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Tech: Seeking advice: Home Recording Studio

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Margo 03 Jan 00 - 04:53 PM
Rick Fielding 03 Jan 00 - 05:54 PM
WyoWoman 03 Jan 00 - 06:32 PM
Barry Finn 03 Jan 00 - 07:28 PM
Richard Bridge 03 Jan 00 - 08:18 PM
bseed(charleskratz) 03 Jan 00 - 08:48 PM
Margo 04 Jan 00 - 03:17 PM
Michael K. 04 Jan 00 - 04:37 PM
Richard Bridge 04 Jan 00 - 05:37 PM
Margo 04 Jan 00 - 05:47 PM
Margo 04 Jan 00 - 06:11 PM
Richard Bridge 04 Jan 00 - 06:34 PM
MK 04 Jan 00 - 07:49 PM
Margo 05 Jan 00 - 03:07 PM
AllisonA(Animaterra) 03 Mar 00 - 12:48 PM
wysiwyg 03 Mar 00 - 07:22 PM
Ana 04 Mar 00 - 05:56 PM
AllisonA(Animaterra) 05 Mar 00 - 10:42 AM
GUEST,Neil Lowe 06 Mar 00 - 08:02 AM
Amos 06 Mar 00 - 01:42 PM
GUEST,paul 25 Sep 00 - 05:22 PM
bigchuck 25 Sep 00 - 06:36 PM
Eric the Viking 26 Sep 00 - 01:23 PM
Bert 26 Sep 00 - 01:59 PM
mousethief 26 Sep 00 - 03:09 PM
Eric the Viking 26 Sep 00 - 03:15 PM
IanS 27 Sep 00 - 09:41 AM
Brendy 27 Sep 00 - 02:47 PM
Kara 27 Sep 00 - 04:43 PM
IanS 28 Sep 00 - 07:23 PM
Brendy 29 Sep 00 - 03:01 AM
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Subject: Seeking advice: Home Recording Studio
From: Margo
Date: 03 Jan 00 - 04:53 PM

I am going to be able to dedicate a room in our house to use for recording! I will be getting the equipment in April most likely. Until then, I need to find out what to do with the room, (soundproofing etc.). Perhaps some of you can recommend a book or two about the subject? Your help is appreciated, Margo


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Subject: RE: Seeking advice: Home Recording Studio
From: Rick Fielding
Date: 03 Jan 00 - 05:54 PM

You'll have a ball Margo! How hi-tech do you plan to get, recording-wise? It'll help us with suggestions, if we know what directions you're going.

Rick


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Subject: RE: Seeking advice: Home Recording Studio
From: WyoWoman
Date: 03 Jan 00 - 06:32 PM

Can we all come to your house to cut our demos?

WW


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Subject: RE: Seeking advice: Home Recording Studio
From: Barry Finn
Date: 03 Jan 00 - 07:28 PM

Don't decorate the walls with sea horses & ships on a light blue backround, all us kids will wanna come over & play. Sorry I have nothing better than offbeat humor to offer & my wishes of best luck to you. Have a hell of a time. Barry


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Subject: RE: Seeking advice: Home Recording Studio
From: Richard Bridge
Date: 03 Jan 00 - 08:18 PM

The most fundamental question is whether you are going to record one by one to a click track (the way virtually all commercial records are cut) or if you are going to try to record in a "live" situation (perhaps with the bass guitar in a separate room with headphones on), if so what you are going to do with a full drum kit (verrrrry loud!!!) to try to get any sort of separation and whether you are going to use "live " vocals as a guide track and then overdub or doubletrack.

It affects the size of the room a lot!

Oh by the way Mackie have just announced a very pretty virtual 24-track sampling at up to 96 for a mere £4000 in the UK.


