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BS: Recipes - what are we eating?

Charmion 15 Feb 20 - 09:58 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 15 Feb 20 - 07:52 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 31 Jan 20 - 04:20 PM
gillymor 31 Jan 20 - 07:30 AM
Stilly River Sage 30 Jan 20 - 09:35 PM
Donuel 30 Jan 20 - 08:55 AM
Stilly River Sage 27 Jan 20 - 12:40 PM
Steve Shaw 25 Jan 20 - 06:29 PM
Stilly River Sage 25 Jan 20 - 10:52 AM
Steve Shaw 24 Jan 20 - 05:36 AM
Dave Hanson 24 Jan 20 - 02:46 AM
leeneia 24 Jan 20 - 12:20 AM
Steve Shaw 23 Jan 20 - 06:01 PM
Steve Shaw 23 Jan 20 - 05:51 PM
Stilly River Sage 23 Jan 20 - 04:47 PM
Donuel 23 Jan 20 - 07:16 AM
Steve Shaw 23 Jan 20 - 06:52 AM
BobL 23 Jan 20 - 03:37 AM
Donuel 22 Jan 20 - 08:02 AM
Donuel 22 Jan 20 - 07:51 AM
Steve Shaw 22 Jan 20 - 07:00 AM
Donuel 22 Jan 20 - 06:42 AM
Steve Shaw 22 Jan 20 - 05:49 AM
Stilly River Sage 21 Jan 20 - 09:36 PM
Charmion 21 Jan 20 - 08:13 PM
Donuel 21 Jan 20 - 08:01 PM
Steve Shaw 09 Jan 20 - 07:05 PM
Steve Shaw 09 Jan 20 - 11:11 AM
Charmion 09 Jan 20 - 07:18 AM
Steve Shaw 09 Jan 20 - 05:47 AM
Stilly River Sage 09 Jan 20 - 02:27 AM
Steve Shaw 08 Jan 20 - 09:23 PM
Steve Shaw 08 Jan 20 - 09:21 PM
Charmion 08 Jan 20 - 08:44 PM
Charmion 08 Jan 20 - 08:18 PM
Steve Shaw 08 Jan 20 - 06:00 PM
Charmion 08 Jan 20 - 02:37 PM
Steve Shaw 08 Jan 20 - 05:37 AM
leeneia 08 Jan 20 - 01:41 AM
Steve Shaw 07 Jan 20 - 12:52 PM
Stilly River Sage 07 Jan 20 - 12:38 PM
Mrrzy 07 Jan 20 - 10:50 AM
Donuel 07 Jan 20 - 08:54 AM
Donuel 07 Jan 20 - 07:39 AM
Charmion 07 Jan 20 - 06:29 AM
Steve Shaw 06 Jan 20 - 04:58 PM
Stilly River Sage 06 Jan 20 - 04:14 PM
Raggytash 06 Jan 20 - 03:57 PM
Stilly River Sage 06 Jan 20 - 01:37 PM
Steve Shaw 06 Jan 20 - 12:54 PM
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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 15 Feb 20 - 09:58 AM

It's February, the dead heart of the Canadian winter, and I have not the faintest idea of what to make for supper.

The only thing to do is open the freezer, close my eyes, reach in, and grab. Culinary roulette.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 15 Feb 20 - 07:52 AM

Re Gary Rhodes, RIP, on ITV just now, such a shame that one of the very few English chefs who championed our own good culture & cuisine left for, & died in, the greedy UAE.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 31 Jan 20 - 04:20 PM

Just added 5 new pics from my "One-Pot Cooking" today.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: gillymor
Date: 31 Jan 20 - 07:30 AM

Veggie Reuben, A local Grocery/Cafe/Bookstore "Food and Thought" introduced me to these, in fact I lived off of them in the aftermath of the last hurricane for about a week when F and T was about the only restaurant that stayed open during the power outages. I substitute roasted zucchini for the corned beef, F and T sometimes uses grilled eggplant. Rye bread is essential here.



