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BS: Recipes - what are we eating?

Thompson 03 Nov 20 - 08:50 AM
Charmion's brother Andrew 03 Nov 20 - 08:43 AM
Charmion 02 Nov 20 - 05:49 PM
leeneia 02 Nov 20 - 12:13 AM
Stilly River Sage 01 Nov 20 - 11:32 AM
leeneia 01 Nov 20 - 10:42 AM
Joe_F 31 Oct 20 - 06:33 PM
Mrrzy 31 Oct 20 - 10:13 AM
Dave the Gnome 31 Oct 20 - 07:55 AM
Thompson 30 Oct 20 - 01:06 PM
Mrrzy 30 Oct 20 - 11:11 AM
Jos 30 Oct 20 - 08:07 AM
Raggytash 30 Oct 20 - 07:50 AM
Jos 30 Oct 20 - 07:01 AM
Raggytash 30 Oct 20 - 06:10 AM
BobL 30 Oct 20 - 04:04 AM
Dave the Gnome 29 Oct 20 - 02:04 PM
Mrrzy 29 Oct 20 - 10:05 AM
Donuel 28 Oct 20 - 02:48 PM
Stilly River Sage 28 Oct 20 - 10:30 AM
Stilly River Sage 27 Oct 20 - 11:28 PM
Charmion 27 Oct 20 - 03:40 PM
Mrrzy 27 Oct 20 - 02:50 PM
Stilly River Sage 27 Oct 20 - 02:31 PM
BobL 27 Oct 20 - 03:57 AM
Steve Shaw 26 Oct 20 - 05:37 AM
Steve Shaw 25 Oct 20 - 10:39 PM
Stilly River Sage 25 Oct 20 - 04:11 PM
Mrrzy 25 Oct 20 - 02:26 PM
Thompson 25 Oct 20 - 11:50 AM
Stilly River Sage 25 Oct 20 - 10:02 AM
Steve Shaw 25 Oct 20 - 09:41 AM
Mrrzy 25 Oct 20 - 09:15 AM
Steve Shaw 24 Oct 20 - 08:18 PM
Stilly River Sage 24 Oct 20 - 06:17 PM
Mrrzy 24 Oct 20 - 12:13 PM
Thompson 24 Oct 20 - 07:03 AM
Steve Shaw 24 Oct 20 - 05:48 AM
Jos 24 Oct 20 - 04:08 AM
BobL 24 Oct 20 - 03:23 AM
Dave Hanson 24 Oct 20 - 03:11 AM
Charmion 23 Oct 20 - 10:19 PM
Steve Shaw 23 Oct 20 - 08:23 PM
JennieG 23 Oct 20 - 05:34 PM
Mrrzy 23 Oct 20 - 04:58 PM
Thompson 23 Oct 20 - 12:17 PM
Thompson 23 Oct 20 - 12:13 PM
Stilly River Sage 23 Oct 20 - 09:47 AM
Jos 23 Oct 20 - 09:01 AM
Charmion 23 Oct 20 - 08:18 AM
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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson
Date: 03 Nov 20 - 08:50 AM

Someone sent me this useful guide to making fried rice. Though with a bit of a sick tummy (writhing and ouching), allied with a stuffed-up nose, but both of them nearly better) what I'm really longing for is some chicken, ginger and corn soup.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion's brother Andrew
Date: 03 Nov 20 - 08:43 AM

One word, Charmion: Kirschwasser!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 02 Nov 20 - 05:49 PM

You just reminded me, Stilly, of the several litres of pitted sour cherries in *my* freezer. I currently have enough jam in the pantry to last the rest of my life, so I have to think of something else to do with them.

No, pie is not the right answer.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia
Date: 02 Nov 20 - 12:13 AM

That sounds delicious, Stilly. I managed to grow some strawberries one year, and we made jam. Sad to say, I could never do it again.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 01 Nov 20 - 11:32 AM

I have seven quarts of strawberries (purchased at deep discount at my town's discount gourmet grocery warehouse) in the freezer, soon to be transferred to the steam juicer. The results will be perfectly clear strawberry juice and a nice dense pulp to use for jam or baking. I'll make strawberry jelly this week, something I haven't done for a while.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia
Date: 01 Nov 20 - 10:42 AM

Hi, Dave. Does your loved one dislike the texture of bones or merely the presence of them on the plate?

I ask because meat cooked with the bones in comes out different from meat cooked without them. The broth is thicker, for one thing. It's hard to describe. My dear husband, the DH, always prefers to have the bones left in.

