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Folk Music in Antarctica?

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GUEST,Chet 07 Apr 00 - 08:37 AM
GUEST,Roger the skiffler 07 Apr 00 - 08:52 AM
AndyG 07 Apr 00 - 09:30 AM
Charlie Baum 07 Apr 00 - 09:36 AM
Bill D 07 Apr 00 - 09:49 AM
Jacob B 07 Apr 00 - 09:58 AM
Mooh 07 Apr 00 - 11:31 AM
AndyG 07 Apr 00 - 11:57 AM
GUEST,Diesel 07 Apr 00 - 06:31 PM
thosp 07 Apr 00 - 06:53 PM
thosp 07 Apr 00 - 06:59 PM
MMario 07 Apr 00 - 07:02 PM
thosp 07 Apr 00 - 07:02 PM
Clinton Hammond2 07 Apr 00 - 07:06 PM
Chet W. 07 Apr 00 - 10:13 PM
Bill D 07 Apr 00 - 11:07 PM
Chet W. 08 Apr 00 - 10:27 AM
Bill D 08 Apr 00 - 02:13 PM
The Beanster 08 Apr 00 - 06:13 PM
diesel 09 Apr 00 - 03:47 PM
Uncle_DaveO 11 Apr 00 - 12:10 PM
GUEST,Martin Ryan 11 Apr 00 - 06:31 PM
Susan-Marie 12 Apr 00 - 09:48 AM
Uncle_DaveO 12 Apr 00 - 11:39 AM
Mark Cohen 13 Apr 00 - 07:19 AM
Susan-Marie 13 Apr 00 - 03:03 PM
Haruo 13 Dec 04 - 09:47 PM
pdq 13 Dec 04 - 09:54 PM
Pauline L 13 Dec 04 - 10:00 PM
Cluin 13 Dec 04 - 11:54 PM
Peace 14 Dec 04 - 01:31 AM
Marje 14 Dec 04 - 12:14 PM
Margret RoadKnight 14 Dec 04 - 05:45 PM
GUEST,Peter 15 Dec 04 - 11:05 PM
MartinRyan 16 Dec 04 - 04:22 AM
Schantieman 16 Dec 04 - 06:14 AM
Uke 16 Mar 05 - 03:06 PM
Bob Bolton 16 Mar 05 - 11:51 PM
MartinRyan 17 Mar 05 - 05:52 AM
dottydot 01 May 05 - 05:32 PM
Bob Bolton 01 May 05 - 08:44 PM
Severn 01 May 05 - 09:11 PM
Commander Crabbe 02 May 05 - 09:07 AM
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Subject: Folk Music in Antarctica?
From: GUEST,Chet
Date: 07 Apr 00 - 08:37 AM

I know this may sound crazy (I've been accused before) but I've been reading about these scientists that spend the winter in Antarctica and I thought wouldn't it be fun to do that and maybe they'd like having a 'house band' during that time. Since their winter is our summer (in the northern hemisphere) it would be a great summer project for teachers, students, etc. Who could be contacted about this. Any interest? Any ideas.

Chet


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Subject: RE: Folk Music in Antarctica?
From: GUEST,Roger the skiffler
Date: 07 Apr 00 - 08:52 AM

Can't help with your query, Chet, but at the other end of the world...
A good few years ago She Who Must be Obeyed and myself did the Norwegian coastal voyage trip in a hertigrute (mailboat) up as far as Svalbard (Spitzbergen). When we stopped to drop off supplies to the remotest stop, an inter-Universities research base, we were met by an impromptu band of assorted brass and string instruments of the scientists, punctuated by the eerie howling of tethered huskies. A wonderful trip and a memorable experience, but I still prefer Greek sun holidays!
RtS


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Subject: RE: Folk Music in Antarctica?
From: AndyG
Date: 07 Apr 00 - 09:30 AM

Many local folkies work for the BAS ( British Antarctic Survey) here in Cambridge. I'll ask when I see one.

AndyG


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Subject: RE: Folk Music in Antarctica?
From: Charlie Baum
Date: 07 Apr 00 - 09:36 AM

Check out the English Book of Penguin Folk Songs.

Actually, I've heard that Antarctica dueing its winter is an isolated, harsh environment that does not lend itself to pleasure trips. But if you're serious, you might start your research at this web site (click here).