    Russian Dressing
    Roasted Zucchini, 1/4" slices
    1 1/2 cups sauerkraut
    8 slices rye bread
    Swiss cheese, sliced
    Butter

Squeeze the liquid from 1 1/2 cups sauerkraut.
Spread butter on one side of each of the 4 bread pieces. Heat a griddle pan to medium high heat. Place 4 pieces of bread on the griddle, buttered side down. On each piece, spread some Zucchini, cheese, sauerkraut, Russian dressing, more cheese, and then another piece of bread. When the bottom bread is browned, flip the sandwich and cook until the bread is toasted and the cheese is melted.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 30 Jan 20 - 09:35 PM

The house smells wonderful after making a pot of lentil soup (an Egyptian recipe) that is very simple - water instead of stock, red lentils, a shredded onion, and when finished cooking a pinch of cumin, a healthy grind of black pepper, a little salt and lemon juice. Served with an extra squeeze of lemon. The restaurant where I order it serves some crispy baked strips of pita bread, but I'm fine with it plain.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel
Date: 30 Jan 20 - 08:55 AM

Hyacynths have been poking their leaves up for the last couple weeks.
The only veg is chives in the yard.

Steve did you ever realize that what you eat or offer stays with you or others in essence for about seven years until it is all replaced?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 27 Jan 20 - 12:40 PM

I have a batch of red kidney beans simmering, and after they're soft I'll add the rest of the ingredients, most pulled from the freezer. A large ham hock, a 1lb chub of Jimmy Dean sausage (I prefer Italian sausage, but this works out also), bags of chopped onions and green and hot peppers. So far the only fresh item is a bay leaf from my tree in the yard and I have a large garlic from last spring's harvest. There are also some home-canned tomatoes that are on the elderly side but still okay for a dish like this. I put the finished beans into 12oz jar portions that go into the freezer. The seasoning that goes in with the sauteed onions and peppers will be salt, ground black pepper (from my large brass Turkish pepper mill), a large dollop of ground cumin, oregano (fresh from the yard), chili pepper, and at the end I'll crush in a handful of the frozen cilantro (grown here in the yard, sealed in a bag with the air pressed out and frozen) and a healthy dollop of capers. You put those in when cooking is finished and turn the heat off a couple of minutes later.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 25 Jan 20 - 06:29 PM

I made a risotto tonight using a ton of accidentally-bought excess veg. It was a triumph. I'm watching the FA Cup on Match Of The Day at the moment, but I'll post my method later...


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 25 Jan 20 - 10:52 AM

I don't have a salad shooter but I did buy one of those salad spinners at a thrift store a while back. It works well and means I'm liable to do a better job of rinsing the lettuce ahead of time. I used to rinse it of then pile the leaves in a dishtowel (tea towel) and step on the porch and give it a quick swing around the remove water. The spinner, as low-tech as it is, is much more efficient.

Time to transplant the asparagus from the bed where it doesn't get enough light to one on the other side of the house. I used to get a pretty good crop but it has been unhappy lately. It's such a luxury to pick the vegetable and carry it in the house in time for the meal.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 24 Jan 20 - 05:36 AM

You won't find any self-respecting Italian chef using dried basil. Check out Marcella's book, for example, and Gino d'Acampo is even more scathing. It just gives all the wrong flavour notes, way too acrid and assertive. In summer I have basil in my garden. The rest of the time I have a pot on the window sill. Other than in pesto, I think the best way to use basil is torn into the sauce at the last minute, or baby leaves sprinkled on top of the finished pasta dish or pizza* or salad, always with a sprinkling of your finest olive oil.
I might have mentioned this before, but in 2016 we spent a week in Puglia (in lovely Lecce) and we ate out every night. The food was always first-rate. Herbs were hardly used at all. Even the tomato and olive oil bruschetta (glorious bread) didn't have any at our favourite eatery. The lovely young woman who waited on us and befriended us never did make it to Cornwall...   :-(

*Depending on the pizza, I might prefer dried oregano cooked on top...


