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Help: Oral History to Book - How much editing

Irish sergeant 23 Dec 05 - 04:16 PM
katlaughing 23 Dec 05 - 04:12 PM
Irish sergeant 23 Dec 05 - 02:58 PM
katlaughing 22 Dec 05 - 02:56 PM
wysiwyg 22 Dec 05 - 02:07 PM
katlaughing 22 Dec 05 - 01:30 PM
wysiwyg 03 Feb 04 - 11:54 AM
Amos 29 Oct 02 - 08:44 PM
katlaughing 29 Oct 02 - 02:23 PM
GUEST,Ed 29 Oct 02 - 01:54 PM
EBarnacle1 29 Oct 02 - 12:23 PM
katlaughing 29 Oct 02 - 12:06 PM
JenEllen 29 Oct 02 - 11:42 AM
MMario 29 Oct 02 - 10:37 AM
katlaughing 29 Oct 02 - 10:12 AM
MMario 28 Oct 02 - 03:51 PM
katlaughing 28 Oct 02 - 03:28 PM
Mountain Dog 09 Jul 01 - 06:33 PM
katlaughing 09 Jul 01 - 04:52 PM
Mountain Dog 06 Jul 01 - 06:22 PM
MMario 06 Jul 01 - 12:33 PM
Chicken Charlie 01 Jun 01 - 03:00 PM
Dicho (Frank Staplin) 01 Jun 01 - 02:51 PM
katlaughing 01 Jun 01 - 02:51 PM
RoyH (Burl) 01 Jun 01 - 02:48 PM
Chicken Charlie 01 Jun 01 - 02:29 PM
katlaughing 01 Jun 01 - 02:10 PM
DougR 01 Jun 01 - 01:54 PM
katlaughing 01 Jun 01 - 01:37 PM
MMario 01 Jun 01 - 01:30 PM
DougR 01 Jun 01 - 01:28 PM
katlaughing 01 Jun 01 - 01:21 PM
katlaughing 11 May 01 - 11:30 PM
Bert 11 May 01 - 10:21 PM
katlaughing 11 May 01 - 09:45 PM
Micca 04 May 00 - 07:42 PM
katlaughing 04 May 00 - 06:57 PM
Gervase 04 May 00 - 06:27 PM
katlaughing 03 May 00 - 09:43 PM
GUEST,Lyle 03 May 00 - 09:29 PM
katlaughing 03 May 00 - 02:08 AM
JenEllen 03 May 00 - 01:49 AM
katlaughing 02 May 00 - 06:27 PM
Robo 02 May 00 - 04:32 PM
Sourdough 02 May 00 - 04:04 PM
Clinton Hammond2 02 May 00 - 03:06 PM
katlaughing 02 May 00 - 02:21 PM
Sourdough 02 May 00 - 01:43 PM
Clinton Hammond2 02 May 00 - 11:23 AM
katlaughing 02 May 00 - 11:04 AM
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Subject: RE: Help: Oral History to Book - How much editing
From: Irish sergeant
Date: 23 Dec 05 - 04:16 PM

By all means! Work has been hectic but should start to slow down now that Christmas is upon us (I work in a candle factory that specializes in relgious candles)I'll be more frequent on these boards. You have a lovely holiday and be safe and happy. Neil


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Subject: RE: Help: Oral History to Book - How much editing
From: katlaughing
Date: 23 Dec 05 - 04:12 PM

Thank you so much, Neil. At this point I will be self-publishing as I did my previous book, so no worries on word count. In fact, I WISH I had more from dad! I am planning to include some genealogy (there's a market for books which include that!) and lots of old and historic pictures, not just of family, but of the area where they homesteaded.

It's so nice to *see* you, again! After the holidays, I may take you up on that brain-picking.:-)

luvyakat


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Subject: RE: Help: Oral History to Book - How much editing
From: Irish sergeant
Date: 23 Dec 05 - 02:58 PM

Kat:
AS far as editing goes even though it is an oral history don't be afraid to cuts parts of the story that aren't gemain to where it's going. If you're tied into a word count and you go over chances are the editor won't bother reading it unles you are well known (and Liked) by him/her. Can't help with the funding but I hope you make a good go of the project. Best of luck and feel free to pick my brain Neil


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Subject: RE: Help: Oral History to Book - How much editing
From: katlaughing
Date: 22 Dec 05 - 02:56 PM

Thanks, Susan!


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Subject: RE: Help: Oral History to Book - How much editing
From: wysiwyg
Date: 22 Dec 05 - 02:07 PM

Kat, I didn't find it at the site where it had been, and I started looking around here and there but was quickly overwhelmed-- too many resources but not necessarily applicable to your project, especially since I am not sure what you have pursued so far. But you might find something useful:

HERE, or HERE, or HERE...

