mudcat.org: Foul-mouthed Folkies
Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafeawe

Post to this Thread - Printer Friendly - Home
Page: [1] [2] [3]


Foul-mouthed Folkies

John MacKenzie 08 Jun 20 - 11:39 AM
Jim Carroll 08 Jun 20 - 08:09 AM
GUEST,akenaton 08 Jun 20 - 07:47 AM
Joe_F 07 Jun 20 - 05:45 PM
GUEST,GuestTF 06 Jun 20 - 10:50 AM
GUEST,Some bloke 04 Jun 20 - 12:00 PM
The Sandman 03 Jun 20 - 02:29 PM
Jim Carroll 03 Jun 20 - 08:30 AM
The Sandman 03 Jun 20 - 06:25 AM
GUEST,kenny 03 Jun 20 - 05:29 AM
Jim Carroll 03 Jun 20 - 04:16 AM
The Sandman 03 Jun 20 - 03:36 AM
GUEST,Starship 02 Jun 20 - 05:34 PM
Paul Reade 02 Jun 20 - 05:25 PM
Jim Carroll 02 Jun 20 - 04:05 PM
GUEST,Kenny B(Inactive) 02 Jun 20 - 02:13 PM
GUEST,Hootenanny 02 Jun 20 - 02:02 PM
GUEST,akenaton 02 Jun 20 - 02:02 PM
GUEST,akenaton 02 Jun 20 - 01:57 PM
GUEST,Starship 02 Jun 20 - 11:40 AM
Jim Carroll 02 Jun 20 - 11:34 AM
GUEST,Hootenanny 02 Jun 20 - 10:16 AM
GUEST,Kenny B(Inactive) 02 Jun 20 - 10:05 AM
GUEST,akenaton 02 Jun 20 - 06:34 AM
Jim Carroll 02 Jun 20 - 05:52 AM
GUEST,Hootenanny 02 Jun 20 - 05:07 AM
Jim Carroll 02 Jun 20 - 04:29 AM
GUEST,akenaton 02 Jun 20 - 04:15 AM
Jim Carroll 02 Jun 20 - 03:29 AM
Tattie Bogle 01 Jun 20 - 01:42 PM
Jim Carroll 01 Jun 20 - 10:48 AM
GUEST,big al whittle 01 Jun 20 - 10:39 AM
Tattie Bogle 01 Jun 20 - 10:02 AM
Jim Carroll 01 Jun 20 - 09:16 AM
Tattie Bogle 01 Jun 20 - 08:53 AM
Jim Carroll 01 Jun 20 - 08:17 AM
GUEST,Hootenanny 01 Jun 20 - 08:09 AM
r.padgett 01 Jun 20 - 07:57 AM
Jim Carroll 01 Jun 20 - 03:31 AM
GUEST,akenaton 31 May 20 - 11:20 AM
Gordon Jackson 31 May 20 - 11:11 AM
Tattie Bogle 31 May 20 - 11:10 AM
Jim Carroll 31 May 20 - 10:56 AM
GUEST,akenaton 31 May 20 - 10:45 AM
GUEST,Gaffer 31 May 20 - 09:45 AM
Jim Carroll 31 May 20 - 05:34 AM
Gordon Jackson 31 May 20 - 05:08 AM
GUEST,akenaton 31 May 20 - 04:47 AM
GUEST,Hootenanny 31 May 20 - 04:03 AM
Jim Carroll 31 May 20 - 04:03 AM
Share Thread
more
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:






Subject: RE: Foul-mouthed Folkies
From: John MacKenzie
Date: 08 Jun 20 - 11:39 AM

In about 1960 I heard Peggy Seeger swearing in the Green Room at Hamilton Folk Club, in the days when Tommy Kearney used to run it. Now I was brought up around men who used swear words like punctuation, but women swearing was a different thing, it wasn't common, but the women who did it were considered to be so. It put me off Peggy, and to this day, I still hate to hear women curse and swear, just a bit old fashioned I suppose. Last time I worked in an office which was about 13 years ago, the girls in there were just as bad as the men for swearing, I hated it.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Foul-mouthed Folkies
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 08 Jun 20 - 08:09 AM