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Dave Hanson
Date: 24 Jan 20 - 02:46 AM

Get Madhur Jaffreys book ' Indian Cookery ' you will never buy curry powder again when you have made the real thing.

Dave H


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia
Date: 24 Jan 20 - 12:20 AM

The salad shooter fad was all over when I finally bought one. I love putting carrots in them and shooting the thin circles of carrot into the pot. Carrots sliced thin taste better.

A couple weeks ago I finally used the blade that shreds. I produced shredded carrots for carrot bread. It was good too.

About dried basil, Steve. There used to be a spice store near me, next door to the natural foods store, with its sagging floors and dingy walls. The spice store seemed to acquire a degree of sincereness via osmosis.

One day I was there searching an elusive curry powder with flowery accents. I made the mistake of smelling the big jar that held the powder. Ewuuu! I don't think they had washed it for years. I tried smelling others jars, and it was the same story. The new product was probably all right, but the stuff stuck at the bottom...moldy-smelling and caked on.   

Maybe you hate dried basil, Steve, because you once got some of that stuff from the bottom of the jar. I use dried basil often, and it's fine, but I buy it in little jars from the supermarket.

After a while there was a fire in that building, and the grocery store and spice store never came back. And finally I found the wonderful curry powder. It is S&B Oriental Curry Powder, and it is made in Tokyo. Comes in a red metal can. A Chinese friend helped me find it.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 23 Jan 20 - 06:01 PM

Actually, I do have a bit of an issue with bay leaves. I do have a bay tree I can raid for fresh leaves, but I do wonder what the leaves actually contribute to any dish. I know that I've overdone bay at times and have had to trash the dish. So if I use less, I can't detect their influence. Hmm. I tend to leave them out these days. Other spicy additions I'm suspicious of are cinnamon and fennel seeds. Tiny amounts only of the former and none of the latter. Overdone rosemary can be a bit of a hooligan too. Someone gave me some pistachio biscotti they'd made the other day. I had to spit out the first mouthful as it was overwhelmed by cinnamon. Mrs Steve is eating them so mebbe it's just me!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 23 Jan 20 - 05:51 PM

I'd use about eight peeled garlic cloves, squashed with my fist and slightly busted up, and leave them out of your holy trinity. It sounds great but I'd have to use whatever chillies I could find. I do live in remote Cornwall, y'know!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 23 Jan 20 - 04:47 PM

Here's one a friend shared on Facebook recently. The text at the beginning describes the author's experience with the dish. From Texas Monthly magazine: Carne Guisada, a spicy meat stew that goes down well in a tortilla.

Sylvia Casares’s Frontera Carne Guisada
Serves 8

  • 3 pounds beef stew meat, cut into 3/4-inch pieces
  • 3 guajillo chiles, stems and seeds removed
  • 1 chile de árbol, stem removed
  • 1 cup chopped white onion
  • 1 cup chopped tomato
  • 1/2 cup chopped bell pepper
  • 1/4 cup tomato sauce
  • 2 teaspoons Holy Trinity*
  • 1/4 teaspoon Mexican oregano
  • 2–3 bay leaves
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons salt
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour

*In a spice grinder, combine 3 peeled garlic cloves, 1 1/2 teaspoons cumin seeds, and 1 1/4 teaspoons peppercorns, along with 1 tablespoon water. Process into a smooth paste.

In a large saucepan, combine the meat with 4 cups water. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat and simmer for 15 minutes. Skim the froth, then cover and simmer for 1 hour and 15 minutes.

Meanwhile, in a small saucepan, combine the chiles with 1 cup water. Bring to a boil, then simmer for 15 minutes. Let cool.

In a blender, process the chiles and their liquid until you have a smooth sauce, about 1 minute. Pass the sauce through a strainer, and reserve 1/2 cup of the liquid.