...or you might not, but best of luck, and relish this project!

~Susan


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Subject: RE: Help: Oral History to Book - How much editing
From: katlaughing
Date: 22 Dec 05 - 01:30 PM

Hmmm...sorry I missed that link, Susan. It's broken now.

With the distance of a year since Dad's been gone and my renewed vigor, I have finally begun work on this, once more. Just in re-reading everyone's input, I am inspired to finally get it done! Have worked all morning on it. I love the archives of Mudcat...I can always check back to see what was suggested and/or what the heck I said! Thanks, folks.

FWIW, I am incorporating the footnotes into the narrative to see how it "fits." Susan, if you can find a new link for that, please post it? I am still considering putting the footnotes at the end of each chapter, too.

It feels good to be back at work.:-)

kat


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Subject: RE: Help: Oral History to Book - How much editing
From: wysiwyg
Date: 03 Feb 04 - 11:54 AM

I thought I would add this to an existing thread rather than start a new one, and I do not know if this link is already in this thread.

Oral History Recommended Methods from ORALHIST

~Susan


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Subject: RE: Help: Oral History to Book - How much editing
From: Amos
Date: 29 Oct 02 - 08:44 PM

A passing thought, Kat -- if you are writing for the pleasure of the family your interjection of family relations (Dad, etc.) are a big plus. If you are writitng for those outside that circle it might read more smoothly saying consistent in voice (3rd person) and with an objective voice.

I think it's a grand project!

A


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Subject: RE: Help: Oral History to Book - How much editing
From: katlaughing
Date: 29 Oct 02 - 02:23 PM

Sure, Ed, that's a good idea. Here ya go, the first page of the first section, with Page 2 so you actually get an idea of my dad's narrative, too. The footnote numbers are in parentheses, as the I din't want to do the html.:-)

PLEASE keep in mind, that this is a ROUGH draft, with various notes to myself included in the footnotes. My sources will all be listed at the back, NOT in the footnotes as I have them now.

As it stands, here, I've left in the page breaks and so far, all of the footnotes fit on these two pages on an 8 X 11 page, which I know will change upon publication.

Having hit a block, at the moment, I am arranging photos and documents for insertion throughout the book.

I've made my dad's text blue, as I don't know the html for indented paragraphs.:-)THANKS, ya'll!

_________________________________________________________________

THE HUDSONS & CRAWFORDS         Page 1

    Ever since I can remember, my grandfather, Frank Hudson, has been a very large presence in my life, despite the fact that he died one year before I was born. I always knew him as he came alive through my dad's stories of growing up with this larger than life character of the old ranching West.

    Frank Hudson was born in the middle of winter, in a log cabin on the Hammerich Ranch on Four Mile Creek, southeast of Glenwood Springs, Colorado. He grew to be a big man, well over six feet, with broad shoulders and back. Dimensions well-suited for the ranch work he was born to and the jobs he held later in life. His parents, Lorenzo Dowd(1) and Mary Beulah Forsythe Hudson were on their way across the Continental Divide(2) from Leadville to New Castle(3) to homestead on Garfield Creek, when he made his appearance on a bright, sunny December morning in 1885. Mary's father, Abraham Forsythe had staked his claim, earlier, then sent word to them to "come on over."
__________________________________________________________________

1) L.D. was known simply as Dowd, all of his life. It is pronounced Dode.

2) Dad is fairly certain they would have followed Tennessee Pass, from Leadville as far as Gypsum, where they would have then taken Cottonwood Pass on to Glenwood Springs. Glenwood Canyon had not yet been opened for travel. From there, after Frank's birth, they went over Three Mile Mountain and on down Garfield Creek, where they homesteaded.

3) The town of New Castle was first called Chapman and Grand Butte. Located on the Colorado River, it took the name from the noted English coal-mining community of Newcastle after coal was discovered in the area. The town's first Post Office operated under the name Chapman from 1884 to 1888 when it was changed to New Castle.

