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BS: The other recipe thread is too long

Related thread:
BS: Recipes - what are we eating? (2562)


leeneia 16 Sep 21 - 03:16 PM
Charmion 16 Sep 21 - 02:14 PM
Mrrzy 16 Sep 21 - 12:57 PM
Steve Shaw 15 Sep 21 - 06:55 PM
leeneia 15 Sep 21 - 04:49 PM
Mrrzy 14 Sep 21 - 08:56 PM
Stilly River Sage 14 Sep 21 - 12:11 AM
Steve Shaw 10 Sep 21 - 06:30 PM
Stilly River Sage 09 Sep 21 - 11:18 AM
BobL 09 Sep 21 - 03:40 AM
Mrrzy 08 Sep 21 - 06:26 PM
Steve Shaw 08 Sep 21 - 01:39 PM
Mrrzy 08 Sep 21 - 01:12 PM
Steve Shaw 08 Sep 21 - 10:51 AM
Stilly River Sage 08 Sep 21 - 10:43 AM
Jon Freeman 08 Sep 21 - 10:27 AM
Mrrzy 08 Sep 21 - 09:35 AM
Mrrzy 07 Sep 21 - 07:06 PM
Steve Shaw 07 Sep 21 - 05:29 PM
Steve Shaw 07 Sep 21 - 05:25 PM
Stilly River Sage 07 Sep 21 - 01:41 PM
Steve Shaw 07 Sep 21 - 01:25 PM
Stilly River Sage 07 Sep 21 - 01:15 PM
Stilly River Sage 07 Sep 21 - 01:09 PM
leeneia 07 Sep 21 - 11:50 AM
Steve Shaw 05 Sep 21 - 05:27 PM
Donuel 05 Sep 21 - 11:36 AM
Steve Shaw 03 Sep 21 - 06:03 PM
Steve Shaw 03 Sep 21 - 06:20 AM
Steve Shaw 03 Sep 21 - 05:19 AM
Mrrzy 02 Sep 21 - 05:28 PM
Steve Shaw 02 Sep 21 - 04:02 PM
Stilly River Sage 02 Sep 21 - 02:09 PM
leeneia 02 Sep 21 - 01:59 PM
Mrrzy 02 Sep 21 - 11:20 AM
Steve Shaw 01 Sep 21 - 06:23 PM
Steve Shaw 01 Sep 21 - 06:14 PM
Steve Shaw 01 Sep 21 - 08:55 AM
Jon Freeman 01 Sep 21 - 07:29 AM
Steve Shaw 01 Sep 21 - 07:07 AM
Stilly River Sage 31 Aug 21 - 10:53 PM
leeneia 31 Aug 21 - 10:26 PM
Steve Shaw 31 Aug 21 - 06:12 PM
Steve Shaw 31 Aug 21 - 05:50 PM
Stilly River Sage 31 Aug 21 - 04:43 PM
Mrrzy 31 Aug 21 - 02:43 PM
Steve Shaw 29 Aug 21 - 05:05 PM
Jon Freeman 29 Aug 21 - 12:14 PM
Stilly River Sage 28 Aug 21 - 03:50 PM
leeneia 28 Aug 21 - 11:43 AM
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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: leeneia
Date: 16 Sep 21 - 03:16 PM

I made something different last night chicken with jerk seasoning.
I juiced and orange into a round glass dish along with the segments and stirred 1 tsp Jamaican jerk seasoning into it. Then I added dark-meat pieces. Baked it in the oven at 350. I can't give you the timing- long story.

I made the mistake of putting the cover on the dish, so that the chicken boiled more than roasted. I have further work to do to keep the orange juice from being boiled away before the meat is done.

Strangely enough, the hot part of the jerk seasoning wound up in the orange segments, and the meat was mild. Go figure.

On the side we had corn on the cob and green beans with almonds. Fruit for dessert.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Charmion
Date: 16 Sep 21 - 02:14 PM

Shakshuka, Mrrzy.

Definitely a dish fit more a caliph.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy
Date: 16 Sep 21 - 12:57 PM

Accidentally made a version of shakshushka (?) - I was sautéing my last bell pepper in snail butter and some hot pepper, added sliced last tomato, was intending a scramble but when I cracked my eggs on top I just left them there, turned the burner off, lidded the pan, and voilà, 4 mn later had yumminess. Oh, a little salt just on the eggs. The yolks were just-barely-not-runny. If only I weren't out of milk...