To the meat in the saucepan, add the onion, tomato, and bell pepper. Stir in the 1/2 cup chile
liquid, tomato sauce, Holy Trinity, oregano, bay leaves, and salt.

Simmer for 20 minutes.

Meanwhile, heat the oil in a small skillet over medium heat. Whisk in the flour and stir until golden in color. Remove from heat and add a small amount of liquid from the stew pot and stir to remove any lumps.

When the meat is tender, whisk in the flour mixture. Stir occasionally while simmering for about an hour, or until the stew is thickened. Serve immediately.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel
Date: 23 Jan 20 - 07:16 AM

Separation by hours of the two should be enough

There are many interactions that are worse or unknown.

Life: you pay your money and you take your chances with medicine.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 23 Jan 20 - 06:52 AM

Grapefruit contains a chemical that inhibits a gut enzyme that breaks down certain medicines. Doses are calculated taking into account the fact that some of the drug will be broken down by this enzyme before it can act. So, if you've eaten grapefruit you may get an overdose of the drug because your gut isn't breaking any of it down. I understand that the grapefruit chemical is also present in Seville oranges. It is absent from other citrus fruits. You can find lists of medicines that are affected online. Most medicines aren't affected, but better safe than sorry, eh!

I can live without grapefruit but not without Seville orange marmalade...


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: BobL
Date: 23 Jan 20 - 03:37 AM

If you're taking grapefruit-incompatible medication (as my partner is), you should have been advised accordingly. If in doubt, ask a pharmacist.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel
Date: 22 Jan 20 - 08:02 AM

Don't drink grapefruit juice if you're taking any of these medications,

Some statins (cholesterol-lowering drugs): lovastatin (Mevacor), atorvastatin (Lipitor), simvastatin (Zocor, Vytorin). ...
Antihistamines: fexofenadine (Allegra)


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel
Date: 22 Jan 20 - 07:51 AM

The action of grapefruit on medicine is partly in the stomach lining changes and not the time release mechanism alone.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 22 Jan 20 - 07:00 AM

Well I hadn't heard that, but I take two time-release medicines...


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel
Date: 22 Jan 20 - 06:42 AM

Grapefruit causes time release medicines to release all at once.
Cantlopes and mellons are sometimes brought to rapid ripening
with traces of arsenic.

The new apple is called cosmic crisp. It is not as tart as honey crisp but never turns brown when cut in half even after a week.
The traditional McKintosh is my next best favorite.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 22 Jan 20 - 05:49 AM

Not sure about grapefruit. I've heard bad things...


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 21 Jan 20 - 09:36 PM

There is a local grocery store (high end) that does various promotions, and about now is their citrus fruit one. All of that stuff is harvested and at a reasonable price. I get a bag of ruby red grapefruit at my local discount grocery, leftover from the high end grocery promotion.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 21 Jan 20 - 08:13 PM

Half mandarin, half navel? I’ll look out for those.

The only good thing about food availability in January is the abrupt appearance for a very short time of citrus fruits at a price that feels not quite as ruinous as usual.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel
Date: 21 Jan 20 - 08:01 PM

I tried a new hybrid fruit purchase. They are 1/2 Mandarin Oranges and 1/2 Navel orange. They virtually peel themselves, are large and more reliably sweet than Navals.
Sumos:^)


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 09 Jan 20 - 07:05 PM

If that puts you off, try this instead. Boil up your frozen peas until done to your liking. Drain and add a small knob of butter and a sliced garlic clove. Use your spud masher to bust them up. You don't have to go mad. If you like (I don't), add a small quantity of finely-chopped baby mint leaves. There you go. Rich man's mushy peas!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 09 Jan 20 - 11:11 AM

