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BS: Recipes - what are we eating?

Steve Shaw 01 Sep 19 - 02:42 PM
Stilly River Sage 01 Sep 19 - 02:24 PM
Jon Freeman 01 Sep 19 - 10:58 AM
Steve Shaw 01 Sep 19 - 10:27 AM
Stilly River Sage 01 Sep 19 - 10:06 AM
Stilly River Sage 01 Sep 19 - 09:57 AM
Jon Freeman 01 Sep 19 - 08:15 AM
Steve Shaw 31 Aug 19 - 12:26 PM
Steve Shaw 30 Aug 19 - 06:21 PM
Stilly River Sage 30 Aug 19 - 01:29 PM
Neil D 29 Aug 19 - 04:01 PM
Steve Shaw 29 Aug 19 - 04:27 AM
BobL 29 Aug 19 - 03:47 AM
Steve Shaw 28 Aug 19 - 08:06 PM
Charmion 28 Aug 19 - 07:46 PM
Mrrzy 28 Aug 19 - 03:29 PM
Stilly River Sage 28 Aug 19 - 12:59 PM
Mrrzy 28 Aug 19 - 12:44 PM
Steve Shaw 28 Aug 19 - 10:40 AM
Charmion 28 Aug 19 - 09:54 AM
Steve Shaw 27 Aug 19 - 07:46 PM
Stilly River Sage 27 Aug 19 - 07:29 PM
Steve Shaw 27 Aug 19 - 05:03 PM
Steve Shaw 26 Aug 19 - 07:20 PM
Stilly River Sage 26 Aug 19 - 06:43 PM
Steve Shaw 24 Aug 19 - 04:44 AM
Steve Shaw 24 Aug 19 - 04:36 AM
leeneia 23 Aug 19 - 11:03 AM
Stilly River Sage 22 Aug 19 - 10:43 PM
Mrrzy 22 Aug 19 - 10:42 PM
Steve Shaw 22 Aug 19 - 08:34 PM
Charmion 22 Aug 19 - 07:19 PM
Steve Shaw 22 Aug 19 - 06:28 PM
Charmion 22 Aug 19 - 09:39 AM
Mrrzy 21 Aug 19 - 11:36 PM
Stilly River Sage 21 Aug 19 - 08:18 PM
Steve Shaw 21 Aug 19 - 06:59 PM
Stilly River Sage 21 Aug 19 - 03:59 PM
Dave Hanson 21 Aug 19 - 03:19 PM
Steve Shaw 21 Aug 19 - 03:12 PM
keberoxu 21 Aug 19 - 03:08 PM
Jon Freeman 21 Aug 19 - 12:53 PM
Stilly River Sage 21 Aug 19 - 11:08 AM
Mrrzy 20 Aug 19 - 09:59 PM
Steve Shaw 20 Aug 19 - 06:02 PM
leeneia 20 Aug 19 - 12:28 PM
Stilly River Sage 20 Aug 19 - 11:17 AM
gillymor 20 Aug 19 - 10:17 AM
Charmion 20 Aug 19 - 09:51 AM
BobL 20 Aug 19 - 03:59 AM
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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 01 Sep 19 - 02:42 PM

How odd that, despite the planetary gulf between us, we both relish cheddar cheese from the same dairy. Also, for the record Mrs Steve makes banana loaves all the time, and we freeze them too. I'll pass on the tip for breakfast but I fear we'll be sticking to that "healthy" rabbit food with wood dust in the bottom of every box that goes by the name "muesli..." :-(


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 01 Sep 19 - 02:24 PM

They only deliver to England and Wales, but I think the fact that they show the Coastal cheese in the wrapper means they load it up and send it abroad. That's the same wrapper we get here. That producer has some very nice varieties - I hope you all enjoy sampling them! That ballcap looks nice, but it is a bit pricey, though they say they ship free.

Costco buys things in bulk to sell in their warehouse clubs and they don't buy every brand that's out there, they try to get the best value for what they charge and this cheese is (so far) always in stock. That can't be said about everything they carry.

