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BS: Recipes - what are we eating?

punkfolkrocker 30 Nov 18 - 06:23 AM
Donuel 29 Nov 18 - 11:14 PM
EBarnacle 29 Nov 18 - 09:19 PM
Jos 27 Nov 18 - 04:12 PM
EBarnacle 27 Nov 18 - 03:42 PM
Stilly River Sage 27 Nov 18 - 01:34 PM
Charmion 27 Nov 18 - 01:19 PM
Steve Shaw 27 Nov 18 - 07:13 AM
Donuel 27 Nov 18 - 07:08 AM
Dave Hanson 26 Nov 18 - 02:41 PM
Dave Hanson 26 Nov 18 - 02:39 PM
Stilly River Sage 26 Nov 18 - 11:37 AM
Jos 26 Nov 18 - 10:50 AM
Charmion 26 Nov 18 - 10:35 AM
Jon Freeman 26 Nov 18 - 05:47 AM
Stilly River Sage 25 Nov 18 - 09:11 PM
Steve Shaw 25 Nov 18 - 06:47 PM
Stilly River Sage 25 Nov 18 - 05:55 PM
Steve Shaw 25 Nov 18 - 04:25 PM
Stilly River Sage 25 Nov 18 - 01:02 PM
Jon Freeman 25 Nov 18 - 10:36 AM
Stilly River Sage 25 Nov 18 - 09:54 AM
Jon Freeman 25 Nov 18 - 07:54 AM
Steve Shaw 25 Nov 18 - 07:51 AM
Jon Freeman 25 Nov 18 - 06:28 AM
Jos 25 Nov 18 - 06:15 AM
Steve Shaw 25 Nov 18 - 05:45 AM
Jon Freeman 25 Nov 18 - 05:26 AM
Jos 25 Nov 18 - 05:09 AM
Jon Freeman 25 Nov 18 - 04:09 AM
Jon Freeman 25 Nov 18 - 03:06 AM
Steve Shaw 24 Nov 18 - 07:19 PM
Jon Freeman 24 Nov 18 - 10:42 AM
Stilly River Sage 24 Nov 18 - 10:35 AM
Jon Freeman 24 Nov 18 - 09:17 AM
Jos 24 Nov 18 - 08:50 AM
Jon Freeman 24 Nov 18 - 07:54 AM
Thompson 24 Nov 18 - 12:43 AM
Steve Shaw 23 Nov 18 - 07:25 PM
keberoxu 23 Nov 18 - 07:02 PM
Steve Shaw 23 Nov 18 - 06:50 PM
keberoxu 23 Nov 18 - 06:00 PM
Jon Freeman 23 Nov 18 - 05:31 PM
Stilly River Sage 23 Nov 18 - 05:21 PM
Steve Shaw 23 Nov 18 - 04:14 PM
Steve Shaw 23 Nov 18 - 04:07 PM
Jon Freeman 23 Nov 18 - 03:34 PM
Stilly River Sage 23 Nov 18 - 03:17 PM
Steve Shaw 23 Nov 18 - 03:08 PM
Steve Shaw 23 Nov 18 - 02:41 PM
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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: punkfolkrocker
Date: 30 Nov 18 - 06:23 AM

Chocolate digestive bisuits topped with slices of mature chedar cheese...

and a mug of strong black tea [leave the teabag in]...


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel
Date: 29 Nov 18 - 11:14 PM

Unfortunately we have no Mustang Grapes in these parts.
As for wild Tarts, I don't know.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: EBarnacle
Date: 29 Nov 18 - 09:19 PM

Unless I want edema, I avoid salt.
This morning, we had home made latkes [potato pancakes] with peach compote[also homemade].


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 27 Nov 18 - 04:12 PM

Sometimes when food is just too bland, what it needs as well as other flavours is a little salt.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: EBarnacle
Date: 27 Nov 18 - 03:42 PM

Aaah, back to the beets. I used to strongly dislike beet foods until I got together with Lady Hillary. She has made a convert of me. She cuts the beets up fine, then boils them and adds a few spices, finishing up with an immersion blender. We make the batch large enough to store in a couple of quart size Chinese Tupperware containers. We generally serve it cold with home made yogurt instead of sour cream [shades of my grandmother].

