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Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia

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NOT IN THE BOOK


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Sandra in Sydney 19 Sep 20 - 01:48 AM
Sandra in Sydney 19 Sep 20 - 01:47 AM
Sandra in Sydney 19 Sep 20 - 01:32 AM
Stewie 18 Sep 20 - 08:54 PM
Stewie 18 Sep 20 - 08:46 PM
Stewie 18 Sep 20 - 08:37 PM
Stewie 18 Sep 20 - 07:49 PM
Sandra in Sydney 18 Sep 20 - 09:27 AM
Sandra in Sydney 18 Sep 20 - 09:23 AM
Sandra in Sydney 18 Sep 20 - 09:21 AM
Sandra in Sydney 18 Sep 20 - 02:17 AM
Sandra in Sydney 18 Sep 20 - 02:14 AM
rich-joy 17 Sep 20 - 11:44 PM
Stewie 17 Sep 20 - 10:14 PM
Stewie 17 Sep 20 - 09:45 PM
Stewie 17 Sep 20 - 09:23 PM
Stewie 17 Sep 20 - 08:40 PM
Stewie 17 Sep 20 - 08:25 PM
Stewie 17 Sep 20 - 08:03 PM
rich-joy 17 Sep 20 - 07:58 PM
Sandra in Sydney 17 Sep 20 - 05:41 AM
Sandra in Sydney 17 Sep 20 - 04:59 AM
Sandra in Sydney 17 Sep 20 - 04:28 AM
Sandra in Sydney 17 Sep 20 - 04:16 AM
Sandra in Sydney 17 Sep 20 - 04:12 AM
Sandra in Sydney 17 Sep 20 - 04:08 AM
rich-joy 17 Sep 20 - 04:05 AM
Sandra in Sydney 17 Sep 20 - 03:52 AM
Sandra in Sydney 17 Sep 20 - 03:40 AM
Sandra in Sydney 17 Sep 20 - 03:39 AM
Sandra in Sydney 17 Sep 20 - 03:31 AM
rich-joy 17 Sep 20 - 02:58 AM
rich-joy 17 Sep 20 - 02:40 AM
rich-joy 17 Sep 20 - 02:24 AM
Stewie 16 Sep 20 - 11:19 PM
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Sandra in Sydney 16 Sep 20 - 01:25 AM
Sandra in Sydney 16 Sep 20 - 01:23 AM
rich-joy 16 Sep 20 - 12:49 AM
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Stewie 15 Sep 20 - 10:56 PM
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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 19 Sep 20 - 01:48 AM

now we are 200!


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 19 Sep 20 - 01:47 AM

DEVLIN'S GENERAL STORE, words: © John Warner 19/10/93
tune: John Warner/Margaret Walters

Where can I get a cross-cut saw?
Devlin's General Store.
You can get a cross-cut saw
And anything else you're looking for,
It's been there since '94,
Has Devlin's General Store.

Where can I go to collect me mail?
Devlin's General Store
There you can collect your mail
That came from Melbourne town by rail
You can get a cross-cut saw [etc]

Where can I get a dozen eggs?
Devlin's General Store
You can get a dozen eggs
A washing line, some dolly pegs
There you can collect your mail [etc]

[And so on until the last verse:]

Where can I get some sly grog, mate?
Devlin's General Store,
You can get some sly grog, mate,
We just sold some to the magistrate,
* You can get a length of fuse
Several types from which to choose
You can get some gelignite,
Samsonite or dynamite,
* You can get some 12 gauge shot,
Powder, wadding, they've got the lot
You can get a liquorice strap,
A tupenny bunger, a rabbit trap,
You can get a carbide lamp,
A miner's pick or a ha'penny stamp,
You can get a set of spurs,
Flannel underwear, his or hers,
You can get a dozen eggs,
A washing line, some dolly pegs,
There you can collect your mail
That came from Melbourne town by rail,

You can get a cross-cut saw,
And anything else you're looking for,
It's been there since '94,
Has Devlin's General Store.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 19 Sep 20 - 01:32 AM

From Phyl - I wrote it because my father Roy Vinnicombe went to the Somme aged 18 and was injured a couple of years later. He recovered or I would not be writing this e-mail. He went to WW 2 when I was 3 and was invalided home but died when I was 8.

A recording of my lyrics accompanied on Uilleann pipes played by Declan Affley is freely available on my web site website The recording was made somewhere in the 80’s I think. It was performed at a concert in the Sydney Town Hall.

BATTLE OF THE SOMME, Sung by Phyl Lobl with Pipe accompaniment from Declan Affley

Words: Phyl Lobl   Tune: Pipe Major William Laurie adapted by Phyl Lobl.


The lark in the evening she drops to the ground now
Bidding farewell to the long summer day.
High on a ridge hear a gun hit the silence,
Flames like a flower brighten the sky.
Dugouts are quiet we wait for the morning
Feeling a thrill as the battle draws near.
As dawn with her pale flush, silvers the grey sky
Sharp tongues of shell fire call up the day.

Glory, vain glory, you beckoned us onward,
Kitchener’s call and your light led the way.
Then just when we seem to be near
You turn into darkness
Splashed with the mud and the pain of the day.

The lines they are formed and the orders are given
While General Haig sends his prayers to the sky.
As we move onward our bayonets before us
We know that those prayers were no better than lies.
Rising and twisting the smoke curls above us
I see by the green glow there's gas in its domes.
We stumble and fall through the craters and shell holes,
Watching the bombs turning trenches to tombs.

We're over the rise now, the line is before us,
Enemy gun fire taking its toll
What hope have the bayonets and the rifles we carry
Against a machine gun here on the Somme.
Day's nearly done now the battlefield empties,
The living are hidden the dead lying still.
The wounded are calling for someone to save them
But no one can help them, no body will.

*‘What's to be said of the life-time of man now,
Shifting from sorrow to sorrow again.
You button up one cause for man kind's vexation
Only to find there's another undone.'*
Each generation has freedom to fight for,
Choose between gun fire or words for your tools.
Freedom's a phantom but reason could find her.
Honour and glory a haven for fools.

• Words between the stars are a direct quote from the book.
The rest are mine distilled from the revelations of people Guy Chapman interviewed for his book.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 18 Sep 20 - 08:54 PM

R-J, here's one of your Kiwi favourites.

FAREWELL TO GERALDINE
(J.Fleming/Trad/P.Garland)

(Chorus)
Oh, fare well to you, old Geraldine
I am now upon the track
I'm travellin' down that long and weary road
With a swag all on me back

I'm headin' towards Temuka town
And if work I cannot find
I'll make me way on towards Washdyke
Leave Temuka far behind

Chorus

Perhaps I'll call in at Timaru
And round there take a look
But if no farmer should want me there
I'll drop on down to the Hook

Chorus

I'll push ahead then to Oamaru
Ngapara and Duntroon
Where farmers often work late at night
By the pale light of the moon

Chorus

When harvest days are over
And corn is in the sack
I'll shoulder bluey once again
By the rattler I'll be comin' back

Chorus

Joe Fleming was a swagger poet who roamed through South Canterbury and North Otago. He always wintered in the town of Geraldine. His little rhymes would appear on hut doors throughout the countryside. Joe died along the track, a frozen corpse by the side of the road. He left the itinerary of his regular round which Phil Garland set to a traditional tune.

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 18 Sep 20 - 08:46 PM

In New Zealand, loggers and forestry workers were known as bushmen. In 1976, Phil Garland collected 'The Dying Bushman' from Ken Hart of Palmerston North who first heard it from bushmen in the Otaki area during the 1930s. Apparently, it is still sung by a younger generation of bushmen.


THE DYING BUSHMAN
(Anon)

I've knocked around the logging camps since early boyhood days
I've seen the famous axemen come and go
Now me chopping days are over, I shall swing that axe no more
On the hillsides where the native timbers grow

(Chorus)
For me slasher is all rusty, and my axe handle's broke
I've laid them both behind the whare door
For the rata and the rimu have got so goddamn tough
That I really cannot cut them any more

The tramways in the valley, I shall never tread again
No more I'll hear the hauler's whistle blow
Well, oft times I look back as I travel down the track
Please don't take me from the only home I know

Chorus

I'm a poor old worn-out bushman and my chopping days are done
Soon this world shall know I'll be no more
Down the valley of the shadow, I'll soon be on the track
Where oft times I've seen bushmen go before

Chorus

And when I sleep that last long sleep, I pray that it may be
Where the tawa and the matai and the pine
And the hinau and the ngaio and the koromiko tree
Grow forever by that lonely grave of mine

Chorus

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 18 Sep 20 - 08:37 PM

This is another old favourite that Danny Spooner recorded on his final CD. I first heard it sung by a good mate, Ian White, who recorded it on his LP 'Songs from a Busker's Bag'.

Here are the lyrics as printed in the booklet to Danny's 'Home' CD.

ANOTHER FALL OF RAIN

The weather has been sultry for a fortnight now or more
And the shearers have been driving might and main,
For some have got the century who ne'er got it before
But now we all are waiting for the rain.

Chorus (after each verse):
For the boss is getting rusty and the ringer's caving in,
His bandaged wrist is aching with the pain,
And the second man I fear will make it hot for him
Unless we have another fall of rain.

Now some had taken quarters and were keeping well in bunk,
When we shore the six-tooth wethers from the plain.
And if the sheep get any harder some other blokes'll flunk
Unless we have another fall of rain.

But the sky is clouding over and the thunder's muttering loud
And the clouds are driving eastward o'er the plain.
And I see the lightning flashing round the edge of yon black cloud
And I hear the gentle patter of the rain.

So, lads, put on your stoppers and let us to the hut
And we'll gather round and have a friendly game,
While some are playing music and some play ante up
And some just a-gazing at the rain.

Some cockies come here shearing, they would fill a little book
About this sad dry weather for the grain.
But here is lunch a-coming, make way for Dick the cook,
Old Dick is nigh as welcome as the rain.

But now the rain is over let the pressers spin the screw,
Let the teamsters back their wagons in again.
We'll block the classer's table by the way we push them through,
For everything goes merry since the rain.

So it's, “Boss bring out the bottle” and let us wet the final flock,
For the shearers here may never meet again.
While some may meet next season and some not even then,
And some they will just vanish like the rain.

Final Chorus:
And the boss he won't be rusty when his sheep they all are shore,
And the ringer's wrist won't ache much with the pain
Of pocketing a season's cheque for a hundred quid or more—
And the second man will press him hard again.

Danny's note:

Also known as 'Waiting for the Rain', John Meredith collected a version from wharfie Leo Dixon, who had been a bush worker and shearer and was born at Eugowra. Meredith stated that the words were written by John Neilson of Penola, a bush worker, farmer, and balladist, and the father of John Shaw Neilson. The last verse in this version was sent me by email and comes from Dave de Hugard"s record 'Freedom on the Wallaby'.

Martyn Wyndham-Read recorded it on his 'Starlit Skies' album at a more leisurely pace.

Martyn's note:

A song that goes back many years for me. Just recently I played it with a different rhythm and it took on a new life. The beauty of these old songs is that they will stand any interpretation and still come back to the same shape and form. The song may be based on the poem by Australian poet John Shaw Neilson to a tune of his time 'The Little Low Log Cabin in the Lane'.

Wyndham-Read

Was it written by John Shaw Neilson or his dad?