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 15 Sep 21 - 06:55 PM

I haven't got the room to freeze whole tomatoes. I make tomato sauce which I freeze in portions enough for two, in plastic bags that I can flatten to save space in the freezer. The tomato sauces I use in cooking may contain onion (a small amount), or garlic (never, ever both), chilli and basil. To keep my options open, I don't put any of those in my basic sauce for freezing. Just extra virgin olive oil, tomatoes and seasoning. I may or may not skin the tomatoes, though I think I usually do. I nearly always want garlic and fresh basil in there, but I rarely want onion, which makes tomato sauce claggy. Even so, I always reckon that I can add any of those things later. The sauce needs simmering for half an hour or more, until you see the olive oil separating and floating on top. Once thawed, it's just a matter of reheating the sauce then adding anything else you want in there that you've sautéed in a separate pan. I've often frozen Marcella's onion and butter tomato sauce, which needs nothing added except spaghetti and fresh parmiggiano reggiano. With that one, you make the sauce with a whole onion cut in half which you discard at the end. Perfect.

But if you stick loads of onion and garlic in your sauce, not to speak of dried basil, then you and I have parted culinary company...


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: leeneia
Date: 15 Sep 21 - 04:49 PM

I like to blanch and freeze garden tomatoes, putting them in one-quart plastic bage. Then, on a cold winter night I whizz them in the blender with some nice oil. (You have to use your judgment on how much juice to keep in.) Add optional flavors such as basil, black pepper or garlic powder. It makes an incredible salad dressing - the taste of summer.   

However, you need to eat by candlelight, because the red dressing looks funny on green lettuce.

I also make the beginning of tomato sauce by sauteing onion and garlic, adding sliced garden tomatoes, simmering for a while and freezing. This is not much more work than preserving the plain tomatoes, and it saves time and dirty dishes later on.
=====
We husk our corn and put it on a pie plate with 2 T water. Nuke 4 mins in our very small microwave. It's safer than trying to take off corn husks with steam trapped inside. Modern varieties of corn stay sweet from field to market.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy
Date: 14 Sep 21 - 08:56 PM

Aparently the secret to gazpacho is to make it very late at night when you are really full. That is the only way to let it sit long enough to turn into gazpacho. Otherwise I make, and immediately eat, a liquidified salad.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 14 Sep 21 - 12:11 AM

Yesterday I used jars of last summer's canned whole tomatoes along with peppers and garlic from this year's garden to make myself two quarts of spaghetti sauce. It is the veg part without meat or cheese because I use a hot water bath to process, not a pressure canner.

This is the Italian tomato sauce recipe in the back of the Ball Blue Book, for those of you who cook and can. I filled two pint jars and four half-pint jars and had a little bit left over. That went onto a 1/4 of a tandoori bread to make a small personal pizza this evening. The flavor is amazing!


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 10 Sep 21 - 06:30 PM

I called into our fishmongers today (the beautiful Linda also sells lamb they've raised themselves as well as other meat and veg). I wanted a chicken and I got a beautiful free-range chicken from Creedy Carver, not far away in south Devon. I'll be cooking that the two-lemon Marcella way on Sunday. But Linda happened to be filleting some ultra-fresh sea bass which was certified line-caught (I saw the certification!). It was a bit pricey, but I bought two good-size fillets which Mrs Steve and I will have tomorrow, on a bed of puy lentils cooked with a soffritto of carrot, shallot, celery and pancetta. There'll be plenty of fresh herbs in the mix too (though I'll be leaving out Yotam's turmeric: personal taste...) I got the idea from Yotam Ottolenghi in the Guardian. Yotam can do no wrong.

The usual trawling method of sea bass destroys the sea bed so I won't buy it, even though it's much cheaper. I'd rather just have proper line-caught sea bass as a rare treat. No farmed fish will ever knowingly pass my lips. Dammit, I'm looking forward to a weekend of good living!


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 09 Sep 21 - 11:18 AM

There was a Nero Wolfe mystery in which fresh corn on the cob was a major plot point.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: BobL
Date: 09 Sep 21 - 03:40 AM

Three cooks were discussing the best way of cooking corn on the cob for it to be really fresh.