" but "Darkie" was not considered abusive in these days, "
Not in certain quarters but generally it has always been regarded as abusive when applied to the colour of people's skin
It had a wider use, of course
Jim


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Foul-mouthed Folkies
From: GUEST,akenaton
Date: 08 Jun 20 - 07:47 AM

Well Guest TF, Hamish had a few versions of that parody, I definitely heard both mentioned, the former being in the days of the American occupation of Holy Loch an occupation which Hamish was very much against. Perhaps you did not know him back then, but "Darkie" was not considered abusive in these days, whereas the use of "black" to describe African American negros certainly was! I never saw anybody take offence at anything Hamish sang he was such a big hearted character.
Maybe present day navvies might object to being thought of as mindless oafs?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Foul-mouthed Folkies
From: Joe_F
Date: 07 Jun 20 - 05:45 PM

"Vulgarity is the garlic in the salad of taste."


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Foul-mouthed Folkies
From: GUEST,GuestTF
Date: 06 Jun 20 - 10:50 AM

Akenaton, I worked with Hamish a lot. That parody of 'Black Velvet Band' finished with 'Held up by a big navvy's haun'. I never heard him say 'darkie's'.
As an aside I also did a couple of performances of 'The Merry Muses' with Fred freeman. Bit difficult to avoid swearies in that.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Foul-mouthed Folkies
From: GUEST,Some bloke
Date: 04 Jun 20 - 12:00 PM

I think twice before swearing in a sing around. On stage, it is a tool that when used appropriately and seldom, can be most effective.

At home I'm a foul mouthed fucker though....


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Foul-mouthed Folkies
From: The Sandman
Date: 03 Jun 20 - 02:29 PM

What did Francis Drake drake say to the Doctor , I could do with a Daffy Duck.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Foul-mouthed Folkies
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 03 Jun 20 - 08:30 AM

"I just thought it was a go(o)d one liner"
It was Dick, Shaw was renowned for them, but it needs to be remembered he wasn't always serious
Jim


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Foul-mouthed Folkies
From: The Sandman
Date: 03 Jun 20 - 06:25 AM

I just thought it was a god one liner


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Foul-mouthed Folkies
From: GUEST,kenny
Date: 03 Jun 20 - 05:29 AM

"Starship" mentioned Latin, which I did for a year at secondary school. I got into trouble once when I was asked to translate into Latin "They lead" - ( "third-person plural present active indicative)*"
[ * - I had to look this up to check ]


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Foul-mouthed Folkies
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 03 Jun 20 - 04:16 AM

"Foul language is the prerogative of   a Bird Brain, Dick Miles 2020"
Wouldn't say you were a bird-brain Dick, but I don't agree with you
You do realise ou are saying the opposite of Shaw, don't you
Paul Reade hits te nail square on the head - gratuitous swearing is useful words being wasted by being used badly

Some vintage 'filth' from THE master of the art, John Wilmot, Earl of Rochester - well worth digging out to see how 'bad language' can be used to cover every subject, including politics

From 'The Mock Song [1680]

Were all my body larded o'r
With das of love so thick,
That you might find in every pore
A well-stuck standing prick,
Whilst yet my eyes alone were free,
My heart would never doubt.
In amorous rage and ecstasy, *
To wish those eyes, to wish those eyes fucked out.”

On Cary Frazier" [?1677]
Cary Frazier, Maid of Honor to Queen Catherine and a celebrated beauty of the Court of Charles II, was the daughter of Sir Alexander Frazier, the King’s principal physician. Her mother was one of the Queen’s Dressers.

