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England's Favourite Folk Song

GUEST 21 Jun 19 - 02:58 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 21 Jun 19 - 04:15 PM
JeffB 21 Jun 19 - 04:44 PM
Leadbelly 21 Jun 19 - 04:49 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 21 Jun 19 - 04:50 PM
David Carter (UK) 21 Jun 19 - 04:59 PM
David Carter (UK) 21 Jun 19 - 05:02 PM
GUEST 21 Jun 19 - 05:59 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 21 Jun 19 - 06:40 PM
GUEST,.gargoyle 21 Jun 19 - 07:58 PM
RTim 21 Jun 19 - 08:17 PM
GUEST 21 Jun 19 - 10:14 PM
Joe Offer 21 Jun 19 - 10:59 PM
GUEST,henryp 22 Jun 19 - 02:08 AM
Dave Hanson 22 Jun 19 - 02:10 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 22 Jun 19 - 03:45 AM
GUEST,patriot 22 Jun 19 - 05:07 AM
GUEST,Mark Bluemel 22 Jun 19 - 05:18 AM
David W 22 Jun 19 - 05:27 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 22 Jun 19 - 05:31 AM
GUEST,Mark Bluemel 22 Jun 19 - 05:37 AM
Dave the Gnome 22 Jun 19 - 02:30 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 22 Jun 19 - 02:36 PM
Georgiansilver 22 Jun 19 - 02:39 PM
Georgiansilver 22 Jun 19 - 02:42 PM
Dave the Gnome 22 Jun 19 - 03:04 PM
GUEST,Greg Stephens 22 Jun 19 - 03:18 PM
GUEST,patriot 22 Jun 19 - 03:28 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 22 Jun 19 - 04:12 PM
Tattie Bogle 22 Jun 19 - 08:05 PM
Allan Conn 23 Jun 19 - 04:06 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 23 Jun 19 - 04:07 AM
Dave the Gnome 23 Jun 19 - 04:27 AM
GUEST,Jerry 23 Jun 19 - 05:41 AM
GUEST,Peter Cripps 23 Jun 19 - 06:19 AM
Tattie Bogle 23 Jun 19 - 09:12 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 23 Jun 19 - 09:39 AM
GUEST,Some bloke 23 Jun 19 - 10:33 AM
GUEST,Kenny 23 Jun 19 - 12:09 PM
GUEST,Jerry 23 Jun 19 - 04:10 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 23 Jun 19 - 04:27 PM
Big Al Whittle 23 Jun 19 - 11:21 PM
Dave the Gnome 24 Jun 19 - 06:43 AM
GUEST,Kenny B 24 Jun 19 - 07:13 AM
Big Al Whittle 24 Jun 19 - 08:32 AM
Vincent Jones 24 Jun 19 - 09:56 AM
Dave the Gnome 24 Jun 19 - 10:37 AM
GUEST,Brimbacombe 24 Jun 19 - 11:33 AM
Dave the Gnome 24 Jun 19 - 11:54 AM
gillymor 24 Jun 19 - 12:05 PM
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Subject: England's Favourite Folk Song
From: GUEST
Date: 21 Jun 19 - 02:58 PM

Possibly the BBC will look across the Irish Sea and take inspiration, however why wait till then, when we discuss it here. What would be people's choices for England's favourite folk song?

I guess Scarborough Fair would occupy the same place as Danny Boy in the Irish contest as the 'pop' choice for the public.

John Barleycorn would be another public favourite.

Myself I would like to see Cruel Sister and Bedlam Boys in the running.


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Subject: RE: England's Favourite Folk Song
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 21 Jun 19 - 04:15 PM

The Drunken Sailor is probably just as well known as Scarborough Fair.


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Subject: RE: England's Favourite Folk Song
From: JeffB
Date: 21 Jun 19 - 04:44 PM

Most English people wouldn't know any, or eben care to. Those that did would choose something regional - John Peel for NW, Blaydon Races for NE, Ilkley Moor baht at for yorkshire, etc.


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Subject: RE: England's Favourite Folk Song
From: Leadbelly
Date: 21 Jun 19 - 04:49 PM

The british hymn without any doubt. Everybody knows and can sing it...


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Subject: RE: England's Favourite Folk Song
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 21 Jun 19 - 04:50 PM

In the NE - also Waters of Tyne and Blow the Wind Southerly.

Every Christmas, a lot hear the tune to Barbara Allen during A Christmas Carol.


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Subject: RE: England's Favourite Folk Song
From: David Carter (UK)
Date: 21 Jun 19 - 04:59 PM

Early One Morning. Anyone who was at primary school from the 50s to the 70s and maybe later will have sung it.


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Subject: RE: England's Favourite Folk Song
From: David Carter (UK)
Date: 21 Jun 19 - 05:02 PM

I have no idea what "the British hymn" is.