First cook: "Get the water boiling, go to the corn patch, cut a cob and run with it (not walk) to the kitchen. Time from picking to cooking, less than a minute."

Second: "Set up a portable stove next to the corn patch, get the water boiling, cut the cob and throw it straight in. Time from picking to cooking, two seconds at most."

Third: "Set up a portable stove right there in the corn patch, get the water boiling, then bend the plant so that your chosen cob dangles in the water. That way it's cooking even before it's picked."


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy
Date: 08 Sep 21 - 06:26 PM

Cuban shrimp creole, from WashPo. My whole house smells deliciously of shrimp heads.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 08 Sep 21 - 01:39 PM

I have a microwave but I'm not a fan. It was a top Panasonic model with all the bells and whistles, about 25 years ago. The only things I ever use it for are to soften butter in winter to make it spreadable and to make emergency porridge in a hurry. I have a granite slab about an inch thick and six inches square in a plastic frame that I can microwave on full for four minutes. That gets it hot enough to stand a dish on when I want to keep my bowl of Mediterranean-style potatoes warm for a useful period of time. Otherwise it sits in the corner, sadly and deservedly neglected. I've been campaigning to replace it with a deep fat fryer, which would take up less space and allow me to make croquetas and arancini, but Mrs Steve won't let me because she thinks I'll just use it to make chips. A scandalous accusation...


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy
Date: 08 Sep 21 - 01:12 PM

Microwave corn 2mn in husk. It husks more easily and the corn is cooked perfectly. 2mn per ear, no reduced time for lots of ears. No pot. No boil. No flavor dilution.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 08 Sep 21 - 10:51 AM

Ten minutes does it for us. Mind you, ours is always supermarket stuff, so perhaps it needs a bit longer than ultra-fresh....?

I'm sure there was a saying once, Jon, that you cut the cob from the plant and then ran to the pan of boiling water...


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 08 Sep 21 - 10:43 AM

Boiling corn on the cob for 10 minutes was the rule of thumb when I was growing up but kitchen science has moved along and it is enough to simply heat it really well in that water for 2 or 3 minutes.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 08 Sep 21 - 10:27 AM

When the veg plot was a bit bigger and mum was an active gardener, she
used to grow a bit of sweet corn. Not much, maybe 3-4 meals, but it was nice and sweet corn is at its best cooked straight after picking. We just used to boil it.

I don't think any of us have the teeth to munch into it on the cob these days.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy
Date: 08 Sep 21 - 09:35 AM

Why is cold leftover spicy so much spicier than reheated leftover spicy?


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy
Date: 07 Sep 21 - 07:06 PM

Fajita soup. One ghost pepper in the vat. Funny how the Spanish Ay ay ay sounds just like the French aïe aïe aïe...

Slice onions beef bell & ghost pepper as for fajitas. Smash a lot of garlic. Heat olive oil, infuse with ghost pepper, then garlic, then onions, then some salt, then beef, sauté till no visible pink, turn down, add thyme marjoram, touch of worcestershire, mushroom broth to cover, simmer a half hour. Serve with biiiig sour cream dollop.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 07 Sep 21 - 05:29 PM

I've never made falafels, but at one of our supermarkets (Waitrose, Brits) you can buy sweet potato falafels that are extremely good. They freeze perfectly too.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 07 Sep 21 - 05:25 PM

Our supermarkets sell corn cobs in pairs that are called "supersweet." Generally they're not too bad. My favourite way with them is to shove them on the barbie, uncovered, for about 20 minutes. Failing that, boiled in a big pan for ten minutes. There's something a bit caveman-ish about picking up a buttery cob and viciously stripping away the kernels with your teeth...


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 07 Sep 21 - 01:41 PM

I don't know that creamed corn on its own is "the rage" - though corn (look up elote) is coming into it's own again in various recipes because it has always been a popular Mexican street food, and those recipes have traveled north with immigrants (or evolved here with native North Americans who grew it in the American Southwest, in particular).