Her father gave her dildoes six
Her mother made ’em up a score
But she loves nought but living pricks,
And swears by God she’ll frig no more.

On 'Mrs. Willis (Sept 1680 [Uncertain]

Against the charms our ballocks have
How weak all human skill is,
Since they can make a man a slave
To such a bitch as Willis

Jim


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Foul-mouthed Folkies
From: The Sandman
Date: 03 Jun 20 - 03:36 AM

Obscenity is whatever happens to shock some elderly and ignorant magistrate.

— Bertrand Russell, 1872-1970, British philosopher
?
George Bernard Shaw        Vulgarity is a necessary part of a complete author's equipment; and the clown is sometimes the best part of the circus.

— George Bernard Shaw, 1856-1950, Irish writer, Nobel 1925

Foul language is the prerogative of   a Bird Brain, Dick Miles 2020


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Foul-mouthed Folkies
From: GUEST,Starship
Date: 02 Jun 20 - 05:34 PM

I think they resort to Latin et irrumabo eruit.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Foul-mouthed Folkies
From: Paul Reade
Date: 02 Jun 20 - 05:25 PM

I think this is an age thing. The bus I used to get to work every morning was full of school children, probably 6th formers, and the language, from both boys and girls, was full of "f*****g", c**t etc.- just seemed part of their normal speech.

The thing that puzzled me was … what on earth do they say if they want to swear?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Foul-mouthed Folkies
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 02 Jun 20 - 04:05 PM

It becomes pointless whan people decide to be judge, jury and executioner to a laughably developed to serve the funtion of ordinary people and refuse to justify why
Mary Whitehouse would have married you pair and had your babies without a second thought
Jim Carroll


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Foul-mouthed Folkies
From: GUEST,Kenny B(Inactive)
Date: 02 Jun 20 - 02:13 PM

To add a source of humour for those who like that sort of thing

Im sorry I hav'nt a Clue BBC Radio Programme

Old words Redefined ….. worth waiting for


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Foul-mouthed Folkies
From: GUEST,Hootenanny
Date: 02 Jun 20 - 02:02 PM

Never met Jimmy Reid, did he not become Labour party MP? but did know his wife and sister-in-law, used to give them bookings.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Foul-mouthed Folkies
From: GUEST,akenaton
Date: 02 Jun 20 - 02:02 PM

I suspect Burns in the Merry Muses was employing much the same tactics as the so called comedians and entertainers of the 21st century.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Foul-mouthed Folkies
From: GUEST,akenaton
Date: 02 Jun 20 - 01:57 PM

Yes Starship, but most words have a specific meaning especially when applied to material things, or actions. There are a whole list of words which have had their meaning changed to serve a political purpose over the last twenty years. My point regarding music, poetry and the performing arts is that specific words describing femininity, the sexual act, and people who through no fault of their own find themselves fatherless, are being used by performers either to create a shock effect or as terms of vicious abuse. Using these words in such a manner is insulting in the extreme.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Foul-mouthed Folkies
From: GUEST,Starship
Date: 02 Jun 20 - 11:40 AM

If people don't think words have specific meaning, or only meanings they alone understand, then good luck ordering from a takeaway.

' “When I use a word,’ Humpty Dumpty said in rather a scornful tone, ‘it means just what I choose it to mean — neither more nor less.’

’The question is,’ said Alice, ‘whether you can make words mean so many different things.’

’The question is,’ said Humpty Dumpty, ‘which is to be master — that’s all.” '


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Foul-mouthed Folkies
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 02 Jun 20 - 11:34 AM

"I just found the singing laughable."
I'm sure you did Hoot - I would have been disappointed if you liked it
Can't make out why it's still available 60 odd years after it was made and half that long since the death of the singer - nowt as queer as folk eh?
" "keepin a civil tongue in their heids"
Mustst be a different crowd than those I worked with on the Liverpool docks
I spent a great deal of drinking time with an Glaswegian ex-shipyard worker named Jimmy Reid at one time he was a bit of a 'barrack-room lawyer' who would't bare his bum for the bosses and he told a mean dirty joke   
Takes all sorts
Jim


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Foul-mouthed Folkies
From: GUEST,Hootenanny
Date: 02 Jun 20 - 10:16 AM

Jim,

I clicked on the link in your posting. Have to admit that I couldn't listen all the way through. I just found the singing laughable.