Two small loaves of banana bread are in the oven since I had three very large bananas one step away from the compost and I already have at least three pints of frozen bananas already. I'll freeze one of these and use the other for breakfast for a couple of days. A slightly warmed up slice of banana nut bread with a cuppa tea is a very nice way to start the day.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 01 Sep 19 - 10:58 AM

It's available from their online shop

It's one I'd considered trying if (not yet done...) also ordering a bit of the Cave Aged Cheddar.

(A small order of 2 or 3 online makes more sense to me with our transport limitations than say trying to get to Aylsham M&S).


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 01 Sep 19 - 10:27 AM

Well whaddya know, SRS: your Rugged Coastal is made at the same dairy, Ford Farm, as our very favourite cheddar, Wookey Hole cave-aged. I don't recall seeing it anywhere but I'll be looking out for it from now on.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 01 Sep 19 - 10:06 AM

Steve and Jon, my favorite sharp cheddar is a UK import they sell in the Costco warehouse club here. Coastal Rugged Mature English Cheddar Cheese. Even better than this is one of the aged blond cheddars that comes out of the Ag school at Washington State University. Cougar Gold is my favorite. Since it's so hot here right now they let you know they won't ship until it's cooler weather.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 01 Sep 19 - 09:57 AM

There is a long-lived cooking show on Public Television here in the US called Cooks Country and it's companion America Test Kitchen. They ditched the host who established the program a few years ago; too bad. But they still make some pretty interesting dishes, and on a repeat program yesterday they did a pretty interesting Eastern North Carolina Fish Stew.

I logged in to the free part of the site but this recipe isn't appearing. The description is:

    Locals have loved this hearty, tomatoey, bacon-infused stew for decades. For our version, we staggered the cooking of the onions and potatoes instead of dumping them both in at once. In a handful of tests we found that any mild, firm whitefish worked as long as it was cut into chunks of equal size and added toward the end of cooking. An oddball addition to this dish is poached eggs, which are layered atop the stew and cooked in a covered pot over medium-low heat until silky in texture.


You can set up a free account, and once you're in, try navigating to the recipe via the search box. I couldn't get to the video or recipe I first landed on, I had to log on and search again to get to it, and with a free account I can only see the video. Take notes if you want to try cooking it.

This is the video if you already have an account.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 01 Sep 19 - 08:15 AM

Here’s a link to the BBC article.

Drifting a little… Cheese came in briefly in conversation with brother in oz (a bit NE of Brisbane) on his last visit. Apparently he can find some very nice cheese but he’s never managed to find something along the lines of a simple Cheshire.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 31 Aug 19 - 12:26 PM

Dunno whether you Americans can get the BBC News website (not the TV one), but there's an interesting item on there today entitled "American cheese: does it deserve its bad reputation?"

Because of tariffs it's unlikely that we'll be tasting each other's cheeses any time soon, but I'd be interested to hear your comments about the item and the cheeses mentioned, or not mentioned, therein. Don't worry, it's quite sympathetic!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 30 Aug 19 - 06:21 PM

Must confess that I'm a winter soup man mostly. In summer I've rarely made gazpacho, but I've often made salmorejo, the Andalucian thick tomato bready stuff that's probably more a tapa than a soup, served cold with breadsticks and a topping of chopped hard-boiled egg and scraps of Serrano ham. I'll hang on for colder weather before telling y'all about me hot soups...

But keep making that real stock. Utterly paramount...


