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BS: Recipes - what are we eating?

Stilly River Sage 17 Aug 20 - 09:57 AM
Raggytash 17 Aug 20 - 09:33 AM
Jos 17 Aug 20 - 09:32 AM
Mrrzy 17 Aug 20 - 09:11 AM
Charmion 16 Aug 20 - 04:12 PM
Raggytash 16 Aug 20 - 01:55 PM
Charmion 16 Aug 20 - 11:27 AM
Stilly River Sage 16 Aug 20 - 08:26 AM
Mrrzy 16 Aug 20 - 08:09 AM
Stilly River Sage 15 Aug 20 - 08:44 PM
JennieG 15 Aug 20 - 08:18 PM
Mrrzy 15 Aug 20 - 07:36 PM
Mrrzy 14 Aug 20 - 10:19 AM
Charmion 14 Aug 20 - 08:30 AM
Stilly River Sage 13 Aug 20 - 02:51 PM
Dave Hanson 13 Aug 20 - 02:29 PM
Charmion 13 Aug 20 - 01:31 PM
Stilly River Sage 12 Aug 20 - 08:49 PM
Mrrzy 12 Aug 20 - 11:16 AM
leeneia 11 Aug 20 - 01:51 PM
Charmion 11 Aug 20 - 08:17 AM
Stilly River Sage 10 Aug 20 - 09:55 PM
Stilly River Sage 09 Aug 20 - 11:00 PM
Steve Shaw 08 Aug 20 - 06:10 PM
Charmion 08 Aug 20 - 05:27 PM
Steve Shaw 08 Aug 20 - 09:10 AM
Raggytash 08 Aug 20 - 09:03 AM
Steve Shaw 08 Aug 20 - 08:51 AM
Raggytash 08 Aug 20 - 07:16 AM
Steve Shaw 07 Aug 20 - 07:11 PM
Steve Shaw 07 Aug 20 - 07:02 PM
leeneia 07 Aug 20 - 01:45 PM
Jos 07 Aug 20 - 12:07 PM
Charmion 07 Aug 20 - 11:31 AM
Steve Shaw 07 Aug 20 - 08:30 AM
Mrrzy 07 Aug 20 - 07:27 AM
Jos 07 Aug 20 - 07:10 AM
Raggytash 07 Aug 20 - 06:48 AM
Jos 07 Aug 20 - 01:33 AM
leeneia 07 Aug 20 - 12:45 AM
Steve Shaw 05 Aug 20 - 04:12 PM
Charmion 05 Aug 20 - 09:35 AM
Charmion 05 Aug 20 - 09:33 AM
Raggytash 05 Aug 20 - 09:08 AM
Mrrzy 05 Aug 20 - 08:59 AM
Steve Shaw 05 Aug 20 - 05:39 AM
Jos 05 Aug 20 - 04:14 AM
Steve Shaw 04 Aug 20 - 06:15 PM
Raggytash 04 Aug 20 - 06:14 PM
Dave Hanson 04 Aug 20 - 04:06 PM
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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 17 Aug 20 - 09:57 AM

I peel the eggplant, even the smaller ones, as a matter of course, though the small ones (under about 16 ounces) don't need the salt and sit an rinse treatment.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Raggytash
Date: 17 Aug 20 - 09:33 AM

Charmion, just cut in half, skins and all.

Italian seasoning can be bought here in jars. It is a mixture of dried Oregano, basil, red bell pepper, marjoram, thyme, rosemary, sage and parsley.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 17 Aug 20 - 09:32 AM

Mrrzy, did you include courgettes / zucchini? They can be bitter if the plant they came from was under stress, such as short of water, or if it was from a seed resulting from cross-pollination from another variety of squash. This has been a problem recently, especially when people have saved their own seed from last year, but it has also happened with seed from commercial suppliers, who have had to recall some batches of seed. If it is bad, don't eat it as it could be poisonous.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 17 Aug 20 - 09:11 AM

Made a kind of ratatouille-y thing but there was an occasional bitterness. First time I've used eggplant; the recipes said no need to peel. Should I have pelt, though? To avoid bitterness?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 16 Aug 20 - 04:12 PM

Raggytash, before they go in the oven, do I skin and chop them, and what sort of vessel should I put them in? And what constitutes Italian seasoning chez vous?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Raggytash
Date: 16 Aug 20 - 01:55 PM

A touch of salt, a touch of italian seasoning and leave in a VERY low oven overnight and put into jars with some VERY good olive oil would be my suggestion! :-)


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 16 Aug 20 - 11:27 AM

I sent Himself to the market yesterday, and now I’m knee-deep in tomatoes. The Romas will become pasta sauce, but what is to become of the dozen not-quite-ripe beefsteak tomatoes set out on a tray in the hope they might become ripe before they rot?