____________________________________________________________________

Page 2

    That Frank came from such stock as legends are told of makes it no surprise that his own have grown over time. My dad, Gardner Lorenzo, remembers his Grandfather L.D. Hudson, Frank's dad:        

As far as I know, the Hudson side of the house
originated on the East coast, Virginia, I believe. And
then, migrated to Lake Huron during the War of 1812(1)
They were shipbuilders and there was a fleet to be built
there to fight the British, which never materialized in that
particular area; but anyhow, I guess the fleet was built and
they settled there, ran sawmills and were builders from
then on.
My grandfather, Lorenzo Dowd Hudson, ran
away from home at the age of eleven(2), so that history
is more or less sketchy, although I do know he had one
grandmother that was a Mohawk; and any family that's

_________________________________________________________________
1)Recent research shows they actually went to New York, before Michigan and, at a later date. In L.D.'s published obituary, it states, having been born on 1854 in Lawrence County, NY, "he moved from New York to Michigan overland at the age of 3 years." It may be that relatives went out for the War of 1812 and invited the others to join them later. (WAITING FOR 1812 SERVICE RECORDS as his obit said they both came from stock who had fought in the 1812 war.)

2) In the same obituary for L.D. Hudson, it says, "He lived in Southern Michigan on his father's farm until he was 13 years old, when he heard the call of the great West and went to Kansas and Indian Territory," which would have been in 1867.

In a biography of L.D. Hudson in Progressive Men of Western Colorado , published by A. W. Bowen & Co., in 1905, it says that he lived in Texas in his childhood, with an older brother. The older brother sent him on his way home to Michigan at the age of fourteen, when he instead stopped off in Indian Territory where he stayed for eight years. (1812 service records ordered 7/02 for Dowd's grandfathers, maternal and paternal.)

© 2002 K. LaFrance All rights reserved


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Subject: RE: Help: Oral History to Book - How much editing
From: GUEST,Ed
Date: 29 Oct 02 - 01:54 PM

Kat,

It's difficult to advise without an example. Would it be possible for you to post a 'sample page' (with footnotes) here?

I do like EBarnicle's solution however. I find having to continually turn to the end of a chapter something of a pain too.

Ed


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Subject: RE: Help: Oral History to Book - How much editing
From: EBarnacle1
Date: 29 Oct 02 - 12:23 PM

If your notes are that extensive, you might head the facing page as "notes" and use that as a formatting concept, rather than tying the notes to the foot of the page.


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Subject: RE: Help: Oral History to Book - How much editing
From: katlaughing
Date: 29 Oct 02 - 12:06 PM

No, nobody's suggested that, JenEllen and I like that idea, too. In fact, I am running into what I consider too much chopping up of my dad's part, now that I've dug into it more (sorry, MMario:-), and am thinking the footnotes had better stay. I'll try it all three ways and see. Still, I don't like having to have two bookmarks and really do hate turning those pages back and forth.**BG**

Thanks, both of you!!

kat


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Subject: RE: Help: Oral History to Book - How much editing
From: JenEllen
Date: 29 Oct 02 - 11:42 AM

Sorry, I've only read the refresh so far, so forgive if someone's stated this already, but to keep the lyrical format and stop the page flipping, could you arrange the footnotes at the end of each chapter? Are the sections delineated enough for that? I've read historical works both ways, with notes at the end of the chapters, and notes in a huge section at the back....both work okay, just requires TWO bookmarks!


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Subject: RE: Help: Oral History to Book - How much editing
From: MMario
Date: 29 Oct 02 - 10:37 AM

you know what they say - no plan of action survives the first encounter...I'm always for more lyrical writing...


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Subject: RE: Help: Oral History to Book - How much editing
From: katlaughing
Date: 29 Oct 02 - 10:12 AM

Thanks, MMario. I've started a second version that way and I have to say I've already enjoyed it more than the other.


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Subject: RE: Help: Oral History to Book - How much editing
From: MMario
Date: 28 Oct 02 - 03:51 PM

should I change the format and put the formatted info into my paragraphs of the actual content? It would fatten the book up a bit, plus make my wriring job easier, as I could write in a more lyrical way, rather than just reporting facts, etc.

I would say so - based on what you say you have found.


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Subject: RE: Help: Oral History to Book - How much editing
From: katlaughing
Date: 28 Oct 02 - 03:28 PM

Ha! Bet you all had given up on me. *bg* Two years and two moves later and I still have questions!

It's been shaping up quite well, though a little light on content, SO, I've been doing tons of research AND getting more stories from Dad. I am also going to have a whole other section of the book which will include my maternal grandmother's memoirs, about the same area, as written by her while in her late 70's in the early 1960's.

Anyway, with all of your suggestions, I'd decided to go with the footnote format for the research stuff, with dad's actual words quoted in indented paragraphs, with my comments and stories leading into each of his.

With all of the research I've been doing, the footnotes are running into a lot of space. My question is: should I change the format and put the formatted info into my paragraphs of the actual content? It would fatten the book up a bit, plus make my wriring job easier, as I could write in a more lyrical way, rather than just reporting facts, etc.

I don't know about you all, but when I get footnotes which carry on to the next page and I am not done with above text on the first page, I hate flipping back and forth.