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 18 Sep 20 - 07:49 PM

New spin on an old favourite by pommie pair:

Aldridge and Goldsmith

At a more familiar pace:

The Bushwackers

From the forum database:

TRAVELLING DOWN THE CASTLEREAGH

I'm travellin' down the Castlereagh, and I'm a station-hand
I'm handy with the ropin' pole, I'm handy with the brand
And I can ride a rowdy colt, or swing an axe all day
But there's no demand for a station-hand along the Castlereagh


So it's shift, boys, shift, for there isn't the slightest doubt
That we've got to make a shift for the stations further out
With the pack-horse runnin' after, for he follows me like a dog
We must strike across the country at the old jig-jog


This old black horse I'm riding, if you notice what's his brand
He wears the crooked R, you see, none better in the land
He takes a lot of beatin', and the other day we tried
For a bit of a joke, with a racing bloke, for twenty pounds a side


It was shift, boys, shift, for there wasn't the slightest doubt
That I had to make him shift, for the money was nearly out
But he cantered home a winner, with the other one at the flog
He's a red-hot sort to pick up with his old jig-jog


I asked a cove for shearin' once along the Marthaguy
"We shear non-union here," says he. "I call it scab," says I
I looked along the shearin' floor before I turned to go
There were eight or ten non-union men a-shearin' in a row


It was shift, boys, shift, for there wasn't the slightest doubt
It was time to make a shift with the leprosy about
So I saddled up my horses, and I whistled to my dog
And I left his scabby station at the old jig-jog


I went to Illawarra, where my brother's got a farm
He has to ask the landlord's leave before he lifts an arm
The landlord owns the countryside - man, woman, dog and cat
They haven't the cheek to dare to speak without they touch their hat


It was shift, boys, shift, for there wasn't the slightest doubt
Their little landlord god and I would soon have fallen out
Was I to touch my hat to him? was I his bloomin' dog?
So I makes for up the country at the old jig-jog


But it's time that I was movin', I've a mighty way to go
Till I drink artesian water from a thousand feet below
Till I meet the overlanders with the cattle comin' down
And I'll work a while till I make a pile, then have a spree in town


So it's shift, boys, shift, for there isn't the slightest doubt
We've got to make a shift for the stations further out
The pack-horse runs behind us, for he follows like a dog
And we cross a lot of country at the old jig-jog


Notes

First published in the Bulletin in 1892 This poem of Banjo Paterson's ('The Bushman's Song') has grown a number of tunes in its time in the bush. Meredith collected three tunes in NSW, and two tunes are given in the Queensland Centenary Pocket Songbook while in his Big Book of Australian Folk Song Ron Edwards gives another two. The most commonly sung tune was collected separately by Geoff Wills and John Manifold. Manifold got it from Mr Hines of Donald, Victoria, and it is in his Penguin Australian Song Book.

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 18 Sep 20 - 09:27 AM

that makes 195 songs.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 18 Sep 20 - 09:23 AM

When the Wind Blows (Eric Bogle) video

The evening air lies heavy and sleep it still escapes me
A night where hope and courage are still-born
Outside the lurking shadows they press against my windows
And wait for the coming of the storm
       They dance, those shadows
       When the wind blows

The shadows are advancing over all the earth they're dancing
And everywhere they dance they shall bring death
All the priced and even pages that we've written through the ages
Shall vanish in the shadow's poisoned breath
       The story book will close
       When the wind blows

Suddenly I'm frightened, I wish this room were lightened
Can no-one light a candle in the dark
For I hear the sullen murmour of far-off threatening thunder
I feel its menace chill me to the heart
       Where can I hide, where can I go
       When the wind blows

There is no-one that can save you and nowhere you can run to
No shelter in a world that's gone insane
In this world that we created in our arrogance and hatred
Stand naked 'neath the gentle deadly rain
       There will be no rainbows
       When the wind blows

In the darkness I am trembling, this night seems never ending
It seems the morning sun will never rise
And the crashing of the thunder it split my head asunder
And lighting burs and heats into my eyes
       And oh how the darkness grows
       When the wind blows

In a thousand searing flashes the world shall turn to ashes
Whirling like a burning coal in endless space
This good earth we did inherit we shall leave a smoking desert
A headstone for the heedless human race
       To mark our final flows
       When the wind blows

Oh I must be dreaming for I thought I heard a screaming
Like a billion lost souls falling into hell
In a thousand tongues bewailing at indifferent fate a-railing
Each one calling on the saviour as they fell
       Shall we reap what we did sow
       When the wind blows

You can call upon your saviour it you think that is the answer
But you've called on him so many times before
Call on Allah, Buddah, Jesus, I doubt if they can hear us
For we let the devil loose, now hear his roar
       Hell shall overflow
       When the wind blows

----------------------------------------------------------------------
recorded by Eric Bogle.
Copyright Larrikin Music)

"This song was inspired by the book of the same name by Raymond Briggs.
It's a chilling little book. I'd like to lend a copy to the world leaders,
it might frighten them. It certainly frightened me, and this song is
the result" - Eric Bogle

(The book was also made into an equally chilling animated movie)


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 18 Sep 20 - 09:21 AM

PERILOUS GATE (cut down from a 35-verse poem published in 1877)

The Darling Downs Gazette and General Advertiser (Toowoomba, Qld. : 1858 - 1880) Sat 29th Dec 1877 refers to the Christmas issue of "The Queenslander" which has a supplement that includes a poem by the author of 'Craddock Head,' entitled 'The Perilous Gate;' (Craddock Head is a 4-part story!)

PERILOUS GATE Words & Music: Phyl Lobl audio

A tale I tell of a narrow gate upon the eastern coast
Of many wrecks and ruins this narrow gate can boast,
Beneath Newcastle Harbour waves lie rotting hulls and sailor's graves,
Heroes tombs are hidden caves below the Nobby's post.

It is a pretty entrance but when you're homebound sail,
I'd rather stand far out to sea when it blows a stiffish gale.
Blowing from the South or East each huge wave a crest of yeast
Comes roaring like a wounded beast and mounts the rolling rail.

The sixth day of November round eighteen fifty eight,
The Eleanor Lancaster was caught entering the Perilous Gate,
We watched those huddled at the top with nothing but a slender prop
Which at each blow we thought would drop and all her timbers fail.

An awful sea was running and not in all that crew
Was one who thought boats could be brought those boiling breakers through
But then a little fair haired man pushed and panted as he ran
And urged us all the waves to scan and to our mates be true.

'Now lads', he shouted shrill and clear 'Who'll venture it with me?
Each minute lost a life might cost in such a tumbling sea.
With four good men I’ll wager I'll bring them all to shore
Come who will try?' ,three answered 'Aye' and I sir made up four.

It was a roughish kind of trip but Chatfield steered us well
I see him there with sea drenched hair facing what befell,
And when we'd brought them all to shore he shook us by the hand once more.
'I've met no braver men before, the truth to you I tell.'

For ten good years the Oyster Bank was beaconed by a spar
That stood in witness of the storm that sank the Lancaster
Five fathoms deep that rotting shell up reared the slender spar to tell
Of brave deed done so nobly well upon that very bar.

Then t'ward the close of winter, hard blowin' all the night
The great seahorses tearing high raced madly past the bight
Many a man came down to see if inbound craft there chanced to be
And sailor's wives watched anxiously out on the surging flood.

The 'Carrwarra' was coming in, I knew her bow so well
We watched her as she struggled on and battled with the swell
We stood there watching through the blast and hoped that once the Nobby's past
The Harbour she might make at last, none but the god's could tell.

She tried to turn again to sea but a snow white whiff of steam
Told us that her fires were spent, she drifted on her beam,
The engines by the waves were quenched, the men by those same waves were
drenched,
Watcher's hearts were sorely wrenched with hope a fading gleam.

No boat stood out to rescue those still clinging to the deck
Though one was there with sea drenched hair who now stood on the deck
The beacon pointing to the sky urged us not to let him die
But his same noble feat to try no man would risk his neck.

Many's the time at midnight I've heard the tempest roar
I've lain awake and wished that I could have the chance once more,
To be the one to leave the crowd and call his name out clear and loud
And free from Neptune's salty shroud bring him back to shore.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 18 Sep 20 - 02:17 AM

another of Kevin Baker's great songs

Aunty Rooney's on a Sunday

Getting up on Sunday morning I can hear my parents talking
Saying how it's been a long time and it doesn't look like rain
And I know it's Aunty Rooney's where my feet will soon be walking
First to mass at Kogarah then to Banksia by train
And I think Mass will never end, O'Farrell's in the pulpit
And I wonder how my father felt to find his mother gone
But Aunty Rooney raised him when his mother went to Heaven
With the help of Aunty Mary and Uncle Pat and John

Soon the Mass is over and to Kogarah we will amble
Waiting on the platform looking down the track for trains
We spot it in the distance and soon on it we will scramble
My sister grabs the window-seat and off we go again
We get off at Banksia station with it's many beds of flowers
The Station-Master tells us he's won a prize or three
We find our way to Short Street but it seems to take us hours
As we watch out for the wooden house with it's Frangipani tree

Chorus -
And they're formerly of Redfern and late of County Galway
They tend the Celtic home-fires with a kind of loving hand
With each new generation they extend the celebration
And keep the green of Ireland growing in this golden land

Aunty Rooney tends the oven; Aunty Mary sets the places
They take their turns in scolding John who hit the grog last night
Uncle Pat returns the book he reads to one of his book-cases
And greetings break upon us as we step into the light
And after we've had our dinner comes the time that's most exciting
All the chairs go in a circle; Uncle Kev is asked to sing
He gives us Kevin Barry then my father's up reciting
Today I'll play the mouth organ my mother let me bring

Chorus

Well everyone did something with sometimes some harmonising
Though Colleen blushed and giggled and her sister wasn't keen
"No politics" calls Mary but just hear the voices rising
John has started something with "The Wearing of the Green"
So it's "Children to the backyard. Go! Come on now, use your nouses"
We'd rather stay inside but still the yard is parent-free
We roll and run for hours until Aunty Rooney rouses
"Now who has knocked that branch down from my frangipani tree?"

Chorus

Soon five-o'clock comes round and now the winter sun's declining
Grown-ups are startled by the time start straining to get home
John says: "Why not stop for tea?" but mum says she's got ironing
And things to do before her tribe is fit next week to roam
And home in bed before I sleep I catch my memories to me
And all those lovely moments get entangled in my dreams
And I hope I never get too old to go to Aunty Rooney's
To eat and laugh and sing with friends and raise the old roof-beams

chorus


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 18 Sep 20 - 02:14 AM

An Ozzie favourite for you -

"Christmas has been cancelled" by Paul Mortimer (nowadays found in the Gaelic Club & at Irish sessions, wot a loss to the folk world!)
(Tune: Lili Marlene) K-Tel records were around in the 60s & 70s & Toltoys distributed (original) Star Wars toys.

Christmas has been cancelled,
Santa Claus is dead.
When the scandal broke
He put a bullet through his head.
Pinned to his chest they found a note
Admitting what - the papers wrote:
That he was on the payroll
Of Toltoys and K-tel.

It was bigger still than Lockheed
Worse than Watergate.
Kids throughout the world
Called for his head upon a plate
The myth was destroyed and in its wake,
Old Santy stood there a callous fake.
And evidence is mounting
That he was C.I.A.

The Church it tried to brand him
A charlatan and worse.
The Pope said 'Keep off Christmas, mate,
We used that number first,
As a time when all good Christians sing
Of Jesus Christ and cribs and things.
Of course it's only bulldust
To get the faithful in.'

Further allegations
Have made the papers wail,
That Santa's love for children
Was way beyond the pale,
He always liked to give out toys
To little girls and little boys.
It seems that he was harmless
But some don't understand.

Well we can still be jolly
And celebrate New Year,
And we'll be nice to other folks
More than once a year.
With no tinsel trees or plastic snow
Or jingle bells or yo ho ho's.
And no more f***ing reindeer
Or little drummer boys.

Repeat first verse.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 17 Sep 20 - 11:44 PM

Ah yes! Fond memories of Batey singing 'Gutboard Blues' at the Turret!!

My experience of EnZed songs is sadly not much more than Phil Garland and Martin Curtis concerts at the Turret, back in the 80s.

Though I recall liking Paul Metser's Farewell to the Gold plus :
Hills of Coromandel / Bright Fine Gold / Farewell to Geraldine / Wind Among the Tussocks? / Tuapeka Gold / Long and Friendly Road / Packing My Things, of course as posted ...... and there's always Peter Cape's She'll Be Right Mate!


I have to get back to werk now, I'll check in in a few days!
Cheers, R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 17 Sep 20 - 10:14 PM

This one was always a great favourite at the gun turret in Darwin back in the day.