--Charlie Baum


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Subject: RE: Folk Music in Antarctica?
From: Bill D
Date: 07 Apr 00 - 09:49 AM

although it was written for the far NORTH, they might appreciate a stirring rendition of WHEN THE ICE WORMS NEST AGAIN


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Subject: RE: Folk Music in Antarctica?
From: Jacob B
Date: 07 Apr 00 - 09:58 AM

Michael Cooney spent several months a year or two ago as the resident entertainer on the first passenger ship to circumnavigate Antartica. It stopped at lots of research stations along the way. He wrote it up in his publication, The Friendship Letter.

I don't have his email address with me, unfortunately.

Jacob


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Subject: RE: Folk Music in Antarctica?
From: Mooh
Date: 07 Apr 00 - 11:31 AM

Charlie, thanks for making my day with Penguin Folk Songs! I laughed and am still laughing. I gotta remember this...

Peace, Mooh.


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Subject: RE: Folk Music in Antarctica?
From: AndyG
Date: 07 Apr 00 - 11:57 AM

Before getting too incoherent with laughter you should check here for the EBPFS.

AndyG


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Subject: RE: Folk Music in Antarctica?
From: GUEST,Diesel
Date: 07 Apr 00 - 06:31 PM

Howya !

Just when you thought you were mad, out of the mudcat jumps another madman !

I've been to Antarctica, oh near 10 years ago now, and yes it is cold and no there are no polar bears !!!

Actually the rhetorical answers above are a flashback to when on returning home people used to ask the most obvious of questions - Is it cold ? Etc

I'm not a scientist - a mechanic in fact, the thread posted above for B.A.S. is who I travelled down with and I have ot admit it was a fabulous experience and something I would possibly consider again but definitely recommend.

Of the 15 people we had on base only one could be regarded as scientist, one other almost a scientist and 3 others with pretensions to be... the rest of us lowlife were trades of one description or other ( mechanics, electrician, carpenter, cook, plumber, hanndyman and outdoor specialist(mountaineer etc )). There was no divide of trade/profession in fact it worked out great for everybody on our trip. The folk side of things went brilliant - at least 3 good folkies and a lot of wannabes.

It definitely is worth the experience but some caution first, beware that mail and fresh food comes but once a year, mixed gender for the winter is not allowed - in other words once there you see not the opposite sex 'till you get back (no I'm not gay ) which brings me nicely to when you get back... I was lucky in that my contract was one winter, I therefore stayed in Antartica for 15 months, some of my friends who I travelled down there with were contracted for 2 winters - I left behind on my return - they compoleted a 27 month tour. It is a long time away with no possibility of return eary for emergency or family etc. That said and known in advance though helps with acceptance. Once back in the real world the challenge is to accept crowds again - therein lies the greater challenge - some opt to go back again almost immediately.

Contact the people at BAS in Cambridge - they're very helpful and also by the way take people for shorter 6 month contracts - you get to go there - but staying the winter is better !

rgds

Diesel


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Subject: RE: Folk Music in Antarctica?
From: thosp
Date: 07 Apr 00 - 06:53 PM

if you want to vacation in antartica etc. this is a good place to exploreblueclicketything

peace (Y) thosp


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Subject: RE: Folk Music in Antarctica?
From: thosp
Date: 07 Apr 00 - 06:59 PM

hmmmmmmmm what happened? well lets try again if this doesn't work --- it's www.anetstation.com --- but lets try theblue clickety thing again

peace (Y) thosp


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Subject: RE: Folk Music in Antarctica?
From: MMario
Date: 07 Apr 00 - 07:02 PM

Thanks Thosp....listening now.


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Subject: RE: Folk Music in Antarctica?
From: thosp
Date: 07 Apr 00 - 07:02 PM

ok that's better ---somewhere in there they explain how to go about vacationing in antartica ---- it's better in the summer --- the ice isn't sooooo cold


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Subject: RE: Folk Music in Antarctica?
From: Clinton Hammond2
Date: 07 Apr 00 - 07:06 PM

Folk music in Antarctica eh??

Prolific Canadian Ian Tamblyn has done it and has 1 or 2 CD's about his experiences... but the titles of which elude me right now....

Look aroud, you'll find him

{~`


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Subject: RE: Folk Music in Antarctica?
From: Chet W.
Date: 07 Apr 00 - 10:13 PM

Thanks all. Just when you think you had a new idea. I love the iceworm song. Could it really be by Robert Service? Would appreciate any info on the song, like the tune or a recording.

Thanks, Chet


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Subject: RE: Folk Music in Antarctica?
From: Bill D
Date: 07 Apr 00 - 11:07 PM

well, Chet..I actually HAVE a recording of it by some guy from Alaska..I guess I could make a tape.....