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Subject: RE: Seeking advice: Home Recording Studio
From: bseed(charleskratz)
Date: 03 Jan 00 - 08:48 PM

I suspect Margo might find that a bit steep: but a way that is useful is probably a minidisk recorder--there was a discussion of this on Harp Talk (harmonica, that is), and a basic system can be put together including either a component minidisk recorder with an inexpensive mixer and four mikes for say four hundred up--and the four hundred buck outfit might allow you to make decent sounding CD's in a room with decent accoustics: carpeted, curtained, etc., to cut down on echo. Balancing could be done through earphones off the mixer--even a cheap minidisk recorder is capable of recording sound equivalent to MP-3 files: about all the music you normally hear, without tape hiss. And hooked to your computer you can record additional tracks. The medium, the 75 minute disks, are themselves much less expensive than recording quality tapes, or even good dubbing quality tapes (I've seen twenty for about 25 bucks). And if you have a CD-R or CD-RW drive, you can download your music for play on a regular CD system. Assuming you already have a sound-capable computer, adding the CD-RW drive takes you to the finished product for another couple hundred bucks (Costco has a CD-RW available for that price).

--seed


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Subject: RE: Seeking advice: Home Recording Studio
From: Margo
Date: 04 Jan 00 - 03:17 PM

Thanks guys! I've decided to record to hard drive. Yes, I'll use a guide track and then overdub. I have to record in tracks because I can't sing and play (whistle or what have you) at the same time. Plus, I want to sing harmony with myself. The room is about eight feet by ten feet, and is carpeted. It's a bedroom, so it has a closet.

Wyo, I think it would be a gas if any visiting 'catters would come and record. We can do a duet!! :o)


Margo


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Subject: RE: Seeking advice: Home Recording Studio
From: Michael K.
Date: 04 Jan 00 - 04:37 PM

I (am fortunate) to have a home recording studio, and did much research on the various aspects of it, including the room construction as well as the equipment involved. It also helped of course that I was familiar with the electronics end of it and mixing boards, from having been a working musician for many years.

For most things, other than acoustic instruments, you can go ''directly into the board'' (mixer) of your multi-track recording unit. (In my case I used a Yamaha MD-8 Mini Disc 8 track, multi-track system, which yields great results - CD quality sounding product.)

If you can afford it, go at least 8 track. You will outgrow a 4 track system surprisingly fast, and develop a lot of sound degenation and ''bleedling'' (one track running into another an losing the clarity of the sound of each individual track) through bouncing (a.k.a. ping ponging ---taking the accumulated recorded tracks and re-recording them all onto 1 single track, to make more room for additional overdubbing on the other tracks.) You can get a great unit such as the Roland VX-880, or the Yamaha MD-8 for 1500.00 U.S. or less.

The Roland has a few advantages in that it is entirely digital (recorder as well as mixer as opposed to the MD-8 having a digital recorder but analog mixer, and no digital out --but there are ways around that--) and the Roland has digital outs for mastering directly to your hardrive or CD copier. It also has built in effects...so you wouldn't have to purchase additional effects processors --but it requires that you have a SCSI based hardrive (which I don't - have IDE) or that you use ZIP disks on some of their cheaper 8 track models. (Personally I've never had any luck with ZIP disks or Iomega products so I avoid them like the plague.) As I already had the effects processors (as the MD-8 was a move up for me) I didn't need the extra bells and whistles the Roland had, and I personally liked the fact that it used Mini Disks. The Yamaha is also more user-friendly and has a better display panel (mutil-coloured fluorescent as opposed to the black text on grey LCD panel of the Roland.)

For recording acoustic instruments (which for me is primarily guitar and voices) I use a good quality condensor microphone, and you should have a mic chord with a powered transformer-ed end (1/4 '' phono jack end) or XLR end (also known as a ''cannon'' end.) My condensor microphone of choice is an AKG C1000S.....which is very crisp and clean. You can also get by with a Shure SM-58 or 57....Good results with either Shure but more clarity and crispiness with the condensor.)