Anyone with a good chutney recipe, now is your time to be kind and share!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 16 Aug 20 - 08:26 AM

Bread pudding for breakfast.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 16 Aug 20 - 08:09 AM

Wonder if I could resist just eating them all long enough to freeze any. Gotta sauté in butter with thyme, though. Thanks!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 15 Aug 20 - 08:44 PM

I buy mushrooms in a large quantity at a favorite discount gourmet store (they buy from the grocery warehouses that didn't manage to send all of their stock to grocery stores). So when I can find them I slice them, then saute in butter and package them in plastic restaurant carryout containers (poor man's Tupperware) and into the freezer. I usually package maybe a 1/2 cup in each container so pull them out in multiples if I need more. They're very soft, but they work on the pizza.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: JennieG
Date: 15 Aug 20 - 08:18 PM

We make pizzas from Lebanese flat bread. Tonight Himself will spread ready-made pizza sauce (tomato based) on his, followed by sliced salami, sliced leftover roast white and sweet potato, liberally topped with a grated cheese mix - cheddar, mozzarella, parmesan. Mine will be spread with cream cheese (because I don't eat tomato), black olive tapenade, contents of a small tin of salmon, a few capers, amd finished with the same grated cheese mix.

Purists would probaby shudder. We like it.

You can also make crispy nibbly things with the same bread. Brush with olive oil, sprinkle with lemon pepper seasoning, bake until crispy. Break into pieces. Enjoy with dip or just on its own.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 15 Aug 20 - 07:36 PM

Accidentally put this into peeves thread...

I started off to stuff half an avocado with crab salad, but it kinda took a sharp left... Now I have a big bowl of chopped lettuces tomato avocado celery dill parsley with crab and lemon on top, with vinaigrette and almonds. Yum.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 14 Aug 20 - 10:19 AM

I'm not retired. I'm in my post-paid years

Stilly, your pizza sounds delish, but gow did you freeze sautéed mushrooms? I'm lucky if mine even make it to the table, I eat'm up so.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 14 Aug 20 - 08:30 AM

Actually, Thursday night, but when you’re retired (even sort of) you sometimes lose track.

Yes, Stilly, it is funny — both peculiar and ha-ha. But most of all I think I’m living under Parkinson’s Law: work expands to take up all available time. Now that I have ten to twelve hours (including overtime and commuting) per weekday that are no longer contracted to the Department of National Defence, I find it necessary to do all kinds of things that never seemed important before.

Such as, for example, reading for at least a couple of hours in the afternoon and doing the New York Times crossword puzzle after breakfast.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 13 Aug 20 - 02:51 PM

Isn't it funny how sometimes retirement is just about as busy as when you were "employed."


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Dave Hanson
Date: 13 Aug 20 - 02:29 PM

Sounds good to me.

Dave H


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 13 Aug 20 - 01:31 PM

Tonight, we shall dine al fresco, on fire-grilled sausages and a salad made from some of everything in the veg bin. It's summer, by God, and we are RETIRED (sort of), and if we want to light a fire and drink beer 'til late on a Wednesday night, who's gonna stop us?

Besides, Environment Canada says the weekend will be wet.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 12 Aug 20 - 08:49 PM

Using half of a tandoori flat bread (large) pulled from the freezer I made another pizza. Since I'm out of mozzarella at the moment it was an odd mix of cheddar, Swiss, and Parmesan. Lots of other stuff as I used leftovers and pulled a couple of other things out of the freezer. There is 1/4 of it left for lunch tomorrow. A glass of red wine with it, and I'm finished.

I caramelized some onion, cooked 2 strips of bacon to crumble, defrosted some sliced sauteed mushrooms, sliced a half of a baked chicken breast, used some Alfredo sauce, the cheese mentioned above, and some thawed slices of red bell pepper. Dried basil sprinkled over the top. It was stacked with goodies but since it didn't have tomato sauce it wasn't as sloppy as some pizzas can be.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 12 Aug 20 - 11:16 AM

Somehow I am supporting local businesses this week. Ordering out, eating on restaurant patios, not cooking...


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia
Date: 11 Aug 20 - 01:51 PM

SRS, I commiserate with you on the 101 temperatures. I've lived through heat up to 108, but this August has been milder here in Missouri. Bitter thought - with such a good summer, why aren't my tomatoes thriving?

