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BS: Cheesey reminiscences!

WalkaboutsVerse 24 Jun 19 - 05:04 PM
beardedbruce 24 Jun 19 - 04:52 PM
Steve Shaw 24 Jun 19 - 04:32 PM
Steve Shaw 24 Jun 19 - 04:22 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 24 Jun 19 - 03:22 PM
Mrrzy 24 Jun 19 - 03:10 PM
Dave Hanson 24 Jun 19 - 02:54 PM
Raggytash 24 Jun 19 - 02:43 PM
Steve Shaw 24 Jun 19 - 02:35 PM
Jos 24 Jun 19 - 02:28 PM
Steve Shaw 24 Jun 19 - 01:50 PM
Charmion 24 Jun 19 - 12:31 PM
Mrrzy 24 Jun 19 - 12:07 PM
Mr Red 24 Jun 19 - 11:56 AM
Dave the Gnome 24 Jun 19 - 11:47 AM
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Subject: RE: BS: Cheesey reminiscences!
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 24 Jun 19 - 05:04 PM

That pleases


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Subject: RE: BS: Cheesey reminiscences!
From: beardedbruce
Date: 24 Jun 19 - 04:52 PM

From the DT:

WHAT A FRIEND WE HAVE IN CHEESES

What a friend we have in cheeses,
Mozzarella, Cheddar, Swiss!
Bleu and Limberger's sweet breezes
Lingering like a lover's kiss.
Humble milk's apotheosis,
Muenster, Provolone, Brie
Damn cholesterol's thrombosis
Cheese is Gouda stuff by me!

Heed the U. S. Dairy Council,
Keep the Gruyere on the shelf.
Even just a tiny ounce'll
Give you vitamin B-12.
Gather, pilgrims at the deli
Buying Edam and Havarti,
Wedges moist and cold and smelly,
Bring home lots and have a party!



Now we are above the line!


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Subject: RE: BS: Cheesey reminiscences!
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 24 Jun 19 - 04:32 PM

Mature cheddar is fine for those who are lactose-intolerant.


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Subject: RE: BS: Cheesey reminiscences!
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 24 Jun 19 - 04:22 PM

Cheeses that contain bits of fruit or herbs or garlic are abominations. I heard a while ago that only inferior cheese is used for this purpose. I'd make a single honourable exception for Boursin, though even that can be lived without I find.


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Subject: RE: BS: Cheesey reminiscences!
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 24 Jun 19 - 03:22 PM

Growing up in the suburbs of Sydney in the 70s, I also recall those triangles DTG mentions, but also clear these plastic tubes where we would cut or bite off the top, then extrude out some kind of soft cheese for a snack.

Now, a vegan most of the time, I quite like such varieties of cheese on a sandwich for a change.

Also, on an office Christmas do, I was once served a Brie Wellington that had to go back as it had only a large flat mushroom in it...I doubt the chef got the boot, though.


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Subject: RE: BS: Cheesey reminiscences!
From: Mrrzy
Date: 24 Jun 19 - 03:10 PM

After my kids started loving Wallace and Grommet they went through a What's wrong with Wesleydale? phase. Tastes like a good cheddar, Wesleydale does.


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Subject: RE: BS: Cheesey reminiscences!
From: Dave Hanson
Date: 24 Jun 19 - 02:54 PM

Derby's got green bits because of it's age,
And when it gets older it's kept in a cage,
And what does it sing when it reaches this age,
Oh the hard cheese of old England,
In old England very hard cheese,

Les Barker, The Hard Cheese of Old England.

Dave H


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Subject: RE: BS: Cheesey reminiscences!
From: Raggytash
Date: 24 Jun 19 - 02:43 PM

When I was a child on Saturday mornings we would go to Eccles market and buy (small amounts) of Lancashire, Cheshire,Cheddar, Green Sage Derby (dyed) Red Leicester (dyed) and Danish Blue.

That was the entire range of cheeses available at the time.

Since then, although now sadly lactose intolerant, I have sampled literally hundreds of cheeses. My Favourite English cheese, if I was forced to choose, would either be Poachers Imp, a mature Lincolnshire Poacher or a Colston & Basset Blue Stilton.

My favourite "foreign" cheese of all time was a Weisslacker cheese from Bavaria, the smell was appalling but the cheese tasted sublime.


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Subject: RE: BS: Cheesey reminiscences!
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 24 Jun 19 - 02:35 PM

I'd eat cheese on toast when ah were a lad, or I'd grill an ugly mixture of cheddar, milk and chopped onion. Delicious mopped up with nasty sliced Wonderloaf. But I don't remember eating much raw cheese. Maybe a bit of crumbly Lancs...


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Subject: RE: BS: Cheesey reminiscences!
From: Jos
Date: 24 Jun 19 - 02:28 PM

Once, back in the 1960s or 1970s, we had a whole Cheshire cheese that had gone well past its sell-by date (not that they had them in those days). It came free as it couldn't be sold because it no longer resembled Cheshire - it had gone soft and runny like a Brie or Camembert. Unforgettable.