The creamed corn variety I've always thought of as a New England dish, but that video clearly lays a southern claim to it (I think they might best claim the adding milk and butter part of it.) It was always something we had a few cans of when I was a kid - it was treated like a vegetable, but of course, maize is a grain. It was an addition to a meal that needed something more. Canned whole corn also was on the shelf, and I always have a large bag of frozen whole corn handy for various uses.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 07 Sep 21 - 01:25 PM

Well we'll be having what's probably going to be our last BBQ off the summer this evening. 28.5C today (83F). That's rare and it isn't lasting. We've been out for most of the day so it'll be a burger in a bun, some sausages and....corn on the cob. I might grill a slab of halloumi too, though Mrs Steve hates the squeaky-tooth thing. Some rocket and some cherry toms from the garden and some onion chutney, and I'll be a happy man.

I had never even heard of creamed corn until I read about it in the Guardian, let alone knew it came in tins! You'd think from the blurb that accompanies some of the recipes here that it is all the rage in the States. You lot don't half disappoint me!


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 07 Sep 21 - 01:15 PM

I made falafel on Sunday for lunch with friends, and it came out very well. It's easy to make if you have a food processor large enough to put the whole batch in. I requested one on my xmas list a couple of years ago after comparing models. I was tired of fussing with several batches in a small processor. This is one of the few foods that I get out the small deep fryer for. Because of the fryer's small size it uses only a few cups of oil and there isn't the splatter problem.

I also make the tahini sauce. The pita bread came from a local halal grocery store bakery, and we added cut up iceberg lettuce and chopped cucumbers. I have made pita bread before, but in some ways the name of the bread spells out the making process - it can be a pita - pain in the ass. Good to know how to do it, but better from the local bakery for $1.19 for six.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 07 Sep 21 - 01:09 PM

I've seen cooking show hosts make creamed corn several times - it involves cutting the kernels off the cob and getting some of the "corn milk" from the cob as well, then simmering for quite a while.

This Southern Living video gives you the most important part of it - how you remove the corn from the cob. There are various manufactured and homemade gadgets out there that cooks use for removing corn from the cob.

But I'm with Leenia, I get it from a can (and those don't have cream or butter, just a little added salt and using corn starch as a thickener). If I have fresh corn here at the house I eat it off the cob (after 2-3 minutes in a pan of boiling water.) I grew up buttering and salting it first, but now I eat it straight, no toppings.

When I was a kid my mother used to do a once-a-summer meal with a bushel of corn and she'd boil it and keep bringing it to the table and we'd fill up on corn on the cob for dinner.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: leeneia
Date: 07 Sep 21 - 11:50 AM

It's definitely suitable with barbecued stuff, though in summer I would be much more likely to buy corn on the cob. If hosting a formal dinner, where cobs are unthinkable, I buy frozen corn.   

I have never heard of anybody preparing creamed corn. We buy a can of it and heat it up. Butter optional. Actually, I haven't seen it in years.

I'm sure your own creamed corn was much better than ours. It sounds like a lot work, though.

As for consistency, it's between mushroom soup and mayonnaise.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 05 Sep 21 - 05:27 PM

Right, yanks. Just yesterday I heard for the first time in my life about creamed corn. So I made some today to go with my barbecued maple-cured bacon and sausages.

This is how I did it, for two of us:

I took three corn cobs. I cut the grains off half of the cobs with a sharp knife. I grated the rest into a bowl with a coarse grater. I then ran the back of the knife up and down the stripped cobs to get as much juice out as possible.

Next, I sautéed a chopped shallot in butter, along with a goodly portion of fresh thyme leaves. Once the shallot had softened (not coloured) I threw in all the corn. I added a good splash of water along with a touch of seasoning and simmered it for seven or eight minutes, until the grains were cooked and the liquid was thick. At the last minute I added a blob of cream.

Well I thought it was pretty good. Come on, yanks. This is one of yours. Did I do it right? Should it be stiff or floppy (I'm still talking about the creamed corn...)? Would you eat it with barbecued stuff?


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Donuel
Date: 05 Sep 21 - 11:36 AM

Humble but yummy. I whisk my eggs with a bit of riccota til smooth for my scrmbled eggs , no milk.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 03 Sep 21 - 06:03 PM

Well the lentil meatball thing didn't work. You can't make meatballs out of a pouch of lentils. I tried a different recipe that involved adding sautéed onions, Parmesan and oats to the mix. It did make "meatballs," they did fry nicely but as soon as I added them to the tomato sauce they disintegrated. So I made it into a sauce with tomatoes and lentils and we had it on spaghetti. Not bad, but the oats made the whole dish slippery. I might make some lentil and bacon soup with the leftover sauce...