So, please let me know what you think and what you prefer when reading these types of books. If you've already said in the past and don't feel like adding anymore, that's fine. I appreciate all of your help.

BTW, dad has read a rough draft and he is really happy about it, even when my research poked a few holes in family mythology.:-) Thanks to you all, I was brave enough to present it to him and not hurt his feelings.

THANKS!!

luvyakat


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Subject: RE: Help: Oral History to Book - How much editing
From: Mountain Dog
Date: 09 Jul 01 - 06:33 PM

Hi, Kat

Here's another book you might find of interest as a resource. "Writing Life Stories" by Bill Roorbach, published by Story Press, 1998 is subtitled "How to Make Memories in Memoirs, Ideas into Essays and Life into Literature."

It's full of good information about crafting creative non-fiction and has many helpful exercises. Worth looking up in the library )or at my favorite on-line used book source, Powell's). Even if you don't use it for your current project, it's a good reference work to remember for your next venture into the genre.


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Subject: RE: Help: Oral History to Book - How much editing
From: katlaughing
Date: 09 Jul 01 - 04:52 PM

MtnDog, that is wonderful! Thank you for sharing it with us.

MMario, I had not seen that, thanks very much.

Dicho, thank you. I have just ordered two books, after looking them over in the library, which are chockful of specifics for hundreds of sources of grant money for all kinds of projects: "Free Money and Help for Women Entrepreneurs" and "Free Money from the Government for Small Businesses and Entrepreneurs."

I have a friend who is working in the community foundation field whose boss just wrote a winning grant application for the Aspen Institute, so I know I could get help writing something up. My old boss is an expert at that, too, so I hope I can find some monies that way.

Chicken Charlie, thanks for the tip on the Writer's Market, I have subscribed online and am finding it helpful. I did study the U of OK publishing site quite a bit and they are pretty stringent on requirements, but I think I can meet those, once I've got the whole thing done and ready to ship.

One of the things I've just found out about which will garner interest for the book, I am working on getting the old homestead listed on the Colorado Scarce Places List, and possibly the Historic registry. If I can do that, there is a group which will help secure funding to restore the buildings or at least keep them from anymore decay. THAT in itself would bring about a lot of interest, at least locally. It seems a lot of people don't know the colourful history of the place, including my greatgranddad's shootout with a neighbour who ran his fence 12 feet over the line and died in the shootout. At my great granddad's trial the widow said it was the best thing anyone had ever done for her!

Anyway, thanks very much to everyone for your interest and encouragment.

luvyakat


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Subject: RE: Help: Oral History to Book - How much editing
From: Mountain Dog
Date: 06 Jul 01 - 06:22 PM

Hi, Kat

Cast another vote for minimal editing, liberal use of periods, judicious use brackets and use of footnotes (or hyperlinks in the case of a CD version). These, for me, take care of inconsistencies and provide clarity without sacrificing the true voice of the speaker/storyteller.

I had the honor and tremendous pleasure of helping a friend's father put together his spoken memoirs during the last few months of his life; a project he had always wanted to do, but had never found time for...until he realized that he had little of it left.

We used a tape recorder, left running and unnoticed in a corner, and simply talked for hours on end (mostly him talking and me listening). Afterward, I would make verbatim transcriptions (with the microcassette player, not a transcriber - somewhat akin to plowing furrows in a stony New England field with a toothpick) and check with him on any questions of fact or points of clarification.

In the end, his family was left with a first hand recollection of a long and eventful life that not only sounded, but looked and felt like the man they had known so well and loved so deeply.

My personal feeling was, and remains, that the summing up of a life in the first person deserves to be conveyed just as it pours forth from the teller's lips...and let the reader decide whether or not to lend an ear to the tale.

Bless you for doing this work in the way your heart directs you. That is the truest guide you could ask for.


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Subject: RE: Help: Oral History to Book - How much editing
From: MMario
Date: 06 Jul 01 - 12:33 PM

of possible interest click


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Subject: RE: Help: Oral History to Book - How much editing
From: Chicken Charlie
Date: 01 Jun 01 - 03:00 PM

Good point, Dicho. I too have a healthy respect for U. Oklahoma. If I ever get anything whipped into book form I plan to send it there first. Check this year's "Writers' Market" for further.