Different strokes for different folks.

Read your last line above. Does that statement make sense?

As for having to repeat things it might help if you didn't insist on always putting down observations made by people who were regularly in the presence of E & P in the late fifties early sixties before the existence of the Singers Club. AND before your involvement.

Wishing you a happy lock down.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Foul-mouthed Folkies
From: GUEST,Kenny B(Inactive)
Date: 02 Jun 20 - 10:05 AM

Ake
A succinct and balanced comment

The people who worked, and still do, in the shipyards and building trades in Scotland are certainly respected for "keepin a civil tongue in their heids" rather than the foul mouthed "would be" bully boys and barrack room lawyers. From personal experience it is the same in all parts of the British Isles and further abroad.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Foul-mouthed Folkies
From: GUEST,akenaton
Date: 02 Jun 20 - 06:34 AM

I suspect that I am much closer to my working class roots than you are Jim, being still "on the tools" and mixing with large numbers of building trade operatives on a daily basis.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Foul-mouthed Folkies
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 02 Jun 20 - 05:52 AM

"singing songs from their own culture in their own language?
Wrong again on all counts
Peggy reacted in exactly the same way to an East end lad trying to sound like black chain gang convict as Alan Lomax did when he turned up and heard Ewan and Bert trying to sound like Woodie and Big Bill - he demanded to know what they were doing about their own beautiful repertoire of native songs
Ewan and Bert took it seriously and the revival flourished as did our understanding and enjoyment of our native cultures despite the Joanie clones and Bobby bleaters
The policy was never an expectation for anybody other than Singers club members - it was formally accepted by the Audience Committee - thank Christ it was otherwise we'd be inundated by mid Atlantic accents
It was never a case of regional accents - I sing songs from Sunderland to East Sussex - even from Scotland and Ireland when I can Anglicise them,   as did Ewan, Carthy - and every revival singer I knew
Peggy sang in a 'neutral American' accent' - she still does with her traditional material

What on earth is hypocritical about that ?
This has no lace here and should stop now, but I hpe these ostings are left intact to save me the trouble of having to repeat them AGAIN
Jim


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Foul-mouthed Folkies
From: GUEST,Hootenanny
Date: 02 Jun 20 - 05:07 AM

No I am not looking for an argument but is this an example of singers singing songs from their own culture in their own language?

Bearing in mind Peggy's reaction to a Londoner's attempt to sing a song from the American South many years back I wonder how she could do this with a straight face.

Is that the hypocrisy that you refer to Jim?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Foul-mouthed Folkies
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 02 Jun 20 - 04:29 AM

You have no idea whether or not it is diminishing Ake - there are no reports of this or maybe you can link us to some
Our personal experience of it is no guide - it's is now generally used on respectable and widely viewed programmes like Q.I. and 'Have I Got News For You - sometimes with a bleep, sometimes not, but like the 'Little People' in Ireland, "they're there just the same"
We are now experiencing a blast of fresh air running through everyday things that were once taboo - it becomes part of progress
A SONG FROM THE DARK DAYS when hypocrisy ruled OK
Jim


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Foul-mouthed Folkies
From: GUEST,akenaton
Date: 02 Jun 20 - 04:15 AM

I think Tattie Bogle is quite correct. The words themselves are perfectly valid......the trouble arises when these words are used as terms of abuse or as Tattie pointed out as shock tactics by some on stage performers.   Jim speculates that these words are in every day usage among working class people, but thankfully that usage is diminishing, but in so called modern comedy the misuse of language is increasing alarmingly.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Foul-mouthed Folkies
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 02 Jun 20 - 03:29 AM