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Subject: RE: England's Favourite Folk Song
From: GUEST
Date: 21 Jun 19 - 05:59 PM

I will put in a vote for   The Wild Rover


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Subject: RE: England's Favourite Folk Song
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 21 Jun 19 - 06:40 PM

Hmm - not cricket...a bit like Morgan captaining England!


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Subject: RE: England's Favourite Folk Song
From: GUEST,.gargoyle
Date: 21 Jun 19 - 07:58 PM

As colonists....everyone, everywhere understands the true Brit undertones of "Saving the Queen"

However, here in the Republic, the tune is usurped to "My Country, Sweet land of liberty."

Sincerely,
Gargoyle

Perhaps...soon...after Brexit you too can sing of sweet liberty


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Subject: RE: England's Favourite Folk Song
From: RTim
Date: 21 Jun 19 - 08:17 PM

Silly question - way too many songs and people to chose.....

Tim R


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Subject: RE: England's Favourite Folk Song
From: GUEST
Date: 21 Jun 19 - 10:14 PM

Danny Boy,

Could win both the Irish and English contests.

Not bad for a song about Scotland.


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Subject: RE: England's Favourite Folk Song
From: Joe Offer
Date: 21 Jun 19 - 10:59 PM

So, is the "British Hymn" "God Save the Queen"?


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Subject: RE: England's Favourite Folk Song
From: GUEST,henryp
Date: 22 Jun 19 - 02:08 AM

The OP holds Bedlam Boys in affection.

From Wikipedia; "Tom o' Bedlam" is the name of an anonymous poem in the "mad song" genre, written in the voice of a homeless "Bedlamite." The poem was probably composed at the beginning of the 17th century. The original ballad was popular enough that another poem was written in reply, "Mad Maudlin's Search for Her Tom of Bedlam". It was apparently first published in 1720 by Thomas d'Urfey in his Wit and Mirth, or Pills to Purge Melancholy. "Maudlin" was a form of Mary Magdalene.

Dave Moran writes; Nic [Jones] and I and mandolin/guitar player Nigel Patterson made up the Halliard. We were looking to develop some new music and we took the advice of song-writer Leslie Shepard. We decided to add tunes to Broadsides that we discovered, uncovered or collected – we checked out the Harkness Collection at Preston and the collections in Manchester etc. We also used Ashton's Street Ballads and Victorian Street Ballads (Henderson) and on a couple of occasions we dipped into Thomas d'Urfey's Pills to Purge Melancholy. That is where we found Mad Maudlin (Tom of Bedlam or the Boys of Bedlam).

Nic and I wrote all the tunes together usually sitting in the front of the Mini and singing and working out tunes as we drove – as the mandolin was the smallest instrument and Nigel was in the back, he always played the tunes. 'Jones and Moran' wrote a heap of songs like this including Lancashire Lads, Going for a Soldier Jenny, Miles Weatherhill, Calico Printer's Clerk etc. We wrote the tunes to fit the words and sometimes added or altered words, as in The Workhouse Boy. So Nic and I wrote the tune to d'Urfey's words of Mad Maudlin – audiences were confused and stunned – it was very surreal...We did a booking in the Midlands and an unaccompanied foursome called the Farriers loved the song and asked if they could sing it unaccompanied. We said, Sure – they were very good, a bit like the Young Tradition. I believe that is how it got into the mainstream.


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Subject: RE: England's Favourite Folk Song
From: Dave Hanson
Date: 22 Jun 19 - 02:10 AM

Quintessential English folk song ' Barbara Allen ' no contest.

Dave H


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Subject: RE: England's Favourite Folk Song
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 22 Jun 19 - 03:45 AM

Barbara Allen is in my repertoire but I also love hearing "The Snows They Melt the Soonest", from the north of England, as used in the BBC's adaptation of Thomas Hardy's "Tess of the D'Urbervilles", based in the south of England.


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Subject: RE: England's Favourite Folk Song
From: GUEST,patriot
Date: 22 Jun 19 - 05:07 AM

After the last pointed poke at the Londoncentric BBC, let's have a north/south folksong argument- the north is full of songs about industry and real people.
The soft south is all about milkmaids walking out on May mornings & such nonsense- how's that for a start


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Subject: RE: England's Favourite Folk Song
From: GUEST,Mark Bluemel
Date: 22 Jun 19 - 05:18 AM

I presume the "English Hymn" is the one where the first verse is entirely rhetorical questions to which the answer is no...

And did those feet in ancient times walk upon England's mountains green? No...


