

Well, it's true that Lee was not an infanty officer and neither were his sons (arg, their names are on tbe tip o' my tongue!), he was STILL the commander of The Army of Northern Virginia. Any one who was part of the A of NV, be they cavalry, artillery, infantry, or engineers, were still under his command. I don't think we should get so picky as "I marched with Lee", "I rode with Lee", "I fired cannons with Lee", or "I built earthworks with Lee." Man, this reminds me of a game my sister invented, called "Picking Apart Plebian Phrases."


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Subject: RE: Civil War songs - Goober Peas
From: Lonesome EJ
Date: 21 Sep 00 - 07:02 PM

Yeas.Mbo,that's what I meant,and plenty of good ol' boys rode as Cavalrymen with Jeb Stuart,not just the gentry.

CAUTION___NON_MUSICAL DIGRESSION

I read an interesting article recently that explained some of Lee's superiority over McClellan,Hooker,Meade, and most of the Generals thrown against him in the early going.Most of these generals,Lee included,were trained engineers.Their method of evolving strategies and implementing tactics were very "engineer-like"...they would evolve a structured plan of battle,seek to implement it,and when the chaos of battle ensued they would either adhere rigidly to it,or withdraw,regroup,and go back to the drawing board. Lee was different.He was almost always outnumbered,but relied on immediate battlefield information and knowledge of his opponents movements to determine the soft points in the opposing line. He would then concentrate his forces in a massive punch at this soft point(s),initiating chaos and panic in the enemy ranks. This method served him well until the notable failure at Pickett's Charge,which was based on inadequate information and a failure of his unrivalled (until then) intuition regarding the opponent.He had also been served well by the Union's habit of joining battle with a rigid plan,withdrawing,and joining battle again. When Grant took control of the Army of the Potomac,this habit was abandoned. Grant knew that no individual battle loss was significant in itself...the Union had the superiority in manpower and materials that would eventually force the Confederacy's defeat if the pressure was maintained.By the time,at Petersburg,Lee had abandoned his brilliant offensive tactics and entrenched his army.he had as good as acknowledged this fact himself.


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Subject: RE: Civil War songs - Goober Peas
From: Mbo
Date: 21 Sep 00 - 07:15 PM

If he'd only listened to Longstreet!


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Subject: RE: Civil War songs - Goober Peas
From: catspaw49
Date: 21 Sep 00 - 07:23 PM

Grant certainly changed the face of warfare in many ways.

I like those thoughts Leej. Probably a lot of truth and the engineering angle can be seen on many occasions with the Army of the Potomac when all advantages were forsaken while ___________(insert General's name here) waited for mortars or bridges or whatever. You saw this same thing happen in Confederate armies as well. I think of Bragg (an idiot with clusters) failing to follow up after Chickamauga and being roundly thrashed later at Chattanooga.

I think there were a few very notable exceptions to that angle though, but they, like Lee, were men a cut above the rest. Certainly "Pete" Longstreet was one and also George Thomas. I doubt anyone reacted better when thrust into a defensive role as George Thomas. Longstreet may have been the true master of taking the initiative and exploiting the mistakes of others (when he had the chance). These two figures, operating at their best, is what makes Chickamauga such an entertaining battle to study.

Spaw


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Subject: RE: Civil War songs - Goober Peas
From: Mbo
Date: 21 Sep 00 - 07:34 PM

That's "Texas Pete"!


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Subject: RE: Civil War songs - Goober Peas
From: BanjoRay
Date: 21 Sep 00 - 07:47 PM

A tune we often play in sessions is Waitin' For The Federals, also known as Seneca Square Dance. At Clifftop this summer someone told me that what you called it depended on which side you were on! Anyone know any others like this?
Cheers
Ray


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Subject: RE: Civil War songs - Goober Peas
From: Little Hawk
Date: 21 Sep 00 - 08:18 PM

Wow...I go to Toronto for a day, and look what's waiting when I return. I don't even have time tonight to read it all...will do so later if I can. Great stuff, folks!