As for the room itself, it is dry-walled and underneath the dry wall, is sound proofing insulation (readily available at most ''do-it-yourself'' builing places, but in addition to the sound proofing insulation (both in the walls and ceiling) there is another WONDERFUL and cheap source of acoustic dampening, that you can use - either in addition to the sound proofing insulation - or as a stand alone - better though if you add a layer of this OVER your insultation, and under the drywall with a seal of vapour lock over everything, beneath the drywall -- that being EGG CRATES!!! Yes eggcrates (the kind you see that hold a dozen or 2 or 3 dozen eggs, that arrive at farmer's markets, etc....work marvelously. I have even been in professional studios that have used them on the outer walls within the studio, and they've been painted in patterns and wild colours, etc. They work just great, and are cheap...

If you plan to do in any recordings utilizing a drum machine, or other multi-source signals, consider investing in a sub-mixer - to have more control over the stereo spectrum of how you want to place (or pan) your instrument sounds, either during recording or final mix-down.

As well, consider investing in a decent compressor (to limit peak signals, which can occur during a vocal or acoustic performance) and as well a decent digital and programable reverb.

Consider, as well the learning curve involved in using all the above stuff together....could take you a month before you have a comfortable handle on the whole process from beginning to end, but an ENJOYABLE and interesting voyage of discovery.

Obviously these are all suggestions AND if you are fairly well heeled and are striving for as professional a finished sound/product as possible out of your home studio.

There are cheaper ways to go........but I can only speak from my own experiences, and the standards that I use for my own projects.


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Subject: RE: Seeking advice: Home Recording Studio
From: Richard Bridge
Date: 04 Jan 00 - 05:37 PM

Well it sounds like you will not be using a full drumkit in a room that size, so that is one blessing.

A false ceiling should not be square to the walls or floor. Reduces Standing waves.

Eggboxes reduce reflection - but they do not much affect the transmission of low frequencies unless filled with something pretty solid. Try expanding foam. THis is a guess.

It will be really hard singing in a room with no ring. You may want to add a frame to enable you to slap up a chipboard or plywood (different sounds) false wall on two facing walls to add ring.

In a room that size you will tend to get guitar (etc) on the vocal mic and vice versa. Work VERY close to the vocal mic and if that means you overload a C1000S (or better, a 3000S which are being remaindered as I write) try an ATM89HR (phantom power required, but cheaper). Or if you want to go dynamic try an AKG D880. Warmer than an SM58 and lots cheaper if you look around.

You may want a false floor - a board over underlay with underlay and carpet on top. It will reduce the annoyance to the people below. If you have next door neighbours separated by a mere partition wall check with a professional how to build a "box within a box" (a room made entirely of chipboard with NO rigid connection to the walls ceiling or floor). This is the ebnefit of the experience of the parents of the drummer in my daughter's electric band.

Plug the guitar if you can. Bugs (and woodies, and bottletops) are useless. They sound like dogs***, but you could try a tiny little Tandy (Radio Shack) voice lapel mic on a bed of blu-tak on the scratch plate. Martin Carthy does it so it can't be all bad. It is a more traditional sound than the modern scooped sound with treble added tizz!


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Subject: RE: Seeking advice: Home Recording Studio
From: Margo
Date: 04 Jan 00 - 05:47 PM

Thank you, Michael. Yes, I have been looking at the self contained units too. The only down side to them (I think) is that if you take the accumulated recorded tracks and re-record them all onto 1 single track, then they are mixed, and can't be changed. Am I right? I was thinking of recording directly to hard drive with a software program, and a small mixer in between for convenience. I figure on spending $3,000.

I will be recording acoustic instruments and vocals. I did record one song and the tech used two mikes to record the concertina in stereo because the sound comes out of the two sides. (I'm wondering if that is necessary.) I'll have to have two nice mikes if I'm going to do that.

I know it will take a while for me to figure out what the heck I'm doing, but fortunately I have someone who is interested in working with me. He's got the know how (and a great voice to boot!).

You know, it's funny, but I was wondering if I ought to be saving my egg crates. I can just see myself painting egg crates light blue with sea horses and ships. Yeah, come on over, Barry!