GUTBOARD BLUES
(Dave Jordan)

Well I'm off down the road every mornin' 'bout eight
Down on the job, and it's a job (that) I hate,
Hackin', cuttin' mutton gut on a contract basis
I climb into my overalls and take my place as
The boss comes along and he tells me that
I’ve got to strip and clip a stomach every second flat
So I bust a gut just to get the job all done
Hackin', cuttin' mutton gut until the cows come home
   
Sling 'em here, sling 'em there
Them guts keep a-comin' in from ev'rywhere
I’ve got more trouble than I’m able to use
I've got hackin', cuttin', bust-a-guttin' gutboard blues

Now down through the 'chute with a slosh and a slop
Them sheep guts drop and never seem to stop
So I grab me a stomach and I split it wide
Then I trim it and I scrape it till it's clean inside
Then I turn on the hose and let the water run
Chuck it on the pile, and that's another one done
The pace is hot, I stop a spot and mop my brow,
And my face has all been covered up with digested grass by now

Sling 'em here, sling 'em there
Them guts keep a-comin' in from everywhere
I need the money and a beggar can't choose
I got the sloshin', sloppin', never-stoppin' gutboard blues

Now there's hydrochloric acid eatin' into my head
My hair's turnin' green and I’ll smell like I'm dead
There's jokers all around me sloshin' juice on my knees
And the temperature's a-hittin' 'bout a hundred degrees
I've had a gutsful of guts, I'm tellin' you true
I don't think that I could stomach one more ewe
It's a way of makin' money and a living, but --
Sheep, I hate your guts!

Sling 'em here, sling 'em there
Them guts keep a-comin' in from everywhere
How else can I afford to live the life that I choose
Without them acid-burnin', stomach-churnin'
Money-earnin' gutboard blues

Go drop dead!

The gutboards referred to in Dave Jordan’s 'Gutboard Blues' are now called ‘viscera tables’. At the time, sheep guts earned New Zealand $50 million a year exported as sausage skins. As one freezer said, ‘It’s sometimes what you have to handle that is the guts of the matter’. Dave explained:

I worked at Fielding Freezing works in the summer holidays of ’65 and ’66, but as a point-switcher on the mutton/lamb grading lines. My best mate at the time, Graeme Cowley, was on the gutboard. I wrote the song out of sympathy for him after asking him one time why the skin was coming off his hands and his toes appeared to be rotting off, and why he smelled like vomit all the time.

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 17 Sep 20 - 09:45 PM

STRONG WINDS FOR AUTUMN
(Bob McNeill)

Strong winds for Autumn
Better bring those engines up
No sail can carry my love
No words will guide her
The calling voice is silent

And I watched them make turns for ten knots
I went each day to the end of the dock
Till the day my Annie sailed
On the last boat down the weeping loch

When the sickness came
I suffered with my friends
One day I thought the world would end
In the dark I called her name
The others there heard nothing

And I watched them make turns for ten knots
I felt her wake with my feet in the surf
Till even that was calm
And the last boat had gone

Sail away my Annan love
No breeze can catch you now
It's all clear
There's only memories here
This year will know no winter

[Instrumental break]

And I watched them make turns for ten knots
The cries of the gulls filled the air as I watched
The day my Annie sailed
On the last boat down the weeping loch

Chorus (X2)

Strong winds for Autumn
Better bring those engines up

Bob McNeill moved from Glasgow to New Zealand in 1998 and established himself as one the country’s foremost singer-songwriters. He has twice won the Recording Industry of New Zealand’s award for ‘Best Folk Album’. In relation to his best-known song, 'Strong Winds for Autumn' about a community off the coast of Scotland, he noted:

In small coastal communities, there was sometimes a delicate balance between the number of people in the community and the amount of work needed to feed them. If many people died from illness at one time, often this left too few people to get enough food in to enable the community to survive the winter. In the song, a village is evacuated for this reason. The story is told from the perspective of a man who died from the sickness.

You can hear Bob introducing and singing this song at about the 5-minute mark of this set:

Youtube

Emily Smith did a fine cover:

Emily

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 17 Sep 20 - 09:23 PM

Here's a tour around NZ. R-J, I think you sent me a copy of the album by 'When the cat's been spayed".

TEA AT TE KUITI
(Ken Avery)

I'm havin' tea at Te Kuiti with my sweetie
Then a row at Rotorua on the waves
Do a tour of Turangi
When the Maoris have a hangi
Then I'll wind up in the old Waitomo caves

I'm gonna tread the narrow path at Ngar'awahia
And dash to Dannevirke before the beer is cut
I'm going to town at Taum'runui
Wander down the Wangernewy
Then I'm go'ng'ta live it up at Upper Hutt

I'm gonna chat about the Chateau Tongariro
I'm gonna talk about the Tokomaru Bay
And when I tell a man or two
About the Manawatu
They'll wonder why I ever went away

I'm gonna crow about the good old Coromandel
And tell them where I'd like to see Waiwera shore
Although it sounds like Taranaki
When I'm shooting at Wairakei
I can always hit a geothermal bore

I'm gonna have a cuppa tea on Kapati Island
And a cup of coffee in Kawhia town
Drink a handle or a schooner
When I tack at Takapuna
Where the Waitamata never lets me down

I want to eat a pie at old Paekakariki
See the wishing well in Wellington and then
When we pull in to Kaiwhara
There's a fiver I can borrow
So I'll turn around and do it all again

Interlude   Been there … etc

I'm gonna travel in by car to Invercargill
Then I’ll meet a man at Manapouri Lake
Though I'm not the one to boast
I've been toasted on the coast
And washed ashore at Taylor's Big Mistake

I've eaten oysters in the stew at Stewart Island
And met a mutton-birder down at Foveaux Strait
I've tried to bluff them at the Bluff
Each time I said I'd had enough
They put another dozen osters on my plate.

I'm gonna canter on the plains at Canterbury
I'm gonna rue the day I leave ol' Oamaru
I'll spend the winter on the inter -
Island ferry, makin' merry
An' wait for North and South to come in view

Now you can see a lot that's new in ol' New Zealand
You c'n keep your Port of Spain an' Mexico
But if if you plan to go away
Down A-o-tee-a-ro-a way
A Kiwi always tells you where to go
- "Look out for Trentham" -
A Kiwi always tells you where to go

My source for this little ditty is an all-female Kiwi group entitled ‘When the cat’s been spayed’. It is from the pen of Ken Avery from Dunedin who was known for his novelty songs featuring wordplay and exotic names – classics such as 'The dog dosing strip', 'When the scrum is on the ball' and 'The way she handled the clutch'.

NZ Sheilas

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 17 Sep 20 - 08:40 PM

Way back in this thread (on 19 Aug) Mysha mentioned 'By the dry Cardrona'. Here ya go:

BY THE DRY CARDRONA
(James K. Baxter)

Oh I can tell where the cherries grow
By the dry Cardrona
Where I picked them long ago
On a day when I was sober
On a day when I was sober

My father wore a parson's coat
By the dry Cardrona
He made a tally of the sheep and the goats
But I was never sober
I was never sober

My mother sewed her Sunday skirt
By the dry Cardrona
They say she died of a broken heart
For I was never sober
I was never sober

I loved a young girl, and only one
By the dry Cardrona
She up and married the banker's son
For I was never sober
I was never sober

I courted a widow of forty-nine
By the dry Cardrona
She owned a stable and a scheelite mine
But I was never sober
I was never sober

Lay my bones till the judgement crack
By the wild Cardrona
A blanket swag all on my back
To pillow me drunk or sober
Pillow me drunk or sober

All rivers run to a rimless grave
Even the wild Cardrona
But never a one will come my way
Till I am stone cold sober
Till I am stone cold sober

I can tell where the cherries grow
By the wild Cardrona
Where I picked them long ago
On a day when I was sober
On a day when I was sober

One of New Zealand’s best-known poets, James Keir Baxter, featured his poem,'By the Dry Cardrona', in his 1958 radio play, 'Jack Winter’s Dream'. The dry Cardrona is a symbol of the spritual aridity of his early life in contrast with the life-giving? springtime snowmelt waters of the wild Cardrona that nourish the cherry trees along its banks. Scheelite, which is mentioned in the poem, is an important source of tungsten, a very hard metal.

English folkie, Steve Turner, always did it justice:

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 17 Sep 20 - 08:25 PM

The inimitable Kath Tait was also a NZ icon before fleeing to London. Here's one of her best:

THE RIVER OF LIFE
(Kath Tait)

She was born in a middle-class town
She could have gone up, she could have gone down
But she just went around and around
On a downward spiral
One morning so fair and fine
She stole away while the moon did shine
Strayed on down the wayward line
Southwards of survival

(Chorus)
She could have been a lady
She could have been a wife
But she fell into the river of life
Swimming in a pool of trouble and strife
She really loved the danger
But the river of life it rolls and flows
Down by the banks where the brambles grow
Swimming around in trouble and strife
Way down low in the river of life

Over hills of thorns and valleys of scorn
Rambling like she was gypsy born
Travelling on through weather and storm
Without a thought for danger
But she was young and looking for fun
And dreaming of things she'd never done
So lost in sweet oblivion
She welcomed in the stranger

But the stranger he was a wanton rake
For he took her money and he called her a fake
And he shook her around like an old earthquake
And left her there for plunder
Now a heart gone down might never be found
Might lie in the dirt and roll around
But she was always on the rebound
And she never would go under

Chorus

Now the woman of character wins in the end
The river of life will be your friend
Not frail of heart, but a true upstart
The river of life has made her
And like a flood she did surely rise
High as the hills and the clear blue skies
She never was a lady but she was wise
And nothing much would change her

Chorus

Lin Van Hek and Joe Dolce did a beaut rendition for their 'Difficult Women' project.

Youtube clip

Kath Tait has been described as ‘the diva of the dysfunctional’. She departed New Zealand to live in London. The 'Waikato Times' noted:

It was inevitable she left New Zealand, having insulted most of her family and friends in her songs. Behind the cheerful guitar and sweet voice lie lyrics of barbed wire. The ironies of modern life are her inspiration, the contrast in her disarming delivery and often explicit words, is her charm.

--Stewie


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 17 Sep 20 - 08:03 PM

R-J, I remember Martin Curtis from his days in Tennant Creek back when the world was young.
Sandra has also now posted a song by a Kiwi. Let's go for it - our conspicuously absent moderator can always chuck 'em out!

Sandra, thanks for the Marcus Turner song. I posted the lyrics of his magnum opus, 'When the boys are on parade', over a decade ago. It is one of finest songs ever about armed forces. Andy Irvine's made it known outside NZ, but my favourite rendition is by Michael Black on his wonderful self-titled CD on Compass Records.

Michael Black

WHEN THE BOYS ARE ON PARADE
(Marcus Turner)

Here they come marching past the houses, shiny boots and khaki blouses
Stiff as the creases in their trousers, standing tall and straight and strong
And they all keep in step together, glint of steel and flash of leather
Braving every kind of weather as they boldly march along
You may dismiss it as a ploy for the enlistment of the boys
Who’ll be impressed to see the toys and play the games that can be played

Refrain:
And you may well prefer abstention but I feel compelled to mention
You’d do well to pay attention when the boys are on parade

Look at your sons before they’re older they’ll be stronger, they’ll be bolder
Just the thing to make a soldier and we’ll turn them into men
And they’ll be taught to follow orders, keep the peace and guard the borders
To protect us from marauders and defend us to the end
But the position they’ll be filling is to be able and be willing
To be killed or do the killing when there’s a price that must be paid

Refrain

In the pursuit of a community of decency and unity
And equal opportunity, we stand prepared to fight
And if there’s a threat to our position from aggressive opposition
Then, with guns and ammunition, we’ll repel with all our might.
We’ll dehumanise and hate them, send in the troops to decimate them
As in the name of the nation all it stands for is betrayed

Refrain

Merely the whim or intuition of an elected politician
Makes a melee without conditions as the monster quits the cage
It’s a machine that knows no quarter, dealing death and sowing slaughter
Raping mothers, wives and daughters in an all-consuming rage
We may well decide we need it and we’ll pay to arm and feed it
Can you tell me who will lead it when a decision must be made?

Refrain

Instrumental break

Some will wonder what’s to fear and say there is no danger here
But there has never been a year when soldiers haven’t been at war
And the eternal executions and the bloody revolutions
And the ultimate solutions, too, have all been seen before.
And there’s always someone scheming and some nights when I am dreaming
In the distance, I hear screaming and in my heart I feel afraid

Refrain

Here they come marching past the houses, shiny boots and khaki blouses
Stiff as the creases in their trousers, standing tall and straight and strong
And is it any cause for pride that now the women march beside them
Will they have wiser gods to guide them in discerning right from wrong?
‘Cause every step is a reminder of the threat that lies behind
If we forget the ties that bind us when the decisive game is played

Refrain

And as the procession passes by, consider the sight before your eyes
‘Cause it’ll be you they’ll kill and die for when called to the crusade
And you may love them and adore them, you may hate them and abhor them
But, for God’s sake don’t ignore them, when the boys are on parade

The late Marcus Turner was fine songwriter. One of his close friends wrote: ‘Multi-instumentalist, singer-songwriter, Marcus Turner, is a New Zealand folk music icon, regularly guesting at folk festivals and clubs for over 30 years … He is renowned for his astute song-writing from the dark to the endearing, from the political to the exceedingly funny’.

