mudcat.org: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafeawe

Post to this Thread - Printer Friendly - Home
Page: [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8] [9] [10] [11] [12] [13] [14] [15] [16] [17] [18] [19] [20] [21]


BS: Recipes - what are we eating?

WalkaboutsVerse 06 Oct 19 - 08:51 AM
Mrrzy 06 Oct 19 - 07:49 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 06 Oct 19 - 07:28 AM
Steve Shaw 06 Oct 19 - 05:38 AM
Stanron 06 Oct 19 - 04:57 AM
Dave Hanson 06 Oct 19 - 02:25 AM
Stilly River Sage 05 Oct 19 - 10:56 PM
Steve Shaw 05 Oct 19 - 08:56 PM
Jon Freeman 05 Oct 19 - 08:00 PM
Jon Freeman 05 Oct 19 - 07:19 PM
Charmion 05 Oct 19 - 07:03 PM
Jon Freeman 05 Oct 19 - 06:10 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 05 Oct 19 - 05:58 PM
Stilly River Sage 05 Oct 19 - 05:18 PM
Charmion 05 Oct 19 - 04:41 PM
Mrrzy 05 Oct 19 - 02:10 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 05 Oct 19 - 10:20 AM
Charmion 05 Oct 19 - 09:38 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 04 Oct 19 - 05:01 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 04 Oct 19 - 04:46 PM
Mrrzy 04 Oct 19 - 04:34 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 04 Oct 19 - 02:53 PM
Stanron 04 Oct 19 - 12:16 PM
Mrrzy 04 Oct 19 - 11:55 AM
Stilly River Sage 03 Oct 19 - 07:29 PM
Stanron 03 Oct 19 - 07:09 PM
Stilly River Sage 03 Oct 19 - 07:07 PM
Steve Shaw 03 Oct 19 - 06:07 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 03 Oct 19 - 03:24 PM
Steve Shaw 03 Oct 19 - 05:54 AM
Stilly River Sage 02 Oct 19 - 11:42 PM
Steve Shaw 02 Oct 19 - 06:48 PM
Stilly River Sage 02 Oct 19 - 05:21 PM
Stilly River Sage 02 Oct 19 - 05:15 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 02 Oct 19 - 02:04 PM
Steve Shaw 02 Oct 19 - 12:21 PM
Mrrzy 02 Oct 19 - 12:18 PM
Steve Shaw 02 Oct 19 - 12:01 PM
Jon Freeman 02 Oct 19 - 02:03 AM
leeneia 02 Oct 19 - 01:06 AM
Steve Shaw 01 Oct 19 - 06:52 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 01 Oct 19 - 06:48 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 01 Oct 19 - 06:43 PM
Steve Shaw 01 Oct 19 - 06:29 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 01 Oct 19 - 06:04 PM
Steve Shaw 01 Oct 19 - 05:50 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 01 Oct 19 - 02:49 PM
Stilly River Sage 01 Oct 19 - 02:32 PM
leeneia 01 Oct 19 - 02:01 AM
Stilly River Sage 30 Sep 19 - 08:42 PM
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:






Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 06 Oct 19 - 08:51 AM

Wouldn't mind joining you, Mrrzy - with you having some extra bison!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 06 Oct 19 - 07:49 AM

When I was still college professing, I did not allow my students to [rudely, to my training] eat nor drink during class. In the latter years I would hear that they literally could not go one hour without water.
Bullshit. Spoiled brats. You just don't need to have constant water intake. Well, maybe some medical conditions, but just regular folks? Nonsense.
I miss my job!
Meanwhile I have purchased but not tried rooibos. It still scares me.
Made some kickass bison and mushroom spaghetti, though.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 06 Oct 19 - 07:28 AM

By the way, nice place Bude, in my opinion - my late auntie and uncle from Manchester retired there; hence my poem, from WalkaboutsVerse, "Birdwatchers' Bude"


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 06 Oct 19 - 05:38 AM

You see people round here, taking a stroll on the sea cliffs or around the Bude Canal (it never gets that hot round here), lugging two-litre plastic water bottles with 'em! I suppose I shouldn't judge...


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stanron
Date: 06 Oct 19 - 04:57 AM

Dave Hanson wrote: Carrying a bottle of water around all the time in the UK is just fashion.
As with many things this all depends on context. When I worked as a volunteer steward for folk festivals (you know, the real folk police) I always took a small bottle of water or cold tea with lemonade on my duties.