CC


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Subject: RE: Help: Oral History to Book - How much editing
From: Dicho (Frank Staplin)
Date: 01 Jun 01 - 02:51 PM

Kath and Sourdough are right. Do not edit out the flavor. Brackets (few) and footnotes (as many as needed) take care of ambiguities or faulty recollection. Also remember that over-editing can remove the "word sense" of the time. Our spoken lingo has, like, changed since your dad's and granddad's time. Nothing wrong with using gran'maw or similar. Just add name (in parentheses) following first usage. Readers are not as dumb or as easily confused as most editors seem to think. You should recheck sources of money. The first guy you contact often is interested in keeping spending down and keeping "nuisances" away from the people who actually make the decisions or are familiar with the subject matter. Although Colorado-based, you might sent a copy of the tape and covering letter to the University of Oklahoma. They have published recollections based on settlement from the Canadian border to Mexico.


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Subject: RE: Help: Oral History to Book - How much editing
From: katlaughing
Date: 01 Jun 01 - 02:51 PM

Wow, great advice, CC, thanks very much! I guess I have muddled along fairly well, as I've been using a lot of footnotes and explanation along the way. Good to know I ma on the right track.

So far I am okay on the place names, as I grew up near most of them or have seen them in print when I've done research, etc.

That is wonderful that you've worked so much on oral histories and also the transcribing of the mortuary books. Those are of such great value to anyone researching, esp. their family genealogy! Thanks!

kat


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Subject: RE: Help: Oral History to Book - How much editing
From: RoyH (Burl)
Date: 01 Jun 01 - 02:48 PM

As a lover of oral history I LOVE this thread. Good luck to your project Kat, I'm sure it will provide much joy. Just as a by-the-way, George Ewart Evans, author of 'Ask The Fellows Who Cut The Hay' and many other works of oral history wrote a fine handbook on the subject called 'Spoken History', pubs Faber & Faber, 1987. ISBN-0-571-14982-0.


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Subject: RE: Help: Oral History to Book - How much editing
From: Chicken Charlie
Date: 01 Jun 01 - 02:29 PM

Kat--

My "day job" is supervising the archives in the library where I work, so I've transcribed over 120 oral histories & been to a couple of workshops & no end of bull sessions on the subject. Despite all that, I won't be adding much, because you've got some good advice in the previous 40-odd posts.

I would not bother to do the whole text twice. His sentences are not that long and as SDShad et al have pointed out, you have the open of making a full stop and starting a new sentence with 'And.' Orally, I'd say that was OK. A purist is going to say "Don't change it unless it's factually wrong." As to what you do then, a question you raise in a later post, I think there are two cases, or at least I do one of two things depending.

If the persons makes a blatant error and corrects it either immediately or at least in the same paragraph, I just run the correct word, date or whatever, in brackets.

E.g., Joe says "We came out here in 1931. Lived on Main Street for a while. No, that was 1934." I've been known to type: "We came out here in [1934]. Lived on Main Street for a while...."

If the error is never corrected, it stands the wrong way in the text and is corrected in a footnote. "We came out here in 1931 (1)." (1) City Directories indicate the family arrived in 1934.

Don't be afraid to footnote. Use footnotes to correct errors, to explain rare words or phrases, or to point a reader toward other written sources. If more than one person adds footnotes, each should be initialed. I got a diary which had been annotated by a grandson, so I put "K.E." after all his notes and "T.J.C." after mine.

Explain that--and explain your particular editing philosophy briefly--in a short preface. It's basically fair to go in one of several ways as long as the reader knows what you did.

Two more things: Make a copy or two of the tape(s) and make sure the copies are in different places. Finally, unless you know all the spellings of local place-names, a convenient source for confirming spelling is World Book Encyc. Near the map of each state, they list "Towns, Villages and Other Inhabited Places." I use that constantly because what I'm doing right now is databasing a local mortician's funeral books. His clients had been born all over the world and his orthography was strictly pragmatic, so World Book has rescued me many times.

Good luck getting any kind of grant. Our feeling is that that is going to be much harder in this administration--even for state grants, because if the Fed withdraws funding from one area the state must adjust somewhere to compensate. But try, anyway.

CC


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Subject: RE: Help: Oral History to Book - How much editing
From: katlaughing
Date: 01 Jun 01 - 02:10 PM

LOL, thanks, DougeR!!


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Subject: RE: Help: Oral History to Book - How much editing
From: DougR
Date: 01 Jun 01 - 01:54 PM

Well, if you get flack for it, you can blame me and MMario, kat! :>)

DougR


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Subject: RE: Help: Oral History to Book - How much editing
From: katlaughing
Date: 01 Jun 01 - 01:37 PM

Thanks, that's kind of what I figured and have done, but then it seemed so major I wasn't sure.


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Subject: RE: Help: Oral History to Book - How much editing
From: MMario
Date: 01 Jun 01 - 01:30 PM

What Doug Said...