With a slow cooker it's pretty easy to cook the food, take out of the meat, let it chill till it's safe to handle, and remove the bones. Put the meat back in, and you have the best of both worlds - boneless meat with rich gravy.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Joe_F
Date: 31 Oct 20 - 06:33 PM

Bacon, liver, & onions (a classic bachelor dish)

Cut a strip of bacon into squares. Saute with a coarsely chopped onion slice. Put chicken livers on top. When they are half done, turn them over & add mushroom slices.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 31 Oct 20 - 10:13 AM

Water to cover plus a couple of inches.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Dave the Gnome
Date: 31 Oct 20 - 07:55 AM

As it turned out there wasn't much bone. I removed what there was using scissors and put them in a pan to boil up for stock.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson
Date: 30 Oct 20 - 01:06 PM

Or you can debone wearing rubber washing-up gloves so you don't burn the little fingies. Same with skinning roasted peppers.
How much water do ye put to yizzer vegetales for stock?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 30 Oct 20 - 11:11 AM

About deboning can you make it bones in then cool, remove meat from bones, reheat and serve the next day?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 30 Oct 20 - 08:07 AM

You could try dates as well, and prunes - but maybe the prunes should be in the Christmas pudding to make it a real plum pudding.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Raggytash
Date: 30 Oct 20 - 07:50 AM

Currants Jos, I've remembered what we called them as children!

But the guy in question doesn't like those, raisins or sultanas.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 30 Oct 20 - 07:01 AM

Is that 'flies' as found in 'squashed fly biscuits' (whose real name eludes me at the moment)?

Oh yes, I've remembered: Garibaldis.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Raggytash
Date: 30 Oct 20 - 06:10 AM

In conversation with a drinking friend about my Christmas cakes that I made earlier this week he stated he didn't like Christmas cake because it had "flies" in it. He meant raisins and sultanas which he really doesn't like.

That got me thinking. Could I make a Christmas cake without these items so today I am making a cake using dried apricot and figs instead of raisins and sultanas.

I'll let you know how it turns out!!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: BobL
Date: 30 Oct 20 - 04:04 AM

Fried rice: there are essentially two ways.
1) Boil it and then fry it,
2) Fry it and then boil it.

So you can fry up cold leftover boiled rice with additions & flavourings of your choice.
Or fry uncooked rice briefly, then add an equal volume (or slightly more) of stock and cook over a low heat for 10 minutes, by which time the liquid should be absorbed. Additions & flavourings as before, except that some are better fried before the rice is added.

No doubt I shall be told this is not be a patch on the real thing, but it works for me.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Dave the Gnome
Date: 29 Oct 20 - 02:04 PM

This looks as good a place as any to ask this. I am going to do a mutton curry in the slow cooker next week. I do cheat and use a sachet of sauce but my question is about the meat. I need to de-bone some mutton leg pieces. If it was just for me I'd be happy with leaving the bones in but someone I am cooking for would hate it.

What's the best way of getting shut of the bones before the curry reaches her plate?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 29 Oct 20 - 10:05 AM

Breath of the wok - how do *you* make fried rice?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel
Date: 28 Oct 20 - 02:48 PM

I had such a huge collection of nuts and berries I turned them into breakfast cereal by blending to chop: walnuts pecans cashews peanuts dried soft cranberries and tart cherries - and when it was a consistancy I liked I added Rice Crispies and a few more whole dried cranberries. With milk and bananas it was good.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 28 Oct 20 - 10:30 AM

My mom used to make good dumplings, but I've not had great luck with them. Does anyone have a fool-proof recipe? To add to the chicken soup.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 27 Oct 20 - 11:28 PM

I followed my own advice this evening; I didn't have many vegetables handy, but the carrots, parsnip, and onion baked in the Dutch Oven in the oven for a while, then I added chicken breast (bone and skin included) and some necks and wings and let them all roast. When I pulled out the breast and added water to the rest it turned into a beautiful golden broth that I let simmer for a while as the breast continued to bake in the oven. When the breast was finished the skin was dropped into the pot and the meat in a box in the fridge. Tomorrow I'll make soup using the chicken breast and fresh vegetables (to be purchased during senior shopping hours tomorrow).