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Subject: RE: BS: Cheesey reminiscences!
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 24 Jun 19 - 01:50 PM

Well here are my favourites. I think Appleby's is the best Cheshire. Mrs Kirkham's is the best Lancashire. Morrison's sell an excellent Wensleydale under their "the best" label. I've researched all the much-vaunted cheddars such as Montgomery's, Gould's, Green's, Westcombe's, Keen's and Barber's, as well as Mrs Quicke's excellent range, but I think the best is Wookey Hole cave-aged. Buy it at M&S and it still has its washed rind. Superb. I find Stilton far too variable, often not creamy enough or unevenly veined or bitter or too salty, so I avoid it. Instead I seek out Stichelton, which is really Stilton but made with unpasteurised milk (not allowed under the Stilton name). It's made by one very careful and proud cheese maker and it's a masterpiece. Another superb blue is Bath Blue, but you have to hurry up and eat it it before it starts to darken. I'm a big fan of three triple-creme cheeses: Vallage from France, Montagnolo d'Affine from Germany and that ubiquitous masterpiece St Agur. A lot of bries are unreliable, often too salty or decidedly bitter or with that horrid chalky middle. Sharpham's brie, made in Devon, is lovely and rich when at its runny peak. The French Brie de Meaux is a grand, tangy example best eaten just before the rot sets in. There's a very nice English camembert made at Cricket St Thomas in Somerset. You might have to leave it out of the fridge for a few days to get it flowing, a not uncommon issue with camembert. I'd rather hack off the family jewels with a rusty machete than eat "mild cheddar" or Edam or anything pre-sliced or in triangles. A bit of philly on oatcakes makes a good lunch. And I have lots of ways of employing mozzarella and proper parmesan.


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Subject: RE: BS: Cheesey reminiscences!
From: Charmion
Date: 24 Jun 19 - 12:31 PM

Cheese used to be Cheddar, in two colours: white and orange. I have no idea why mild (i.e., young) Cheddar had to be (and still is) orange in Ontario. Old cheddar was (and still is) white.

Fancy cheese came from Oka, a Trappist monastery just over the border in Quebec, and it was (and still is) round and semi-soft with a gentle whiff of adulthood and, just maybe, port after dinner.

Another type of fancy cheese was Danish blue, which was not Danish or even European but just as Canadian as all the other cheese we ate. It had visible mold in it and therefore seemed risky. Its complex and decidedly emphatic flavour announced its status as food intended only for the grown-ups of the household. Consequently, we children insisted we loved it, though we actually had second thoughts after the first bite.

Fake cheese was Kraft plastic-wrapped slices or a hunk of Velveeta, and it, too, was always orange because it was pretending to be mild Cheddar. Its proper habitat was the sandwich lunch your mother made for you to take to school, and it tasted of nothing much in particular unless she augmented it with a sliced pickle, in which case it tasted of sliced pickle.


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Subject: RE: BS: Cheesey reminiscences!
From: Mrrzy
Date: 24 Jun 19 - 12:07 PM

The cheese shop exploded. All that was left was de Brie.

I was lucky enough to grow up with a cheese course as a normal part of the meal. Thanks, Mom & Dad.


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Subject: RE: BS: Cheesey reminiscences!
From: Mr Red
Date: 24 Jun 19 - 11:56 AM

I thought you wer going to sing the praises...............

"The Bries and I"





I'll get my pinny..............


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Subject: BS: Cheesey reminiscences!
From: Dave the Gnome
Date: 24 Jun 19 - 11:47 AM

When I was a kid in 50s/60s Manchester there were only 2 kinds of cheese. Eating and cooking. The former was invariably white and crumbly. More than likely Cheshire. The latter was yellow and harder. Probably a Cheddar of some sort. Cheese spread was Dairylee and if you were lucky you got a triangle of said cheese with a wooden "spreader", a couple of salted crackers and a little pickled onion in a snack pack. Later on I remember Kraft cheese slices but they really were the bees knees and decidedly a luxury food.

In the 70s strange things started happening, like putting cheese cubes on cocktail sticks with pineapple chunks as part of a buffet. If you were really posh you had half a grapefruit with the sticks stuck in it alongside the other half a grapefruit with cocktail sausages on sticks. Looked like a couple of demented hedgehogs had been rolling in the party food. I always refer to the 70s as the decade that taste forgot :-)

Not sure when it was but Edam was probably the first foreign cheese I came across and, luckily, it did not put me off continental cheeses for life. I soon discovered Danish blue, which was promptly trumped by our own Derbyshire Stilton. Now I am narked if my local shop doesn't have a full compliment of French Compte, Spanish Marchengo, Somerset Cheddar and, the king of all, Lancashire in all its variants.

Can anyone tell it is a dull afternoon awaiting a lift to a dinner party in about an hour? With British chicken, a locally made cheesecake and a selection of wines from Italy. (Yes, Steve. Including Mossers Nero d'Avola) Our hosts have a selection of fine malts too. Don't expect any sense from me after nine.

Not that you get much anyway.

:D tG


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