Spaw, what was thar comment about ashes supposed to imply? It was strange. I'm beginning to think you must like me a lot, and that is worrisome. Actually I didn't type out all the lyrics, I just added those little "break" symbols, after copying it from the DT. I thought it would be nice to post the lyrics.

Roll, Alabama, Roll is a cool song. And you can now get a beautiful 1/96 scale (big!) model of the Alabama from Revell (it's been rereleased this year), if you're into hobbycraft. I love hobbycraft, always have.


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Subject: RE: Civil War songs - Goober Peas
From: Mbo
Date: 21 Sep 00 - 08:50 PM

Cool, LH. I was a big fan of plastic models about 5-7 years ago. Of course, my favorites to build were tanks and military aircraft, especially from the Pacific theater of WWII.


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Subject: RE: Civil War songs - Goober Peas
From: Ely
Date: 21 Sep 00 - 09:38 PM

Mbo and Lonesome EJ,

EJ--I missed something. Most cavalrymen are privates, just like most infantrymen. If you could bring your own horse or mule, you could be in the cavalry.

My intent was not to ruin the song for anyone, and I think we've all done some nitpicking somewhere along the line. By the letter, yes--all of the divisions of the A of NV did their thing with Lee, and I can see that the singer might have *ridden with Lee* in spirit (meaning that he admired and felt devoted to the General). On the other hand, I think it can hardly hurt when the whole point of the song to begin with was to make fun of the people whose views it purports to convey.

I could nitpick about a lot of other threads (like the fact that there are no pink-eyed albino stallions because true albinism doesn't exist in horses) but I don't. I didn't mean to start a debate with this, and if it isn't worth nitpicking about whether or not somebody literally rode with Lee, I don't think it's worth nitpicking about whether or not they didn't.

I hope I'm done. With this exception, this is a pretty cool thread.


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Subject: RE: Civil War songs - Goober Peas
From: Mbo
Date: 21 Sep 00 - 09:46 PM

Actually, I've never heard the song! I don't even know what we're talking about! HELP!


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Subject: RE: Civil War songs - Goober Peas
From: Lonesome EJ
Date: 21 Sep 00 - 09:50 PM

Whoah,Ely!I meant I was nit-picking at trying to justify the line about "riding with Lee" and that I was probably really stretching it by wondering if the reference was to a Lee offspring.

I read a lot about Civil War History,am enjoying this conversation,and I find your input valuable,my friend.


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Subject: RE: Civil War songs - Goober Peas
From: GUEST,CLETUS
Date: 21 Sep 00 - 10:09 PM

Now da yall think we cud git back ta the war an all? I meen like Ise got me a gud an solid forth grayde edgykashun but thizzeers gotta lot mor to it an all.

Doan runoff thair Ely. Catspaw sez Leej izza well noan noze picker so I spose he can pick nits rite gud too.

CLETUS


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Subject: RE: Civil War songs - Goober Peas
From: SINSULL
Date: 22 Sep 00 - 10:40 AM

Cletus,
Goobers are peanuts, not snot. Catspaw is teasing you. Or outright lying. Southern gentlemen are not nose pickers. At least not in public.
Mary


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Subject: RE: Civil War songs - Goober Peas
From: Bert
Date: 22 Sep 00 - 11:13 AM

Long ago, I read somewhere that goobers were chick peas, now they seem to be peanuts. Strange!


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Subject: RE: Civil War songs - Goober Peas
From: Mbo
Date: 22 Sep 00 - 11:17 AM

Bert, goobers have ALWAYS been peanuts. "goober" derives actually for an African word for peanuts.


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Subject: RE: Civil War songs - Goober Peas
From: catspaw49
Date: 22 Sep 00 - 11:41 AM

Now Sins, I wouldn't lie to the boy.

Goobers were and are preferably eaten boiled BTW.

Spaw


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Subject: RE: Civil War songs - Goober Peas
From: Kim C
Date: 22 Sep 00 - 12:14 PM

Mbo, as I understand it, there was actually a man whose last name was Goober, who grew peanuts, and they were called "Goober's Peas." Seriously. 'Course, Goober may not have been his real name...