Margo


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Subject: RE: Seeking advice: Home Recording Studio
From: Margo
Date: 04 Jan 00 - 06:11 PM

Hi Richard. Your post came in as I replied to Michael. Fortunately, we are in a house, and the room is on the ground. Actually, it is halfway underground. It has wall to wall carpeting, and even though I would assume it has subflooring under the carpet pad, I wouldn't bet on it. Without subflooring, it would just be on cement pad. gosh, I'll have to go look!

Someone else had mentioned to me possibly needing a "bass trap", to absorb the lower frequencies. Apparently, the closet filled with coats and such might just do the trick. Odd, huh? I'm going to have to do something about the door, too. The house is so far off from square, that I can see light above the door at one end. And the door is hollow. There is a window, and I think I'll have to stuff that area with something.

I know what you mean about not having any reverberation while singing. That was something I definately had to get used to when I did my one recording. But it is do-able. I think I want to be as simple and basic as I can be to begin with, then add on features later if desired.

Say, when you fellows mentioned microphones by number, are they numbers used by different makers? Is there a brand name to look for or does one just go by the number? This is great! Thanks for your input, everyone. Margo


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Subject: RE: Seeking advice: Home Recording Studio
From: Richard Bridge
Date: 04 Jan 00 - 06:34 PM

SM58, 57, Beta 58 and 57 etc, Shure. Look for the giveaway SM in the number. Industry Standard. Can't go wrong. Pay for the priviledge and prepare to be a bit behind the cutting edge - like 30 years with the 58 and 57. I have a friend with a very unusual sounding Martin 000 and the SM58 caaptures the subtelty (if not all of the frequency range) better than anyhting I ahve heard.

C1000S and C3000S, and D880(vocal) and 770 (instrument) - AKG. German quality. The Cs (capacitor) are very well respected. Their dynamics ahve been underrated since the D190E. I like the 880 but it is not all that neutral. I bought my daughter one. THe best discount price in the UK for the Sure is GBP79 and I got the AKG for GBP25.

ATM (etc) is Audio TEchnica. The ATM89HR is a condenser which needs phantom power (no internal battery). It is well thought of.

Sennheiser are also well thought of.

You can pay up to thousands of pounds for valve mics. If you can afford about a hundred pounds or a bit more, you should be able to get a couple of remaindered C3000S. I suggest you buy a couple of 880s for vocals and borrow an sm58 (everyone and their dog has one) for comparison. Different voices like different mics.


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Subject: RE: Seeking advice: Home Recording Studio
From: MK
Date: 04 Jan 00 - 07:49 PM

I appreciate and respect your comments Richard, and for the most part I agree with your assessments of sound proofing, and of microphones.

Margo, In answer to (''The only down side to them (I think) is that if you take the accumulated recorded tracks and re-record them all onto 1 single track, then they are mixed, and can't be changed. Am I right?'')

Yes you are correct. But with good software and alternately a good quality recorder, it's not necessarily a detriment. It gets a little dicey when you're only working with a 4 track unit. Because sometimes a song or an arrangement will really only start to take shape after you've already recorded a few tracks. Then you might get, or hear, other ideas, that you might want to add and incoporate. This is where the flexibility of working in a digital medium vs. analog, really shines. With your software and hard-drive method, or, with a self contained digital unit, you have the ability to ''cut and paste'' sections of a tune, and add new or different sections to the areas you've already cut and pasted from.

With an 8 track unit (or simulating software) it's much easier to get all the elements of the ''bed'' down first....but bear in mind, I'm working differently than you are as I tend to go for full band arrangements, rather than just a couple of acoustic instruments and a couple of voices.......so the equipment and the methods of capturing it, may differ - alot...but the fundamental principles of doing the actual mutil-track recordings remain constant.

For me a bed mix usually includes: the drums, bass part, comping/rhythm parts (ie: piano, guitar, organ, etc...)...and once I get this ''band rhythm section' done, it's time to bounce.....so I make sure that I have all the levels exactly where I want them to be, and of course you can re-do the bounces as many times as you want, till you have just the right mix. When you're sure you've got it, then you can go and erase the other recorded tracks. Once having done this, then I'll add in vocals, solos, and any horn or string arrangements. But again it really depends on the tune and the arrangment.