A couple of weeks before Thanksgiving I made up a batch of leek and potato soup. The problem I had with it was that it resisted taste. No matter what spices I added to it [again, the batch size gave us three quarts for the fridge] it was determinedly bland. Hot sauce, curry, chili sauce no effect.

For Thanksgiving Lady Hillary made up a butternut squash soup that, for its final heating got some ginger and garlic [both fresh]. Delightful.

This weekend we had sweet potato fries at a barbecue restaurant. It came with a dusting of brown sugar that was very good. There was something in the taste which suggested that a bit of finely chopped ginger would go well with it. That will get a try in the next few days.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 27 Nov 18 - 01:34 PM

I have shifted over the years to giving as many consumable gifts as possible, made at home. This year I've canned both pickled okra and mustang grape jelly and last night I made seven small loaves of banana nut bread that are now wrapped and in the freezer.

I recently send my son and my sister pickled okra, but neither is sure they'll like it, so my advice has been to wait until they have guests over to open the jar. Try it themselves and see if they like it. If not, chances are someone at the gathering will know what it is and like it and they can send the rest home with them. It keeps in the fridge for a long time so they can try that trick at parties all through the holiday season until it's eaten or given away.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 27 Nov 18 - 01:19 PM

I love white sourdough bread, but my digestion does not. If I'm going to eat bread more than occasionally, it really has to be whole-grain. A batch of brown is under construction as I type.

Beetroot is great stuff. I like to include it in a batch of roasted veg, with Jerusalem artichokes, carrots, celery root and parsnips, flavoured with shallots, garlic and thyme. The carrots and beets usually have to be parboiled, but it's a small nuisance. Around here, we can get beets in every hue produced by beta-carotene, from pale yellow to darkest crimson. Golden beets are just as delicious as the red kind, but don't result in pink pee.

Just sayin'.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 27 Nov 18 - 07:13 AM

I love beetroot and devour it with relish but I have to make a pact with myself not to look down the toilet for the next 24 hours.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel
Date: 27 Nov 18 - 07:08 AM

Thompson I do believe I would enjoy beet root prepared your way.
I have had such an aversion to beets as a result of having to eat Borsch as a kid.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Dave Hanson
Date: 26 Nov 18 - 02:41 PM

Incidently I've tried sourdough wholemeal and sourdough rye and I'm distinctly very dissapointed with both.

Dave H


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Dave Hanson
Date: 26 Nov 18 - 02:39 PM

White sourdough is the best white bread I've ever tasted, my starter is over 10 years old now, it never fails.

Dave H


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 26 Nov 18 - 11:37 AM

Agreed - I bet you can find a taker for the next stage of your experiment. :)

My broth is ready to use - with as much turkey as is here I'm going to make a dense turkey pot pie stew with some of it and freeze the extra broth.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 26 Nov 18 - 10:50 AM

Maybe you could give the sourdough culture to a friend or neighbour, like finding the dog a new home.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 26 Nov 18 - 10:35 AM

I make almost all the bread we eat at home. I've been running a sourdough experiment for several months now, but I recently decided that it's not worth the trouble with just two of us, and only Himself eating more than a slice per day. Also, I have so far failed to produce a wholemeal loaf that I like using the sourdough method. So I'm (reluctantly) going back to active dry yeast.

Disposing of the sourdough culture (its name is Fred) feels like shooting the family dog. I hate the idea, but it must be done.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 26 Nov 18 - 05:47 AM

I cut the 600g loaf from this one lengthways these days before slicing. I know that leaves you with bread with only 3 sides of crust that might not appeal to many but for our purposes at home it does give 2 loaves of a size everyone is happy with out of one run of the machine.

Our toaster btw, seems quite shallow to me. It's wide and will do crumpets nicely but in terms of shop bought loaves, is more suited to a smaller Hovis brown than much larger.
---
Pip was another who did a banana bread, using fruit past their best. Parent's loved it but I'm not sure it was one of my favourites.
--
Shame about the walnuts. Pip used to do a very nice date and walnut loaf. Seems a long while since it was last made though.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 25 Nov 18 - 09:11 PM

On Thursday evening (Thanksgiving) I put the entire roasted turkey back into the fridge and pulled it out to get slices for meals; tonight I cut it apart and have the stock simmering. It's just too much to prepare for the meal and do all of the cutting up and soup on the same night. The pot is cooling a little before I pull out the bones and skin, strain the broth, and use that for making soup tomorrow.