If I'm sitting around the house all day or nipping to the shops there is no need. Intensity of hangover can increase the likelihood but I'm having a sober month right now so no bottled drinks.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Dave Hanson
Date: 06 Oct 19 - 02:25 AM

Carrying a bottle of water around all the time in the UK is just fashion.

Dave H


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 05 Oct 19 - 10:56 PM

Over the years there were staff events at my university where they gave away a number of BPA-free insulated tumblers (they're translucent and have air between the layers) with a lid and acrylic straw. I also bought a batch of acrylic straws (and a couple of extra brushes for cleaning them). These do for me around the house and in the car and they're sturdier and more durable than the soft plastic water bottles. Ice in the fridge is filtered and I usually fill it up from the tap. For some reason water coming through the fridge filter tastes more like chlorine than the tap water does. I use the filtered water for the glass kettle but I fill it the night before so it sits on the counter and any chlorine dissipates.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 05 Oct 19 - 08:56 PM

Weak tea is called gnat's piss round here, Charmion. I regard caffeine-free tea and coffee as not tea and not coffee. I can't understand this need to lug water around all the time that afflicts some people. The only time I'll do that is on my holidays in the Med on hot summer days, and then it's just a 500ml bottle that I can refill at drinking fountains, which is occasionally only. Some people think that drinking a ton of water is good for you, that it somehow flushes you out. It doesn't. Your body just chucks it back out almost straight away so that your blood doesn't get diluted (we call it homeostasis), down the lavvy or in a hedge somewhere, and any toxins that are inside you end up still there, awaiting your body's natural systems to delete them at their leisure. I'll admit that drinking when you're thirsty should never be ignored. The main sign that you're not drinking enough is constipation. I rarely tote water around and I never suffer from the aforementioned issue.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 05 Oct 19 - 08:00 PM

Anyway, to try to get back more to food. Just a reheat with more rice today. I did a root veg curry thing on Thursday night for Friday tea and nearly always make enough for two meals. Everyone is happy with this 2 days in a row.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 05 Oct 19 - 07:19 PM

Sure, Charmion. That applies more to dad but mum’s hands and arms aren’t what they were either. Both find these 500ml containers with a press button flip top nice to handle.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 05 Oct 19 - 07:03 PM

I go about with a water bottle, too, Jon Freeman. I keep one in the car, and I have one in my shopping basket. For older folks whose hands shake or have lost strength, a bottle may be easier to manage than a glass.

Besides, I’m a tightwad who resents paying good money for water that I have for my taxes at home.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 05 Oct 19 - 06:10 PM

My decaf coffee consumption has gone down a bit lately. Partly as I was drinking too much anyway and partly as I’m advised not to have one (or tea…) within a certain time of the iron tablets I’m taking 3 times a day Apparently some things can interfere with the iron absorption.

We still have cups of tea/coffee but plain water in “sports” water bottles is “in” here at the moment. Thinking it might be handy in the future, I got one from Amazon when I was asked to drink a quantity of water over the 45 minutes before an appointment. I liked it and thought one might be better for dad than having a glass of water at his table. We’ve each got one now. Mum’s travels with her depending on whether she is in the study, living room or trying to do something outside.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 05 Oct 19 - 05:58 PM

I think a beer mug would be better for your tea than the folkie cliche of drinking from a pewter tankard, Charmion...although I have seen someone turn up at a bar with a tankard hooked to his trousers/belt.

I myself have more than just keys hooked to my trousers - when the strap of an otherwise good watch wore out, I tried adding it to my key ring and have stuck with that method ever since.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 05 Oct 19 - 05:18 PM

I was drinking way too much tea, probably a quart every morning in my very large (16 ounce) mug. I'm now using a 10 ounce cup and limit myself to two of them. They're small enough they don't have time to get cold before they're finished.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 05 Oct 19 - 04:41 PM

It is the aroma of coffee that yanks me from the arms of Morpheus most mornings, but when Himself is away and I’m on my own I would rather have tea. For me, coffee requires company, but tea goes well with solitude. Besides, when Himself is at home, he brings me cup after cup of coffee, as my lap is usually full of cats and he is far too normative to allow the large beer mug for coffee-drinking. The beer mug is necessary for tea because, again, my frequently cat-besat situation prevents refills. Besides, a small cup goes cold too quickly.