"Uncle Bob Pavitt sings Ballads of Alaska"...truly memorable...leading off with the "Ice-Blue Mendenhall Glacier Blues"


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Subject: RE: Folk Music in Antarctica?
From: Chet W.
Date: 08 Apr 00 - 10:27 AM

I found the actual sheet music for the song on the official Robert Service website. It's from a book of songs he wrote called Bathtub Ballads. If anyone's interested (there's sheet music for a lot of his other songs too) the address is www.ude.net/service/songs/ice_worm.html

Thanks again, Chet


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Subject: RE: Folk Music in Antarctica?
From: Bill D
Date: 08 Apr 00 - 02:13 PM

....amazing! The things you can find! I wouldn't think that a little song like this had been 'processed', but the original differs significantly from versions I have seen. I also went and looked at the other songs in "Bathtub Ballads"...I can't quite decide whether he reminds me more of Dr. Seuss or Ogden Nash...with maybe a touch of Kipling..


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Subject: RE: Folk Music in Antarctica?
From: The Beanster
Date: 08 Apr 00 - 06:13 PM

Sounds good in theory but...how are ya at picking on a stringed instrument wearing giant mittens? LOL

I just read a book called "Alone" by Richard Byrd and the cold down there sounds like nothing any of us has ever experienced (except Diesel!) They had to use alcohol in the thermometers because mercury freezes at -38, whereas alcohol will still flow at -179. According to Byrd, at -50 or so, when you exhale, your breath hangs in the air in the form of tiny crystalline droplets and crackles as the wind carries it away. Any exposed skin immediately begins to frostbite and the least bit of exertion makes your lungs burn like fire. Don't mean to scare you, but I think Diesel's words of caution should be taken seriously. It doesn't sound like a walk in the park.

Besides, I hate to rain on the parade but there is major concern over the fact that this last frontier, a truly pristine environment, is being irreparably harmed by tourists and non-essential travelers...


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Subject: RE: Folk Music in Antarctica?
From: diesel
Date: 09 Apr 00 - 03:47 PM

Forgot to mention - guitars suffer a lot of warpage problems due to drying out in the low humidity environment. People got around this by keeping a wet towel in the case with the instrument.

Others never noticed !!!!

diesel


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Subject: RE: Folk Music in Antarctica?
From: Uncle_DaveO
Date: 11 Apr 00 - 12:10 PM

Sorry to be a wet blanket, but your "house band" idea has been preempted.

There is already a bluegrass band at the 90 South (South Pole) station. They have a website, and I will TRY to find the URL to post. They have pictures and I THINK some sound clips.

Dave Oesterreich


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Subject: RE: Folk Music in Antarctica?
From: GUEST,Martin Ryan
Date: 11 Apr 00 - 06:31 PM

Must dig out a few accounts of Shackleton in the South. One of the (other) Irish on the voyage from Elephant Island to South Georgia (Crean? McCarthy?) was a notoriously tuneless singer. I suspect the buggers didn't appreciate good sean-nós when they heard it!

Regards


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Subject: RE: Folk Music in Antarctica?
From: Susan-Marie
Date: 12 Apr 00 - 09:48 AM

Just because there's already a "house band" doesn't mean they wouldn't like some fresh blood! I believe there is some kind of arts scolarship program for Antarctica. A year or so ago I read a great book called "Antarctica" - it's fiction (a great story), but it had a lot of realistic details about living there. I remember the flyleaf saying the author had spent some time in Antarctica through an arts grant program or something like that. Sorry I can't be of more help, but if I come across more specific info I'll post it.


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Subject: RE: Folk Music in Antarctica?
From: Uncle_DaveO
Date: 12 Apr 00 - 11:39 AM

Susan-Marie:

I think you're referring to "Antarctic Navigation". A fine book. No music, though.

Dave Oesterreich


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Subject: RE: Folk Music in Antarctica?
From: Mark Cohen
Date: 13 Apr 00 - 07:19 AM

If anyone is interested, there are no song circles on the Big Island of Hawaii, and the weather is a little warmer.

Aloha,
Mark


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Subject: RE: Folk Music in Antarctica?
From: Susan-Marie
Date: 13 Apr 00 - 03:03 PM

Dave - No, the one I read was definately "Antarctica" by Kim Stanley Robinson, a sci fi writer. No music in it either, but there is skinny-dipping in thermal springs beneath the ice, which sounded like fun...

I'll look for Antarctic Navigation now that I've developed an appetite for books about cold snowy desolate places.