For the banana bread, the bananas I'll be using were at the over-ripe state and then I froze them one or two at a time and they're finishing defrosting in the fridge now. I'll make a double batch of batter that will add up to probably six small loaves.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 25 Nov 18 - 06:47 PM

Mrs Steve does amazing banana bread out of bananas that are going a bit past it. We can't do nuts as she's seriously allergic to walnuts.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 25 Nov 18 - 05:55 PM

I'm preparing to make my famous banana nut bread that was baked in regular bread loaf pans when I had the kids here devouring it. Now I make loaves in smaller artisanal-style pans that are given to friends who live alone or have just a partner at home now. They don't need all of those calories. It's a quick bread with baking soda and I use a lot of extra bananas so it's more cake-like. I bake the pecans so they give off that warm maple-like flavor and I use butter instead of shortening or oil.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 25 Nov 18 - 04:25 PM

I've found the 500g loaf ideal for most things. The 600g job rises triumphantly above the top of the pan, and the slices are too tall for me toaster!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 25 Nov 18 - 01:02 PM

They take about four cups of flour, sometimes a little more.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 25 Nov 18 - 10:36 AM

That does sound a big loaf, SRS. The most ours will take flour wise (and what I usually use - it will do smaller ones) is 600g/ around 1.3lbs and that seems to me a fairly large loaf.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 25 Nov 18 - 09:54 AM

I was given a bread machine years ago and thought it was a silly specialized piece of equipment, but I set out to master it and I use mine regularly still. It's a large-capacity one manufactured by Welbilt, in this case sold by another company that branded it. But it's a round 3-pound loaf and when you bake the loaf in the machine you end up with round or half-circle shaped sandwiches and such and that shape seems to dry out fast.

I started using it on the manual setting all of the time now and when it finishes mixing and kneading I remove the dough, shape it and bake it in a regular loaf pan. I make rolls, pizza dough, and more, letting the machine do the initial mixing and I use it after the first rise.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 25 Nov 18 - 07:54 AM

I agree there...


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 25 Nov 18 - 07:51 AM

Nowt wrong with Mother's Pride for a chip butty...


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 25 Nov 18 - 06:28 AM

Flour, I'm not sure it's all organic but I do like the stuff from the localish Leatheringsett watermill (and their outlets).

Jos, I can't know how the machine compares to traditionally home baked loaves (have tried a couple but not say your regular white or whatever loaf) but do believe that it can be easy to better a shop bought (and I'm not just thinking Mothers Pride or whatever cheap sliced loaf) loaf with one.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 25 Nov 18 - 06:15 AM

Years ago, probably in the 1970s, I was invited to one of those sales parties where there was a demonstration of a breadmaker and they tried to sign people up for a regular supply of their flour and their 'special secret ingredient' that speeded up the process. The secret ingredient was vitamin C, but they didn't tell you that (or you would have known you didn't need to buy into their regular supply).
I didn't buy it anyway - a long rising improves the flavour of the bread.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 25 Nov 18 - 05:45 AM

Well, Jon, I'll admit to also possessing a Panasonic bread maker. We've had it for around twelve years now and I echo your remarks about repeatability. Actually, all we ever use it for is to make ciabatta loaves (the ones with 500g of strong white flour and extra virgin olive oil) and a 2/3-to-1/3 wholemeal 500g loaf. After many years I discovered that you don't need to add Vitamin C at all. I like the fact that you have control over the quality of the flour (always organic this end) and the amount of salt (I cut it down by about a third). The bread is much better than any shop bread, though I'm the first to admit that using the thing might be regarded as cheating!