The house smells really good this evening.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating
From: Charmion
Date: 27 Oct 20 - 03:40 PM

I make stock in an Instant Pot electronic pressure cooker, which sits on the counter and can be left unattended, and indeed the results are excellent.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 27 Oct 20 - 02:50 PM

Tried peas instead of corn in my asparagus crab soup. Still good but not quite as. Added my usual spoon of hummus, yum.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 27 Oct 20 - 02:31 PM

Good idea, Bob! You'd get all of the marrow goodness out of the bones that way also.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: BobL
Date: 27 Oct 20 - 03:57 AM

Salt would only add flavour to the bits that are going to be thrown out. In this case, you want all the flavour to remain in the liquid so definitely no salt.

I usually make chicken stock (carcass + carrot + onion + celery if available) in a pressure cooker. I found long ago that this way, the bones ended up all crumbly and harmless, and the strained remains could safely be offered to the cats who were trying to break down the kitchen door. This avoided a disposal problem - we had paper waste sacks at the time, and any wet waste had to be wrapped in lots of newspaper.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 26 Oct 20 - 05:37 AM

Though the seasoning can be omitted, depending on what the stock is for. In fact, I don't usually add salt, and I might just throw in a few whole black peppercorns.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 25 Oct 20 - 10:39 PM

My veg stock consists of roughly-chopped carrots, unpeeled, celery and onions (the outer layers that you're never too sure about are ideal). A sprig of parsley, thyme and bay go in there. Season. Boil it for at least an hour. No leaves or trimmings from brassicas should ever be included. You will live for ever!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 25 Oct 20 - 04:11 PM

I like to roast the vegetables in the oven first, to give an extra boost to the flavor. Be sure to run boiling water over the pan or foil to get all of the wonderful baked-on drippings. Then go from there to put it in a pan of water to simmer.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 25 Oct 20 - 02:26 PM

Oh I know Steve Shaw but my will power won't...

Veg stock is made chez nous by boiling all the veg garbage (ends of things, peels, onion skins etc) with some herbs spices and salt, and then straining it through cheesecloth.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson
Date: 25 Oct 20 - 11:50 AM

How do ye make ye're vegetable stock?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 25 Oct 20 - 10:02 AM

I've been enjoying regular batches of Pasta e Fagioli soup this year, though in the height of summer I didn't make it as often. It's time again to round up the ingredients.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 25 Oct 20 - 09:41 AM

Ribollita is expressly intended for the next day. Its name means reboiled.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 25 Oct 20 - 09:15 AM

I can never not eat till the next day, I have to make enough for there to BE a next day's worth. Kudos.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 24 Oct 20 - 08:18 PM

I've made my own version of ribollita today. I start with a fairly coarse soffritto of carrot, onion and celery (I like texture in me grub). Best olive oil of course. Once that's done (at least half an hour if not longer) I throw in a tin and a half of plum tomatoes, a teaspoon of sugar, a small pinch of chilli, a few cloves of fist-smashed garlic, two cans of cannellini beans and about 800 ml home-made veg stock. Seasoning of course. Simmer that lot for half an hour then add a big bunch of cavolo nero, torn up with coarse stems discarded. After about fifteen minutes it's done. But don't eat that until at least tomorrow or the next day. My amount does two of us twice. To serve it, you need two big slices (one each) of toasted bread that you've rubbed with olive oil and garlic. Put the toast in the bottom of the bowl and spoon the thick soup on top. Drizzle with your best olive oil and shave some Parmesan on top. You need chianti.

I don't use herbs or red wine in this recipe and I won't use the fennel seeds that some recipes recommend. There are herby flavours in my veg stock but I never want herbs to dominate.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 24 Oct 20 - 06:17 PM

This afternoon I turned on a movie and spent the two hours listening to it in the background while assembling the chopped ingredients (including cucumbers, pepper, and garlic from the garden) for a more-or-less dill relish. I had two recipes I couldn't decide between so merged them a little bit. Added mustard seed and one hot pepper to the mix that called for red bell pepper. And the dill recipe didn't have any onion or garlic like the other one did (but the other second recipe was full of sugar and had cornstarch as a thickener.) We'll see how it turns out. The proportions of vege to apple cider vinegar was good, though there was a lot of liquid left over at the end, since cucumbers are so wet to begin with.