I made some chili con carne yesterday. All the usual ingredients, but I season it at the end of cooking with chili powder and cocoa. Cumin seeds go in at the start.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 11 Aug 20 - 08:17 AM

I remember life without a decent freezer. Things are better now.

Himself has gone camping for a couple of days, leaving me (gratefully) at home, so I'm eating girl food -- toast, cheese, salad and tea.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 10 Aug 20 - 09:55 PM

Sometimes you have to just muscle through a tough time, and turning on the stove when it's so darned hot out is a struggle. But today I took out a pound and a half of top sirloin beef from the freezer, onions, peppers, and black beans that I cooked this morning, and made a batch of my "taco/nacho/burrito" mix. I made enough that I put a couple of jars into the freezer.

Tonight I used up some leftover restaurant tortilla chips and scooped up my "nachos" - the filling on the plate topped with some thawed leftover guacamole (plus some of my homemade thawed to even it out - the restaurant stuff was awfully spicy hot), sour cream, and a few dashes of Tapatio hot sauce.

The beans had soaked overnight so they simmered for about 90 minutes this morning then cooled and I also put several jars of them into the freezer. If I'm going to do this I might as well make extra for later.

Tomorrow I'll make the bread pudding.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 09 Aug 20 - 11:00 PM

For a complete change and because I have 5 pounds of them I need to use I had a baked potato for dinner, served with sour cream, bacon, and chives. It was salad for lunch, and dessert this evening was a smoothie because I have some very ripe bananas to use. (Banana, big dollop of yogurt, a splash of milk, the rest of the bag of frozen blueberries, a little sweetener, and since I'm working on strengthening my fingernails, a teaspoon of dried gelatin.) It was at least 101o today so the fact that I cooked anything is pretty phenomenal.

I have the end of a loaf of bread and a little in the freezer, enough to make a bread pudding tomorrow, and I have 3 cups of black beans soaking overnight. I'll cook beans tomorrow and freeze most of them, reserving some for a beef and bean mix I make that I use for nachos or burritos or tacos, depending on what kind of tortilla or chip I want to use with it.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 08 Aug 20 - 06:10 PM

That's happened with lamb shanks here too. It amazing how stuff that you loved for its cheapness as well as its flavour suddenly gets all popular and expensive. It happened here with John Dory, one of my absolute favourite fish. Cheap as chips a few years ago, now so expensive that it's affordable only as a a rare treat.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 08 Aug 20 - 05:27 PM

That’s often what I do with a leg of lamb, too, Steve.

Perhaps the most challenging hospitality-related task I routinely undertake is carving a bone-in leg of lamb. It ends up in collops, every time; my Dad, a master carver, would be ashamed. But I know several delicious lamb stews — one is even Italian! — and serving stew is a no-brainer — trivet on table, pot on trivet, Bob’s yer paternal relative.

It’s a source of great sadness to me that other Canadians have discovered the lamb shank, and now they are terribly expensive. I used to be able to buy a whole beast’s worth of shanks for about ten bucks, but now they cost about that much per each! I buy them anyway, and gnaw the bones. I don’t dare eat a lamb shank in public.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 08 Aug 20 - 09:10 AM

Nah, you can't tell me that a shoulder from the same beast as your leg doesn't taste better! Do feel free to send me one, however. Diced leg makes a superb Italian lamb stew... :-)


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Raggytash
Date: 08 Aug 20 - 09:03 AM

If I could I would send you one Steve, I'm fairly confident it would challenge your viewpoint! :-)


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 08 Aug 20 - 08:51 AM

It must be a matter of regret for you that, while you were enjoying your leg of lamb, two other lots of people were enjoying shoulders from the same beast even more...


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Raggytash
Date: 08 Aug 20 - 07:16 AM

A good leg of Lamb is a thing of beauty.

The best I have ever had was from Calveys Butchers on Achill Island, County Mayo.

Across the road from the shop is a grass sward down to the sea, this is where the lambs are reared. The meat is slightly salted due to the proximity of the sea blowing salt onto the grassland.