Some pub mushy peas are terrible, which is a shame. Bad texture, dodgy added colour (absolutely not needed). They're easy to make. You start with those starchy marrowfat peas. You can soak them overnight, or, around here, you can buy cheap kilo bags of frozen part-cooked ones for a pound in Morrison's. One bag does the two of us around four times. You can't do much cheaper than that. With those, all you do is simmer them in just a bit of water for about 20 minutes, once they're warmed up (you start from frozen), with a bit of salt. When they start to break up, help them along with a fork or your spud masher. You may need to adjust the liquid a bit to get them mushy enough. That's it. The soaked ones need simmering for a bit longer, otherwise just as easy. They're great with fish and chips.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 09 Jan 20 - 07:18 AM

Yes, Steve, I was quite a treat for the eye back in the day. I still have an ancient snapshot of myself on the open ramp of an M113 armoured personnel carrier, and it is proof that at that time of my life I was tired, not very clean, and dressed by somebody who either did not care or failed to notice that I am not male.

As you say, pulses are the other exception to the rule against canned veg, although I buy only chickpeas in cans, probably because they are not usually the principal ingredient in a dish.

I used to buy bottled tomato-based pasta sauce, but stopped when I discovered Marcella Hazan.

I know all that about the nutritional value frozen veg, but I can’t get past the texture. Also, there’s the memory of military cooking to contend with — vast pans of peas mixed with diced carrots boiled from frozen and set out on the serving line in the junior ranks’ mess. Oy.

When on holiday in England some years ago, I was treated to a pub lunch of pie with mushy peas. The pie was okay, I guess, but I had a very hard time with the peas, which came from a can and tasted like all my worst memories of youth. Fortunately, the local cider was strong enough to cancel the effect.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 09 Jan 20 - 05:47 AM

I never use bought pasta sauces. Rustling up a quick tomato sauce is pretty simple, and I find the creamy ones in the shops to be too claggy/starchy/oddly thickened. I do use Spice Tailor curry packs though. Questionable authenticity at best, but a lot better than those ones in jars. Frozen peas can be pretty good. I can ever understand why frozen broad beans are never anything like the ones I grow and freeze myself. They're always very small with thick, tough skins and starchy middles. I'm one of those people who can't be arsed to shell broad beans. I've used frozen broccoli to make broccoli and Stilton soup, not especially successfully. The problem with most frozen veg is the watery/floppy/soggy texture. I've always been an aficionado of slightly-undercooked, fairly firm, slightly crunchy veg. I think I was conditioned by my parents boiling coarse, dark green cabbage to within an inch of its life in incredibly salty water, and by an aunt of mine many years ago who used to boil up the cauliflower in advance until very soft then reheat it just before plating up. Can you imagine that....


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 09 Jan 20 - 02:27 AM

Actually, I've heard several nutritionists and popular cooks discuss frozen fruit and vegetables. Typically the produce in those bags or boxes was picked ripe and frozen very close to the field; this in contrast to fruit or vege picked early enough that it will ripen while travelling to wherever it will be stored. It never has the full flavor of vine-ripened when it is treated that way. If you're cooking with fruit or vegetables and choose to use frozen, you'll typically get good quality.

Process foods, there are very few I use. Pasta sauce (and I'm picky about the one I use) is about it, an acceptable shortcut.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 08 Jan 20 - 09:23 PM

Now there's an image. You in wet combat clothing. I'm just off to start dreaming...


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 08 Jan 20 - 09:21 PM

I suppose. Peanut oil is our go-to for very hot frying, mainly for oven chips. I didn't know you could get Bisto over there. I'd rather hack off me dangly bits with a blunt hacksaw than use Bisto. Its presence in our house would constitute an immediate divorce issue. I don't use canned veg either, but I'm assuming that you're not including pulses there. Ideally I'd soak all my beans and chickpeas overnight but I don't. I use canned or tetrapacked every time. Chickpeas especially are pretty good out of cans. I won't buy anything like that if they're salted or in a mix with chilli and herbs. I'll control all that meself, thanks!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 08 Jan 20 - 08:44 PM

Things I won’t use:

Shortening — that is, solid vegetable fat (e.g., Crisco) for use in frying and pastry. I use lard or butter for pastry, on the rare occasions when I make it, and oil for frying.