The jars processed for 15 minutes and are now cooling, with some leftover in a jar in the fridge to sample once it's had a little time to sit and merge flavors. Yield: three pint jars and six half-pint jars.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 24 Oct 20 - 12:13 PM

Potato skins make potatoes worth eating.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson
Date: 24 Oct 20 - 07:03 AM

Yes, yes, of course the peel is the best part of the potato, but there are those who peel potatoes before chipping them. I don't know why, myself.
I have the last of a present of hard green apples and the whole of a present of hard green pears from two neighbours; I'm dithering about what to do with them, but… probably a ginger jam…


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 24 Oct 20 - 05:48 AM

Tenderstem is more akin to sprouting broccoli than to calabrese (the most boring vegetable on the planet). Its green spears are atop long green stems which cook nicely along with the spears. I find that steaming doesn't work too well, so I pack the tenderstem snugly in a lidded pan with the stems mostly in the water and the spears mostly sticking above. Very unforgiving if overcooked. Pinch of salt.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 24 Oct 20 - 04:08 AM

BobL - If you cook the potatoes in their skins then take the skin off and make the potatoes into chips, you can fry the skins until they are crisp and eat them all yourself. (A selfish greedy pig? Me?)


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: BobL
Date: 24 Oct 20 - 03:23 AM

Thompson what do you mean, PEEL THEM? The skin is the tastiest part!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Dave Hanson
Date: 24 Oct 20 - 03:11 AM

Tenderstem is a variety of broccolli.



Dave H


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 23 Oct 20 - 10:19 PM

I’ve made that daube, Steve. It are deeelicious.

What’s “tenderstem”?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 23 Oct 20 - 08:23 PM

Well Mrs Steve is 70 on Sunday (she doesn't look it, and don't tell her I said it), and we're having me daughter and her feller and our bubble friend round. I'm doing Elizabeth David's boeuf en daube. It's been a winner before and I'm sure it'll work again. I'll cook it tomorrow and we'll eat it on Sunday. I've never known any daube, stew or casserole that isn't ten times better the day after it's been made. We'll be having it with mashed potatoes (for which I always use at least three different varieties, which irons out any weaknesses) and a stack of tenderstem. A class act, I hope.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: JennieG
Date: 23 Oct 20 - 05:34 PM

Charmion - I tried poutine once on one of our Canadian visits. It was very delicious and I could have eaten it more frequently, but I think of it as a heart attack on a plate.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 23 Oct 20 - 04:58 PM

Poutine is arriving on menus here in Charlottesville, but it is usually adulterated with something like parmesan. Ugh.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson
Date: 23 Oct 20 - 12:17 PM

Here's Teagasc (agricultural avisors) advice on growing potatoes, with favourite cultivars. I don't like Roosters much myself, but love Records - but I think that's mainly because Roosters are kind of industrially grown.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson
Date: 23 Oct 20 - 12:13 PM

It may be an urban legend, but I have heard that potatoes in Ireland are so sweet that diabetics are advised to avoid them.
They're not sweet like sugar, but there's an underlying sweetness that's part of their deliciousness.
The first potatoes in Ireland were called "An Spáinneach Geal", or "The Bright Spaniard"; we have always grown them in the same style as the Peruvians - the duplicitously-named lazy-beds formed by making a ridge a metre wide, putting the potatoes in rows along it and folding and earthing up on top, continuing to do so as the leaves grow, to make a long stem that produces many tubers along its length.
Some recipes here.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 23 Oct 20 - 09:47 AM

I still use them if they're sweet, but now I know better than to keep them in the fridge unless it's really necessary (because they're starting to sprout and I'm going to use them very soon).

Throw them out in the garden and grow some more.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 23 Oct 20 - 09:01 AM

Thompson, when you say that the potatoes are "sweeter if you steam them", do you mean that you think being sweeter is better?
A couple of days ago the discussion was about potatoes being sweet, concluding that it was caused by keeping them too long - I got the impression that at least some people, like me, don't want potatoes to taste sweet. If mine are sweet I assume they are going off, and throw them away.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 23 Oct 20 - 08:18 AM

In eastern Canada, the perfect potato for chips comes from Prince Edward Island or New Brunswick; unfortunately, I do not know the cultivar. The "right" way to obtain chips is from a chip wagon, which is a small truck with a deep-fryer installed in the bed and a serving hatch in the side of the box body. Chip wagons may also offer poutine, a confection that I do not dare attempt to digest for fear of bad things happening.

The Canadian chip order is traditionally delivered in a small pressed-paper tray or a "toot" (cone) of stiff brown paper, slathered with ketchup (not by me; hate the stuff, and fortunately vinegar is also available), and eaten with a toothpick. The traditional habitat of the chip wagon is outside hockey arenas and curling clubs.


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