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 30 Aug 19 - 01:29 PM

We had a respite from summer with a couple of rainy days earlier this week, so I pretended it was back to "cooking weather" and made a batch of turkey stock and later a batch of chicken stock (from the carcass of the rotisserie chicken). The chicken stock will go into the freezer but I'm planning to make a very small batch of turkey soup. Just because it's so long since I've had soup.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Neil D
Date: 29 Aug 19 - 04:01 PM

My wife just made low-carb turkey schnitzel using breading made from crushed pork rinds and almond flour. This morning I made a sloppy Joe omelet.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 29 Aug 19 - 04:27 AM

They're pretty rare round here, unfortunately. I remember once picking hatfuls of them from hedges in South Wales. They make glorious jam, and the stones all float conveniently to the top in the preserving pan.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: BobL
Date: 29 Aug 19 - 03:47 AM

Selling damsons? Good grief Steve, they're free for the taking round here (Aylesbury Vale). There were orchards full of them back in the days when their juice was used to dye straw for the Luton hat industry, and they're still to be found a-plenty in the local hedgerows.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 28 Aug 19 - 08:06 PM

I've done it quite a lot with raspberries. I love the end-product but no-one else does. So I have a secret personal supply of raspberry gin unmonitored by Mrs Steve... :-)

Damsons are like small, dark plums, about the size of a large cherry tomato, quite tart in the mouth but excellent for jam - and for damson gin or vodka. I use them in the same way as sloes, tiny wild plum-like things that ripen in late autumn on blackthorn bushes. They are very astringent in the mouth but they make superb sloe gin. The general formula is 12 oz pricked sloes or damsons to one 70cl bottle of vodka or gin, along with 6oz sugar (you can always add more later). Keep for at least three months in a wide-necked jar, shaking occasionally, then decant into clean bottles. The cloudy residue looks unattractive but is what I regard as "cook's treat"... you can profitably freeze the fruit for a day or two first, which obviates the need for pricking.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 28 Aug 19 - 07:46 PM

Steve, I do that vodka thing with sour cherries or raspberries. Never tried damsons — are they what we call Italian or prune plums?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 28 Aug 19 - 03:29 PM

Also check the Italy thread if you aren't hungry enough.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 28 Aug 19 - 12:59 PM

I've never made it, I buy it from a couple of local sources.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 28 Aug 19 - 12:44 PM

Ceviche. First attempt yummy but not cevichy, more like a salad with yummy fish in it. Advice?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 28 Aug 19 - 10:40 AM

Stumbled across a shop selling damsons this afternoon. I'll prick 12oz of them and put them in a jar containing a bottle of vodka and 6oz sugar. By Christmas I'll have a bottle of beautiful liqueur to wash down the Christmas cake.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 28 Aug 19 - 09:54 AM

Tomatoes are in season in Perth County, and therefore cheap, cheap, cheap.

I bought a three-litre punnet of Romas from down the road yesterday, and spent a messy hour rendering them into sauce with oregano and basil from the garden. A heavenly scent permeated the house, bringing Himself out of his study with a distinctly greedy glint in his eye. Pasta for supper, with grated Parm and chorizo, and a green salad on the side.

That batch of tomatoes produced enough sauce for four meals, if I don't let myself at it with a spoon.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 27 Aug 19 - 07:46 PM

Yep, peanut equals groundnut.

The hardest bit of cooking skin-on fish in the oven is the timing. Tonight, my pollack fillets, which were quite thick, took about nine minutes in a 200C oven. They tell you to test whether the fish is opaque all through and going flaky. That is not easy! Much better slightly underdone, rather than dry and tough because you've lost your nerve. I nearly always get it right these days.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 27 Aug 19 - 07:29 PM

"Groundnut" - would that be peanut on this side of the pond?

I found some pollack buried in the back of the freezer. It won't be as wonderful as yours, but it makes a great breaded and fried fish to go with pan-fried potatoes (cut into chunks and sauteed in olive oil and seasonings), a homemade form of fish and chips.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 27 Aug 19 - 05:03 PM

Tonight we had line-caught pollack from Bude Bay. Our fishmonger prepared it beautifully for us, fresh as a daisy it was. I made some oven chips from "Jazzy" potatoes (cut into wedges, parboil for eight minutes in salted water, drain well, coat with groundnut oil and bake for 20 minutes in a very hot oven). Meanwhile I made some mushy peas from the frozen Morrison's article, 20 minutes' boiling in sparse water. I basted the skin-on fish fillets in olive oil, lemon juice, fresh thyme and a whiff of garlic, plus seasoning, then baked them open for about nine minutes in the hot oven (turned it down a tad first) on the chip tray (I put the chips on another tray first). Nirvana.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 26 Aug 19 - 07:20 PM