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Subject: RE: Folk Music in Antarctica?
From: Haruo
Date: 13 Dec 04 - 09:47 PM

At the Chantey Sing at Northwest Seaport Friday night, Cap'n Matt did a wonderful medley about the legendary toppling (because mesmerized by aircraft) penguins. I'm trying to find it, but no luck yet. (It can't be an urban legend because there are no cities in Antarctica.

Haruo


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Subject: RE: Folk Music in Antarctica?
From: pdq
Date: 13 Dec 04 - 09:54 PM

You can't sing folk songs in Antarctica because it's too cold. The notes freeze and fall to the ground before they can reach the audience!


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Subject: RE: Folk Music in Antarctica?
From: Pauline L
Date: 13 Dec 04 - 10:00 PM

No, no. That's Paul Bunyan you're thinking of. It got so cold in the winter that, when he spoke, his words froze and fell to the ground. We picked them up and stored them behind the stove. When the spring thaw came, they thawed out and we could hear what he had said in the winter.


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Subject: RE: Folk Music in Antarctica?
From: Cluin
Date: 13 Dec 04 - 11:54 PM

Don't bring those little green balls inside though. They're farts.


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Subject: RE: Folk Music in Antarctica?
From: Peace
Date: 14 Dec 04 - 01:31 AM

And that stuff that looks like pizza? If you bring that inside it's OK. It's pizza.


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Subject: RE: Folk Music in Antarctica?
From: Marje
Date: 14 Dec 04 - 12:14 PM

This refreshed thread just caught my eye and reminded me of an old book I have. It's called The Great White South, and was written by Hertbert G Ponting, the photgrapher who accompanied Scott to the Antarctic in 1910-13. It's a first-hand account of the expedition.

They apparently sang on the sea voyage southwards. In a passage of the book with the running header "About Chanties", several songs are mentioned and some of the words given. They include Sally Brown, A-Roving', Rio Grande and Ranzo. The author describes how they used them as call-and-response work-songs.

He concludes that section;

"Sailors dearly love these old songs of the sea, as well they may, for when using under such circumstances as the present, there is a simple grandeur about them that is really stirring. They are known only by seamen of merchant sailing-vessels, as there is no occasion for their use in steamships."

Marje


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Subject: RE: Folk Music in Antarctica?
From: Margret RoadKnight
Date: 14 Dec 04 - 05:45 PM

In the late '70s I recorded Colin Campbell's song "Ice" (a spectacular sonic Antarctic landscape) which was broadcast - well, actually narrowcast - to the Australian workers at the station down there......
Btw, it's now released on "Silver Platter" CD (info, via Google search, at my website)
Margret RoadKnight


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Subject: RE: Folk Music in Antarctica?
From: GUEST,Peter
Date: 15 Dec 04 - 11:05 PM

Shackleton's 1914-16 expedition to the Weddell Sea (the one where his ship "Endurance" was swallowed by the ice) had a member, named Hussey, who was the official Meteorologist. He also had a banjo and entertained the rest of the troops with same through some of the darkest days and nights. This is of great interest to me as I was a meteorologist (now retired, but still with a keen interest in things Antarctic) and play tenor banjo and am learning 5-string.

Harry Robertson, Scottish seaman who settled in Australia, wrote a lot of songs about whaling and such. Not a nice subject today perhaps, though the songs are great. Many of them feature Antarctic subject material. These include "The Wee Pot Stove", "Antarctic Fleet", "Blubber Laddie", to name a few. Some are on Harry's re-released album - I think it's called "Whale Chasing Men", but can't put my hand on my copy just at the moment.


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Subject: RE: Folk Music in Antarctica?
From: MartinRyan
Date: 16 Dec 04 - 04:22 AM

Peter

I know "The Wee pot stove" alright, but haven't heard the others. Would be interested in hearing/reading the words.

Regards

p.s. On the "not a nice subject today" element: I was fascinated at a recent book fair to find that the only book on Irish Whales and Whaling (by Fairley), which I think I bought remaindered for a few quid some years ago, is now selling at nearly 200 euro! The interest continues, clearly.


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Subject: RE: Folk Music in Antarctica?
From: Schantieman
Date: 16 Dec 04 - 06:14 AM

The Antarctic eh? The lengths some people will go to to get away from banjos!   And then someone takes one along!

;-)

Steve


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Subject: RE: Folk Music in Antarctica?
From: Uke
Date: 16 Mar 05 - 03:06 PM

As an aside, I recently came across this great little poem by Herbert Ponting (Scott's photogrpaher in the Antarctic) called 'The Sleeping Bag' - that essential Antarctic item. I presume that sleeping bags in those days were made out of animal fur (seal fur?)...