The leg of lamb from there I would put alongside the best of meat from anywhere and be confident it would be the top one.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 07 Aug 20 - 07:11 PM

By the way, in m'humble the only way to cook a goodly piece of shoulder of lamb is very slowly. Chuck away those repressive cookery books that say "this many minutes to the pound and that many over..." etc.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 07 Aug 20 - 07:02 PM

Jos, oh yes, shoulder of lamb. I will not buy leg of lamb. Years ago, our butcher, with whom I'd cultivated a brilliant relationship (it helped that he was a bird and butterfly aficionado, as indeed am I, along with my penchant for wild flowers), bought his pork, free range, from Mrs Quicke MBE, her of Quicke's cheddar cheese in Newton St Cyres in Devon. She's a lovely lady is Mrs Quicke, which I can attest to from buying cheese from her in person from her lovely farm shop. A large part of Mrs Quicke's pigs' diet was the whey from her cheese making. I've never tasted pork that good before or since. Unfortunately, Mrs Quicke stopped keeping pigs, but our butcher tracked down another excellent source of pork. I never found out where he sourced his lamb (though here in Cornwall butchers nearly always source local), but it was amazingly good. Since he retired, I've been getting my lamb from a local man who farms his own sheep. His lamb is absolutely superb.

It has to be whole shoulder and it has to weigh in at at least six or seven pounds, or more. If you buy shoulder you absolutely must ensure that it's whole shoulder and that the fillet has been left in. I once bought a supermarket allegedly whole shoulder, only to find that that the fillet had been removed, presumably to be resold at a higher price.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia
Date: 07 Aug 20 - 01:45 PM

I put big pieces of meat in the microwave to warm them up from fridge temp to room temp, thus saving energy because the wave is so efficient. Also, it doesn't hurt to kill germs which could get transferred to surfaces and to implements before cooking.

After the nuking, it's the meat that's lukewarm, not the bacteria, which have been boiled to death from the inside by the microwaves.
===============
Steve, your pork recipes sound delicious. Loved the pun about crackling.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 07 Aug 20 - 12:07 PM

Can I just put in a word for the shoulder of lamb, which, like the shoulder of pork, is far tastier than the leg.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 07 Aug 20 - 11:31 AM

The American "pork shoulder butt" is the upper, or butt, end of the pig's foreleg, including only the muscle and bone of the shoulder joint and upper back.

The pig's actual butt, or bum, is the ham.

(I also translate from French.)

I'm with Steve Shaw on the issue of pork lusciousness -- the shoulder wins by miles. Loin and leg roasts benefit hugely from smoking and curing, which is why ham is so much easier to find than a fresh leg roast of pork. It also explains all the variant forms of bacon, of which my favourite is Canadian-style peameal ...

Hmmmm. Let's talk about bacon.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 07 Aug 20 - 08:30 AM

The cut of pork matters a lot. Leg and fillet are more or less tasteless. The fattier the cut, the better the flavour. I always use shoulder for a good roast to feed the masses, preferably on the bone but even boned and rolled is fine. Always slow-roasted for hours, with a boost at the end to crackle the crackling. As a gourmet for two, you can't beat belly on the bone. Good pork sausages are made from shoulder. One of my favourites is the herby, cured Italian pork jowl (guanciale), for a peerless carbonara. It's extremely fatty but begod it tastes wonderful. Free-range pork, preferably not the boring Landrace breed, always tastes much better than Belsen-house pork, and has a much nicer texture. A thick-cut pork chop, baked with mushrooms, lemon, fresh thyme and cream, done the Delia way, is a thing of beauty too. I cut the rinds off and freeze them to go into my boeuf en daube when the weather turns cold.

Discussions about how to get good crackling can get very heated. For me it's good, deep scoring with a Stanley knife, just seasoning without oil and a 15-minute hot boost at the end of roasting. Shoot.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 07 Aug 20 - 07:27 AM

I noticed the butt=shoulder too. I thunk they meant Any really big piece of pig.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 07 Aug 20 - 07:10 AM

Six hours in the slow cooker should kill off most of the germs, though - I wouldn't bother with the microwave.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Raggytash
Date: 07 Aug 20 - 06:48 AM

"Put the meat in the microwave and nuke it at medium power about 5 minutes to kill the germs and make it lukewarm."


Leeneia, I think you will find that germs absolutely delight in being lukewarm!!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 07 Aug 20 - 01:33 AM

"Pork butt or shoulder (same thing)"

I thought "butt" was what Americans call the rump - or does it also refer to the shoulder? I'm confused.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia
Date: 07 Aug 20 - 12:45 AM

We still don't have an oven, so I invented Pork Calypso, which is sort of Caribbean. It doesn't have the red pepper of Caribbean seasoning, and it's not grilled or roasted, so I gave it a new name.

