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BS: upright walkers

leeneia 03 Jan 21 - 04:58 PM
Rapparee 03 Jan 21 - 08:24 PM
punkfolkrocker 03 Jan 21 - 09:17 PM
Steve Shaw 03 Jan 21 - 09:26 PM
Manitas_at_home 04 Jan 21 - 01:48 AM
Jon Freeman 04 Jan 21 - 01:57 AM
leeneia 04 Jan 21 - 02:32 AM
Jos 04 Jan 21 - 05:55 AM
Mr Red 04 Jan 21 - 06:57 AM
robomatic 04 Jan 21 - 08:35 PM
leeneia 05 Jan 21 - 01:53 PM
Jos 05 Jan 21 - 02:24 PM
Donuel 06 Jan 21 - 07:15 PM
vectis 07 Jan 21 - 04:36 PM
Mrrzy 07 Jan 21 - 05:26 PM
Bonzo3legs 07 Jan 21 - 05:29 PM
leeneia 08 Jan 21 - 07:11 PM
Bonzo3legs 09 Jan 21 - 07:45 AM
Thompson 09 Jan 21 - 08:42 AM
leeneia 10 Jan 21 - 01:42 AM
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Subject: BS: upright walkers
From: leeneia
Date: 03 Jan 21 - 04:58 PM

Does any 'catter have experience with an "upright walker"? A walker is known as a Zimmer frame in Britain. There's a walker advertised in Parade magazine which promises to let one stand straight and be more comfortable, however it costs over $500. That's roughly three times the cost of my present Rollator.

Another warning flag to me is that the price is not stated in the advertisement - one has to call to learn the price.

All that aside, has anybody found that such a model makes walking better?


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Subject: RE: BS: upright walkers
From: Rapparee
Date: 03 Jan 21 - 08:24 PM

No experience with such, just the usual open frame type. My wife and I have used it after all-too-frequent surgeries. Medicare will pay a certain amount for durable medical equipment, which is what a walker is. It could be a scam.


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Subject: RE: BS: upright walkers
From: punkfolkrocker
Date: 03 Jan 21 - 09:17 PM

$500...!!!???

Here in the UK, when my mum was discharged from hospital after a fall and surgery,
she was issued with 2 walkers free of charge by the NHS.

[one for downstairs, one for upstairs, use in her home]

The understanding being they are on long term loan,
and it's up to our good social conscience if they are eventually returned...


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Subject: RE: BS: upright walkers
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 03 Jan 21 - 09:26 PM

I've got one that anyone can have for free: it's a 4-wheel job that cost me mum £65. You can sit on it if you need a rest and you can stash stuff under the flip-up seat. In me mum's case it was usually a massive bag of Fox's Glacier Mints...


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Subject: RE: BS: upright walkers
From: Manitas_at_home
Date: 04 Jan 21 - 01:48 AM

We've just bought one for Liz. It has arm rests and aims at an upright position. It's quite adjustable, with brakes, a seat and a shopping bag. Liz hasn't had a chance for a full test yet.
https://smile.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B001W7XRPU/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o03_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1


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Subject: RE: BS: upright walkers
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 04 Jan 21 - 01:57 AM

A walker is known as a Zimmer frame in Britain.

Maybe it's jut me but I've always taken "Zimmer" to refer to the basic walking frames with either no wheels or two front wheels. I'd call the four wheeled thingies with a seat "Wheeled Walkers" or "Rollators".

I can't help with your query but wouldn't height adjustment be the main thing in getting upright? And maybe a physio (I think you call them physical therapists) could help you in getting the best posture?

Oh and we have one that sounds similar to Steve's. Its pocket under the seat is holding some of mum's gardening bits, secateurs, a trowel...

We could do with finding something better but again, I don't know what. It would have wheels that would ride the chippings and the uneven grass round the back better but could be no wider than the one we have.


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Subject: RE: BS: upright walkers
From: leeneia
Date: 04 Jan 21 - 02:32 AM

I have a Rollator and a Stander that have both been adjusted for me, but all too often I find myself leaning over them, with a lot of pressure on my wrists and tension in my shoulders. I tell myself to stand up straight, but soon I catch myself leaning over again.

The new design seems like a better idea, but is there a catch that people only discover with long use? That's the question.

Thanks for the link, Manitas. That walker is a forearm walker, though, and I want one that I hold onto with my hands.