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Subject: RE: Help: Oral History to Book - How much editing
From: DougR
Date: 01 Jun 01 - 01:28 PM

kat, you might report it as your dad related it, footnote it, and include in the footnotes (assuming you will have them)a clarification based on your research.

DougR


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Subject: RE: Help: Oral History to Book - How much editing
From: katlaughing
Date: 01 Jun 01 - 01:21 PM

One more question for you Truth in History buffs:

I am working from my dad's memoirs. It is important to remember he recorded them, on tape, in his 70's and that the granddad in question, below, died when dad was only 6, but he did continue to hear some of the stories from his dad. It is also important to consider i am hoping to finish this in time for him to read and he is 84 now, so I want to be sensitive to his memories, even if a bit faulty.:-)

Anyway, in my breakthrough research, I've found that one major premise of family lore is incorrect. Dad says the Hudsons started out in VA and moved to MI, where my Great-granddad, Lorenzo Dowd Hudson came from, to work on building ships for the War of 1812.

My research, backed by published resources (obits and the like) say they went from VA to NY, then to MI in 1857, considerably later than the War of 1812!

As they were shipbuilders and ran sawmills, etc., I am thinking maybe he got it mixed-up and they went up north to NY to help out for that war, then moseyed over to MI. I will pursue this in my research.

What I'd like your take on, is how do I present this in the book? It is in the opening paragraphs of the first chapter. I have led into dad's comments, then put a footnote about the research and the discrepancies. Does that seem alright, or should I edit out dad's words and just present the story from MI on?

Thanks!

kat

PS: You know you all get a BIG Dedication in the book, right?**BG**


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Subject: RE: Help: Oral History to Book - How much editing
From: katlaughing
Date: 11 May 01 - 11:30 PM

Thanks, bertdarlin'...you've got it!


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Subject: RE: Help: Oral History to Book - How much editing
From: Bert
Date: 11 May 01 - 10:21 PM

Good Luck! kat me kuv. But I really don't think that you're going to need it.

Don't forget I want a signed copy.


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Subject: RE: Help: Oral History to Book - How much editing
From: katlaughing
Date: 11 May 01 - 09:45 PM

Well, it's only taken me a year of not very much time spent on this, but, as I noted in my recent thread about visting Colorado, I ahve finally worked out a format that I think will work for this. I will be introducing each section of dad's exact words with a few paragraphs of my own, then lead right into his, with his paragraphs indented more.

Thanks to an observation by Deckman about touchstones, my working title is, "Touchstones of Our Past: One Family's Early Days in Garfield County, Colorado."

Wish me luck!?

kat


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Subject: RE: Help: Oral History to Book - How much editing
From: Micca
Date: 04 May 00 - 07:42 PM

kat, to return to the columns/not columns point, I have a copy of a book of Greek poetry by George Seferis,and the translator dealt with this question by having the greek originals on the left-hand page and the english translation on the right. I like both versions, but must confess that the "edited" made more sense...To me. Much encouragement....


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Subject: RE: Help: Oral History to Book - How much editing
From: katlaughing
Date: 04 May 00 - 06:57 PM

Thank you, Gervase, very much. Good points.

Now, if I may say to all of you: if you are regretting not listening more and it is too late, please, please consider those who come after you and make a tape or write down your memories, stories, etc. I know it won't bring the old ones back whom you miss, but it will provide generations to come a tangible link to you.

A few years ago I encouraged my brother to make a family history tape of his own memories as a Christmas present, along with his reading our favourite stories from childhood. He did and it was wonderful. In fact, now that I think of it, maybe there is some stuff about the grandparents on there that I should include, too!

Thank you.


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Subject: RE: Help: Oral History to Book - How much editing
From: Gervase
Date: 04 May 00 - 06:27 PM

To wander back to a point halfway through, I would always opt for the original - but also remember that the best kept secret of editing is punctuation. You should be able to keep all of those words with all the wonderful and uniquely personal nature of your dad's voice by picking your pauses and punctuating accordingly. Don't be afraid to break things up into sentences, even if they're Molly Bloom-style streams of thought. One of the things about any transcribed dialect is that it takes very little time for the reader's 'ear' to adapt and for what you might call 'the voice in the head' to learn to speak. I remember the first time I came across broad Norfolk dialect and it seemed as incomprehensible as Sanskrit, but after a few pages, blarst it bor, Oi hed it in mi hid. And good luck with the project; I just wish I had listened more (and recorded anything) before it was too late.


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Subject: RE: Help: Oral History to Book - How much editing
From: katlaughing
Date: 03 May 00 - 09:43 PM

That does help, Lyle, very much, thank you! I think I was trying to read it that way and that is what prompted me to start this thread. You've put your finger on it. Most of it is very "flavourful", so there is not a lot to edit or whatever I decide to do, but it is a very important point you make, as well as someone else further up, that the written is read differently than the tape is heard.