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 17 Sep 20 - 07:58 PM

I AM A TOLERANT MAN

anon (from WA Goldfields)

I don't mind blokes who digs or stokes,
Who fettle or work on derricks;
I can even stand a German band,
But I draw the line at clerics.

Ch.
Why strike me pink, I'd sooner drink
With a cove sent up for arson,
Than a rain-beseeching, preaching, teaching,
Blanky, cranky, parson.


I snort and jibe at the whole of the tribe,
Whatever their sect of class is -
From lawn-sleeved ranters to kerbstone canters,
From bishops to Army lasses.


Give me the blaspheming, scheming, screaming,
Barracking football garcons -
In preference, to the reverent gents,
The blithering, blathering parsons!


I couldn't get John Thompson's recording to play on his Oz Folksong a Day website, so here is one from "Les Wayfarers" :
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cTm8_8MvRtc

"Words from John Lahey's Great Australian Folk Songs (1965) via Mudcat, where Bob Bolton notes that it is from the Western Australian goldfields."
Apparently an early poem in the "Kalgoorlie Sun" newspaper; music by John Lahey.




Cheers, R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 17 Sep 20 - 05:41 AM

THE WHALE (Terry Fielding and Fred Dyer) - Fred used to post on Mudcat youtube

(Am) (G) (Am)
Di Di Di Di DA Di DE Di Di

(Am) They sailed from port one morning the (G) weather it was (Am) fair
A gentle breeze it pushed them and (G) no one gave a (Am) care
They sang and danced and (Am7) laughed that night and D opened up a (E) keg
They're (Am) out to catch the monster whale that (G) took the captain's leg
(Am) Di Di Di Di Da (G) Di DE Di (Am)Di

(Am)The Captain said "a piece of gold for (G)him who sees me (Am)whale"
So bend your backs and row me boys I(G) know that we won't (Am)fail

Chorus (chords as Verse1)

So bend your backs and row me lads and take me to me whale.
Tonight we'll sing and dance and tomorrow night we'll sail.
We'll sail into the harbour no prouder man there'll be;
We'll show them all we captured the monster from the sea
Di Di Di Di Di Da Di Di

They saw the whale one morning the weather it was fair
the men were white as ghosts, the Captain didn't care
I'll take this whale meself he cried the weak can stay behind
The strong can share my glory and tonight they'll share my wine
Di Di Di Di Di Da Di Di

The whale it came so close it was bigger than the sky
they lowered down the longboat and they heard the captain cry

Chorus
Bend your backs and row me lads and take me to me whale.
Tonight we'll sing and dance and tomorrow night we'll sail.
We'll sail into the harbour no prouder man there'll be;
We'll show them all we captured the monster from the sea
Di Di Di Di Di Da Di Di

Chorus

The whale it came so close it almost tipped the boat
The captain took his spear and he rammed it down it's throat
the whale it gave a mournfull cry and lifted it's great tail
and brought it down a crushing their small boat like a gale

(spoken)
Now 100 years have passed since the Captain and his men
went below to spend their days in Davy Joneses' den
The whale it goes on living but inside it bears a scar
And if your ever near that place a voice calls from afar

Chorus twice, last line:
We'll show them all we captured the monster from the sea


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 17 Sep 20 - 04:59 AM

I'm going thru my folder of songs - did you know there are 828 species of birds in Australia, one in 10 of the world's 10,000 or so living bird species.

BIRD SONG
    Words and Music John Broomhall

Adelaide Hills, it's early mornin', through the window see them yawnin',
Lonesome travellers wind their way back home;
Misty valleys, lofty ranges, signposts mock our weary strangers:
Pack a road map mate next time you roam!

There's a Kookaburra, Cuckoo, Bronzewing, Budgerigar,
Lorikeet, Cat Bird, Currawong, an old Galah;
Frog Mouth, Magpie, Miner, and a White-Winged Chough,
A Babbler, a Warbler, and even a bird called Rough.

Somewhere up in Northern Queensland, sunshine bright, golden sea sand,
We're lyin' on the beach the way that dreamers do.
Paradise Lost, ah poor John Milton, he didn't get to stay at the Douglas Hilton,
I guess he missed Mossman, Kuranda, and Cooktown too.

Seagull, Plover, Petrel, and Ocean Tern,
Albatross, Grebe, Shearwater and Frigate Bird;
Cormorant, Pelican, Gannet and Cockatoo,
Cassowary, Egret, Heron and Jabiru.

Life's a breeze in the centre of Australia, corroboree's the only regalia,
Wide brown land, and a sky that's big and blue;
Camel Drivers wearin' turbans, nothin' here you'd call suburban,
They're all dinkum Aussies through and through.

Curlew, Drongo, Falcon, Emu, Wren,
Brolga, Spoonbill, Duck and Native Hen;
Spinebill, Thrush and Lark up in the sky,
Swallow, Butcher, Robin, Silver-eye.

Soldier, Shoe Maker, Coot and Sooty Owl,
Buzzard, Booby, Bell and Mallee Fowl;
Rainbow, Sparrow, Crow and Whistling Kite,
A Wedge-tailed Eagle and a Boobook late at night.

(c) Copyright J. Broomhall 1991


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 17 Sep 20 - 04:28 AM

2 songs from the Shiny Bum Singers (Canberra Chris was a founding member)


I am Speaking [C] – Tune: Frere Jacques

I am speaking
I am speaking
And I’m right
And I’m right
You shut up and listen
You Shut up and listen
Or we’ll fight
Or we’ll fight
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

There’s No Paper Here (tune: A Pub With No Beer) (words ©ShinyBumSingers 2020)

It's lonesome away, from your kindred and co.
In the throne-room at night, where we all have to go
But there's nothing so lonesome, so morbid or drear
Than to stand in an aisle, when there’s no paper here

Now the public is anxious, for the quota to come
There may not be paper, for a-wiping their bum
The Mums are all cranky, and the staff’s acting queer
What a terrible place, when there’s no paper here

Then the stock man rolls up, with his pallet shrink-wrapped
Overtaken by hoarders, he screams “Holy Crap!”
A mad glint in their eyes, as the rolls disappear
As with locusts to Egypt, there’s no paper here

There's a Dad on the dunny, for his shopper he’ll wait
But she’s a non-starter, having left it too late
She searches forlornly, despair ever near
There’s no place for a shopper, when there’s no paper here

Old Gilly the Greenie, first time in his life
Has run out of paper, and now he’s in strife
He’d settle for NewsCorp, but the irony’s clear
It’s a “digital” world, when there’s no paper here

(NewsCorp, Rupert Murdock's papers in Australia)


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 17 Sep 20 - 04:16 AM

Randwick Races    John Dengate   (Tune: "The Galway Races")

(D) We arrived at Randwick races, by (Em) taxi from Clovelly.
I had (C) money in my trousers, boys, and (G) schooners (D) in my (G) belly.
(G) Well the bookies (d) saw us (D) coming and they (Em) panicked in a crisis;
They (G) tinkered with the odds and they (Em) shortened (D) all their (G) prices.
Chorus: With my (D) whack, fol the do, fol the (Em) diddley idle (Em) day

Well the hunger it was gnawing and the thirst was in us rising
While the crowd's excited roaring reached a level quite surprising.
Oh, we swallowed several middies and demolished pies and sauces
And we set to work comparing prices, jockey's weights and horses.
Chorus: With my whack, fol the do, fol the diddley idle day

Denis Kevans said, "I reckon we will finish rich as Pharaoh
If we back the chestnut filly from the district of Monaro.
She's a trier, she's a flier, never knock her or decry her -
She's sixty-six to one; when she wins we']] all retire."
Chorus: With my whack, fol the do, fol the diddley idle day

There was every kind of punter from illiterates to scholars;
I struggled throuah the betting ring and wagered twenty dollars -
Then the horses were away; from the barrier they thundered
And we hoped that very day to collect the thirteen hundred.
Chorus: With my whack, fol the do, fol the diddley idle day

We shouted in despair; Denis Kevans tore his hair,
O'Dea began to swear at the filly from Monaro.
She was struggling in the pack and our very hearts were bleeding;
She was falling further back and the favourite was leading.
Chorus: With my whack, fol the do, fol the diddley idle day


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 17 Sep 20 - 04:12 AM

Both Sides Now (known as The Toast Song)
(Chris Clarke) - former Mudcatter Canberra Chris

In morning time when I arise
My breakfast fare is no surprise,
I pour the cornflakes, make the tea
And then reach for the bread.
I turn the gas on, light the grill,
And think this time I really will
Stay wide awake, make perfect toast
and start the day well-fed -

I'll lightly toast it both sides now,
Both up and down
To golden brown,
The toasting time I will recall,
I really can make toast
After all.

But then I read, to pass the time,
The cornflakes advertising rhyme,
I hear the news, but don't take in
A single item read.
And then an old, familiar smell
Invades the dreamworld where I dwell,
and fills the room with flames and smoke
and fumes of burning bread -

I've burnt the toast on both sides now,
Both front and back
To charcoal black,
The toasting time I don't recall,
I really can't make toast
After all.

And so I scrape it in the bin
Which makes the slices rather thin,
Then wipe the knife upon the cloth
Back in my dream-like state.
I butter it with marmalade,
Then to correct the mess I've made
Spread butter on the other side
And stick it to the plate -

My toast is buttered both sides now,
Both left and right,
I'm none too bright,
The buttering I don't recall,
I really can't make toast
At all.

Written in Perth, Western Australia, early 80s.
Chris Clarke


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 17 Sep 20 - 04:08 AM

another NZ song that used to be heard around the Sydney sessions years ago
Folksong NZ site

The chocolate Song by Marcus Turner (sound) bite of Chocolate

    When you're tired and depressed, and feeling lonely,
    When your chequebook's in the red, and you are blue,
    When you've left the freezer open,
    or your rubber band is broken,
    Or you've dropped the toilet paper down the loo,

    If you feel a sudden urge to wash the bread-knife,
    Or to sniff at the exhaust-pipe of your car,
    Or to farewell those you love 'n'
    take a nap inside the oven,
    STOP!... Salvation's just a sup from where you are!

      Chorus:
       When you're feeling down, the best way up is chocolate:
       It's the answer that will get you through the day.
       Let me get my teeth around
       something small and square and brown,
       And I'll masticate until I feel O.K.

    Now, when God had finished making all the heavens,
    And the valleys and the mountains and the seas,
    And the weather, and the weasels,
    and the squid, and German Measles,
    And the gherkins, and Hong Kong, and all the fleas,

    On the seventh day, as he was sitting resting,
    He was feeling in a very chipper mood.
    There came one more inspiration
    for one last divine Creation:
    Something fit to please a God, that could be chewed!

    Ch.

    When I see a bar of chocolate lying idle,
    It always seems to find its way inside my jaws.
    It's a shame to mess about,
    'cos it tastes better in than out,
    And it's going to a very worthy cause.

    And although it won't endear me to my dentist,
    And my doctor will be worried for my health,
    And it's given me a skinful
    of enormous oily pimples,
    I'm still feeling very good about myself!

    Ch.

    Just remember, if it's chocolate, you can eat it:
    Chocolate eggs and chocolate fish and chocolate chips,
    Chocolate steak and mousse and frogs,
    chocolate beans and mice and logs,
    Let a chocolate bomb explode across your lips!

    Some is crunchy, and is filled with Hokey-pokey,
    Some is thrown about by cowboys, and is white.
    There's a whole world out there waiting:
    don't just sit there salivating,
    Pull your socks up, brace yourself and Bite! Bite! Bite!

    Ch.

    You will never have a bad trip eating chocolate.
    And it's tastier than sex, and much more fun.
    Keep your pills and dope and glue,
    and your gin and whiskey too,
    'Cos there's no buzz like a chocolate Buzz - Bar none!

    If you really, really love me, give me chocolate,
    Give me chocolate 'till it's coming out my ears.
    All I crave is just enough
    so I can indolently stuff
    myself for years and years and years and years and years!

    Ch.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 17 Sep 20 - 04:05 AM

Greg Hastings! OMG Sandra, I rem'ber when his family first arrived - in Perth - with their Welsh accents and great songs - his shy young sister Val, in particular, had a lovely voice : COCKY BELL is a good song, which I think she wrote .....