I have found that I get a more homogeneous consistency in the finished article if I put the yeast in the pan but mix all the other dry ingredients thoroughly in a bowl first. That goes in on top of the yeast, then in go the oil/butter and finally the water.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 25 Nov 18 - 05:26 AM

I think the principle is the same there, Jos. As far as I understand it, as well as taste, sugar can increase rising and salt restrict rising.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 25 Nov 18 - 05:09 AM

The salt in bread making isn't just for flavour. Too much, and the dough won't rise properly and the bread will be very dense. Too little, and the dough will rise too much, be very light and fluffy, and seem to be trying to climb out of the top of the tin.
PS. I have never used a breadmaker so I don't know what the effect would be in one of those.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 25 Nov 18 - 04:09 AM

Even more OT but for those who might use a breadmaker, the things I like about this Panasonic are:

1. "Repeatability". I don't understand all the wherefores but this one produces the most consistent "same loaf each time" of the ones we've had.

2. Others have needed water first and you sort of "balance" other ingredients, starting with the flour, on top. With this one, the water goes in last and it mixes things up before adding the yeast (which goes in it's own slot) after the other bits have had a stir. Perhaps this helps towards getting more consistent results?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 25 Nov 18 - 03:06 AM

And to clarify, just in case. I think there is room for more than one approach to cooking and do respect the efforts of those, including a brother, who may take a more dedicated approach.

I suppose “wrong” to me is more about total dependency on microwave meals and takeways. I can see that infirmities can make cooking difficult or impossible (and to some degree, even see that with Pip), can see that there can be the odd day where you simply fancy say fish and chips from the local takeaway, but I become more baffled by the not knowing how to do anything angles. (But Peter/dad was a bit like that. His upbringing was such that a kitchen was purely a woman’s place… We on the other hand were expected to help mum out a little which at least left us with some basics to use if needed).

I must admit though that even I am a bit undecided over the Thermomix – can there be a taking automation too far? - I don’t know. That and perhaps even I will find the pressure/multi cooker a bit strange to start with. I’m more of the “take a few veg from what’s around, taste, try a bit of this, etc.” variety than one for precise weights and measures in advance…

...At least mostly. Another gadget we have is a (Panasonic now and the best we’ve had by far) breadmaker and, while you might try, eg. an extra ½ tsp of salt, a few more ml of water, etc. to get to your ideal, I think you do need to be quite accurate with your measurements there.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 24 Nov 18 - 07:19 PM

I encountered a thermomix which was on display at a food fair about a year ago. Very sophisticated and very expensive. I'll tell you what. I love cooking, though I'm not that good at it. I like to get my hands in there, to do my own chopping, grinding, mixing and timing. I don't need a machine to sort out my cooking. I need a hob, an oven, some good pans and the finest ingredients I can lay my hands on.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 24 Nov 18 - 10:42 AM

Thinking smash, anyone heard of "stwnsh"? It's a Welsh word and can be qualified but from my childhood, I'd eg. be thinking of potatoes and swede mashed together here.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 24 Nov 18 - 10:35 AM

Years ago I found a set of recipes in Martha Stewart Living magazine that I started using regularly. I always baked salmon, but her simple salmon steak sauteed in butter won me over, as did the new potatoes that were simmered in water until tender, slightly cooled, then "smashed" enough to split the skins and lower their profile. Those patties of softened potato are then placed in a skillet with butter and turned once and served with salt and fresh ground pepper. All of those little crispy edges of skin (I like this with red or Yukon potatoes, the ones that are a little more waxy). Sometimes I sprinkle chives over the top. I don't remember what Martha called those potatoes, but my son and his girlfriend make "smashed potatoes" all of the time, and when I asked what it was he told me it was the ones I'd been making and he added the standardized name.

Today on Pati's Mexican Kitchen (a PBS cooking program) she made a very elaborate version and she calls them smashed potatoes - using different colors of new potatoes for the variety, and then she puts them on an olive oiled pan, smashes them slightly with a spoon and spoons olive oil and various seasonings and peppers over the top and bakes it all. My sauteed in butter version is quicker and easier, but the point of describing this is that as a comfort food goes, those little potatoes are a family favorite.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 24 Nov 18 - 09:17 AM

I guess that depends on the cook and time available to fit cooking in life, Jos.

For my personal part, I'm not one who particularly enjoys cooking and does't mind short cuts. I do of course aim, with a very basic repertoire, to produce things that are enjoyed by the family (and, even with my ways, did seem to pass that with visiting family from oz; and brother there can be quite a serious cook when he wants to be)...