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 03 Sep 21 - 06:20 AM

The skinny residue has been duly whizzed! I could have whizzed the whole lot, but I do like my tomato sauce a tad chunky...


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 03 Sep 21 - 05:19 AM

I made a big pan of lovely, tangy tomato sauce last night using my glut of Sungold cherry toms (just extra virgin olive oil, a gently-fried chopped onion, seasoning and a pinch of sugar and a last-minute whiff of fresh basil). I rarely bother to skin tomatoes, and it wouldn't be practical in any case to try to skin a couple of hundred cherry toms! To avoid too much skinniness in the sauce I chopped the toms into quarters first. If the sauce still looks a bit too skinny when I check it later on I'll push it through a coarse sieve, whizz the skinny residue and put it back in. We've going to have the sauce tonight with some "meatballs" made from cooked puy lentils, those little brown ones, which I'll season and to which I might add a pinch of chilli flakes and a bit of chopped fresh parsley. The idea is to fry the "meatballs" then simmer them in the sauce, as I do with meat meatballs, then devour them on top of some long pasta. Maybe Parmesan. Never tried anything like this before, though we used to give our kids a sauce made with red lentils and tomatoes on spaghetti when they were little. That actually went really well with grated cheddar. I'll let youse know how it goes...


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy
Date: 02 Sep 21 - 05:28 PM

Leeneia, yeah, anchovies too, very different.

My ratatouille with tinned sardines in hot oil was marvy.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 02 Sep 21 - 04:02 PM

Blight spores don't overwinter in soil. They can survive only in living tissue, "volunteer" spuds for example (the ones missed during the lifting), or in blighted tomato fruits.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 02 Sep 21 - 02:09 PM

There is a great deal of research out there if you look in the right places. Hydrogen peroxide sprayed on the leaves in the 3% form (grocery store strength) will take out a lot of fungus. A spray with the cornmeal tea will also do that. The fungus overwinters in the soil, it gets to the plants later. Treating the soil doesn't hurt and it will generally help with fungal diseases.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: leeneia
Date: 02 Sep 21 - 01:59 PM

To go back to the spaghetti frittata, it's easy to eat. Make it in a skillet, and cut the finished, pie-shaped frittata into wedges, like a pizza. [I forget whether I used kitchen shears or a serrated knife.] Eat the wedges with a knife and fork.

Mrrzy, I ate sardines in Italy once, and they were nothing like the sardines we get in cans. The Italian fish were fresh and delicious, and they were several times bigger than canned sardines. The fuselages were a curious triangular shape, and the scales were beautifully bright and silver. I wonder if your recipe is for that kind of sardine.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy
Date: 02 Sep 21 - 11:20 AM

I like Then we ate a Viennese restaurant.

I had a thought today but when I looked it up, it is apparently a thing: Sardines and ratatouille.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 01 Sep 21 - 06:23 PM

Oh, and my Autumn Bliss raspberries are fruiting magnificently. They freeze beautifully too, and they don't seem to get that horrid reversion disease that afflicts summer raspberries. My raspberry bed is now 25 years old and I have to be very stern with it in order to stop it from turning into a jungle!


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 01 Sep 21 - 06:14 PM

I've made a determined effort to keep my veg beds filled with something or other at all times from now on. As soon as my broad beans came out, I planted the bed with purple sprouting broccoli plants that I'd raised from seeds and held in small pots. I can expect them to crop from December through to March or April. I had a bit of room at one end of the bed so I planted some young french bean plants. They may be a bit too late, but I'm giving it a whirl. I've also interplanted the big gaps (for now) with some Little Gem lettuce plants that I sowed four weeks ago. The big spud bed, now cleared, is now full of young spring cabbage plants. I've planted them rather close, hoping to be able to thin them out for some early greens in winter whilst leaving some to form large heads. My choice is Durham Early, a really nice variety. I'm going to sow some Aquadulce Claudia broad beans next month, which can go in where the early french beans are coming out and in any other gaps I have. Some of these ideas may fail, but at least I'll have even more greenstuff for composting for next year. For now, I still have plenty of runner beans, a few french beans, herbs of all sorts including an embarrassingly-huge amount of flat-leaved parsley (which freezes magnificently) and those lovely spuds. Chives and rocket are "weeds" in my garden. I never have to plant or sow them and I have bucketloads of them, which I like. My parsnip bed is luxuriant but I refuse to use them until we've had a frost on them...