Last night we had a food emergency. I was going to barbecue some rather magnificent cod loins, skin on, but I'd misjudged the amount of time needed for it to thaw. Normally, that wouldn't matter, but I found that pinboning half-frozen cod is impossible without wrecking the fish. I therefore abandoned the fish, returning it to the freezer (discuss...), and we had cheese instead. But what cheese. Aside from the small lump of Mrs Kirkham's Lancashire that we had lying around, we tried a French one that we'd never tried before, namely blue d'Affinois. What a magnificent cheese. With those two to hand, we were in cheese heaven. The d'Affinois is a soft blue, double-cream cheese. You don't need much as it's very rich, but, begod, it's a beauty....


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 26 Aug 19 - 06:43 PM

I've been over to my local one-off gourmet surplus grocery that sells deeply discounted foods, many that came from the grocery store supplier because they weren't sold to the stores, others that are extra after big events (there's a high-end store that does cheese and fish and fruit and chile and other events during the year; the extra ends up here.) I'm concluding a frugal month and the purchases were mostly to restore dwindling supplies of fresh vegetables. I'll be eating a lot of asparagus because I couldn't resist buying two bunches for ten cents each. Green and yellow bell peppers and poblano peppers will be sliced and frozen.

Yesterday I brought home a rotisserie chicken and I'll be using it this week in various dishes - with these fresh peppers the first thing I'll do is pull a breast apart and mix the shreds in with sauteed sliced onions and poblanos for fajitas. I have frozen corn tortillas that will go with those. I top it with some of my thawed homemade guacamole, lebne (works like sour cream) and a few dashes of Tapatio hot sauce.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 24 Aug 19 - 04:44 AM

That was yesterday evening. I started the message last night and finished it this morning. Don't ask... :-)


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 24 Aug 19 - 04:36 AM

We did a very simple barbecue this evening. Very basic, very delicious. The main player was mackerel fillets, three each, quite large. I had to spend half an hour pin-boning the buggers, but it was worth it. I made a baste of lemon juice (fresh lemons or forget it), a squidge of garlic, a sprig of thyme, a dash of Tabasco and, not least, extra virgin oil. We had salad potatoes, cut in half, coated in extra virgin olive oil and seasoned, baked on a tray in a hot oven for half an hour, and cherry tomatoes skewered and done for five minutes on the grill. It was a beautiful evening too. Lit the fire pit and dotted a few citronella tea lights to ward off the mozzies. Bliss.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia
Date: 23 Aug 19 - 11:03 AM

We have made the cauliflower steaks with olive oil both fried in a skillet and baked in the oven. Both are good.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 22 Aug 19 - 10:43 PM

I've been tempted to put some links at the top of the thread to various recipes posted here, but there are so many that are casual yet actionable descriptions I wouldn't know where to start.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 22 Aug 19 - 10:42 PM

Um, cooking things twice as long as the recipe says usually does result in dry/acrid/burned, in my experience. I have had great experiences with grilled cauliflower steaks, oh do try again. Maybe thinner slices? I'd hate for you to miss out...


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 22 Aug 19 - 08:34 PM

Well as you can imagine, Charmion, I possess Marcella's "bible," and as soon as I saw your post I looked up that cauliflower recipe. It will be next on my cauliflower hit-list and I shall report back. I must have posted our favourite Yotam Ottolenghi cauliflower recipe before, the one with chorizo, sliced olives, pumpkin seeds and paprika. I really must get to bed now but I'll post it tomorrow if I haven't already.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 22 Aug 19 - 07:19 PM

Thanks for the report, Steve. I thought it looked too good to be true.

Marcella’s cauliflower — the one where you boil the entire head whole, then smush it up with olive oil, Parmesan, salt and pepper — was such a revelation to me that I’ll never eat it any other way again.