Even got praise for my cauliflower cheese from a niece and I do nothing special. Just use a strong cheddar, cut the cauli into larger chunks than say Pip would, leaving more stalk and keep a careful watch on when the veg is cooked (I think it can turn quite quickly from nice and still a bit crisp to soggy, but maybe that's just me...).

So I suppose that all makes me lazy but tries in some ways...


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 24 Nov 18 - 08:50 AM

"supposed to do everything from the measuring to the cooking?"

Wouldn't that take all the pleasure out of cooking?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 24 Nov 18 - 07:54 AM

Well the "controversial" device came today. With the jiggling around I need to do to find it a permanent home, it's likely to be a few days before I get to trying anything on it though.

Coming back to points raised. Its ability with meat (which seems to be the most questioned) isn't an issue here. On the other hand (as well as veg soup) if I could find a few recipes on the nut/chickpea/lentil stew/casserole lines (all missing from the bits I do here now but sometimes feel I ought...) that suit it, I think from my side of things at home, it will justify its existence. Pip may also have her own ideas...

For really fancy btw, has anyone enountered a thermomix. I believe very expensive (£1000+) things that are supposed to do everything from the measuring to the cooking?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson
Date: 24 Nov 18 - 12:43 AM

Worcestershire indeed, but still correctly pronounced Wooster (the sauce, that is, not the place).
We use a Japanese fuzzy-logic rice cooker that always cooks rice perfectly, whether it’s brown or white, basmati or jasmine, then keeps it hot till you use it.
I’m not that gone on non-stick otherwise. Watch the Storyville episode called Poisoning America, about the largest ever class action to know why.
Made the Guinness stew, it was hearty and was wolfed down. I wouldn’t use housekeeper’s cut for it again, though, didn’t much like the texture.
The next meal when it’s my turn will involve harissa - ‘rose harissa’, the recipe says. I have yet to find an affordable source.
By the way, a couple of years ago I asked the checkout person in a local Polish or Moldovan shop (and you can feck off, Hillary Clinton, telling Europe to “control immigration”) what the great big bunches of dill sold there in winter were used for. The answer was borscht, with pork ribs, beetroot, onions and dill.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 23 Nov 18 - 07:25 PM

I know the far south of Italy and I've come across "arugula" there. "Eruca" is the botanical Latin name of the genus that includes the plants we call rocket. Unless you're in a posh restaurant that's pretending to appeal to the cognescenti only, it's "rocket" this end. Unfortunately, unless you grow your own (incredibly easy), the rocket we get here in supermarket bags is insipid and just about useless.

I have a couple of lovely recipes that use rocket in a non-salad context. We'll see how it goes.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: keberoxu
Date: 23 Nov 18 - 07:02 PM

The Etymology of the Words "Arugula" and "Rocket",
or, why it's called one thing in Northern Europe
and another thing in the Americas


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 23 Nov 18 - 06:50 PM

Isn't arugula what we call rocket? I like to include a bit of that in any salad. In fact, it grows wild in my garden. Adds a nice bit of spice.

I tend to use home-grown rocket and lettuce in my salads, even at this time of year. I've still got some nice mixed lettuce growing in big pots in a sheltered spot. I'll buy a nice red pepper and some decent cherry tomatoes (mine are finished), cut them up, put them in the bottom of my salad bowl and put in a good tablespoon of my finest Tuscan extra virgin olive oil. I then add a slightly smaller amount of the most expensive, thick, syrupy balsamic vinegar (a bottle lasts me all year). I will not countenance that thin, watery abomination that sells for a couple of quid and totally discredits the name. I then mix that thoroughly with the tomatoes and pepper, and only then put the lettuce and rocket on top. I'll then cover the lot with cling film. I don't mix the lettuce with the dressing until the very last minute as I don't much care for soggy lettuce. There's only one way to toss the salad, and that's to get your two hands in there and enjoy yourself.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: keberoxu
Date: 23 Nov 18 - 06:00 PM

Thank goodness the Bertucci's franchise of Italian family restaurants
has got an entree salad built out of baby arugula greens;
my tummy is now full of fresh crunchy tasty ones.
That way I could get my nutrition and avoid romaine lettuce at the same time.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 23 Nov 18 - 05:31 PM

Well Steve, 3 minutes (after which I fluff the rice up with a fork) works for me but one should feel free to adapt/adjust as one sees fit...