But I have to add this one for Stewie!

THE GIN AND RASPBERRY

Written by Martin Curtis, c.1980

While hunting for fox we first came this way
From Lake Pembroke township took many long days
We cut through the bush and we found a new rush
With a mine called the Gin and Raspberry

Ch.
Oh, but it's hard, cruel and cold
Searching Cardrona for nuggets of gold
An ounce to the bucket and we'll all sell our soul
For a taste of the gin and raspberry

The rumors went out and the thousands poured in
A handful grew rich but many grew thin
They all hoped to find their own patch of tin
As rich as the Gin and Raspberry

At first it was summer and we all thought it grand
No shirts on our back as we sluiced and we panned
But then came the snow and the southern wind's blow
And there's ice down the Gin and Raspberry

Now Billy McGraw he worked hard and worked long
Ready to smile and to give us a song
But then he struck gold and was found dead and cold
Down in the Gin and Raspberry

So I'll work at the mine and I'll stay out of strife
I'll save all me gold to send home to me wife
And when the gold’s won I’ll leave at the run
And to hell with the Gin and Raspberry


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bwN5A1zeROk
Martin Curtis singing his own song.

My GGGrandfather left Lancashire in 1857 for a new life in Victoria, but by the early 1860s he was in Sth Isle EnZed in these very same goldfields.   He found enough to buy a couple of pubs!
Cheers, R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 17 Sep 20 - 03:52 AM

Greg Hasstings on didgeridoo traveling down Highway 1 (no words!)


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 17 Sep 20 - 03:40 AM

Greg Hastings - lyrics

Greg began his musical career as a founding member of the Mucky Duck Bush Band in 1973, 3 years after he migrated to Australia from Wales. In 1976 the band turned professional and rose to great heights of success in Western Australia. At the beginning of 1979 Greg launched his solo career, travelling to New Zealand, America, Canada, United Kingdom and Europe. He then returned to Australia for a year before setting off once more around the world in 1982. On his return to Australia in 1983, he began touring the continent extensively. For 25 years he has toured almost continually playing Festivals, Clubs, Tourist Resorts, Schools etc.
GGreg has traversed over 400,000 kilometres of this vast continent amassing a unique knowledge of Australia and Australians, including some of the most respected elders of the Aboriginal people. Learning to play the didgeridoo from them on his first tour of the Kimberley Aboriginal communities in 1988.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
reg's humorous, environmental protest song

COCA COLA CAN

T'was on the Canning Stock Route, by the Kannanagi Well
I parks the four wheel in the shade, the sun was hot as hell
I thought that I would have a leak where no man had before
But as I strolled off in the bush, imagine what I saw;
There were kangaroos, all sweat and flies, playing football in the sand
And the ball they were using was a Coca cola can.

CHORUS:
Why must I always be second (Mate)
It can't be part of the plan
Why must I always be second
To a Coca Cola Can

While Climbing up Ben Nevis on a cold and freezing day
The sun was falling lightly, so I took an easy way
And as I trudged up to the top, the sky began to clear
Just my footprints in the snow, no-one else was there.
Then I stood in silence, the horizon to scan
I spotted below me, a Coca Cola can.

CHORUS (Jimmy)

Now in the great Grand Canyon, on an early summer's morn
I thought if I climbed the side, I could watch the dawn
I struggled through the cactus, it must have been 5 miles
Thought that when I reached the top, I'd sit there for a while.
But as I reached that one last time, I felt beneath my hand
Yep, you guessed it, a Coca Cola can.

CHORUS (Yee Ha)

I thought I'd found an island where no man had ever been
No footprints in the sand, the water was so clean
So I went in for a swim, to wash the dust away
And as I swam down to the rocks to watch the fishes play
There, right below me, half buried in the sand
Was that red and white monstrosity, a Coca Cola can

CHORUS (By Jingo)

So if you're walking or you're riding or sailing on the sea
Don't throw your empties overboard and leave them there for me
I wouldn't come to your place, chuck me rubbish on the lawn
And if I did I'm sure you'd be the one to moan
But, if you didn't you wouldn't understand
Why I don't like coming second to a Coca Cola can

If we looked into the future, I wonder what we'd see
In a thousand years from now, I wonder where we'll be
For since the world begun, many places man has trod
Some believe in Einstein, some believe in God
But if whoever started it could reveal the plan
I am sure it would not include a Coca Cola can

Copyright Greg Hastings © 1980


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 17 Sep 20 - 03:39 AM

Greg Hastings - lyrics

Greg began his musical career as a founding member of the Mucky Duck Bush Band in 1973, 3 years after he migrated to Australia from Wales. In 1976 the band turned professional and rose to great heights of success in Western Australia. At the beginning of 1979 Greg launched his solo career, travelling to New Zealand, America, Canada, United Kingdom and Europe. He then returned to Australia for a year before setting off once more around the world in 1982. On his return to Australia in 1983, he began touring the continent extensively. For 25 years he has toured almost continually playing Festivals, Clubs, Tourist Resorts, Schools etc.
GGreg has traversed over 400,000 kilometres of this vast continent amassing a unique knowledge of Australia and Australians, including some of the most respected elders of the Aboriginal people. Learning to play the didgeridoo from them on his first tour of the Kimberley Aboriginal communities in 1988.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

After seeing many a night 'ruined' by mismanaged sound systems, Greg penned this song.

TESTING 1, 2, 3 by Greg Hastings

For many years I've sung in places all around the world
No sweeter than the human voice in chorus can be heard
But now with our technology all reason has been lost
Sometimes I wonder if the end defeats the cost.

CHORUS
Cos it's testing, testing 1, 2, 3
We don't need electricity
Don't need a microphone to sing a song
So nice to hear the music back where we belong.

Once not long ago if you had a mind to sing
Friends would gather round you and make the rafters ring
But now with these amps they run in mortal fear
With the booming of a microphone ringing in their ear

CHORUS

Now the local musos gather round
With their ultra quado phonic sound
The crowd was stunning nearly yelled for more
When one he counted up to four !
His quiet little voice was made to sound
Just like Michael Jackson in the London underground
With digital delays, effects by the score
Just one check blew his audience through the door

CHORUS

I stayed at that club till just a few were there
Speakers the size of tea chests standing on a chair
I checked, it buzzed, everything went wrong
When I finally got to singing, the audience had gone.
Saying why can't you just sing to me
Without this testing 1, 2, 3
We long for the day you can do without
Because it's far too loud and it hides your mouth.

CHORUS

Yes, I feel acoustic music is music of the soul
Sharing it in harmony should always be our goal
The way things are going it's very plain to see
Before we can speak we'll have to test 1, 2, 3
But they'll flick a switch and they won't say when
Before you know we'll have to sing again
But I can sing to you and you can sing to me
There'll be no more testing 1, 2, 3



Copyright Greg Hastings ©
https://www.greghastings.com/asongs.html#top

m


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 17 Sep 20 - 03:31 AM

Alistair Hulett winners

https://www.alistairhulett.com/alistair-hulett-memorial-fund/songs-for-social-justice-award-aus/ (2019 & 2020 winners are not yet on the website, so I contacted one of the organisers)

Winner of the 2020 Songs for Social Justice Award: Karen Law for Wildflower Woman. (Qld newspaper)

Winner of the 2019 Songs for Social Justice Award: Penelope Swales for Cambridge Analytica (NFF website)

Winner of the 2018 Songs for Social Justice Award: Teri Young for ‘Fishing at Okehampton Bay’

Winner of the 2017 Songs for Social Justice Award: Miguel Heatwole for ‘Better Times’

Winner of the 2016 Songs for Social Justice Award: Tony Eardley for ‘Sally Cross the Water’

Winner of the 2015 Songs for Social Justice Award: Paddy McHugh for ‘The Snowmen’

Winner of the 2014 Songs for Social Justice Award: Miriam Jones for ‘Post Post Feminist Revolution’

Winner of the 2013 Songs for Social Justice Award: The Lurkers for ‘Mining Man’

Winner of the 2012 Songs for Social Justice Award: Steph Miller for ‘The Riverside’


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 17 Sep 20 - 02:58 AM

Another song from the pen of Hendo (I remember this played regularly on the radio) :

Put a Light in Ev'ry Country Window"

DON HENDERSON

Ch.
Put a light in every country window
High-speed pumps where now the windmills stand
Get in and lay the cable so that one day we’ll be able
To have electricity all over this wide land.


Miners tunnel to feed the fires at Wangi
While others scrape the brown coal at Yallourn
Turbine blades are yielding to the tumbling tons of Eildon
And the Snowy will be finished before long.


The little farms and giant outback stations
They all are mechanised today
For milking cows and shearing sheep to do it fast and do it cheap
Electrically is the modern way.


The old Coolgardie and the red-hot woodstove
They all have seen their day at last
For now the ice and fire that is coming on the wire
Has made them all relics of the past.


Ch.
Put a light in every country window
High-speed pumps where now the windmills stand
Get in and lay the cable so that one day we’ll be able
To have electricity all over this wide land.


Here is Gary Shearston's version : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N6NScBO_JWU

Who knows if in another 50 years, Electricity will still be "the modern way"?!


Coolgardie Safe : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coolgardie_safe



Cheers, R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 17 Sep 20 - 02:40 AM

BOONAROO

Don Henderson, 1968

Ch.
Oh, who will man the Boonaroo?
Who will sail her, be the crew,
sailing on the Boonaroo?

Is there food and is there store
to feed the hungry, clothe the poor?
In this world their number isn't few.
In her cargo would you find
any way for one mankind,
sailing on the Boonaroo.

Is there bandage by the reel?
Is there medicine to heal?
Christ knows, there's healing work to do.
In her cargo would you find
any way for one mankind,
sailing on the Boonaroo?

Would the hull be filled with material to build,
perhaps a bridge for a world that's split in two?
In her cargo would you find
any way for one mankind,
sailing on the Boonaroo?

Or jam packed in the hold,
is there grief and death untold
and asked "Why?" have to answer true.
In her cargo would you find
any way for one mankind,
sailing on the Boonaroo?


Thanks to Mark Gregory's Union Songs site : http://unionsong.com/u260.html

Don Henderson wrote:

"Australian seamen have manned the Australian National Line M.V.s Boonaroo and Jeparit sailing to Vietnam 'under strong protest'. In the case of the Boonaroo, which has already completed one round trip, the crew's continued hostility to the U.S. aggression in Vietnam, and the friendly contacts they established with Australian troops engaged in the war, are already a small part of Australian working-class history."



Cheers, R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 17 Sep 20 - 02:24 AM

DECLAN AFFLEY SONGWRITING AWARD :

After mentioning the NFF’s 1987 winner, Mark Gillett, a few posts ago, I thought : “Now there’s a go! Probably many other winners of this competition should have their entry in Mudcat’s Aussie thread!”

Well, that was another idea and much time, lost down the rabbithole.

When I googled, many artists are proudly claiming to have been a winner (or a runner up) - and rightly so. However, where are the details of this award? Where is the List of previous winners and entries? How does one enter? Is it even still being awarded???

I could find no information on the current National Folk Festival (Australia) website about awards/comps – until, that is, I opened the 2019 Program Book, where a half page was devoted to the idea. It seems that ‘The Declan’ is no more and that the current thing is the Alistair Hulett Memorial Award for the best ‘social justice’ song, which follows on from the original British award. (but where now, do the writers of worthy non-social justice material go?!)

OK, there now appears to be a number of other awards (as well as the post-1994 Lis Johnston Awards, for vocal excellence) – but who would know that you have to add “/festival-awards/” up to the main URL, to be able to locate any info on the NFF website?? (and that’s just for 2019!)

Surely there should at least be some easily accessible, permanent page of The Nash’s website which acknowledges and celebrates past award winners, and their great music?

Because if not there, where is that info? At present it appears that it’s purely up to the actual artist to inform or remind us - IF they still have an online presence, that is – and IF we happen to come across their web data!!

So, can any regular Nash attenders (Sandra, Gerry, Graham et al), shed any light on this situation??!!


Cheers, R-J :)


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 16 Sep 20 - 11:19 PM

This one was a favourite in the Darwin folk scene.   Martyn Wydham-Read put a tune to Matt O'Connors' poem.