When is a beer mug a tankard, Walkies? My tea mug is earthenware, and I have always believed that a tankard was made of metal — traditionally pewter or silver. Am I wrong?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 05 Oct 19 - 02:10 PM

A stein of tea. I like the idea.

I find it entertaining that I miss tea more than I miss coffee when awake, but what I dream about is coffee.

Gonna get me some rooibos (always read that as roobios) later today. We shall see.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 05 Oct 19 - 10:20 AM

...rather than a tankard, Charmion?!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 05 Oct 19 - 09:38 AM

The Norwegian expression for weak tea is “danserinatiss” — ballerina’s pee. This never fails to make me snicker.

I drink smoked tea, Lap-sang sou chong. I’m told that Chinese people make it for foreigners who had their tastebuds shot off in the war and never really liked tea anyway, but I just love the stuff. It is the flavour of my father’s tea, selected when I was about 10 and my family moved from the country, where we had our own well, to the city, where the water came from the river and stank of chlorine. On the one hand, no fear of typhoid, but on the other, your Earl Grey was a little too much like swimming pool.

I put milk in it, and sweetener. I drink it out of a large beer mug. So sue me.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 04 Oct 19 - 05:01 PM

In Fiji, I joined some locals with a nice cup of kava/yaqona...and soon went a bit numb in the mouth.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 04 Oct 19 - 04:46 PM

I have drinking chocolate in the cupboard as a change from tea and coffee, but each with soya rather than milk.

Never tried nor heard of rooibos until now.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 04 Oct 19 - 04:34 PM

Yes, I don't know why I am afraid of roobios. I should get me some, thanks.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 04 Oct 19 - 02:53 PM

Re packet noodles, I usually put the sachet of flavouring into a mug, stir, then add it to the noodles in a pan; I often add tofu as well as soya sauce for a bit of protein but today, for the first time, I had noodles with baked beans - not bad.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stanron
Date: 04 Oct 19 - 12:16 PM

Mrrzy wrote: Open to suggestion here
Try rooibos tea.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rooibos

like normal tea but no caffeine and low tannin content and can be taken with milk.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 04 Oct 19 - 11:55 AM

Walkaboutsverse, the French call herbal tea granny pee, which I find hysterical.

I like vervain/verbana, and that cherry thing from the red zinger people, but neither take milk well. Open to suggestion here. I actually like a cup of chicken broth [better than bouillon] polluted with hot sauce and lemon (from a horrible bottlel) but want a real coffee or tea substitute. Apparently Postum still exists but eewww.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 03 Oct 19 - 07:29 PM

Yes, I let the water stop boiling and give it a little while to still before I pour it over the cup. I use a different strainer for green tea (so I don't get residual from the black tea; I soak them in a water and bleach mix only periodically.) And making this in a white cup is helpful; if it's a dark cup you can't see that the tea has brewed, and it's usually a very light color (though it has a rich flavor).


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stanron
Date: 03 Oct 19 - 07:09 PM

If you make green tea the in same way as you make black tea it will be way too bitter. Black tea is made with boiling water. Green tea should be made with boiled water which has been left to cool a little bit. You can find the precise details on-line. I usually wait until the kettle has stopped singing and that works for me.

Incidentally, If you drink tea without milk you should really drink it from a glass cup. It won't enhance the taste but it does look good. There are plenty of heat proof glass cups available these days. You can use a normal glass with green tea if you put a spoon in the glass before pouring or put some lemonade in first.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 03 Oct 19 - 07:07 PM

There are lots of great green teas. My daughter was in Japan last year and brought back a gift of samples of several types; the largest bag was the least expensive, the smaller ones are quite pricey.