I meant to reply to this last but retied from the garden one of the walking wounded
"banter"
To a degree, this has always been been a part of some performers performance - (others chose to chuck-up over the front row of the audience) - I never remember foul-mouthedness, but bawdy innuendo is part of out traditions
What did disturb me was when the clubs became refuges for fourth rate would-be comedians not good enough to make in on the Working-mans club scene - robust (I refuse to call dictionary-based words that have been part of our vocabulary, "foul") language became a part of this, but, after 'Lady Chatterly' that was general - the language was out in the open, whereas, previously society had driven it underground
You only need to look into what was happening in real life in stiff-necked Victorian Society where socail reformers were using the children they were 'saving' prostitutes and to condemn a child to the care of the church was to plunge him or hear into a woerld of institutionalised violence and debauchery - that continued until it was finally exposed in the latter half of the twentieth century and is not yet fully understood

I served the first five years of my working life on the Liverpool docks, where such language was almost obligatory if you ere to be fully accepted; I wouldn't use it at home because my parents had been conditioned by the church not to use it, but they were both aawre of it and both, in their different ways, even respected
My mother was a gentle, humourous and totally inoffensive woman who, when you asked what was for dinner, would reply when under pressure, "Cow's cock and hairy bacon"
When I took my first teetering steps as a singer she heard me practicing and said, "If you were singing for shit, you would't get the smell of it" (she lived long enough (just) to quite like it and come out to listen to me)
My dad adored and even studied the rich variation of our language (he was a navvy who spent his life where the air was permanently blue)
It was he who pointed out the meaning and significance of 'Ophelia's "nothing"'

This 'foul' language is a part of what we are and where we have been - I believe it only becomes 'bad' when it is used unnecessarily gratuitously, or when it is used to insult and demean - 'shocking' people is part of our culture, particularly through humour (It's well worth reading what Gershon Legman had to say about it - or working your way through he two Vance Randolph books)

That it is 'always with us' was driven home to me one night in our local pub in Kirkby (Liverpool) when I sat near to a middle-aged couple of regulars - usually quiet and reserved - and particularly 'well-spoken'
They were quietly having a blazind domestic row under their breaths, when suddenly she said audibly enough for everyone to hear, "All you ever think of is your belly and what hangs under it" - I don't think you can beat that as a put-down
Jim


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Foul-mouthed Folkies
From: Tattie Bogle
Date: 01 Jun 20 - 01:42 PM

No, I don't have a problem with people singing these songs per se, or per anything. That's as they were written.
But going back to the original remit of the thread, I see no place for liberally peppering on-stage "banter" with multiple Fs or Cs. That's what I meant by "lazy".


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Foul-mouthed Folkies
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 01 Jun 20 - 10:48 AM

"My Jo" but they would be unlikely to be sung in the middle of an average folk club night"
That may be true - I believe it to be a pity if it is
WE hared it regularly because Ewan sang it whenever he felt like it - I can never remember anybody protesting or walking out in disgust - but The Singers' was a serious folk club and recognised as such, which is why we ot loads of young students from he States I'm not suggesting for a minute that singers should nip down to their local Care Home to entertain the residents with these songs but I do belive we should ask ourselves is it us or them that have the problems
I'e told the story far too often, but I remember being told by Ewan how, when he first sang long ballads in public he worried about "putting the audience off"
He used to sing 'Gil Morris in two halved until an irate regular told him, "it's like waiting for the other shoe to drop"
It transpired he was far more worried about long ballads than they were
Jim


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Foul-mouthed Folkies
From: GUEST,big al whittle
Date: 01 Jun 20 - 10:39 AM

last week i had this idea about a George Formby that didn't bugger about with double entendres.


https://soundcloud.com/denise_whittle/sam-sam-the-lavatory-man


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Foul-mouthed Folkies
From: Tattie Bogle
Date: 01 Jun 20 - 10:02 AM

Scots by birth and country I've lived in for over 30 years, but spent the other half of my life in England, Jim.
I do need a haircut, but then so does most of the population since lockdown! (If they still have hair to cut!)