THE SHEARER'S LAMENT
(O'Connor/Wyndham-Read)

We finished shearing sheep
Out west of the Paroo
But now it's rained three inches
We don't know what to do.
A week ago the sand was loose
And dust blew every day
But now the mud is three feet deep
And we can't get away

I've just been talking to the boss
You all know Hector Cole
He says the Bulloo's two miles wide
To cross it there's no hope.
You hear a lot of people swear
About the dough we make
But they forget the price of beer
And all the combs we break

Well, why I took this job on
I just can't understand,
If the bloody sheep ain't waterlogged
The cows are full of sand
A man is doubled up all day
Half-blinded by his swea;
And when the darkness comes around
Cooped up in a mozzie net

It might have been a good job once
Those old hands had their breaks
They pushed a bike from shed to shed
And lived on johnny cakes
They had more time to do the job
They worked nine hours a day
And after paying for their grub
One pound a hundred paid

I think I'll give this job away
I'm sick of being a greasy
I've heard about a fencing job
They tell me it's dead easy

Youtube clip

Martyn noted: 'Some bush poems definitely invite a tune. "A shearer's lament" came from Matt O'Connor who contributed the odd ballad to the "Singabout" magazine in the 60s. This was his last contribution prior to his death in 1965.'

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 16 Sep 20 - 10:12 PM

I can't believe I did it again.

Anyhow, despite no answer re Kiwi songs, if R-J can post one, so can I. Here is my favourite - it has an Australian connection with Cobb & Co. Phil Garland put a tune to Peter Cape's lovely poem.

THE STABLE LAD
(Cape/Garland)

When Cobb & Co ran coaches from the Buller to the Grey
I went for a livery-stable lad in a halt up Westport way
And I gave my heart to a red-haired girl, and left it where she lay
By the winding Westland highway from the Buller to the Grey

There's Neatsfoot on my fingers, and lamp-black on my face
And I've saddle-soaped the harness and hung each piece in place
But my heart's not in the stable, it's in Charleston far away
Where Cobb & Co goes rolling by from Buller to the Grey

There's a red-haired girl in Charleston, and she's dancing in the bar
But I know she's not like other girls who dance where miners are
And I can't forget her eyes and everything they seemed to say
The day I rode with Cobb & Co from Buller to the Grey

There's a schooner down from Murchison, I can hear it in the gorge
So I'll have to pump the bellows now and redden up the forge
And I'll strike that iron so very hard she'll hear it far away
In the roaring European that the road runs by from Grey

Some day I'll be a teamster with the ribbons in my fist
And I'll drive that Cobb & Co Express through rain and snow and mist
Drive a four-in-hand to Charleston, and no matter what they say
I'll take my girl up on the box and marry her in Grey

There's a graveyard down in Charleston where the moss trails from the trees
And the Westland wind comes moaning in from off the Tasman seas
And it's there they laid my red-haired girl, in a pit of yellow clay
As Cobb & Co went rolling by from Buller to the Grey

Youtube clip

Back in the day, I once introduced with the following - I can't remember where I got the info.

This tragic love story of a stable hand and saloon girl is set against the colourful background of Cobb & Co coach travel. Freeman Cobb, an American, began Cobb & Co in Australia in 1853. From small beginnings, it became the biggest and best transport system in the world with branches in all Australian states (except Tasmania) and in NZ, South Africa and Japan. The red-haired girl in the poem is obviously Catholic. There are 2 graveyards in Charleston, one on a hill to the north and the Catholic one by the roadside where camper-vans of Japanese tourists go rolling from the Buller to the Grey River Valley. The 2-storey, corrugated-iron European Hotel eventually collapsed in the 1970s. Cobb & Co passengers all travelled one class, but travellers often paid big money to sit on the 'box seat' next to the driver to listen to his yarns, poetry and songs. Sometimes the box seat was auctioned to the higher bidder.

You can find more information here:

Click

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: GUEST
Date: 16 Sep 20 - 09:12 PM

Impressions of the outback in the late 19th century don't come better than this.

ACROSS THE WARREGO
(Jim Grahame)

I dreamt some dreams of dried up streams
Streams that never flow
Of men and things misfortune brings
Across the Warrego

And I could see old faces there
Old faces grim and sad
Old mates of mine that tramped with me
And some are tramping yet

And I dreamt then of other men
All trudging to and fro
With empty bags and cruel swags
Across the Warrego

And most of them looked straight ahead
A few were looking back
The bush had claimed their souls and left
Their bodies on the track

And in my sleep I saw the sheep
Heard them bleating low
The ringing flocks, the stringing flocks
Across the Warrego

The young and strong were in the lead
The old and weak behind
With lagging feet and dragging feet
And some of them were blind

And in my dreams I saw the teams
The teams I used to know
The long long teams, the strong strong teams
Across the Warrego

And lurching wool bales strained the ropes
That lashed them fore and aft
And every ounce of horse flesh pulled
From leader to the shaft

I dreamt of nights by campfire lights
The flicker and the glow
The great white moon, the black gin’s croon
Beyond the Warrego

And I could hear the bullock bells
A-ringing on the plains
And thirsty kangaroos loped in
And bounded out again

And in the scrub I saw a pub
A name I do not know
But it was there to cash the cheques
Across the Warrego

A graveyard stood right out in front
Two pepper trees were near
The goats were camping underneath
A skillion at the rear

And in my dreams a camel team
Was winding in and out
Its swaying packs and blistered backs
The messengers of drought

And as they crossed the sandy ridge
The sun went down below
I saw them on the skyline then
Beyond the Warrego

And in the night I woke in fright
My pulse was far from slow
I thought that I was on the road
Beyond the Warrego

I thought a mirage danced ahead
A dry plain at my back
And I was trudging trudging on
Alone along the track

Youtube clip

In 1890, Lawson went to work in Brisbane for 'The Boomerang'. When that collapsed in the depression of 1890-91, he decided to go up country in search of work. With a mate, Jim Grahame, he swagged it to Bourke and out to Hungerford. They worked as house painters and around the sheds as pickers-up, pressers or scourers when shearing was on. Although it was not a long trip, Lawson drew extensive copy from it. Jim Grahame (spelled with and without an 'e'), whose real name was James Gordon, came from Creswick in Victoria and is said to have been born 'under the flap of a tilted cart'. He had intended to become a jockey, with the help of
Adam Lindsay Gordon, but went jackarooing instead. The outback certainly made a deep impression on him.

Grahame on Lawson

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 16 Sep 20 - 01:25 AM

I tried to correct the date of Gulgong FF competition but it wouldn't take.

The winners of the Illawarra (2014-20) & Gulgong (2017-19) Parody competitions are available to download

sandra


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 16 Sep 20 - 01:23 AM

Noel Gardner won the Dale & John Dengate Parody competition at Illawarra Folk Festival in 2018 & also appeared at the 2020 Memorial zoom get-together

Speaking of excellent Australian songs - the winners of the Illawarra (2014-20) & Gulgong (2017-20) Parody competitions are available to download here


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 16 Sep 20 - 12:49 AM

Ah, that's a noice one, Stew; never heard it before. R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 15 Sep 20 - 11:40 PM

THE DECLARATION
(Neilson/Wyndham-Read)

Now I shall love you till the birds
Have lost the way to sing
Until there be no tenderness
Upon the face of spring

And I shall love you till a babe
Shall neither laugh nor cry
When men no more are wanderers
And women’s tears are dry

And I shall love you till the trees
Know neither sun nor rain
When morning brings no mystery
And love can leave no pain

And I shall love you till there be
No grace in hearts of men
When a girl’s eyes will glow no love
I’ll love you until then

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 15 Sep 20 - 10:58 PM

STORYTIME:
Back in 87, I was performing with the Darwin mob at the 21st National Folk Festival in Alice Springs, NT. It was only the 2nd time The Nash had happened outside of a capital city and the 1st was also in The Alice, in 1980.
(BtW, it only happened twice more : 1989 was Maleny, Qld and 1990 was Kuranda, Qld, and both of which were financially very successful, somewhat unusual for NFFs up til then).

Our lad from The Top End, Paul Lawler, entered into the Declan Affley Songwriting Award competition, his semi-autobiographical song “Son of Rome”***. We all had high hopes for Lawls’ excellent entry.

Imagine our chagrin, when a bloody ‘Quoinslander’ walked away with the prize!!!

One “Noel Gardner” had come west, to sing his mate’s song in the comp. His mate was Mark Gillett, a Kiwi-born-and-raised Queenslander, and the song was “Watching The Obi Flow”.

Many years later, with Paul and I living together in Maleny, Qld and running the ABOFOTS folkclub (where the afore-mentioned Mark Gillett was often welcomed!), well, my sister Alex (who was also at that Alice National),
took up with a Sunshine Coast bloke who was a singer-songwriter ..... and now, Noel Gardner is my Brother-in-Law!!

The winning song is below.

Oh, and Paul’s ‘pipped’ song*** will be posted soon :)


WATCHING THE OBI FLOW ~ Mark Gillett (Hinterland Band)


The city no longer gave me thrills, so I thought I’d move up to the hills
Draw the dole to pay my scratch, sing my songs and tend my patch and
Watch The Obi Flow, I’d Watch The Obi Flow
Sing my songs and tend my patch and Watch The Obi Flow.

Well this countryside had eased my mind, I thought I’d left my cares behind
But I have found what many knew : the city will catch up with you
No matter how far you go, it doesn’t matter how far you go
The city will catch up with you no matter how far you go.

Coz down in the gorge where the trees were tall, they’ve gone and built a mighty wall
And from a lake that’s dark and still, turned The Obi through the hills
To the Sunshine Coast below, to the Sunshine Coast below
They’ve turned The Obi through the hills to the Sunshine Coast below.

Well, Maleny’s sewage flows right through, and the cow sheds drain to The Obi – POOH!!
The water looks a trifle rough, you wouldn’t want to drink the stuff
But my, the lawn should grow, my my, the lawns will grow
You wouldn’t want to drink this stuff, but my, the lawns will grow.

Now down in the gorge where the waters flow, or on the slopes where the bunyas grow
Once they bulldoze, burn, and wreck, no earthly power will bring it back
And the kids will never know, you can tell’em but they won’t know
No earthly power will bring it back and the kids’ll never know.

Well, my little house was high and dry, till the Shire Inspector he dropped by
Said this house should never have been, tear it down and start again
Before the next big blow, it’ll fall down in the next big blow
Tear it down and start again, before the next big blow.

So I’ll move to Maroochy by the sea, get me a job in a factory
And when I come home to my flat, I’ll just turn on my kitchen tap
And Watch The Obi Flow, I’ll Watch The Obi Flow
I’ll just turn on my kitchen tap and Watch The Obi Flow.

I’ll Watch The Obi Flow, I’ll Watch The Obi Flow
Just turn on my kitchen tap and Watch The Obi Flow.



And Watch The Obi Flow, I’ll be Watching The Obi Flow
Just turn on my kitchen tap and .....
(spoken) : Watch The Obi Obi Flow : drip - drip - drip


First track of 4 from The Hinterland Band’s EP “Against the Flow” c.1985 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UFoIDwyZ0XA    with Mark Gillett (also on banjo), Noel Gardner, Jim Maloney, Paul Vella.
This song is still in Noel Gardner’s repertoire, but doesn’t seem to be recorded elsewhere. The posthumous CD of Mark’s recordings (Mark Gillett, 1953 – 2007) proposed by friends at his Wake, is apparently still a work-in-progress .....

PS        The Obi Obi Creek [which drops around 435m over its 53.2km length], was named after a noted warrior of the local Aboriginal ‘Kabi Kabi’ people.


Cheers, R-J
(and yes, OK, it's a top little number!!! Thanks to Noel for correcting my lyrics :)


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 15 Sep 20 - 10:56 PM

Jeez, I finally realised that again I hadn't signed in.

And Neilson's best-loved poem.

THE ORANGE TREE
(Neilson/O'Sullivan

The young girl stood beside me.
I Saw not what her young eyes could see:
A light, she said, not of the sky
Lives somewhere in the orange tree.

Is it, I said, of east or west?
The heartbeat of a luminous boy
Who with his faltering flute confessed
Only the edges of his joy?

Was he, I said, borne to the blue
In a mad escapade of Spring
Ere he could make a fond adieu
To his love in the blossoming?

Listen! the young girl said.
There calls no voice, no music beats on me
But it is almost sound: it falls
This evening on the orange tree

Does he, I said, so fear the spring
Ere the white sap too far can climb?
See in the full gold evening
All happenings of the olden time?