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 23 Nov 18 - 05:21 PM

I don't want the eggs to set in fried rice, I want them to be another loose bit like the pork or chicken and diced vegetables and green onion (scallions) and whatever else happens to appeal to me.

I shop at a Middle Eastern market, where they have massive offerings of rice. I usually buy very long grain Basmati rice and it's nice if I can't read most of the label. :)


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 23 Nov 18 - 04:14 PM

And Tilda is a good, reliable brand.

I wouldn't bother scrambling your eggs first, Maggie. Just beat them in a cup and stir into the rice once it's hot in the pan. That way they coat the rice nicely before they set. Mind you, I haven't tried it your way. But you're dirtying another pan, and the worst pans to clean are the ones that eggs have been scrambled in!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 23 Nov 18 - 04:07 PM

No, Maggie, just at the very start to make sure the rice and water get nicely mixed and there's nothing stuck to the bottom. Then it's lid on and leave severely alone!

Well said, Jon, tho' three minutes is uncomfortably long: the rice will cook a bit more and might go a bit cleggy. Can we agree on a minute and a half...?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 23 Nov 18 - 03:34 PM

And I cook basmati rice in a stainless steel saucepan with a glass lid. The lids got a strainer which I find useful.

I think we've tried a few methods of cooking rice but I just use a simple method found on a packet of Tilda Basmati rice. Add about 70-80g rice per person to pan of boiling water. Boil for 12 minutes, drain the water off, put lid on pan and stand for three minutes.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 23 Nov 18 - 03:17 PM

You STIR your rice during the cooking? That is forbidden in rice cooking circles around here. Not until it is completely cooked is it fluffed before serving. ;-)

Fried rice is a wonderful use of lots of leftovers. I add scrambled eggs at the very end so they don't get too broken up. https://youtu.be/2WJSUVMjNVc The thing they don't mention is that it also comes with an instruction manual, a long list of grains, rice, oats, and more that can be cooked and gives you the proportions. If you're curious, this links the a manuals online source for their rice cooker manuals.

My rice cooker sits on a lower shelf in a small bookcase in the kitchen. That bookcase has two complete shelves of cookbooks and the bottom shelf has the rice cooker, a food processor, and my blender with the glass jar.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 23 Nov 18 - 03:08 PM

I see I spelled "Creuset" two different ways. I'm working on several other imaginative variants.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 23 Nov 18 - 02:41 PM

I don't even know what a rice cooker is. You guys must have very capacious kitchens in which you have room to store all these things.

I cook rice in a non-stick pan with a vented lid. Basmati is the only rice of choice for me unless I'm doing a paella or risotto. The rice goes in the pan and gets two or three rinses with cold water. Drain (I do it roughly, against the edge of the sink). Turn on the ring and boil lots of water in the kettle. Salt the rice (check again later). Put the pan on the high heat and pour in an excess of boiling water. Stir for a minute, get it back to the boil, turn the heat down to a simmer with the lid on and set the timer for exactly twelve minutes from adding the water. Drain well in a sieve or colander - give it a minute. Fluff the rice up with a fork and serve. I really can't be arsed with all this water-measuring and rice-measuring. When I used to do that, decades ago, I got variable, unreliable results. This works every time, though just half a minute of overcooking and the rice won't forgive you. If you really hit the spot with your careful measuring, yours might turn out better than mine, but only very slightly.

Accidentally on purpose, I always cook too much rice. Next day for lunch I melt a knob of butter in a frying pan. Throw in the cooked rice and break it up a bit. Add two or three beaten eggs and a generous amount of cooked peas (anything else you fancy, bacon, mushrooms, ham...). Let the eggs set lightly, stirring gently all the while. Season lightly, put in a bowl and consume while you're watching the one o'clock news. A bit more butter or a squidge of soy sauce is good. It's so comforting that even the latest brexit gloom on the telly won't seem too bad.


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