Thanks!

Progress report: I have half of the pages put into my computer! Good thing I have lots of experience at word processing, eh?**BG**

t'anks!


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Subject: RE: Help: Oral History to Book - How much editing
From: GUEST,Lyle
Date: 03 May 00 - 09:29 PM

Kat - That's a tough one, and difficult to answer; probably the best advise is just do what YOU think is best. Having said that, here is how I handle it. Print out the entire recording. Now read it, trying hard *not* to remember what the recording sounded like. What you will find is that reading it is much different from hearing it. The next step is to pick out passages that you think are the very best at keeping the tone and implications of the message your father was using. Put these in quotes exactly as they are said, forgetting sentence structure, grammitical usage, etc.; keep the *flavor*. The rest you can change to suit you as a writer - consider only the message here.

Hope this helps a bit.

Lyle


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Subject: RE: Help: Oral History to Book - How much editing
From: katlaughing
Date: 03 May 00 - 02:08 AM

So...it's "Bond, Sourdough Bond", eh? And, I thought sure it was going to be a Beezer (BSA), instead! LOL!!!

Thanks, Jen, I will be yakking atcha about it! I DO appreciate all of the generous help you've all given. Keeps me motivated!


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Subject: RE: Help: Oral History to Book - How much editing
From: JenEllen
Date: 03 May 00 - 01:49 AM

Great, now I fear I'm forever imprinted with a mental image of the Mudcat's own JamesBond....Beemer, huh?

katkensho, I have a bit of experience on the grant-hunting and writing end. You need any help, give a holler. Experience has proven that there is always some one out there, just finding them is the key. I've got some leads out for you tho...~Elle


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Subject: RE: Help: Oral History to Book - How much editing
From: katlaughing
Date: 02 May 00 - 06:27 PM

Thanks, again, SD & Rob-O! Willdo!


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Subject: RE: Help: Oral History to Book - How much editing
From: Robo
Date: 02 May 00 - 04:32 PM

Kat . . .

You're doing a pretty fine job, to judge by the sample. I had to look carefully to notice the editings, and that is very much as it should be. I would be careful about the brackets. Last resort kind of thing. Particularly when overused, they intrude on the story and displace the reader from the satory-teller, achieving exactly the things we're trying to avoid. (I didn't find anything in the sample confusing enough to warrant that.) I would only use the brackets for one thing -- and that's as an indicator that more careful copy-editing is required.

Another caution would be to avoid making unnecessary editings. For example, in the first sentence you edited "moved by wagon train to Leadville, Colorado" to "moved to Leadville, Colorado, by wagon train." No particular harm done in that sentence, of course. The conern is that over the full course of the longer piece, those kind of subtle influences from the editor can impact how we hear the speaker as we read.

Hey, when you're all done, let someone test read it and point out anything in the piece that detracts from their reading and enjoying it.

Again, best of luck. -- Rob-O


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Subject: RE: Help: Oral History to Book - How much editing
From: Sourdough
Date: 02 May 00 - 04:04 PM

kat:

Take a look at http://www.uwyo.edu/special/wch

The Wyoming Council for the Humanities seems to have a comprehensive program. You fall under History, Sociology, perhaps economics and you may be able to add other Humanities to the list.

If nothing else, it's intersting reading, what they support.

Sourdough


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Subject: RE: Help: Oral History to Book - How much editing
From: Clinton Hammond2
Date: 02 May 00 - 03:06 PM

I'd rather be listed as "Bad Influence" LOL!!!!!!!!

{~`


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Subject: RE: Help: Oral History to Book - How much editing
From: katlaughing
Date: 02 May 00 - 02:21 PM

You've got it, Clinton!! Autographed copies will be offered HERE FIRST!!**BG**

Haha! Thank you SO much SD, I have a feeling I will be hollering at you as often as you can stand.

I guess I just assumed ya'll knew more than I am telling ya; my mistake. Here's is what I am starting with and feel I really am ahead of the game:

Original tape of dad's memories & family history
Hard copy of transription of tape which I am entering into my WP
Hard copy of my grandmother's memoirs, which I have to enter, yet
Over 200 scanned photos already on my hard drive
A good scanner for more
An excellent printer
Two previous, self-published, small books, self-printed, assembled, etc. using on old 386! LOTS of experience!
Over 20 years as a writer
An excellent graphics program and ability to print all copies myself, although I won't...too tedious

Still have to get the CD burner, next on our list
Rog is a broadcast engineer & has a great mixing board which he says we can use to do the master etc.