Also margarine. It took me ten years to convince Himself that the stuff is awful, and he’s better off eating butter. Science eventually caught up with me.

Macaroni and cheese mix. Yuck. Just yuck.

In fact, pretty well any kind of mix. If there’s a mix on the market, I can make it better and cheaper from scratch. The one exception to this rule is angel food cake, which takes a dozen eggs and a lot of skill and luck to make with real ingredients — and then what do you do with a dozen egg yolks?

Instant anything. Coffee, iced tea (I mean, really?), hot cereal, soup from a sachet, pot noodles, gravy (e.g., Bisto), Minute Rice, mashed potatoes in a box, Bisquick. Most of the stuff they sell in the middle of the supermarket.

Most frozen veg. I agree with Steve about peas and, when I butcher a Hubbard squash, I usually dice it and freeze half for future reference.

All canned veg, except tomatoes, which are technically fruit. In my dreams, I sometimes find myself back in Germany during an exercise, which I know is going on because I’m dressed in wet combat clothing and facing a Melmac plate of alert rations: canned sausage with instant mashed potatoes and canned creamed corn on the side.

Unlike Steve, I use canola (rapeseed) oil. Too many people are allergic to peanuts these days.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 08 Jan 20 - 08:18 PM

The kitchen scale just died, following the computer into electronic oblivion.

F*** my life.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 08 Jan 20 - 06:00 PM

I have a mandoline but I can't be arsed with it. I find that slicing my veg with a good sharp knife to be very therapeutic, especially if I stick some Mozart on and stay mindful while I'm slicing. I too am in a post-Christmas coma. There's stuff in the freezer to keep us eating well. And there's always cheese.

As a diversion, here's a new angle: stuff I never use. I've already trolled SRS about her despicable resort to dried basil. ;-). I'll add to that soy sauce, any oil infused with something (I'll infuse it myself, thanks), fennel seeds, ready-ground pepper, sticky jasmine rice, tomato purée, olive oil that isn't extra virgin, sunflower oil, canola oil, margarine, anything that says low-fat on the label, instant coffee, any shop-bought frozen vegetables except for peas, and calabrese. Calabrese. Ye gods, tasteless mush!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 08 Jan 20 - 02:37 PM

The salad shooter is a mechanical slicer-dicer that I last saw in a TV infomercial back in the days when we still had TV — a very long time ago. Think of a crank-action mandoline.

We are still in a food coma from New Year.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 08 Jan 20 - 05:37 AM

A "salad shooter?"


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia
Date: 08 Jan 20 - 01:41 AM

I invented a new chicken dish yesterday.

Save the grease from cooking breakfast pork sausage. Chill it, and the burned bits will sink to the bottom. Don't use them.

Cut chicken thighs in half, warm up on low power in the wave. (They brown better when warm.)

Cut up and saute an onion in some of the sausage grease

Remove the onions, set aside in a pretty bowl

Brown the chicken thighs on one side.

Meanwhile, use salad shooter to slice up carrots and celery

when the chicken is browned on one side, turn it over and start browning that side.

put the carrots and celery in a ring around the meat

put lid on, simmer till meat is tender, maybe 30 minutes more

(I find I have to cook chicken much longer than recipes say.)

Remember those onions? Shortly before it's time to eat, stir 1 tsp sage into the onions, then return them to the skillet to heat through.

You'll notice there is no salt. The DH doesn't like it. Let diners salt it themselves at the dinner table.

Remove the food with a slotted spoon (so fat drains off) and serve. This was GOOD.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 07 Jan 20 - 12:52 PM

Damn. You posted that ten minutes after I'd just polished off a huge box of fudge... :-(


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 07 Jan 20 - 12:38 PM

Good idea, Don!

This - Make 2020 the Year of Less Sugar is what I need to work on. It includes a link to a lecture I need to listen to. (If the article doesn't open across the pond let me know and I'll do some cut and paste).