I'm a big fan of Burns' poetry and song, and have heard seen and heard at least some of the Merry Muses performed. No, I wouldn't find that poem offensive, nor the other alternative version of "John Anderson, My Jo" but they would be unlikely to be sung in the middle of an average folk club night: more likely reserved for the Burns season (which here goes on for about 6 weeks from soon after Hogmanay until near end of February!)
My husband belongs to a couple of all-male Burns clubs, where such songs maybe get more of a regular airing than they do in mixed company, although I have several female friends who sing that other John Anderson with great relish! Not one I do myself, but not for any prudish reasons - just that I know others do it better.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Foul-mouthed Folkies
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 01 Jun 20 - 09:16 AM

I assume you're a scot from your chosen identy Tattie (could be wrong - maybe you have trouble finding a good hairdresser (-: )
I I put Burns's ' 'Wad You do That' up earlier - do you find that offensive?
Jim


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Foul-mouthed Folkies
From: Tattie Bogle
Date: 01 Jun 20 - 08:53 AM

Well that song is indeed bawdy, but manages to make its point without any Fs or Cs, but plenty of innuendo.
I think Brian Peters also has a version which has only 6 nights in it (the 7th left to the imagination??)

I was going to mention "bugger" earlier on: I was told it was a swear word when I was a kid and not to use it, but then, that it was a term of endearment in Norfolk and other areas - as in "ee's a roight good ol' bugger". And then there's the other meaning...


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Foul-mouthed Folkies
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 01 Jun 20 - 08:17 AM

"Above seems to have a "7 Drunken nights" connection, no doubt!"
I's a Lancashire version from Beckett Whitehead, presumably sat on by the BBC
It came from a file in Ewan and Peggy's home that were remembered to have been collected by Ewan and Joan Littlewood in the 1940s for a programme entitled 'The Song Hunters' - I wouldn't think the BBC allowed it's use, there are no recordings of te Programme existing
Jim


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Foul-mouthed Folkies
From: GUEST,Hootenanny
Date: 01 Jun 20 - 08:09 AM

Well,

that connection must have taken a lot of working out.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Foul-mouthed Folkies
From: r.padgett
Date: 01 Jun 20 - 07:57 AM

Above seems to have a "7 Drunken nights" connection, no doubt!

Ray


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Foul-mouthed Folkies
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 01 Jun 20 - 03:31 AM

"I just think it's very lazy speech,"
On the contrary - it is extremely - sometimes too robust
The beauty of out languages is their richness and scope, ranging from strongly the 'in your face' unsubtlty of songs, from:

Th'owd chap came ower t' bank, bawling for his tea,
Saw a pair o' mucky clogs where his owd clogs should be,
Come here wife, come here wife, what's this here! see?
How come this mucky pair o' clogs where my owd clogs should be?
Y'owd bugger, ye daft bugger, can't you plainly see?
Them's just a couple of pickle-jars me owd mam sent to me,
I've been ower hills and dales, me lass,
And many a grassy moor,
But girt hob-nails on a pickle-jar I've never seen before

Th'owd chap came ower t' bank, bawling for his tea,
Saw a coat on back o' t' door, where his owd coat should be,
Come here wife, come here wife, what's this here I see?
How come this coat on t’ back o' tf door, where my owd coat should be?
Y'owd bugger, ye daft bugger, can't you plainly see?
That's just an owd dish-clout me old mam sent to me.
I've Been Ower Hills And Dales, Me Lass,
And Many A Grassy Moor,
But Buttons On A Dish-Clout I've Never Seen Before.