We had some raw peanuts in the office and no one knew what they were because we city folks are so used to roasted/salted yaddayaddayadda. Somebody asked me, what are these? They taste like soybeans. I said, ah, well, those are actually raw peanuts..........

Now, Jeb Stuart, he da man! Mister often chides me about having this fascination with dead men who rode horses.


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Subject: RE: Civil War songs - Goober Peas
From: Mbo
Date: 22 Sep 00 - 12:20 PM

PLEASE! It's J.E.B!

--Punctilio-bo


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Subject: RE: Civil War songs - Goober Peas
From: Bert
Date: 22 Sep 00 - 12:31 PM

Ah well, now I know. Mudcatters MUST be right.


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Subject: RE: Civil War songs - Goober Peas
From: MichaelAnthony
Date: 22 Sep 00 - 12:54 PM

Mbo,

I have a similar story about this song with my sister. We discovered we could sing the Goober Peas lyrics to a Christmas melody ("Jolly Old St. Nicolus" I think is the title). So now I'm hard pressed to remember the original melody. We had a lot of fun singing this parodied version.

MichaelAnthony


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Subject: RE: Civil War songs - Goober Peas
From: SINSULL
Date: 22 Sep 00 - 01:03 PM

Bert,
I think you have goobers confused with humus. Humus is made from chickpeas and did not appear in any Civil War songs, to my knowledge.
Mary


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Subject: RE: Civil War songs - Goober Peas
From: GUEST,Mbo_at_ECU
Date: 22 Sep 00 - 01:07 PM

Mike, I'll have to try that! Sins, why have I always though that humus was compost? There is no hubris in humus.


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Subject: RE: Civil War songs - Goober Peas
From: mousethief
Date: 22 Sep 00 - 01:08 PM

My problem with unroasted nuts of all stripes is that I have what are referred to in technical terms as "deep teeth" and they get stuck. Roast! Salt! Forever!

I remember this song from a collection of 45's I had when a child, put out I think by Disney, of folk songs. This is whence I learned Goober Peas, and Erie Canal, and Working on the Railroad, among others, and it's what probably set me on a lifetime of love for folk music (that and Mr. Spiropolous in 4th grade who played his guitar for us and taught us The Titanic and other old-timey tunes before he was sent to Viet Nam).

"How sweet to be remembered"
--Flatt & Scruggs

Alex
O..O
=o=


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Subject: RE: Civil War songs - Goober Peas
From: Bert
Date: 22 Sep 00 - 01:39 PM

No, I know what Hommus is. I worked in The Middle East for years.

I read it somewhere, long time ago. Was it in 'The Burl Ives Song book' or maybe in one of Terry Golden's 'Americana' articles.

Bert.


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Subject: RE: Civil War songs - Goober Peas
From: Bert
Date: 22 Sep 00 - 01:44 PM

Nope, 'twas neither. Here's the quote

'The Civil War, the War Between the States, was a singing war. Among the scores of marching songs, sung by soldiers, blue and grey, was this rebel satire on the rationing of chickpeas to the starving Southern troops.'

It's the footnote on page 52 of 'The Penguin Book of American Folk Songs' compiled and edited with notes by Alan Lomax.


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Subject: RE: Civil War songs - Goober Peas
From: GUEST
Date: 22 Sep 00 - 01:48 PM

No no! I think Alan has them mixed up! There is a song called "The Rebel Bean" about Southern soldiers eating chick peas. Something about burying them in the ground to, I seem to remember. "Goober Peas" are definately peanuts. I have the original sheet music, it says "Lyrics: P. Pindar. Music: P. Nutt." No lie!

--Matt


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Subject: RE: Civil War songs - Goober Peas
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 22 Sep 00 - 02:43 PM

From Guru.net:

"REGIONAL NOTE: Most Southerners recognize the terms goober and goober pea as other names for the peanut. Goober is related to Kongo or Kimbundu n-guba, "peanut." The word is especially interesting as one of a small stock of African language borrowings brought over by slaves..."

I must admit I had always thought of them as being chick-peas but I did learn the song from "The Penguin Book Of American Folk Songs" - thanks for reminding me of the title Bert.