Whether you are thin or fat, you can benefit by reducing the sugar in your diet. “It’s not about being obese, it has to do with metabolic health,” says Dr. Robert Lustig, professor of pediatric endocrinology at the University of California, San Francisco, and one of the first to raise the alarm about the health risks of added sugar. (His 90-minute lecture called Sugar: The Bitter Truth has been viewed more than nine million times since 2009.)

“Sugar turns on the aging programs in your body,” Dr. Lustig says. “The more sugar you eat, the faster you age.”


https://www.nytimes.com/programs/sugar-challenge.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 07 Jan 20 - 10:50 AM

I live in Philadelphia.

Sorry.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel
Date: 07 Jan 20 - 08:54 AM

The 'soup' was worthy of a Shel Silverstien poem.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel
Date: 07 Jan 20 - 07:39 AM

I tried to invent a sesame vegetable soup with Tons of hearty ingredents. It grew bigger and worse.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 07 Jan 20 - 06:29 AM

When it has cheese in, it becomes Mornay sauce.

If you care.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 06 Jan 20 - 04:58 PM

Ah, Raggytash is right. She makes the béchamel then stirs cheese into it, which I suppose makes it not béchamel any more. We all have our ways...


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 06 Jan 20 - 04:14 PM

Of course it does - if you add it. "White sauce" - the basis of so many recipes. At my house, many of them have cheese.

I mean, really, WHAT would you want it FOR if it didn't have cheese added?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Raggytash
Date: 06 Jan 20 - 03:57 PM

Ah hem ………………. Bechamel doesn't have cheese in it.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 06 Jan 20 - 01:37 PM

Our family holiday gathering was yesterday and my fridge is stufffed full of leftovers. There won't be any original dishes prepared until some of that is drawn down or frozen. That said, I do have a bowl of chick peas soaking to make a batch of falafel tomorrow; this is to test the new food processor (higher capacity - my old one was woefully under-powered and had a tiny bowl) and take some of the patties over to family who contributed this new tool to my kitchen. (I made a couple of batches of falafel balls last week with the small deep fryer, but this time I'll use shallower oil in a pan and cook flattened patties to eliminate the cleanup involved with the fryer.) The falafel comes now because the son who gave the food processor flies back to the West coast later this week.)


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 06 Jan 20 - 12:54 PM

We made a huge lasagne two nights ago. It's a collaboration, strictly speaking, as I let Mrs Steve make the béchamel ( we use strong cheddar mixed with parmesan and I don't care what anybody thinks) and assemble the thing. We are somewhat at odds over the ragù. She thinks I should be adding garlic-crusher garlic and I think garlic shouldn't go anywhere near. I compromise by chucking in a few peeled cloves that I've bashed with my fist. Over the years I've secretly removed dried herbs from the mix altogether. I'd rather hack off the family jewels with a rusty machete than add dried basil. As it's Christmas I did add a little sprinkle of dried oregano this time. A sprig of thyme wouldn't hurt. I always start with a soffritto in which I include some chopped unsmoked bacon or pancetta. The soffritto is equal parts chopped celery, carrot and onion in extra virgin olive oil, sautéed until the veg is softened. I brown the meat separately, not too much at once, by dry-frying in a big stainless steel frying pan I've inherited. The meat is half minced steak and half minced pork. Once browned it goes into the soffritto along with a bit of chicken stock, tomatoes (one 400ml tin of plum tomatoes fewer than the number of pounds of meat) and some seasoning. Maybe a splash of wine. That needs a good hour or more at a simmer. Two hours wouldn't hurt. Adjust for correct sloppiness with a bit more stock or tomato. Adding water is far too disappointing. Then it's over to the assembly dept. We cook it for about 40 minutes in a 180C oven. Leftovers are perfect microwaved for breakfast the next day. Either you serve it up with a drizzle of your finest olive oil on top or you're wrong. Some garlic bread and salad goes well. I've seen it on offer in pubs with chips. If you see that, call a constable immediately.


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