I stopped by a restaurant supply business near my house this afternoon to look at their frozen sausages. They carry a variety, and I can get some of the really good Czech varieties there. I wasn't disappointed today. I use them in dishes as flavoring, I don't usually eat just the whole sausage, though on occasion a plate of sausage and sauerkraut is nice.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 03 Oct 19 - 06:07 PM

I tried green tea for a while. I found it to be bitterly unenjoyable. Fruit teas, so-called, consist of viciously-powdered dried fruits that retain nothing of the vitamins and fruity charms of their original ingredients. I don't know about herby teas because I haven't tried them. Wild chamomile grows round here and I like to crush a flower and sniff it. Lovely. I love the heady vanilla perfume of winter heliotrope and I can cup and sniff the blossoms of meadowsweet until the cows come home. The Rosa rugosa in my garden is exquisitely scented. Gorgeous. I rub the leaves of scented pelargoniums and sniff my fingers. Orgasmic. And what's better than a rubbed handful of basil leaves raised to the nose? But that's how I want these things left. Not boiled in water to be drunk. Whoever came up with that, I ask myself. Enjoy nature's fragrances as they are meant to be enjoyed. But give over boiling them in water. Grab yourself a builder tea bag and enjoy life!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 03 Oct 19 - 03:24 PM

My poem on "Spearmint Tea"


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 03 Oct 19 - 05:54 AM

'Tonight I thawed a package of organic boneless skinless chicken breasts (I shop at a place that has all meat frozen, it came from the grocery distributors near its sell-by date, so was frozen)."

Oddly, just twenty minutes ago I did the exact opposite with two packs of organic boneless skinless chicken breasts that Sainsbury's were selling off cheap on the chicken's use-by date. I snipped 'em into bite-size, portioned them into "feeds two" and whacked them in the freezer. :-)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 02 Oct 19 - 11:42 PM

Two-fold - they do sound interesting (an Asian flavor) and turmeric and ginger are particularly healthy for you and are good with chicken. It sounds like a wonderful departure from the usual chicken soup.

Tonight I thawed a package of organic boneless skinless chicken breasts (I shop at a place that has all meat frozen, it came from the grocery distributors near it's sell-by date, so was frozen). A lovely small batch of Teriyaki chicken with the last of some white rice left from a Puerto Rican dish (that calls for white rice, not my usual Basmati rice).

This is a simple recipe I learned from The Frugal Gourmet, a wonderful cooking show that had a long run until it had it's own version of #MeToo leveled at the host. Disappointing (but I kept the cookbooks, and I have a branded tall brass pepper mill that was probably part of a PBS package during a fundraiser).


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 02 Oct 19 - 06:48 PM

Well you and I agree on most things culinary, Maggie (bar dried basil and minced garlic). I must say, though, that I'm at a loss as to why anyone would wish to pollute lovely, hearty, homely chicken broth with ginger and turmeric. Yikes. If you have a good stock and you start with a soffritto (for soup, not TOO finely chopped), you can hardly go wrong. As for the chicken, leave some nice big chunks in there. The angel hair is a nice idea, though I've used ordinary noodles to good advantage. I've also used basmati rice instead. I've found that a few drops of Tabasco lifts any soup. I would only ever make chicken soup with stock made from the carcass from which the meat was taken, and I don't skim the stock. If I think it's a bit fatty I'll reduce the amount of oil used for the soffritto.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 02 Oct 19 - 05:21 PM

I pulled it out of the web page and formatted for print:

Turmeric-Ginger Chicken Soup

1 thinly sliced garlic clove
1/4 teaspoon turmeric
1 teaspoon grated ginger
1 teaspoon extra-virgin olive oil
6 cups Basic Chicken Stock or store-bought low-sodium chicken broth
3 ounces angel-hair pasta, broken in half
1 cup shredded cooked chicken
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
Microgreens and thinly sliced scallions, for serving

DIRECTIONS

In a saucepan over medium-high heat, saute garlic, turmeric, and ginger in oil until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add stock; bring to a simmer. Add pasta; cook 1 minute less than per package instructions. Add chicken; heat through, 1 minute. Remove from heat. Stir in lemon juice. Serve with microgreens and scallions.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 02 Oct 19 - 05:15 PM

Martha Stewart's Facebook page pushed out this recipe today; it was originally published in the magazine last year. I can't do anything about the video, and these days they bounce all over the screen if you try to scroll past it. You can click to turn it off. And if you get the same ad I did, I will say here and now that I don't eat Spam. We had too much of it when we were kids.