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Subject: RE: England's Favourite Folk Song
From: David W
Date: 22 Jun 19 - 05:27 AM

Henrup

You may find this interesting, it's a quite comprehensive history of the song.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B2c3nSXKb6E


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Subject: RE: England's Favourite Folk Song
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 22 Jun 19 - 05:31 AM

I'm not sure if Peggy Seeger has ever milked cows, Patriot, but "The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face" by Ewan MacColl.


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Subject: RE: England's Favourite Folk Song
From: GUEST,Mark Bluemel
Date: 22 Jun 19 - 05:37 AM

Steve Knightley's "Tall Ships" is from the soft South. Just saying...


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Subject: RE: England's Favourite Folk Song
From: Dave the Gnome
Date: 22 Jun 19 - 02:30 PM

Bohemian Rhapsody!


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Subject: RE: England's Favourite Folk Song
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 22 Jun 19 - 02:36 PM

Oh dear, Dave: I wonder how many people Freddie Mercury gave AIDS to before dying of it with his bohemian rhapsodies? Brian May should finally see the light, get himself an English cittern, and start turning up at English folk festivals and clubs.


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Subject: RE: England's Favourite Folk Song
From: Georgiansilver
Date: 22 Jun 19 - 02:39 PM

'Wild Mountain time' would get my vote. Heard it sung in many a UK Folk club and at Folk gatherings in peoples houses it is sung, where all join in.


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Subject: RE: England's Favourite Folk Song
From: Georgiansilver
Date: 22 Jun 19 - 02:42 PM

Wiuld Mountain Thyme. Also known as' Will ye go lassie go'


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Subject: RE: England's Favourite Folk Song
From: Dave the Gnome
Date: 22 Jun 19 - 03:04 PM

Wild mountain thyme is not English. Nor is it a folk song by some people's definitions. It was written recently and is still in copyright. Not saying I agree with those definitions, just that they may exclude that song.

Walkabout. WTF has AIDS got to do with anything?


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Subject: RE: England's Favourite Folk Song
From: GUEST,Greg Stephens
Date: 22 Jun 19 - 03:18 PM

Wild Mountain Thyme was written (or re-written) by Scottish poetRobert Tannahil in the 19th century to a much older tune "The Braes of Balquidder". The recent version we all know was put together by the McPeake family in northern Ireland. Or so they say. No connection with England till the 60's folk boom.


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Subject: RE: England's Favourite Folk Song
From: GUEST,patriot
Date: 22 Jun 19 - 03:28 PM

??Peggy Seeger is American so doesn't sing about milking cows- only southerners (UK) do that


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Subject: RE: England's Favourite Folk Song
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 22 Jun 19 - 04:12 PM

Young Emma


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Subject: RE: England's Favourite Folk Song
From: Tattie Bogle
Date: 22 Jun 19 - 08:05 PM

Ooooooohhhhhhhhh, I like to rise when the sun she rises.........


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Subject: RE: England's Favourite Folk Song
From: Allan Conn
Date: 23 Jun 19 - 04:06 AM

"Not saying I agree with those definitions, just that they may exclude that song."

If a prog on England's Favourite Folk Song was to follow the same line as the Irish programme then it wouldn't really matter if the song was relatively recently written and or still in copyright. Just about half of the Irish shortlist fell into that category - neither would it really matter if it wasn't English. The obvious example from the Irish list being Bogle's song. To be fair the programme didn't state it was the favourite "Irish song" but Ireland's favourite folk song - hence it encompasses songs which are popular in the country but doesn't specifically exclude non Irish songs.


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Subject: RE: England's Favourite Folk Song
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 23 Jun 19 - 04:07 AM

Yes, TB, Country Life.


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Subject: RE: England's Favourite Folk Song
From: Dave the Gnome
Date: 23 Jun 19 - 04:27 AM

Maggie Holland's "A place called England" must be worth a nomination!


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Subject: RE: England's Favourite Folk Song
From: GUEST,Jerry
Date: 23 Jun 19 - 05:41 AM

The audience’s favourites will always be different from the performer’s favourites. What are the most requested songs you get asked for? When playing guitar, I typically get asked for The Wild Rover or Streets of London, when playing banjo (even tenor banjo) it’s Duelling Banjos, and when playing mandolin it’s usually “what is that instrument called, mate, is it a banjo?” Steve Knightley’s song Roots sums it up well, and ought to be the performer’s favourite.


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Subject: RE: England's Favourite Folk Song
From: GUEST,Peter Cripps
Date: 23 Jun 19 - 06:19 AM

We started playing 'Michael Finnigan' a few months ago for our care home audiences, and have been amazed at the response - everyone seems to know it, join in, and great applause and laughter!


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Subject: RE: England's Favourite Folk Song
From: Tattie Bogle
Date: 23 Jun 19 - 09:12 AM

One of my favourites is "Twas on on April Morning" but not sure that it would make the top ten!