Is he so goaded by the green?
Does the compulsion of the dew
Make him unknowable but keen
Asking with beauty of the blue?

Listen! the young girl said. For all
Your hapless talk you fail to see
There is a light, a step, a call
This evening on the orange tree

Is it, 1 said, a waste of love
Imperishably old in pain
Moving as an affrighted dove
Under the sunlight or the rain?

Is it a fluttering heart that gave
Too willingly and was reviled?
Is it the stammering at a grave,
The last word of a little child?

Silence! the young girl said. Oh, why
Why will you talk to weary me?
Plague me no longer now, for I
Am listening like the orange tree

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: GUEST
Date: 15 Sep 20 - 10:32 PM

Cathie O'Sullivan put a tune to this lovely poem by John Shaw Neilson.

STONY TOWN
(J.S.Neilson/C.O’Sullivan)

If ever I go to Stony Town, I’ll go as to a fair
With bells and men and a dance-girl with a heat-wave in her hair
I’ll ask the birds that live on the road; for I dream (though it may not be)
That the eldest song was a forest thought and the singer was a tree

Oh, Stony Town is a hard town! It buys and sells and buys
It will not pity the plights of youth or any love in the eyes
No curve they follow in Stony Town, but the straight line and the square
And the girl shall dance them a royal dance, like a blue wren at his prayer

Oh, Stony Town is a hard town! It sells and buys and sells
Merry men three I will take with me, and seven and twenty bells
The bells will laugh and the men will laugh, and the girl shall shine so fair
With the scent of love and cinnamon dust shaken out of her hair

Her skirts shall be of the gossamer, full thirty inches high
And her lips shall move as the flowers move to see the winds go by
The men will laugh, and the bells will laugh, to find the world so young
And the girl shall go as a velvet bird, with a quick step on her tongue

She shall cry aloud that a million moons for a lover is not long
And her mouth shall be as the green honey in the honey-eater’s song
If ever I go to Stony Town, I’ll go as to a fair,
And the girl shall shake with the cinnamon and the heat-wave in her hair

Youtube clip

John Shaw Neilson

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: GUEST
Date: 15 Sep 20 - 09:32 PM

Bernard Carney, a West Australian singer/songwriter, has written a delightful song for his grand-children - Tian, Joe and Dan. R-J has already posted one of his songs.

THE FEATHER FOOT FAIRY
(Bernard Carney)

Now gather ‘round folks, I’ll sing you a song
Of a feather foot fairy named Tian

Chorus:
She never grew old and she never grew young
She knew every song that had ever been sung
And she played in the moon and the stars and sun
And she was there when the world began
The feather foot fairy named Tian

The feathers on her feet were oh so fine
She could fly through the mists of time
She’d fly ten zillion years or more
And she often had lunch with a dinosaur
And the dinosaur’s house had the strangest things
There were butterfly bats with rainbow wings
And the hills were covered in purple trees
Where the starfish bird sang delicussly
Now ‘delicussly’ is not a real word
But it’s often used by the starfish bird
And if you’re wondering how I know
Well the feather foot fairy told me so
And she should know - ‘cos

Chorus

Now the feather foot fairy named Tian
She was there when the world began
And she watched all the oceans come and go
And her only friend was a fossil named Joe.
Now Joe was asleep for a million years
’til she woke him up with her feather foot tears
And they played in the sands of time so free
And they slept upstairs in the fossilott tree
Now the fossilot tree in quite absurd, 
But it’s often used by the starfish bird
And if you’re wondering how I know
Well the featherf oot fairy told me so
And she should know - ‘cos

Chorus

Now Tian took Joe on the trout sea trail
In a plastic boat with a polythene sail
And they dived to the bottom in an old tin can 
And met with a big seahorse called Dan
Now Dan had a pancake stuck to his bum 
And he brewed his tea in a kettle drum
And he knew every horse that lived in the sea
And he talked to them equifishously
Now ‘equifishously’ is not a real word
But it’s often used by the starfish bird
And if you’re wondering how I know
Well the feather foot fairy told me so
And she should know - ‘cos

Chorus

Now the feather foot fairy and seahorse Dan 
Took fossil Joe to the big trout dam
And they all held hands and disappeared
And travelled ahead 10 thousand years.
The future all looked a little bit blurred
But the first thing they saw was the starfish bird 
And if you’re wondering how I know
Well the feather foot fairy told me so
And she should know - ‘cos

Chorus

Yutube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: GUEST
Date: 15 Sep 20 - 09:24 PM

Well done, Sandra.

Despite queries from Mysha and R-J, we still haven't had an answer as to whether this thread's focus could be expanded to include songs from our Kiwi brothers/sisters in arms. I reckon it would be a good idea. It would be good to hear in this regard from our thread mediator or Joe.

R-J has already posted 'Packing my things'. it should be noted, however, that the attribution to 'Phil Colquhoun' is incorrect. The author of the song is unknown. It was collected by NEIL Colquhoun who reconstructed the music from material collected. His informant was Alistair Swan.

In respect of corrections, I had a yarn with Phil Gray of Loaded Dog about 'Glenburgh Wool' by Jack Sorensen the lyrics of which I posted on 6 September. He rejects the addition of the Wendy Evans chorus. He argue that it is inappropriate to the subject of the song. The song is about transportation of wool by camel trains, not about shearers. I agree. Chuck out the chorus!

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 15 Sep 20 - 06:51 AM

it took me 2 days! I've emailed it to you as a doc - easy to search

sandra


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 15 Sep 20 - 06:18 AM

Oh, I'm so glad you've done that, Sandra!!
I kept thinking I should "make a list" soon, but couldn't quite summon the energy to start!!
Excellent Post.

Thanks, R-J :)


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 15 Sep 20 - 06:04 AM

Since 16th August we have posted 144 songs, well done, us!
-----------

1. Date: 16 Aug 20 - 11:00 AM   ANDERSON'S COAST © John Warner 8/5/93

2. Date: 18 Aug 20 - 10:41 AM   "Now I'm easy" (no words)

3.   Date: 18 Aug 20 - 08:11 PM    Battler's ballad

4. Date: 18 Aug 20 - 08:53 PM    Do You Think That I Do Not Know?

5. Date: 18 Aug 20 - 10:00 PM   SERVICE SONG   lyrics and Music: Harry Robertson Arranged by Evan Mathieson

6 & 7 - Date: 19 Aug 20 - 02:12 AM   One of the has-beens by Don Henderson & One of the has-beens (trad)

8 + 9 Date: 19 Aug 20 - 02:44 PM Where the Brumbies Come to Water + Reedy Lagoon

10. Date: 19 Aug 20 - 08:04 PM He fades away Alistair Hulett

11.   Date: 19 Aug 20 - 08:21 PM   Suicide town Alistair Hulett

12. Date: 19 Aug 20 - 08:37 PM   Rabbit Trapper

13.   Date: 19 Aug 20 - 08:48 PM    WHERE THE CANE FIRES BURN   (Bill Scott)

14. Date: 19 Aug 20 - 09:02 PM   HEY RAIN (Bill Scott)

15.   Date: 19 Aug 20 - 09:33 PM    Brown skin baby

16.   Date: 19 Aug 20 - 09:59 PM   Phyl Lobl has written so many great songs lyrics

17.   Date: 19 Aug 20 - 10:00 PM   Dorothy Hewett's SAILOR HOME FROM THE SEA

18. Date: 19 Aug 20 - 10:11 PM   Dorothy Hewett's Weevils in the flour + original poem

19.   Date: 19 Aug 20 - 10:16 PM   BARE LEGGED KATE   words: John Dengate

20. Date: 19 Aug 20 - 10:48 PM   My apologies, the transcription that I posted above of 'Sailor home from the sea' needs severe correction. I copied and pasted it from a Mudcat thread. Martyn's version varies a little from Hewett's original, but this is what he sings:   SAILOR HOME FROM THE SEA

21. Date: 19 Aug 20 - 11:35 PM   THE BROKEN-DOWN SQUATTER   (Charles Flower)

22.   Date: 20 Aug 20 - 07:36 AM    MY DEAR DARWIN       © Paul Lawler, 1983            

23.   Date: 20 Aug 20 - 09:40 AM   Australian version of Stephen Foster's 'Gentle Annie'.

24.   Date: 20 Aug 20 - 10:17 AM JOHNNY STEWART DROVER (Chris Buch)

25. Date: 20 Aug 20 - 10:45 AM   Will Ogilvie, WHEN THE BRUMBIES COME TO WATER

26.   Date: 20 Aug 20 - 11:02 AM    Waltzing Matilda

27. Date: 20 Aug 20 - 11:04 AM
I've just made a quick list of traditional songs, collected & re-popularised in the revival of the 50s/60s.
They were all published by the Bush Music Club in Singabout (1956-67)
Maggie May, Nine Miles from Gundagai, The Neumerella Shore, The Wild Colonial Boy, The Black Velvet Band & The Old Bark Hut, The Drover's Dream, Wild Rover, Old Black Billy (written in 1938 but thought to be trad. when it was collected),
and a couple of other classics which strangely enough were not published in Singabout! - Moreton Bay & Reedy River lyrics & video of Chris Kempster singing

28. Date: 20 Aug 20 - 11:46 AM   Gerry Hallom   The Outside Track

29.   Date: 20 Aug 20 - 08:48 PM   AND WHEN THEY DANCE (Roy Abbott)

30. Date: 20 Aug 20 - 09:19 PM    WATCHERS OF THE WATER   (Paul Hemphill)

31. Date: 21 Aug 20 - 07:56 AM   very famous songs in copyright Redgum - I was only 19 lyrics I was only 19 video    Paul Kelly & Kev Carmody - From little things big things grow