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 01 Sep 21 - 08:55 AM

I get blight every summer, but, because of my policy of promptly cutting off all the top growth (I use sharp shears), I rarely lose any actual spuds to blight. I grow tomatoes in a biggish greenhouse (I grew them outdoors in Essex but it doesn't work here), and, despite what all the pundits tell us about greenhouse toms being safe, I get the blight in there as well, every year. Tomatoes are just that bit smarter at fighting off the disease so it's still a worthwhile pursuit. My favourite tomatoes are Sungold, little orange cherry toms. The plants have the added advantage of being resistant to all the soil-borne tomato wilt diseases as well as leaf mould, so I grow them in the greenhouse soil (hugely enriched with my garden compost every spring) year after year, no problem.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 01 Sep 21 - 07:29 AM

I grew 2 potatoes this year. The other one was just 4 (2 per tub) Aran Pilot I wanted to try to see how it worked out. I'll try to organise our tubs a bit better, possibly adding another 2-4 tubs to our collection. They were a very nice new potato and worth expanding on for this easy plant way of getting a few early samples.

The planting of the Nicola was delayed due to a combination of the weather and the availability of our (usually once a week) gardener. I leave the heavier preparation and digging to him. I think that we in North Norfolk have a similar situation to Steve in Cornwall in that later plantings of potatoes are more at risk of late blight.

As for this year, a found a site that had a UK map predicting the likelihood of blight and showing where there were known infections. It also mentioned it's method of prediction and our spell of very high humidity with cool temperatures didn't look good. As with Steve, I don't think there is any protection available for UK home gardeners. I think all you can do is keep an eye on the leaves and cut the tops off if you find a problem. That should save the potatoes that are in the ground.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 01 Sep 21 - 07:07 AM

Call me Mr Sceptical, but I don't see how spreading something on the ground can deter airborne fungal spores (the only way blight can reach your spuds) from landing and germinating on leaves. From what I read about hydrogen peroxide, there's little evidence of its efficacy apropos of blight and at what concentrations. And as soon as it leaves your sprayer, it's turning into water and oxygen... I think I'll stick to choosing early varieties that evade the worst of midsummer attacks, and remove the tops as soon as I see blight infection. Look hard enough and you'll find myth-busting articles on cornmeal on the web.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 31 Aug 21 - 10:53 PM

You can slow blight by spreading whole ground cornmeal on the soil when you plant, by making a "tea" of that same cornmeal in water and spraying the liquid on the plants, and by using store strength (3%) Hydrogen peroxide, full-strength, as an occasional spray on the foliage. All of these things suppress fungus, which is what blight is. It may not eliminate it, but it will reduce it considerably. Start this as soon as you plant the potatoes.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: leeneia
Date: 31 Aug 21 - 10:26 PM

Congratulations, Steve! That sounds very good.

We didn't cook tonight. Instead we watched a historic steam engine go buy, then we ate a Viennese restaurant.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 31 Aug 21 - 06:12 PM

I tried spaghetti frittata once and found that cutting it and eating it to be a major tribulation. I think I did it wrong.

We had Italian-style sausages (bought from Marks and Spencer) with lentils and chilli tonight and all was lovely. I can't find the Castelluccio lentils that I want in this country, but the puy lentils worked beautifully. You could just use good quality pork sausages, but the Italian-style ones, which use little or no bread and which contain fennel, are the gold standard.

I made a soffritto with shallots, carrot, celery and diced pancetta. A small sprinkling of dried chilli flakes also went in. Once that had softened, I fried the sausages separately for 20 minutes. Meanwhile, once the soffritto was done, I added to it a glass of white wine, some pepper and a splash of stock. I added about 300g of pre-cooked lentils (I swear by the Merchant Gourmet brand) and chopped the cooked sausages into bite-size chunks (you can leave them whole, but then you need to use a knife as well as a fork and sit at a table instead of in front of the telly). I threw in the sausage chunks and heated the whole lot gently to get the ingredients to blend. Off the heat, at the last minute, in went some chopped fresh parsley. Begod, I excelled meself tonight...