Oh, except for that Madhur Jeffrey recipe where you break a whole cauliflower into florets and cook it in a wok with turmeric and nigella (no kidding!) seed. I could eat the whole thing myself, cooked like that.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 22 Aug 19 - 06:28 PM

I wish to report a culinary failure. I bought a beautiful big cauliflower yesterday for a quid. The weather later on today was unexpectedly benign, so we thought we'd have a barbecue. I found a recipe for barbecued cauliflower steaks. You cut the whole cauliflower into thick vertical slices, baste them with garlicky olive oil and barbecue them gently (I used one of those perforated aluminium trays) for six or seven minutes each side.

Well what a waste of a good cauliflower. Dry, acrid, ruined. And it took twice as long as the recipe said. Binned it. Never again.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 22 Aug 19 - 09:39 AM

I stopped buying margarine when I finally managed to persuade Himself that butter would not take him to an early grave with heart disease. I haven't eaten the stuff myself since I was a child, and my parents bought it because it was cheap.

I must confess that it took me way to long to learn that, with respect to food, "both good and cheap" typically applies only to what's in season where you live, if you're lucky.

Yesterday I went out to Canadian Tire and bought myself a Food Saver vacuum-sealer. This is a gadget that vacuum-packs food for storage in heat-sealed plastic bags. As soon as I brought it home, I set it up in the kitchen and promptly packed up two trays of chicken legs bought on special the day before. This task normally takes a great deal of fiddling around with clingfilm, zipper bags and masking tape, with mediocre results. With the Food Saver, time on task was cut by at least half, with much less accompanying mess. The resulting packages look just like the vacuum-sealed items in the butcher's freezer, and I expect them to be as resistant to damage. Himself tells me that vacuum-sealers are very popular with "preppers" -- the people who think they can survive the Zombie Apocalypse if they only pack away enough freeze-dried soup mix in their basements. I hope the Food Saver is the only thing we have in common ...

All this was brought on by the discovery of a package of chicken parts damaged by freezer burn. I remember that package, an awkward thing of corners and odd angles, and it was a damnable nuisance to wrap. I hope that's my last freezer-burned item. It would also be nice to reduce our holdings of baggies and clingfilm, which I loathe because it can't be recycled and it always twists into useless clumps.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 21 Aug 19 - 11:36 PM

Hee hee that was supposed to be mdash but mash was way more culinary!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 21 Aug 19 - 08:18 PM

That sounds like a wonderful Wednesday tradition!

I'm still clearing the freezer so I had the last two small pieces of cod, breaded and pan fried with homemade tartar sauce and I'll nibble something more later. I also defrosted half a multi-grain baguette that I toasted for a crostini later in the week. I made some carrot salad yesterday (ground carrots, raisins, mayonnaise) and I baked some sweet potatoes, so it could be something like that. It has been up to or over 100o for the last three weeks and I just don't feel like sitting down to one meal all at once.

A single malt Scotch (better for me to drink after a meal) finishes the evening.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 21 Aug 19 - 06:59 PM

Mrs Steve and I have this tradition of not cooking on Wednesday nights. The core of the menu is always cheese with Bath Olivers. We have a repertoire of accompaniments/starters. It could be avocado with prawns and Delia Smith's seafood sauce, or my version of mackerel pate* with toasted Crosta Mollusca Puglian bread (two quid from Waitrose, does us twice, freeze half of it), or just assorted nibbles.

Tonight it was assorted nibbles. We had a pot of Greek olives with feta and sun-dried tomatoes (M&S), a small pot of habas fritas, a small pot of almonds, half a jar of caperberries, some Sungold tomatoes from my greenhouse and some baby cucumbers, sliced longways, also from my greenhouse. The cheeses were a hunk of Montagnolo (a soft blue triple-creme cheese from Germany) and a hunk of Mrs Kirkham's Lancashire. My God, we ate well. We washed it down with a bottle of Puglian Primitivo (oddly, the label said Zinfandel, genetically identical). Sweet dreams, dearest...