You also mentioned: ("I was thinking of recording directly to hard drive with a software program, and a small mixer in between for convenience.")

I'm curious and interested as to HOW you are going to get the recorded music into your hardrive. Does your mixer have a digital output?....and do you have a sound card that has a digital input? (ie: the new Sound Blaster Platinum with Live Drive -- as well as another good sound card from Yamaha-- can't remember the name/model number at the moment..) If the answer is no as far as the digital inputs, then as long as your mixer has stereo outs, and your sound card has stero lines in, then there shouldn't be a problem. Also, does your mixer have a midi interface?...and as well does your sound card have one? You'll need this, if you are going to do any kind of mixing with the software once the tracks are recorded to the hardrive....or if you plan on doing any sequencing down the road.

With the software that's available these days, and with midi equipped recorders, you can virtually control all the operations of your recorder using your computer and the related software!

I think your budget is just fine, as far as the equipment goes --excluding the construction of the home studio--

If this is your first real shot at getting into home recording, you may want to re-consider a stand alone, self contained unit, either of the two I mentioned in my first response...and plug that unit directly into your stereo system. It will simplify things, and the only additional things you'll need are a couple of sets of headphones, a couple of microphones and then go for it. Your expressed budget can easily accommodate all this.

Two suggestions. If you don't already have one, buy an uninterupted power supply (UPS) for your computer and/or digital recorder. You don't want to have things locking up or crashing on you in the event of a brown/blackout. Money well spent. And, NEVER do a mix down or a bounce using just headphones, to monitor the mix. It can be very deceiving. Things that you may hear in the backgound although clearly, in headphones, may not come through when listening to the mix through external speakers. Always use external speakers for this process -those with the flattest response work the best, as they don't add ''colouring'' to the sound.

Best of luck. Sounds like you're on the right track (no pun intended) to me.


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Subject: RE: Seeking advice: Home Recording Studio
From: Margo
Date: 05 Jan 00 - 03:07 PM

Haha Michael. Right track. There is so much I need to read up on. I just haven't had the opportunity yet. Yes, a UPS is a must. You know what, I have no idea how the sound is recorded to hard drive, but it is done. I will then burn a CD. There will be no tape at all. Gotta go, Margo


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Subject: RE: Seeking advice: Home Recording Studio
From: AllisonA(Animaterra)
Date: 03 Mar 00 - 12:48 PM

Refresh. I'm looking into the cheapest, simplest way to record voices of up to 8 tracks, with or without a computer. The above info is a start, but maybe some newbies want to add to this?


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Subject: RE: Seeking advice: Home Recording Studio
From: wysiwyg
Date: 03 Mar 00 - 07:22 PM

did not read, but we have PortaStudio, Hardiman learning to use, may post here too.


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Subject: RE: Seeking advice: Home Recording Studio
From: Ana
Date: 04 Mar 00 - 05:56 PM

I sing into my walkman; play that tape on my stereo and (with a new tape in my walkman) record an overlay; then I put that tape in my stereo and... tragic huh - not the info you need? oh well never mind. I have a simple mind. Ana


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Subject: RE: Seeking advice: Home Recording Studio
From: AllisonA(Animaterra)
Date: 05 Mar 00 - 10:42 AM

Ana, that's about the level I've been functioning on. I'd like to get one step up from that. Portastudio, huh? I'll run a search on it. Thanks, Praise!
Ani (My new signature- I'm tired of being confused with Alison of Oz)


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Subject: RE: Seeking advice: Home Recording Studio
From: GUEST,Neil Lowe
Date: 06 Mar 00 - 08:02 AM

I've got a Portastudio...the one by Tascam? 4-track? Not a bad little unit IMO, for the money ($150). A step up from Ana's method, with which I've had a similar experience, and the Portastudio is the next logical progression, I suppose, if one is (like myself) developing baby-step by protracted baby-step. The Portastudio is good for lots of kitchen table productions.