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 31 Aug 21 - 05:50 PM

I've grown potatoes every year since 1979, when I got my first allotment. I've had blight in every year bar one. There is no control for blight available to UK gardeners. The lesson I've learned from this is to grow first earlies and second earlies only, and to get them in the ground in good time, which generally means early to mid-April here in Cornwall. Any earlier and I risk a late frost killing off the tops. One horrible year I got blight before the end of May, but generally I get hit around late July. Maincrop spuds rarely grow big enough before the blight strikes. A double whammy is that late July is when the slugs kick in. So I want my spuds finished by early August at the latest. If I've had blight, I cut the tops off (it's safe to compost them as blight spores can't overwinter - they survive on spuds that have been missed), then leave the spuds for a couple of weeks before lifting, which allows the spores to wash harmlessly away into the soil. I've lifted my last spuds now and the bed is planted up with spring cabbages. I'm hoping that our new cat will deter the bloody woodpigeons.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 31 Aug 21 - 04:43 PM

Over the years I've had the garden in the front yard alongside the driveway, and when people are walking by they sometimes stop to talk. When there are children in those groups I invite them to visit the garden - pick a tomato or an eggplant or pepper, or if it's the right time of year "what do you think grows on this plant?" and when they can't figure it out, suggest sweeping away some dirt below. Little kids are so charmed when they see things in the ground that they are accustomed to from the grocery store. Digging potatoes is kind of like hunting for Easter eggs - always a surprise!

The potatoes I have the best luck with here are the red lasoda, and Beauregard sweet potatoes.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy
Date: 31 Aug 21 - 02:43 PM

Spaghetti frittata sounds great. Also saw a recipe for pizza salad, which also sounded great.

What with the no carbs thing I find I *think about* food all. the. time.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 29 Aug 21 - 05:05 PM

As it happens, Jon, I lifted all my Nicola crop today to make way for my spring cabbage plants which are looking impatient in their little modules. I too cut the tops off, around the end of July, because of blight. The crop from just a few square yards was around 30kg of spuds. Fantastic! I've sorted them this afternoon into three batches: "premier" (big spuds with no blemishes); "chip-sized" (medium size, a touch of trimming of green bits needed on one or two); and "smallish" (best for Mediterranean-style roast potatoes with rosemary and garlic). The premiers are by far the biggest batch, and tomorrow I will put them into a mini-clamp in one corner of a veg bed, with just a touch of organic slug protection. The chip ones and the the smallish will go into a dark cupboard in my utility room, to be used up first.

They are indeed lovely spuds, of a quality you simply can't buy in shops. I grow them strictly organically and we never use them for recipes that need peeled potatoes. That would be a crime! In fact, their one weakness is that they don't make great mashed potatoes, but in a way that isn't a weakness at all. If I want mash, it's off to the shops!


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 29 Aug 21 - 12:14 PM

Well I made the plum jam. The induction thing provides plenty of power to the pan, 2KW better spent..., I found it difficult to control as the seconds of on and off cycles it gives, say at 600W can bubble a drop of jam over before cooling again in an attempt to get a simmer or faster but controlled boil. Maybe I just have to learn to live with this or maybe one day, we find a better model but, overall, having one more efficient and faster ring I can pull out reasonably easily isn't a bad place to be.

On a different subject, was it someone (Steve?) in this thread who suggested Nicola potato? As well us as being late planting, I pulled the tops off because of what I think was blight on the leaves but we have been very pleased with them. It's worked out around 1 root for our three portions, parents have liked them and (I'm, rightly or wrongly, leaving them in the ground till required) have another 5 roots to go. Very firm and very tasty spuds.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 28 Aug 21 - 03:50 PM

Deep Ellum is Dallas, I'm near the big Fort Worth plant. Bimbo Bakeries is huge, it owns several other name-brand bakeries. It's a baking empire that's rolling in dough. :)


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: leeneia
Date: 28 Aug 21 - 11:43 AM

Back to recipes.

Last night the DH and I returned to the past, having spaghetti frittata for supper. I used whole-wheat spaghetti and grated cheese (six kinds of Italian) from a bag. I am not a cheese snob.

This recipe from the New York Times tells you how.

https://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/6791-pasta-frittata

When you get bored with your recipes, spaghetti frittata offers a new and different texture.


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