*The mackerel pate is disgustingly delicious and disgustingly easy. Make it the day before for best flavour. If you have a hand blender it takes about four minutes not counting the washing up. If you haven't got a hand blender, there's something seriously wrong with you...

You need two cans of mackerel in olive oil, which you should drain and discard the oil, one heaped teaspoon of hot mustard (Colmans English innit, not that grainy stuff), one tablespoon of full-fat creme fraiche, a grinding of black pepper (no salt, please), a dash of Tabasco and the juice of a good half of lemon. Do not use that abomination which is bottled lemon juice. Get yourself a fresh unwaxed lemon. You won't regret it.

Put the whole lot into a jug and blitz it to almost death with your hand blender. You will have to shove it down the side of the jug a couple of times. It's very quick. Scoop into a nice ornamental pot (I have a lovely collection that I bought in Andalucía). Just before you serve it up to your beloved, coarsely grate some lemon zest on top. You need some really good hot toast and butter to go with it. The Puglian toast is magnificent if you can get it.

As with many things, I can't tell you how much better this is if you make it the day before and stick it in the fridge...


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 21 Aug 19 - 03:59 PM

I would think pressure cooking would overdo the corn. One point I took from Nero Wolfe was that "American housewives murder corn on the cob" or something along those lines, by boiling it for 10 minutes or more. I took note and usually only have it in the water long enough to get hot, probably 5 minutes.

My dogs love corn on the cob and my Labrador retriever is particularly adept at eating it off the ear row by row, human-style. The other dog it's a bit of a wrestling match to keep her from taking the entire cob to consume. Yes, it is possible to have leftover corn, and this is how I dispatch it. You should see those two gobble it down if there is butter on it. (Agreed about margarine, I haven't used it for years. I adopted friend's policy, who once pointed out that she didn't use much to spread, etc., so she might as well use butter. I also cook with it and have stopped using shortening. I use butter or oil instead.)


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Dave Hanson
Date: 21 Aug 19 - 03:19 PM

My wife left me 20 years ago, not had margerine in the house since.

Horrible stuff.

Dave H


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 21 Aug 19 - 03:12 PM

Margarine will considerably shorten your life. It has not been allowed in our house for 25 years. Butter is the word you're looking for.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: keberoxu
Date: 21 Aug 19 - 03:08 PM

One more reminiscence about sweet corn on the cob.

How my mom found out about
corn on the cob
and pressure cookers, I do not know,
but the two went together, in her kitchen,
as strictly as white with rice.

We gobbled it down as though we had all changed into hogs.
(provided sufficient margarine/butter and salt, that is)

The pressure cooker, I reckon,
would shorten considerably the cooking time.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 21 Aug 19 - 12:53 PM

I found an aubergine “in hiding” today. The other fruit that have formed are much smaller but this one somehow got to about 10 inches unnoticed. I chopped it up together with a courgette and a tub of mushrooms and cooked it it some (in the recycling bin now and I can’t remember what it was) “cook in” sauce. Parents seem to be tucking away happily as I type.

One thing I’m sometimes in two minds about with this sort of hash up is whether to do rice or some pasta with it. I’m none too sure that some of my “cooking” would go down to well with some here but I’m curious anyway. Rice would usually be preferred here but I think either could be used and wonder about others.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 21 Aug 19 - 11:08 AM

I froze this year's wild grape juice because so far I haven't gotten around to making jelly. And while I was in there I evicted a gallon freezer bag of mystery meat, probably cooked turkey. I had some turkey legs and thighs from 2016 that were sealed in the Food Saver vacuum bags and they're a different story&mash;stuff saved that way really does last a long time. I think tonight I'll try making some soup with the thighs; if it isn't any good tomorrow is trash day (though I expect it to be just fine).

This is a "Frugal" month, where I'm trying to spend as little as possible beyond the usual bills and gas and occasionally picking up fresh fruit and vegetables. I'm coming up with some interesting meals with frozen items. I'd forgotten I had a couple of pounds of Jimmy Dean sausage in the freezer so I had a few ounces of that alongside my bowl of oatmeal this morning. All of this cooking is better-aligned with cool-weather, but still delicious.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 20 Aug 19 - 09:59 PM

Them mussels were YUMMY without the Pernod!