Regards, Neil


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Subject: RE: Seeking advice: Home Recording Studio
From: Amos
Date: 06 Mar 00 - 01:42 PM

I use a digital track recording and mixing program for Macs called HD Studio, with bunches of filters and tracks capable of being combined into stereo or mono and output to .aiff. From there I can produce MP3s using SoundJam converter. There are lots of PC equivalents that have even mor features -- some in fact have too bloody many and a simple performer like moi can get lost in the technical aspects of recording engineering, which I don't make time to do. The output is workable if not world-class. You may have heard it on the Mudcat radio -- it's basically just .aiff output with little polish, but sufficient for my simple purposes so far.


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Subject: RE: Seeking advice: Home Recording Studio
From: GUEST,paul
Date: 25 Sep 00 - 05:22 PM

Margo, just last week i bought the Roland vx880 unit that Mike mentioned. It's very imposing to open the user's manual at first, but a friend with some recording experience "showed me the ropes" to some extent and already I'm beginning to get things done in the machine in reasonable time. True the effects don't sound like premium individual units, but there are so many and some sound really good. I realize that I'll be spending some money on zip discs, an item not currently in my budget. I don't have a room that I can dedicate to music with soundproofing and such, but the experience of recording tracks is giving me confidence that I can control the sound I get played back to a great degree. Good luck in your music!


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Subject: RE: Seeking advice: Home Recording Studio
From: bigchuck
Date: 25 Sep 00 - 06:36 PM

For all you trying to do this on a budget, Boss (roland) has recently come out with a neat little unit called the BR8, which is a budget ($699) version of the Roland VRS units. It will record only two tracks at a time, but offers a lot in the way of effects and mixdown.


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Subject: RE: Seeking advice: Home Recording Studio
From: Eric the Viking
Date: 26 Sep 00 - 01:23 PM

Since this thread it's head again, I've got a question that i need some help with.

How do you cut down some of the terrible tape hiss/noise I get when I mix down from a tascam 414 to a TEAC v 395CHX deck? The monitored recording sounds noiseless but the mixed tape is real noisy.I get loads of hiss and I am just begining to get this stuff together. Answers please. Thanks.

Eric


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Subject: RE: Seeking advice: Home Recording Studio
From: Bert
Date: 26 Sep 00 - 01:59 PM

Eric, sounds as though you need to demagnetize your tape path. That's everything, heads, guides, rollers and such.


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Subject: RE: Seeking advice: Home Recording Studio
From: mousethief
Date: 26 Sep 00 - 03:09 PM

I was involved in planning a recording studio once (never got around to building it, as the chief engineer divorced the producer's daughter and wasn't welcome there any more but that's a whole nother story!). If you are worried about noise from outside the studio leaking in, the best soundproofing is multiple layers of sheetrock, separated by lath running horizontally -- spaced about 18" or so. The more layers, the better the sound-insulating quality. This is the method used at GOOD hotels (such as I've only ever slept in once!), and in one local tv studio here in coffeetown that butts up against the freeway (expressway).

Studioless in Seattle,
Alex
O..O
=o=


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Subject: RE: Seeking advice: Home Recording Studio
From: Eric the Viking
Date: 26 Sep 00 - 03:15 PM

Thanks Bert. This stuff is pretty new, how long between demagnetisation? Every time I want to mix down or? Any other reasons that could be the problem?

Eric


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Subject: RE: Seeking advice: Home Recording Studio
From: IanS
Date: 27 Sep 00 - 09:41 AM

An avenue worth investigating that I don't think anyone has mentioned is using your PC as a hard disk recorder. The ISIS Guillimot is a low cost (~£200) PC based system with a PCI card and an external breakout box. This system allows 4 tracks to be recorded simultaneously and 4 playback output tracks. The actual total number of tracks you can record is only limited by the performance of your PC. Using a Pentium 200 MHz I can achieve about 16 tracks with some effects such a reverb or chorus being added in software. Using a software sequencer package on the PC such as Calkwalk or Cubase to mix many tracks (only limited by the performance of your PC) onto the output buses. Using a Pentium 200 MHz I can achieve about 16 tracks with some effects such a reverb or chorus being added in software. This system also allows you to automate your mixdown and backup easily onto CDROM. The downside is that you have to try and keep the PC with its noisy fan as far away as possible from the mikes, and all control is through the PC interface. It is also beneficial to have an external mixer for to act as a mike preamp and general mixing and to have an analogue compressor to maximise the input to the ISIS.