The Sleeping Bag

On the outside grows the furside, on the inside grows the skinside;
So the furside is the outside, and the skinside is the inside.

As the skinside is the inside and the furside is the outside;
One Side likes the skinside inside, and the furside on the outside.

Others like the skinside outside and the furside on the inside;
As the skinside is the hardside , and the furside is the soft side.

If you turn the SKINSIDE outside, thinking you will side with THAT side
Then the soft side, furside's inside, which some argue is the wrong side.

If you turn the FURSIDE outside, as you say it GROWS on that side,
Then your outside's next the skinside, which for comfort's not the right side.

For the skinside is the cold side, and your outside's not your warm side,
And two cold sides coming side-by-side are not right sides one Side decides.

If you decide to side with THAT Side, turn the outside, furside inside;
Then the hard side, cold side, skinside's, beyond all question, INSIDE-OUTSIDE.


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Subject: RE: Folk Music in Antarctica?
From: Bob Bolton
Date: 16 Mar 05 - 11:51 PM

G'day MartinRyan (All right ... good late last year ... or Merry (last) Christmas ... !),

I must have meandered off elsewheres when you asked about Harry Robertson's whaling songs (pre-Christmas rush ... ?).

There has been energetic posting of Harry's songs over the last year or two. A lot of Harry's songs were picked up, in UK, by Nic Jones ... in sort of "Englished" rewrite style that doesn't wash well with Australian fans of the real Scots Harry (but is fondly recalled by Nic's fans). I posted a number of songs and tunes, in response to MudCatters' requests ... Wee Pot Stove and Ballina Whalers are two that spring to mind. Harry's songs are particularly interesting in that many are written from his experience in Australia - in several "off-shore" and island operations using small craft (eg: Ballina Whalers, Norfolk Whalers, Queensland Whalers.

A lot of his songs cover aspects over than hunting and killing whales (Harry worked as a ship's fitter ... and wintered over in Antarctica bringing ships up to scratch for the next season) - eg Wee Pot Stove and Time for a Laugh & a Song. There are some quite funny songs, coming from the collision of Scottish mores and Australian and the LP Whale Chasing Man, remastered from the LP, was released by the National Library of Australia (Easter ... 2003 ... ?).

You should pick up some of Harry's songs from the names given - and a few "3-year" searches ... but PM me if you need some more specific guides.

Regards,

Bob


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Subject: RE: Folk Music in Antarctica?
From: MartinRyan
Date: 17 Mar 05 - 05:52 AM

Thanks for that, Bob.

Regards


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Subject: RE: Folk Music in Antarctica?
From: dottydot
Date: 01 May 05 - 05:32 PM

hi my father and his step brother were both whalers on the ballina my fathers name was robert wilson and his step brothers name was john mitchell they were on the ship in the late 50s and early 60s they were both from matilda street in sandyrow belfast i wonder if you can help me to get information or photos i would be very grateful all the photos and keepsakes have gone they are both dead now so i would be grateful for any help my father was also on the submarines during the war can anyone help me thank you dorothy wilson murphy


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Subject: RE: Folk Music in Antarctica?
From: Bob Bolton
Date: 01 May 05 - 08:44 PM

G'day dottydot,

I think there has been discussion, in some other thread, about a whaling ship called the Ballina, but the Harry Robertson song I referred to above is about shore-based whaling (using WW 2 surplus Fairmile torpedo boats as whale-chasers) from the Australian town of Ballina, the name of which is purely coincidental, as it derives from the local native name.

Sorry that I can't be of more help. A Mudcat search for other threads about "whaling" might turn up the thread ... but I can't remember there being much information on the ship.

Regards,

Bob


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Subject: RE: Folk Music in Antarctica?
From: Severn
Date: 01 May 05 - 09:11 PM

A recording of "When the Iceworms Nest Again" can be found on "Stampfel & Webber- Going Nowhere Fast" (Holy Modal Rounders) on Rounder 3051


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Subject: RE: Folk Music in Antarctica?
From: Commander Crabbe
Date: 02 May 05 - 09:07 AM

During my days in the Andrew I had the pleasure of serving on Endurance the ice patrol ship. One of the things we occasionally did was to give weary antarctic people a lift to some place they could get home from. There were often some fine musicians amongst these people and I remember one session we had in the mess which was quite excellent albeit I was playing guitar with a dicky wing having dislocated a shoulder playing rugby the day previous.

I often wish I had known the song "Icy Acres" back then.


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