And yet still I crave. Vitamin deficiency or something?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 20 Aug 19 - 06:02 PM

Supermarkets here sell corn on the cob that goes by the name "supersweet." It can be very nice, though it's been known to be a bit chewy. Ten or fifteen minutes on the barbecue, not too roaring, renders it delicious. No need to wrap it in foil or anything. Just keep it turning.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia
Date: 20 Aug 19 - 12:28 PM

I find that corn on the cob from local supermarkets is quite good. We shuck it, pull off the silk, put it on a plate with 2T of water and microwave it on high for 5 minutes. You have to let it cool off before you can eat it.

Nero Wolfe's instructions (IIRC) were to bake the corn unhusked, in the hottest possible oven for 45 minutes. I would never do it; it's unthinkable to run a hot oven on a hot summer day.

Cook's Illustrated magazine just had a recipe for country ribs, Spanish style, and we are going to try them today with corn on the cob and fresh tomatoes. "Spanish style" calls for lots of spices from my spice collection.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 20 Aug 19 - 11:17 AM

There was a Nero Wolfe novella in Trio For Blunt Instruments that was made into the TV episode Murder Is Corny. He has specific requirements that the corn be picked and delivered very quickly (and then other information about how to cook it.)

My Facebook page is messed up so I asked the question about the source of this story in the Wolfe Pack page then had to go there via my pitbull's account to read their answer since my original post disappeared. (This is getting really old!)

As a kid in Seattle one of my favorite meals every summer was when Mom would get the fresh corn (she grew up on a farm so I imagine had a good idea of what fresh corn was all about) and boil it and keep bringing it to the table. We got one dinner each summer of just corn on the cob, as much as we wanted to butter and salt and gobble down. With six of us I imagine that must have amounted to a case of corn. :)


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: gillymor
Date: 20 Aug 19 - 10:17 AM

When I lived near the shore in Delaware during summers we'd catch a bunch of blue crabs and then run out to a u-pick farm and gather up some Silver Queen corn and within a couple of hours they'd both be on the boil (not in the same pot) and I can't imagine corn that tasted any better.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 20 Aug 19 - 09:51 AM

BobL, my family practised your first method (run-not-walk-back-to-the-kitchen) of corn preparation when I was young and, since we grew a tender white variety called Country Gentleman (now long disappeared), that was just about right. (My mother would probably have started a grass fire if she had ever been given custody of a camp stove.)

The corn we eat these days comes from local farmers who bring it to market in great heaps in the back of pick-up trucks. It is picked just after dawn, cooked within the day, and eaten before dark. Not optimum by the standards of true corn purists, but okay for our aging olfactory senses.

I never buy corn on the cob at the supermarket. That's just sad, and totally unnecessary in southwestern Ontario, where corn has grown since time immemorial. I see it there, all wrapped in plastic, and wonder if the people who buy it come from Mars or Antarctica, or perhaps had their tastebuds (and common sense) shot off in the war.

Jon Freeman's remark about teeth is very pertinent, however. I thank every higher power there is that I still have a full set of natural-grown, original-to-me choppers, inelegant as they may be, for at the age of 65 I can still gnaw a bone or a corn cob to good effect. Mind you, I have to set aside enough time later for a close encounter with the dental floss, but there you go.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: BobL
Date: 20 Aug 19 - 03:59 AM

"best cooked very soon after harvest"

Which gives me an excuse to repeat an old tale about some folks discussing the best way of ensuring their (home-grown) corn was at its freshest when cooked.

The first said "I get the water on the boil, go and pick the corn and run - not walk - with it back to the kitchen, and put it straight in."
The second said "I set up a camping stove next to the corn patch, get some water boiling, and can cook the corn the instant it's picked."
The third said "I set up a camping stove right in the corn patch. When the water boils, I bend the plants over so that the cobs dangle in it. That way, they're cooked even before they're picked!"


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