As for grants, the last time I called Colorado to ask about funding even just a book of the photos, they were not interested because I didn't live in Colorado. Pissed me off so I never called back. I have a feeling I will be doing some web searching. The PBS and historical society thing could offer some possibilities. I've also found out that the Boulder Public Library has some stuff on my grandmother's family on permanent display in their historical collection room, or whatever it is called and the director used to be my brother's boss, so...I think I may start by contacting her.

Ya know I am gonna hafta list all of you as contributors, nursemaids, sounding boards, gurus, etc., doncha?!!**BG**

THANKS!!

kat


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Subject: RE: Help: Oral History to Book - How much editing
From: Sourdough
Date: 02 May 00 - 01:43 PM

Grants:

Colorado has money for this sort of thing if they get interested in the particular project and are convinced that the proposer has the ability to carry it out.

I would start by inquiring of the state and local historical societies where the stories take place. Emphasize the fact that you have photographs, too. If there are enough photographs, a student might take this on as a photo documentary.

Wyoming public broadcasting supported a well done historical documentary that I recall from five of six years ago that wasn't even about Wyoming. It was about the extraordinary day care centers run in the West Coast shipyards from 1943 through 1945. They were examples of excellence, the centers (the film was good too) and for whatever reason, the Wyoming Historical Society and the PBS station decided to support it.

For the kind of support you are looking for, you can do well with in-kind contributions.

If you get a sponsoring organization, you may get people who will donate transcription services I pay $3.50-$5.00/page to transcribe my interviews so that can save you a good deal of money and a huge amount of time while giving the transcriber a tax deduction if they are so inclined. It certainly will give them a chance to participate in an interesting project. Offering a finished copy (protected by copyright) will probably help.

The local equivalent of Kinko's (an office service company) might be willing to donate scans of your historical pictures. Here they run about $10./scan which seems far too high but which makes a significant donation for them when carried out by their staff during off periods when they aren't working anyway.

Anyway, I am sure you get the idea. Just remember that you need a sponsoring organization in order to be able to offer the tax benefit. It has to be a non-profit organization that has the ability to accept tax free donations.

If you would like, let me know your accomplishments as you go on witht his. I have some more ideas but I don't want to overload you and it is important that you try some of these out before you go on to others.

As far as James Bondish activities go, I always (except once) tell people that I am recording, even though I don't need to in this state. That way, it is clear that our interview is "on the record". If I am thinking fast enough, I make sure I record the part where I tell them I am recording and the interviewee says, "Fine, go ahead."

I DO drive a BMW though.

Does it make a difference that it's a motorcycle?

Sourdough


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Subject: RE: Help: Oral History to Book - How much editing
From: Clinton Hammond2
Date: 02 May 00 - 11:23 AM

Kat...

Regarding grants, there I canna help, except to suggest that this could likely be a project you could do all on yer own with the right PC... a good printer, a CD burner, a good sound editor, and a good word processor... And likely a good scanner... You should be able to keep the cost to under 2500... A dedicated workstation, to atleast get the first printing of it done... then maybe you can look inot mass distribution and such... Oh ya.. and sign the first batch eh!! That way my grandkids can have it appraised on Antiques Roadshow!

LOL!!!!!

All The Best Eh!
{~`


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Subject: RE: Help: Oral History to Book - How much editing
From: katlaughing
Date: 02 May 00 - 11:04 AM

LOL, thanks, Jen, I am counting on you to hold my feet to the fire! Oh, and I had already planned on using given names...even I get confused! Thanks!

Sourdough, darlin', I only lost the computer file of the transcription, not the original tape whihc dad sent out as Christmas presents in 1986! I would be devastated had that happened. I was just whining about having to reenter the transcription, again.**BG** Love the 007 stuff, though! Actually I had thought up a name of a company & everything for doing this as a business, too, but had too much other stuff on my plate....still do.

Jake, thank you very much. That is exactly how I feel, very, very fortunate. I am also fortunate in that my mother's mother wrote her memoirs when she was laid up with a broken arm in her 70's, so I may include some of those in the same book, as she grew up in Colorado, too. It would be a different section and is already in written form. She tells of the first telephone, her first teaching postiiton, going to Normal School on the early campus of CU in Boulder, when it was just one building, etc. plus I have some greta pictures of her, too, riding her horse in front of a one-room schoolhouse, etc.

I will be happy to keep you all posted on how it goes.

One more question: does anybody know of any grants one could apply for to help with the cost of such a project? I am doing it, regardless, but it sure would be nice to have some kind of help with funding other than my dear, darlin' husband (not that he is complaining...he's excited!)

Thanks, ya'll,

kat


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