Th'owd chap came ower t' bank, bawling for his tea,
Saw a head on t' pillow where his owd head should be,
Come here wife, come here wife, what’s this here I see?
How come this head on t' pillow, where my owd head shoald be?
Y’owd bugger, ye daft bugger, can't you plainly see?
That's just a home-grown turnip me owd mam sent to me.
I've been ower hills and dales, me lass,
And many a grassy moor,
But girt big teeth in a turnip I've neves seen before.

Th'owd chap came ower t' bank, bawling for his tea,
Saw a pair of hairy cods where his own cods shoald be.
Come here wife, come here wife, what's this here I see?
How come this pair of hairy cods where my own cods shoald be ?
Y”owd bugger, ye daft bugger, can’t yoa plainly see?
That's just a couple of home-grown spuds me owd mam sent to me.
I've been ower hills and dales, me lass,
And many a grassy moor,
But home-grown spuds with hairs on
I've never seen before.

Th' owd chap came ower t' bank, bawling for his tea,
Saw a girt big standing prick where his owd prick should be,
Come here wife, come here wife, what’s this here I see?
How come this girt big standing prick where my owd prick should be?
Y'owd bugger, ye daft bugger, can't you plainly see?
That's just a home-grown carrot me owd mam sent to me.
I've been ower hills and dales, me lass,
And many a grassy moor,
But a carrot diggin' a great big hole I’ve never seen before.

....to Ophelia's "nothing" (between her legs)
Both are considered obscene to some - I think they have their own strengths and beauty, while at the same time being precise and very visual
Much of our folk vernacular is based on the ability to shock - particularly its narrative humour

Irish society was strictly controlled up to comparatively recently thanks to the influence of The Church (now very much weakened by the revelations of widespread child rape covered up, probably for well over a century, by the hierarchy)
It is refreshing to see changes we believed would never come about
Shortly after we moved here over 20 years ago we went to see a short film (now, in my opinion, regarded a classic)
It ran for about ten minutes and was totally silent, it depicted a schoolteacher entering a classroom to find someone had scrawled on the board; "MR CASEY IS A CNUT"
Furously he searches out the culprit and when he discovers the culprit, drags him to the front of the class and forces him to write the sentence over and over again in the hope the child gets the spelling right - he fails to
I despair, the teacher grabs the chalk, cleans off what the child has written and scrawls in high letters, "MR CASEY IS A CUNT" - just as the Mother Superior headmistress of the school walks though the door - the nun collapses in horror
That, for me, is bawdy humour at its very best
Jim


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Foul-mouthed Folkies
From: GUEST,akenaton
Date: 31 May 20 - 11:20 AM

Sorry Gordon, getting my Steves and Gordons all mixed up...don't know if my arsehole's punched or bored now!    Nicely put Sir, and I didn't mean to imply that you were at all inadequate.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Foul-mouthed Folkies
From: Gordon Jackson
Date: 31 May 20 - 11:11 AM

I don't think you are intellectually inadequate, Akenaton. Therefore I think you are being provocatively disingenuous. As I'm sure you're aware, words change their meanings over time. Calling someone a 'fucking cunt' is not (usually) a sexual reference, but simply an insult, devoid of semantic content. Calling someone a 'bastard' is not (usually) a reference to a person's immediate lineage, but is simply a word to stress that that person is not particularly nice. And to get back on topic, I wouldn't dream of using those words in a folk club, but have no problem using them in an ad hoc discussion on sociolinguistics. That being said, I'm rather bored with this now, so I'm out.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Foul-mouthed Folkies
From: Tattie Bogle
Date: 31 May 20 - 11:10 AM

I just think it's very lazy speech, when there are so many good expressive alternative words about that are perhaps not classed as offensive or foul-mouthed. That's not so say that I never swear, or that the occasional use is never justified, but "bad language" has become over-used.
As for using it in folk clubs:no good reason for it: a witty put-down of an over-vociferous heckler is far more effective at silencing him/her (oh yes, there are "hers" too!) Long live the art of repartee!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Foul-mouthed Folkies
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 31 May 20 - 10:56 AM