Turmeric ginger chicken soup sounds wonderful and is quite beautiful. I'm going to try this soon; I have some chicken broth in the freezer but don't have any chicken in the fridge at the moment. I'll have to cook some, or pick up a rotisserie chicken next time I'm at Costco. (I like the seasoning on Sam's Club's chickens better, it's saltier and more complex, but the Costco chicken is better for putting in other things because of the light seasoning.)

https://www.marthastewart.com/1524910/turmeric-ginger-chicken-soup


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 02 Oct 19 - 02:04 PM

Mrrzy - how about a nice cup of herbal tea? I'm not so keen but notice a lot in the office are.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 02 Oct 19 - 12:21 PM

Here's what I've made for this evening, to have with some Puglian toast (the stuff you might use for bruschetta), some cherry tomatoes and some cheese and crackers. I got this pâté recipe from Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall years ago. It's so easy and quick, as long as you have a stick blender:

Two cans of unsmoked mackerel fillets in olive oil, drained
One tablespoon creme fraiche (full fat or I'll never talk to you again)
One teaspoon of hot made mustard (Colman's English for choice)
The juice of just over half a lemon*
Freshly-ground black pepper (no salt needed)
A few drops of Tabasco

Put everything in a jug and blend, pushing it down the sides once or twice. You don't want it lumpy but don't overdo it. Ideally you should make this the day before and keep it in the fridge, or at the very least a few hours in advance. Just before serving it I like to grate the lemon zest over it.

Any decent bread will do, but I do think toasted is best.

*The lemon juice is the one thing that can make this go out of balance. You need some, but if you add too much it's spoiled somewhat. So go easy. And lemon juice comes out of a lemon, never out of a bottle or a plastic squeezy pretend lemon. Why would anyone use that.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 02 Oct 19 - 12:18 PM

I so miss coffee and tea, but any tiny amount of caffeine turns me into a violent and horrible person I cannot be, so there you have it.
I have *dreams* about coffee though, where either I crave it desperately, or I drink it and it's marvelous, then sometimes it turns into a nightmare of me having had coffee.
I had been a (decaf) tea drinker for over a decade before that caffeine started getting to me too... Love tea (milk and suhgar) but it is coffee I dream about...


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 02 Oct 19 - 12:01 PM

I'm thinking of extirpating the terms "reduced fat," "low alcohol," "sugar-free" and "decaffeinated" from my lexicon.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 02 Oct 19 - 02:03 AM

Leenia, thinking of parents sat with coffee. I’m not sure my mother has ever liked coffee as a drink or flavour. Even in childhood and with a box of chocolates, she’d have to be sure she wasn’t getting one with a coffee centre.

Back to hot drinks. One I enjoy but virtually never get round to making (but what do I? Instant decaf coffee has long been a bit of a habit with me…) is a cup of cocoa made with milk heated in a saucepan. I’ve never really been a fan of the drinking chocolates but I could get something I liked from the cocoa powder.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia
Date: 02 Oct 19 - 01:06 AM

How fondly I remember sitting at their kitchen table with my mother and father, both in their eighies, talking and drinking instant coffee. Both are dead now. I would drink any amount of instant coffee to have them back.

There are detective novels set in Canada by Dean Kaplan. In them, the tec often mentions sitting at the kitchen table with his mother and father, talking and passing around a single tea bag. He doesn't know how lucky he is.

Their other son, the doctor who lives hundreds of miles away and is too busy to call home, is the golden boy, of course. Silly people.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 01 Oct 19 - 06:52 PM

Well I've only ever bought the one, a Delonghi Caffe Corso. I'm very happy with it. You can get a refurbished one on eBay for about £160. For others read the reviews or look them up on the Which? website. And no, I won't give you my Which? login.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 01 Oct 19 - 06:48 PM

...but there is still quite a lot of "devil's vomit" in the cupboard to use up! Azera Intenso, which I do quite like.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 01 Oct 19 - 06:43 PM

...I've just gone as far as looking at the cheapest bean to cup machine at Argos - Morphy Richards, £80...tempting.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 01 Oct 19 - 06:29 PM