Jon


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Subject: RE: Civil War songs - Goober Peas
From: mousethief
Date: 22 Sep 00 - 02:46 PM

Aren't peanuts indigenous to the New World? This means the thing went to Africa, got a name, which subsequently came back. Now THAT is a well-travelled nut!

Alex
O..O
=o=


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Subject: RE: Civil War songs - Goober Peas
From: Bert
Date: 22 Sep 00 - 03:29 PM

Jon, yes that is a good book. The Chord chart in the back is the best I've seen. But Lomax spoils it all with his petulant dig at Lonnie Donnegan in the footnote to 'Rock Island Line'


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Subject: RE: Civil War songs - Goober Peas
From: Bev and Jerry
Date: 22 Sep 00 - 04:23 PM

Alex:

Peanuts are indigenous to the new world. They were cultivated by the Incas in South America in Pre-Columbian times. The Spanish conquistadors discovered peanuts and brought them to Spain. Hence Spanish peanuts. Other Spanish explorers working the coast of Africa traded them there. Then, when slaves were brought to the colonies, they knew about peanuts (goobers). Now they're grown throughout the south, especially in Georgia. So, the next time your kid has a peanut butter sandwich you can explain to him/her the history of the peanut and watch him/her yawn.

Bev and Jerry


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Subject: RE: Civil War songs - Goober Peas
From: SINSULL
Date: 22 Sep 00 - 04:48 PM

Then tell them about George Washington Carver who discovered hundreds of uses for the peanut. They will probably be more interested in that. And add that one of our living presidents is a peanut farmer and watch them yawn again.


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Subject: RE: Civil War songs - Goober Peas
From: mousethief
Date: 22 Sep 00 - 04:54 PM

My daughter has a book about G.W. Carver. He was a big proponent of peanut butter (if not its inventor - I forget). He is held in great reverence by vegetarian monks around the world, who use peanuts and peanut butter to augment their protein intake.

Alex
O..O
=o=


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Subject: RE: Civil War songs - Goober Peas
From: catspaw49
Date: 22 Sep 00 - 06:16 PM

Anybody mention that its really not a nut, that it comes from a bush and not a tree?

OK....I mentioned it.

Spaw


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Subject: RE: Civil War songs - Goober Peas
From: Mbo
Date: 22 Sep 00 - 09:39 PM

Here's what I found:
The Army Bean: The army bean was probably the most appreciated ration to the soldier. Although they were cooked in above ground stone ovens, by far the most popular method was to bake them in the ground. When the bean ration was distributed to the men, invariably this is the way they would cook them. It was not practicle to cook a single ration like this so the men either saved their rations until a good baking could be made or 10 or 12 of the men would combine their rations to make one big pot. Many men saved their cooked bean rations for a couple of days to make it last, so valued as it was.

And the song is "The Army Bean", which you can find here.


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Subject: RE: Civil War songs - Goober Peas
From: Lonesome EJ
Date: 09 Nov 00 - 02:23 AM

"I'm A Good Old Rebel" ("Old Unreconstructed") was also written by a parodist--an ex-Confederate officer making fun of the sympathies of poor Southerners who had served under him as enlisted men. Anyway, nobody rode with Lee--Lee was an infantry officer."....Ely

I am currently reading a history of the Ninth Texas Cavalry,and discovered that they did indeed "ride with Lee". Major General Stephen D. Lee served as Commanding Officer of Cavalry in Mississippi under Joseph E Johnston.The "good ole rebel" in the song of the same name might very well have fought with the Arkansas,Texas or Mississippi Cavalry in the west.


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Subject: RE: Civil War songs - Goober Peas
From: Melani
Date: 09 Nov 00 - 10:48 PM

I learned "Goober Peas" in grade school, and we would substitute the name of our school for "Georgia Militia." I have always liked "Stonewall Jackson's Way," and am currently very fond of "Roll Alabama Roll," though I suspect that may date from after the war. I have an incredibly weird album that I got about 1962, called "The Blue and the Gray--Songs of the American Civil War." It's a recording of music from a 1958 BBC broadcast, and I must say it's a kick to hear "Dixie" sung with just a hint of British accent.


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