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Subject: RE: England's Favourite Folk Song
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 23 Jun 19 - 09:39 AM

Jerry - the greatest comeback since Lazarus was Jesus but, a couple of centuries ago apparently, there was an English cittern in nearly every tavern and barber shop in England...


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Subject: RE: England's Favourite Folk Song
From: GUEST,Some bloke
Date: 23 Jun 19 - 10:33 AM

Who is England and how many on here are second guessing his favourite song?

Mind you, this must be an English thread. The homophobic nonsense above followed by approval of it by the American moderators. Same old same old.


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Subject: RE: England's Favourite Folk Song
From: GUEST,Kenny
Date: 23 Jun 19 - 12:09 PM

None of my business, really, but I do agree with Dave the Gnome's nomination of Maggie Holland's "Place Called England" above.


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Subject: RE: England's Favourite Folk Song
From: GUEST,Jerry
Date: 23 Jun 19 - 04:10 PM

I do play the cittern as well, but nobody ever asks me what it is, so maybe you’re right. Unless people just think it’s a 12 string guitar with an odd shaped body, and a couple of strings missing.


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Subject: RE: England's Favourite Folk Song
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 23 Jun 19 - 04:27 PM

I'd like to hear that, Jerry; when I lived in Newcastle Upon Tyne a few years ago and went to one of his gigs, Jez Lowe used a cittern on a couple of his songs.

As you may know, the Portuguese, when the accompany fado songs, tend to use both a Spanish and a Portuguese guitar.


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Subject: RE: England's Favourite Folk Song
From: Big Al Whittle
Date: 23 Jun 19 - 11:21 PM

When I was a kid there was a division of the English army, nicknamed The Poachers.

The Poachers were given the freedom om of Boston where I lived and marched through the centre of Boston with bayonets fixed, whilst their band played The Lincolnshire Poacher.

Very stirring.


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Subject: RE: England's Favourite Folk Song
From: Dave the Gnome
Date: 24 Jun 19 - 06:43 AM

Never thought of it as a marching song, Al, but it does work well. Reminded me of our version as kids which was, of course, rude.

'tis my delight of a nightly shite any old time of year

:D tG


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Subject: RE: England's Favourite Folk Song
From: GUEST,Kenny B
Date: 24 Jun 19 - 07:13 AM

Re Songs as marches
Most of the old "county" infantry regimental marches are based on popular (Folk?) songs from their part of the country converted to march time where appropriate eg Blaydon Races, Farmers Boy, Sussex by the Sea and possibly subsequently converted to dance tunes by all genres of dance enthusiasts


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Subject: RE: England's Favourite Folk Song
From: Big Al Whittle
Date: 24 Jun 19 - 08:32 AM

I remember asking my Dad what was the tune the Irish guards were playing. He said, I dunno - but I've marched to it hundreds of times.

After about two minutes, he said - I know -its Ballyjamesduff, I've remembered!

Strangely enough it was a song I was singing most mights in Irish theme pubs, and I hadn't recognised it, disguised as a march.

I love the march - The Irish march, Stpatrick's Day march that Henry Fonda dances with Judy Garland too in Fort Apache.

Afterwards Henry does a great polka to Oh Them Golden Slippers!


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Subject: RE: England's Favourite Folk Song
From: Vincent Jones
Date: 24 Jun 19 - 09:56 AM

Still not clear what the 'British Hymn' refers to. Can't be 'God Save the King/Queen' as no-one knows its lyric, only the first verse. There are folk who were brownies or cubs in the 1970s or earlier who may know the third verse, but hardly anyone knows verse two (confound their politics, frustrate their knavish tricks", etc.). Possibly Leadbelly means Blake's Jerusalem? But neither are folk songs.

Me, I'd go for "The Rawtenstall Annual Fair" (which is a music hall song).

Or "The Lincolnshire Poacher".


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Subject: RE: England's Favourite Folk Song
From: Dave the Gnome
Date: 24 Jun 19 - 10:37 AM

MacColl has a couple that could score well. Dirty Old Town and Manchester Rambler are both pretty popular even among a non folk audience.


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Subject: RE: England's Favourite Folk Song
From: GUEST,Brimbacombe
Date: 24 Jun 19 - 11:33 AM

They should put it to a public vote at 8.30pm on a Saturday night on BBC1. Purely for the Mudcat entertainment factor when Ed Sheeran songs take positions one to 10.


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Subject: RE: England's Favourite Folk Song
From: Dave the Gnome
Date: 24 Jun 19 - 11:54 AM

Big Grin :-D


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Subject: RE: England's Favourite Folk Song
From: gillymor
Date: 24 Jun 19 - 12:05 PM

The House Carpenter (aka Demon Lover) and The Blacksmith are probably my favorites.


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