They roast and grind the fresh beans. As far as I'm concerned, instant coffee is devil's vomit. Until we went to Venice in 2010 we didn't drink any coffee at all. One day we stopped off at a bar in Burano. We asked for two cups of tea. They brought us two small cups of not-very-hot water, a tiny jug of milk and two tea bags. We could not get a decent mash. In despair, we traipsed along to another bar and plucked up the courage to order two cappuccinos. We didn't even know what a cappuccino was. It was a Damascene moment. Within weeks of arriving home we'd bought a cheap espresso machine (with milk frother) with our Tesco vouchers and a separate grinder. What a faff, but what a revelation. That machine did us proud but it capitulated via huge leakiness after a couple of years. We dispensed with the separate grinder and bought a bean-to-cup machine for ourselves as a mutual Christmas present. We've never looked back. Making coffee from fresh beans isn't the cheapest way but it's a damn sight cheaper than going to a coffee shop and the coffee is delicious. Keep your beans airtight in the fridge!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 01 Oct 19 - 06:04 PM

Ouch! But you then, Steve, may appreciate the care they put into the Ethiopian coffee ceremony - wiki
.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 01 Oct 19 - 05:50 PM

I'd sooner hack off the family jewels wth a rusty machete than drink instant coffee.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 01 Oct 19 - 02:49 PM

I actually drink sweetened soya, Mrrzy, but accept, as Steve and Stanron suggest, that it may not be that environmentally friendly - slash and burn, etc.

I've bean! tempted by a coffee machine but still only have a percolator as an occasional change from instant, I'm afraid.

I like Darjeeling tea but it is much more difficult to get hold of than Earl Grey, e.g.

Never tried tea with lemondade....

At uni, I wrote a 5000 word essay on chanoyu - the Japanese tea ceremony - but have only experienced the earlier but less famous Chinese tea ceremony (photos attached to my poem here).


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 01 Oct 19 - 02:32 PM

I fried some of the okra from the garden, but I cooked in in the used oil I'd already fried some fish in, so as expected, it was a richer taste, not bad, but I think I prefer it just corn oil with the cornmeal-coated okra slices. It was an experiment.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia
Date: 01 Oct 19 - 02:01 AM

Tonight we had broccoli souffle with a little ham on the side. Salad. Fruit for dessert.

Just in case you are looking for an idea for tomorrow's dinner.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 30 Sep 19 - 08:42 PM

I buy loose tea (my kitchen has a cart full of many varieties here) and use a stainless steel strainer over the lip of the cup I'm going to drink out of. Measure the proper amount then pour water just off the boil over it. I usually have a second cup, so I use the same tea plus a half-portion added to it for the second.

I've been drinking a Middle Eastern brand (Alwazah) that comes in various qualities, from tiny fragments to the larger leaf pieces. I used to drink an English tea (Yorkshire Gold) that was the tiny fragments and cost more than the Alwazah. Several years I took one of our student employees to lunch at a buffet restaurant affiliated with the Middle Eastern grocery store next door, and we walked through the store - she pointed at a can and said this was her mother's favorite. I picked up a can and she protested that I didn't need to buy it for that reason, but I trust that the mother in this Iraqi family has tried different teas and settled on a good one. I started researching the grades of teas, and it's quite fascinating. And that store is interesting; I was talking with a young man one day about a jar of loose tea from this company and I realized that as we handed it back and forth we each turned the side we could read to the front to make our point - so I used the English language side and he used the Arabic side. (I love this store for this very reason - people bond over food.)

I have a lot of Chinese teas, purchased at a very good tea and spice import store in Seattle's Pike Place Market. I've bought Chinese tea at a large Asian grocery in the city where I used to work, and I've bought other Indian teas at the Middle Eastern store. So much of the world drinks tea and they import and flavor it in different ways. Jasimine tea at the Asian market versus cardamom tea or Earl Grey from the Middle Eastern market (that is across the street from the Asian market). I love living in a multi-cultural community.

Earlier this year the Middle Eastern grocery switched suppliers and started bringing in a different type of tea, from Turkey. I tried it and it was awful - reading the package it says it has to brew for a really long time. I despaired getting my good tea anywhere else, but I think their tea-drinking customer base protested and the next time I was over they had all of my old favorites. And I poured that Turkish tea into the compost pile.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate
Next Page

 


You must be a member to post in non-music threads. Join here.


You must be a member to post in non-music threads. Join here.



Mudcat time: 13 November 8:03 PM EST

[ Home ]

All original material is copyright © 1998 by the Mudcat Café Music Foundation, Inc. All photos, music, images, etc. are copyright © by their rightful owners. Every effort is taken to attribute appropriate copyright to images, content, music, etc. We are not a copyright resource.