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Subject: RE: BS: upright walkers
From: Jos
Date: 04 Jan 21 - 05:55 AM

Manitas, I didn't even know Liz had a problem. Please do give her my best wishes.


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Subject: RE: BS: upright walkers
From: Mr Red
Date: 04 Jan 21 - 06:57 AM

Just an observation, as an engineer - maybe mental preparation should I ever need.

1) Bus - With wheeled contraptions I see people struggle to get them on the bus. My theory is to use the handbrakes and tilt back then at the right height release the brakes and push forward to get the front wheel(s) on the step and then lever the back wheels up and push. It must be easier then trying to lift it bodily, and remain steady on dodgy legs.

2) Walking - Pump the brakes as you step to have it rigid, then release the brakes as you push it. I rarely see people doing that.

UK Zimmer frames come in two main types that I have seen. Those with and without little wheels at the front. The wheeled ones for those that find lifting exhausting, but it means the back legs will drag, needing the rubber feet replacing often.


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Subject: RE: BS: upright walkers
From: robomatic
Date: 04 Jan 21 - 08:35 PM

In U.S. groceries where for years we had large shopping carts and very large shopping carts for kids to play minicar, there have for about ten years now been smaller than average carts for single folks to put their presumably smaller grouped purchasers in. These usually have four small wheels but in Alaska we frequently have very slippery parking lots and I use the smaller carts as my little walkers because they provide a good rolling support on my way back to the car. Things have been made more worser whether due to climate change or not, we've actually had some warming periods in the middle of winter where we still have a thin layer of snow and ice on the ground but can have rain or meltwater on top. The combination is as you might expect, incredibly slippery. We use shoe grips but some of us don't always remember to put
'em on.


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Subject: RE: BS: upright walkers
From: leeneia
Date: 05 Jan 21 - 01:53 PM

I agree. Grocery carts really help with balance, slippery days or not.


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Subject: RE: BS: upright walkers
From: Jos
Date: 05 Jan 21 - 02:24 PM

Grocery carts [shopping trolleys] may be a great help inside the supermarket, but in England, at least where I have shopped, the paving outside the shops has a slight slope away from the building, presumably to avoid puddles when it rains and sheet ice if it freezes. This makes the trolleys difficult to control even for able-bodied people as they tend to veer sideways.


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Subject: RE: BS: upright walkers
From: Donuel
Date: 06 Jan 21 - 07:15 PM

I know lots of up right walkers but only a few knucle draggers.


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Subject: RE: BS: upright walkers
From: vectis
Date: 07 Jan 21 - 04:36 PM

My son was issued with a very high walker after an accident. It was so effective that he discarded it within a few days. I thought it was a brilliant idea because it kept one upright when walking. Might put extra strain on the shoulders but far less on the wrists. Try one out if you can before buying at that price.


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Subject: RE: BS: upright walkers
From: Mrrzy
Date: 07 Jan 21 - 05:26 PM

Donuel beat me to it.


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Subject: RE: BS: upright walkers
From: Bonzo3legs
Date: 07 Jan 21 - 05:29 PM

My wife has a "walker" with a seat which I think cost around £150.


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Subject: RE: BS: upright walkers
From: leeneia
Date: 08 Jan 21 - 07:11 PM

Yesterday I visited a store and tried one out. I decided it is simply too heavy and too large for me and car.

The salesman was very helpful, showing me how to adjust my Rollator and giving me good advice: don't push with your arms, use your legs to move it.

So I will try putting those two rules in effect, and when it comes time for a nicer Rollator, that is the store that will get my business. This time I will try to make some kind of cover to keep the airlines from moidalizing it.


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Subject: RE: BS: upright walkers
From: Bonzo3legs
Date: 09 Jan 21 - 07:45 AM

The problem my wife has with her walker + seat is that she cannot lift it in and out of our car. She also has a walker not so heavy, without a seat which she can lift into the car if I am at work.


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Subject: RE: BS: upright walkers
From: Thompson
Date: 09 Jan 21 - 08:42 AM

Leeneia, can you talk to a gerontologist and a rehabilitation physiotherapist about this and ask for recommendations? There may also be an association, like Age Action here in Ireland, who could source secondhand walkers.
vectis, can you tell Leeneia the brand and model of your son's upright walker?


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Subject: RE: BS: upright walkers
From: leeneia
Date: 10 Jan 21 - 01:42 AM

First I'm going to try walking more with my present lightweight Rollator, following the tips the salesman gave me. The lighter the device, the more I will use it.


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