THis will continue to go in circles until someone explains why objecting to perfectly usable, centuries old slang and vernacular words is no more than a matte of personal prejudice
Burn all the slang dictionaries I say
In my experience, people who climb on high-horses such as this are the first to scream "personal infringement of free speech' if someone suggests they tone down their language on issues such as race or religion- we have been cloe to several in the last couple of days
Jim


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Foul-mouthed Folkies
From: GUEST,akenaton
Date: 31 May 20 - 10:45 AM

I disagree Steve, what have a woman's vagina, a person born to unmarried parents, or the sex act, to do with responses to a robber a bully, or a conservative?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Foul-mouthed Folkies
From: GUEST,Gaffer
Date: 31 May 20 - 09:45 AM

When Conwy Folk Club started in the late nineties is was on a ship moored in the harbour, known as "The Frigate", prompting the question: "Whose idea was it to have a friggin' folk club in a folkin' frigate?"
Would that qualify?
Gaff


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Foul-mouthed Folkies
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 31 May 20 - 05:34 AM

"bastard" like "lunatic" "knacker" and even "n****r" were once just descriptive words - their replacement by better terms has made made of them unacceptable
C***, fuck, shit, bollocks etc are slang words - now to be found in the New Penguin Dictionary of Slang'
None of these words are offensive when used inoffensively - that is in the mind of the would-be censor - it is the intention behind them that makes them unacceptable
There was a time up to bery recently when contraceptives and women's sanitary protection could not be discussed publicly - specially here in 'Holy Ireland' - now they are commonplace, no matter what the Mrs Grundys of this world think
Gordon is spot on
Jim


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Foul-mouthed Folkies
From: Gordon Jackson
Date: 31 May 20 - 05:08 AM

If I'm performing in a folk club and some calls out for Dirty Old Town, I will politely refuse, rather than shout back 'Fuck off, you cunt!

If the same person or another person stopped me in the street and demanded money, I may well say 'Fuck off, you cunt'.

Words are definitely not just words; they have multiple meanings, nuances and contexts.

On the other hand, I don't think saying 'Fuck off, you cunt' to an attacker betrays any intellectual inadequacy on my part.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Foul-mouthed Folkies
From: GUEST,akenaton
Date: 31 May 20 - 04:47 AM

"C*** used offesively is not offensive in its meaning, comparing women to their sexual parts is
Words are just words - no-one should have the right to judge them
Jim "

That is nonsensical ...Jim   the words are used by intellectual inadequates as terms of abuse. Leaving aside the misogyny, bastard is used often in folk song, especially parody or contemporary folk, usually in reference to perceived political failings.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Foul-mouthed Folkies
From: GUEST,Hootenanny
Date: 31 May 20 - 04:03 AM

I think that is Bow Locks which are well within the sound of one set of Bow Bells.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Foul-mouthed Folkies
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 31 May 20 - 04:03 AM

Cursing is perfectly acceptable in most societies by us 'lower orders' - lie sex, those who don't understand or get enough of the basic needs of life (like sex) - show their resentment by outlawing them
Offending women say is offensive, no matter what language is used
C*** used offesively is not offensive in its meaning, comparing women to their sexual parts is
Words are just words - no-one should have the right to judge them
Jim


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate
Next Page

  Share Thread:
More...

Reply to Thread
Subject:  Help
From:
Preview   Automatic Linebreaks   Make a link ("blue clicky")


Mudcat time: 15 August 2:38 AM EDT

[ Home ]

All original material is copyright © 1998 by the Mudcat Café Music Foundation, Inc. All photos, music, images, etc. are copyright © by their rightful owners. Every effort is taken to attribute appropriate copyright to images, content, music, etc. We are not a copyright resource.