32. Date: 21 Aug 20 - 08:22 PM   TIME IS A TEMPEST   John Broomhall / John Thompson

33. Date: 21 Aug 20 - 08:30 PM   John Dengate   The Answer's Ireland (Tune Rody McCorley)

34.   Date: 21 Aug 20 - 08:59 PM    AFTER ALL (Henry Lawson/Garnet Rogers)

35.   Date: 21 Aug 20 - 09:42 PM   THE SLIPRAIL AND THE SPUR (Henry Lawson)

35.   Date: 21 Aug 20 - 10:08 PM   THE SWAGGIES HAVE ALL WALTZED MATILDA AWAY (Alistair Hulett)

36. Date: 21 Aug 20 - 10:22 PM      PAST CARIN’   (Henry Lawson)

37. Date: 21 Aug 20 - 11:52 PM    THE REEDY LAGOON    (post 50)

======================

39. Date: 22 Aug 20 - 10:23 PM Ted Egan's 'Sayonara Nakamura'

40. Date: 22 Aug 20 - 10:44 PM Back to Broome - Ted Egan

41. Date: 23 Aug 20 - 10:17 PM NORTHWARD TO THE SHEDS (Will Ogilvie)

42. Date: 24 Aug 20 - 10:02 PM    LAST COAL TRAIN   (Paul Wookey)

43.   Date: 24 Aug 20 - 10:24 PM    SERGEANT SMALL

44.   Date: 24 Aug 20 - 11:21 PM    DUSTY GRAVEL ROAD (Alan Mann)

45. Date: 24 Aug 20 - 11:37 PM   THE POISON TRAIN (Michael O'Rourke)

46.   Date: 25 Aug 20 - 12:19 AM    PADDY'S BACK    (Alan Ralph)

47. Date: 25 Aug 20 - 09:08 PM   CALL OF THE NORTH (J.Sorensen/R.Rummery)

48. Date: 25 Aug 20 - 09:25 PM   THE WINDMILL RUN (Alan Mann)

49. Date: 25 Aug 20 - 10:07 PM   DOWN THE RIVER (H. Lawson/I. MacDougall)

50. Date: 25 Aug 20 - 10:41 PM   KITTY KANE   (John Warner)

51. Date: 25 Aug 20 - 11:15 PM   ON THE DEATH OF MR HOLT   (John Manifold/Paul Lawler)

52. Date: 26 Aug 20 - 10:57 PM   THE SHAME OF GOING BACK   (Henry Lawson)

53.   Date: 27 Aug 20 - 12:37 AM    THE PEOPLE HAVE SONGS   (Miguel Heatwole)

54. Date: 27 Aug 20 - 01:25 AM    THE SIEGE OF UNION STREET (words & music by Alistair Hulett)

55.   Date: 27 Aug 20 - 10:50 PM   WINNIPEG IN WINTER   (Alan Mann)

56.   Date: 27 Aug 20 - 11:41 PM   AWAY TO TINTINARA   (Mike O'Connor)

57. Date: 28 Aug 20 - 09:04 PM   WHEN YOU'RE FLUSH   (T.Brittain/R.Rummery)

58.   Date: 28 Aug 20 - 09:53 PM   MENZIES' SHOUT (HAVE A DRINK ON ME)   (Alan Mann)

59. Date: 28 Aug 20 - 11:20 PM   SONG OF ARTESIAN WATER   (Paterson/O'Sullivan)

60.   Date: 29 Aug 20 - 01:35 AM   WITH THE CATTLE   (Paterson/Hallom)

61. Date: 29 Aug 20 - 10:04 AM      Kevin Baker - Snowy River Men - video

62. Date: 29 Aug 20 - 10:52 AM    Kevin Baker - Superstar

63. Date: 29 Aug 20 - 11:08 AM    THE RABBITER   Words and music: Stan Wakefield

64. Date: 29 Aug 20 - 10:37 PM    BRUNSWICK ROAD   (Steve Groves & Danny Bourke)

65. Date: 29 Aug 20 - 11:03 PM    SHEARING IN A BAR   (Duke Tritton)

66. Date: 30 Aug 20 - 07:14 PM   LEWIS ISLAND LUGGER   (M.Murray & L.Silvester)

67. Date: 30 Aug 20 - 07:57 PM   BENEATH ULURU   (Dave Oakes)

68. Date: 30 Aug 20 - 10:36 PM   SHIP REPAIRING MEN   (Harry Robertson)

69. Date: 30 Aug 20 - 11:14 PM    HOMELESS MAN   (Harry Robertson)

70. Date: 30 Aug 20 - 11:43 PM WEE POT STOVE (Harry Robertson)

71. Date: 31 Aug 20 - 12:27 AM    Reedy River.

72. Date: 31 Aug 20 - 07:37 AM    Weevils in the Flour by Dorothy Hewitt in 1962    (post 100)

=====================

73. Date: 31 Aug 20 - 07:29 PM   SONG OF THE WHEAT   (Paterson/Hallom)

74. Date: 01 Sep 20 - 07:08 PM   This one, relating to the red centre, is by a Scot.   SINGING LAND (Dougie Maclean)

75. Date: 01 Sep 20 - 07:21 PM   BAW BAW BIG BILL   (Terry Piper)

76. Date: 01 Sep 20 - 07:54 PM   HANGING ON FOR THE RAIN    (Anne Infante)

77. Date: 01 Sep 20 - 08:59 PM    FROM LITTLE THINGS BIG THINGS GROW    (Paul Kelly/Kev Carmody)

78. Date: 01 Sep 20 - 09:22 PM   NO MORE BOOMERANG   (Kath Walker)   Oodgeroo Noonuccal

79. Date: 02 Sep 20 - 08:25 PM    THIRTY TON LINE    (Don Henderson)

80. Date: 02 Sep 20 - 11:31 PM   RAKE AND A RAMBLING MAN    (Don Henderson)

81. Date: 03 Sep 20 - 08:44 PM    BONNIE JESS   (T.Spencer/G.Shearston)

82. Date: 03 Sep 20 - 08:59 PM    GIRLS IN OUR TOWN    (Bob Hudson)

83.   Date: 03 Sep 20 - 09:24 PM   NED KELLY'S FAREWELL TO GRETA    (Traditional)

84.   Date: 03 Sep 20 - 10:39 PM IRISH GIRLS (WILL STEAL YOUR HEART AWAY) (Gary Shearston)

85. Date: 04 Sep 20 - 07:50 PM THE KELLY'S TURNING   (Larry King)

86. Date: 04 Sep 20 - 08:29 PM    SONG OF THE SHEETMETAL WORKER   (John Dengate)

87. Date: 04 Sep 20 - 09:12 PM    DIAMENTINA DROVER   (Hugh McDonald)

88. Date: 04 Sep 20 - 09:40 PM   I WAS ONLY NINETEEN (A walk in the light green)   (John Schumann)

89. Date: 06 Sep 20 - 12:48 AM    COURTING THE NET    (Bob Wilson)

90.   Date: 06 Sep 20 - 08:20 PM    THE MAN WITH THE CONCERTINA    {Stewart/Rummery/Kevans)

91.   Date: 06 Sep 20 - 09:31 PM    THE GLENBURGH WOOL    (Jack Sorensen)

92. Date: 06 Sep 20 - 11:18 PM    JAIL AWAY FREMANTLE    (W.Evans/A.Ferguson)

93. Date: 07 Sep 20 - 10:50 PM    THE TOWN OF KIANDRA (THE WEE ONE)

94.   Date: 07 Sep 20 - 11:44 PM    HUMPING THE DRUM    (Steam Shuttle)

95 & 96. Date: 08 Sep 20 - 03:51 AM    Back of the Milky Way (Humping the Drum) - lyrics & audio Lyrics to Graham's songs, all with audio.
The Country Knows The Rest by Graham Seal with audio link.

97. Date: 08 Sep 20 - 08:18 PM    Enda Kenny's Earl Grey

98.   Date: 08 Sep 20 - 09:28 PM      THE SANDY HOLLOW LINE    (Duke Tritton)

99. Date: 08 Sep 20 - 09:49 PM    THE STREETS OF FORBES (THE DEATH OF BEN HALL)

100. Date: 08 Sep 20 - 10:39 PM   THE PUSH ON THE CORNER

101. Date: 08 Sep 20 - 11:26 PM    BOURKE STREET ON SATURDAY NIGHT    (P.C. Cole & Fred Hall)

102. Date: 09 Sep 20 - 12:54 AM   NORTHWARDS TO THE SHEDS    (W.Ogilvie/G.Hallom

103.   Date: 09 Sep 20 - 02:08 AM   Gurindji Blues Ted Egan

104.   Date: 09 Sep 20 - 02:38 AM    the bush girl    (henry lawson)

105. Date: 09 Sep 20 - 03:21 AM    YIL LULL ~ Joe Geia

106. Date: 09 Sep 20 - 04:19 AM    THE GREEN MAN ~ John Thompson

107. Date: 09 Sep 20 - 05:36 AM   DAVEY LOWSTON

108.   Date: 09 Sep 20 - 06:06 AM    COONAWARRA [HAS] THREE SHADOWS   ~ Judith Crossley (post 200)

=============

109. Date: 09 Sep 20 - 07:36 AM    FANNIE BAY ~ Doug & Andy Tainsh / and possibly David Charles

110.   Date: 09 Sep 20 - 08:00 AM    Miner’s Washing ~ John Warner

111.   Date: 09 Sep 20 - 08:26 AM    THE STATION COOK ~ trad Oz

112.   Date: 09 Sep 20 - 09:03 AM    NZ -   PACKING MY THINGS ~ Phil Colquhoun

113. Date: 09 Sep 20 - 08:53 PM   THE FREE SELECTOR'S DAUGHTER   (Lawson/Hallom)

114.   Date: 09 Sep 20 - 09:58 PM   THE FIZZER   (Gerry Hallom)

115.   Date: 09 Sep 20 - 10:13 PM    BOSS LADY   (Bob Sharp)

116. Date: 10 Sep 20 - 08:14 PM    THE BALLAD OF 1891    (H.Palmer/D.Jacobs)

117. Date: 10 Sep 20 - 08:45 PM    WALTJIM BAT MATILDA   (Ali Mills)

118.   Date: 11 Sep 20 - 12:27 AM    Little England    by late Kiwi-Quoinslander, Mark Gillet.

119. Date: 11 Sep 20 - 02:49 AM    THE DROVER'S BOY   ~   Ted Egan

120. Date: 11 Sep 20 - 03:05 AM   THE RUSTY FORD CORTINA ~ Mark Gillett

121. Date: 11 Sep 20 - 03:23 AM    BILL AND THE BEAR - John Thompson

122. Date: 11 Sep 20 - 04:23 AM    SUN ARISE ~ Rolf Harris & Harry Butler

123.   Date: 11 Sep 20 - 10:12 PM   Turning Steel (The Factory Lad) © Colin Dryden 1969

124.   Date: 11 Sep 20 - 10:26 PM       OCEAN LINER   (Barry Skipsey)

125.   Date: 11 Sep 20 - 10:45 PM    YUENDUMU FLAGON WAGON (Wendy Baarda/Bloodwood)

126. Date: 11 Sep 20 - 11:21 PM   "The Year of the Drum" ~ Wendy Joseph

127.   Date: 12 Sep 20 - 09:12 PM   Pass the Song Along ~ Bernard Carney.

128.   Date: 12 Sep 20 - 09:19 PM    KALGOORLIE PIPELINE ~ Alan Ferguson / trad Irish tune

129.   Date: 12 Sep 20 - 09:31 PM    THE DEATH OF BEN HALL

130.   Date: 12 Sep 20 - 09:49 PM    MATT SAVAGE: BOSS DROVER    (Ted Egan)

131. Date: 12 Sep 20 - 09:52 PM    WARATAH AND WATTLE ~ Frances Patterson (& Henry Lawson)

132. Date: 12 Sep 20 - 11:35 PM    ADELAIDE RIVER    (V.McGinness/J.McGinness)

133.   Date: 13 Sep 20 - 02:49 AM    RANGITIKI   [© BOB WILSON 2014]

134.   Date: 13 Sep 20 - 05:14 AM    GREEN AMONG THE GOLD ~ Steve Barnes

135. Date: 13 Sep 20 - 07:37 AM    ORE TRAIN BLUES   © BOB WILSON 2013

136. Date: 13 Sep 20 - 08:52 PM    PIONEERS    (F.Ophel/R.Rummery)

137. Date: 13 Sep 20 - 09:50 PM    THUNDERBOLT'S DREAM   (Trad/Anon)

138.   Date: 13 Sep 20 - 10:07 PM    NEW GUINEA CAMPAIGN    (Mudie/Rummery)

139.   Date: 14 Sep 20 - 08:52 PM   As sung by Martyn Wyndham- Read.   TOMAHAWKING FRED

140. Date: 14 Sep 20 - 09:43 PM    FREEDOM ON THE WALLABY    (Henry Lawson)

141.   Date: 14 Sep 20 - 10:16 PM    THE SHEARERS    (H.Lawson/R.Rummery) (post 200)

===============

142.   Date: 15 Sep 20 - 03:59 AM    WARRANDYTE MORNING ~ Mark Leehy (PARADIDDLE)

143.    Date: 15 Sep 20 - 04:04 AM   Bring Out The Banners    ©1997 John Warner

144.   Date: 15 Sep 20 - 04:08 AM    The Miner’s Way ~ Sally Harris (Gone Molly)


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 15 Sep 20 - 04:08 AM

The Miner’s Way ~ Sally Harris (Gone Molly)

Cold tunnels, black as night
That’s The Miner’s Way
Toiling by the candlelight
Half a shilling in my pay.

Pick and hammer, wedge and wheel
That’s The Miner’s Way
Blackened lungs that never heal.
Half a shilling in my pay.

        Born to the yoke of misery
        Not enough to feed our families,
        While the rich are counting out their pounds
        We must send our children underground.

Working for the rich man’s purse
That’s The Miner’s Way
Poverty, the worker’s curse
Half a shilling in my pay.

12 long hours in the deep
That’s The Miner’s Way
Still we face a famished sleep
Half a shilling in my pay.

         Born to the yoke of misery
        Not enough to feed our families,
        While the rich are counting out their pounds
        We must send our children underground.

When the land no wealth reveals
That’s The Miner’s Way
Parting wages bankers steal
Half a shilling in my pay.

Cast out like a deadly blight
That’s The Miner’s Way
Lords and Ladies dance tonight
That’s the bloody miner’s way,
That’s the bloody miner’s way,
That’s ….. The Miner’s Way.


Gone Molly were a delightful duo (singer-songwriter Sally Harris and Rebecca Wright on cello and vocals) and are now a delightful trio with the addition of Lachlan Baldwin on vocals and multi instruments.
Sally’s songs often have that quality of making you wonder if it’s traditional :) and are also often great for singing along with!

Listen here : https://gonemolly.bandcamp.com/track/the-miners-way They have a CD and an EP so far.

Cheers, R-J


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