Though the ISIS is a fully functional recording system on its own I tend to use it in conjunction with a standalone Fostex D80 8 track hard disk recorder because my setup evolved that way. I record all analogue signals onto the D80 and digitally transfer them onto the ISIS to give the best signal quality. I have found through experiment that often the best instrument sounds are obtained through using a number of mikes on each instrument to give a good stereo image. I have found that the best acoustic guitar sounds is obtained by using a fairly close condenser mike to get the attack of the pick and a stereo pair positioned a couple of feet away to get the full image. When you compare the finished sound with a single miked recording the difference is much more realistic and the guitar seems to come out from the speakers. You can see that once you start to try these techniques you soon run out of tracks on even an 8 track system with just a couple of instruments!!


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Subject: RE: Seeking advice: Home Recording Studio
From: Brendy
Date: 27 Sep 00 - 02:47 PM

I'm going to Ireland in a couple of weeks, and I'm going to but an 8 track digital recorder while I'm there.
I've been on the phone to a few shops in Belfast, and none of them have the Yamaha MD8 in stock, as yet.

But I keep hearing about the Fostex SD8. Is that the same as the D80, IanS?

I do want to make the right choice when I'm purchasing this piece of equipment. And rather like buying a car, I don't know enough of the ins and outs of the technology, to be half-knowledgeable on the subject, and I rely on wading through the salesman's pitch as best I can.

I cant find anything about this SD8 on the net, and would like to hear a bit about it.

Another one which I have heard mentioned, is a 4 Track by Tascam, which, apparently boasts multiple 'bounce-downs' without any loss of quality. This is because 'its all done digitally'.

Whatever that means!

Told ya...I might as well be buying a washing machine!

B.


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Subject: RE: Seeking advice: Home Recording Studio
From: Kara
Date: 27 Sep 00 - 04:43 PM

I've just seen a whole range of new digital 8 track mini disk recorders in the shops for about £500 ( in France that is so it was 5000f) seems like it is worth looking in to.
Kara


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Subject: RE: Seeking advice: Home Recording Studio
From: IanS
Date: 28 Sep 00 - 07:23 PM

Hi Brendy,

I've never heard of the SD8 - though Fostex have launched a lot of Hard Disk Recorders (HDR) in a short space of time.

I think you probably mean the FD8 which is a upgraded version of the DMT8. The DMT8 is essentially an analogue 8 channel desk buit onto a an 8 track HDR. The FD8 added a number of features the most important being vitual tracks (ie a number of takes can be saved per track) and better backup capability. The D80 is like a DMT8 without the built in desk - there is nothing wrong with the DMT8 desk but an outboard desk is much more versatile in terms of patching and controlabilty. I went for a Mackie VLZ1604 which 4 years on I am still very pleased with - its just so easy to use and very versatile.

If you want to easily move your kit around then I would go for the FD8, but if you want a more permenent setup and more control then I would go for the separate route.

Hope this helps.

Ian Sherwood


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Subject: RE: Seeking advice: Home Recording Studio
From: Brendy
Date: 29 Sep 00 - 03:01 AM

Cheers Ian.

No, apparently it is the 'SD8'; I think it's a 'new' model. But I can see that there are a fair few to choose from.
At least from reading this thread, and others on the subject, I'll be a bit more 'knowledgeable' when I'm talking to these salespeople.

A lot of my mates have wee studios at home (wouldn't you know that none of them have the same set-up as each other), but with what I've gleaned from these pages, and conversations with other people, I'll return with some sort of quality set-up.

Thanks again.

B.
(Off to the mountains soon to soak in all those lovely autumn colours)


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