Pork Calypso

Pork butt or shoulder (same thing) . Select the flattest cut.
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 teaspoon nutmeg
many grinds of black pepper

Line a reasonably-sized slow cooker with a Reynolds slow-cooker liner. Put the meat in the microwave and nuke it at medium power about 5 minutes to kill the germs and make it lukewarm. Set it in the slow cooker and rub the spices and black pepper onto top. Place it in the cooker so as much of the surface is pressed against the pot as possible. Add 2-4 tablespoons water.

Cover and cook on Low till very tender, maybe six hours. Remove carefully* from pot and let cool about 40 minutes. (set a timer) Refrigerate on a trivet till next day and discard fat.   Slice and serve with pasta, using the cooking liquid to make a sauce. Or make sandwiches. Delicious!

I wonder whether one should remove the cooking liquid with a basting bulb halfway through cooking. Hmmm...

Sweet potatoes and pineapple go well with this, but not in the same dish.

The beauty of the slow cooker is that its gentle heat does not destroy the spices.
===================
Removing the meat can be dangerous, because the bag can break and dump hot food on a person. But I don't want to put that hot, heavy pot in my fridge. So I set the cooker in the sink. Then I gather the top of the bag together and slip a steel bowl the same diameter as the slow cooker under the bag as I lift it out. I think this is safe. I leave the food in the bag and in the steel bowl to cool in the fridge.

Over the years, I have used many slow-cooker bags, and only one ever broke. One was enough to convince me to be careful.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 05 Aug 20 - 04:12 PM

It's the pope's nose on a turkey at Christmas. I know, because Terry Wogan said so. Once your chicken/turkey has rested for a few minutes, you, the chef, go into the kitchen on your own to remove and devour said appendage. There is a certain way of pulling off the "nose" so as to also remove an immoral amount of the skin just behind it. You are perfectly justified in doing this, and the beauty is that no-one will know that you've done it. It makes your aperitif glass of white wine taste twice as good. Lines the stomach too, so to speak. Shhh...


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 05 Aug 20 - 09:35 AM

Sorry, that wasn't Steve's question but Raggy's. But the answer stands.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 05 Aug 20 - 09:33 AM

The oyster bone was a particular treat for a small child in my family, and the chicken's tail was the parson's nose, or the Pope's nose, or (when we were feeling extra ecumenical) the Moderator's nose.

Now that I carve the chicken, the oysters and the Moderator's nose are MINE. Himself gets the legs.

Answering Steve's question about the egg yolks: They went into the rich French pastry I made for Saturday's sour-cream cherry tart. It's a fairly ridiculous recipe with a quarter pound of butter and three yolks, and a damnable nuisance to roll out, but I've never found anything better for a fruit-and-custard pie.

The cherries were the light red Montmorency type known around here as "pie cherries", and I made the custard with crème fraîche (now available in Perth County!) instead of American-style sour cream, and it was boffo.

I probably won't make another pie until Thanksgiving, when I will use the frozen remainder of the pumpkin pulp yielded by last year's Hallowe'en shrunken heads. For that, English-style plain pastry is best.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Raggytash
Date: 05 Aug 20 - 09:08 AM

Decades ago when I was still working as a chef we used to roast up to a 100 chickens at a time.

The chefs would descend upon them like a plague of locusts when they came out of the oven to pick out the oysters.

The clientele NEVER saw them!!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 05 Aug 20 - 08:59 AM

We called it the pope's nose.

I read in a Chinese cookery book that the best meat on the chicken is in the middle joint of the wing. I still like thighs and those nuggets the Shaws wrassle over. Those go to the person who gets the chicken out of the oven.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 05 Aug 20 - 05:39 AM

No she isn't, though one can never rule out the occasional rummaging in my history. I neither know nor care! I've always felt that investigating your partner's online interactions would be a certain path to misery.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 05 Aug 20 - 04:14 AM

Is Mrs Steve not a mudcatter then? Otherwise you've given the game away now.

(My mother always had the parson's nose, but didn't say why.)


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 04 Aug 20 - 06:15 PM

The thighs, wings and underneath meat are the best. On every roast chicken there are two little oysters of underneath meat that we wrestle each other for in our house. But Mrs Steve has yet to discover the sheer joy of the parson's nose, which is by far the tastiest bit of a chicken, but which no-one in our house has ever discovered, apart from me. Long may that remain so.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Raggytash
Date: 04 Aug 20 - 06:14 PM

I've been thinking Charmion ...........an unusual event for me I might add! .......... if you made Meringues what did you do with the egg yolks?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Dave Hanson
Date: 04 Aug 20 - 04:06 PM

I fully agree with Jos, the thighs are the tastiest part of a chicken.

Dave H


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