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BS: Recipes - what are we eating?

Mrrzy 13 Oct 20 - 09:20 AM
Jeri 13 Oct 20 - 08:39 AM
Steve Shaw 13 Oct 20 - 07:26 AM
Raggytash 13 Oct 20 - 07:24 AM
Charmion 13 Oct 20 - 07:15 AM
Steve Shaw 13 Oct 20 - 06:11 AM
Steve Shaw 13 Oct 20 - 05:34 AM
Steve Shaw 13 Oct 20 - 04:31 AM
Mrrzy 12 Oct 20 - 09:31 PM
Steve Shaw 12 Oct 20 - 08:28 PM
Mrrzy 12 Oct 20 - 04:26 PM
Steve Shaw 12 Oct 20 - 10:38 AM
Dave Hanson 12 Oct 20 - 02:17 AM
sciencegeek 11 Oct 20 - 07:16 PM
Steve Shaw 11 Oct 20 - 04:39 PM
Stilly River Sage 11 Oct 20 - 01:27 PM
Stilly River Sage 10 Oct 20 - 03:53 PM
Mrrzy 10 Oct 20 - 02:51 PM
Mrrzy 09 Oct 20 - 11:31 PM
Charmion 09 Oct 20 - 07:37 PM
Mrrzy 09 Oct 20 - 12:58 PM
Stilly River Sage 09 Oct 20 - 12:21 PM
Charmion 09 Oct 20 - 12:11 PM
Mrrzy 09 Oct 20 - 10:40 AM
Stilly River Sage 08 Oct 20 - 06:10 PM
leeneia 08 Oct 20 - 11:55 AM
Charmion 08 Oct 20 - 09:16 AM
sciencegeek 08 Oct 20 - 07:11 AM
Mrrzy 07 Oct 20 - 10:55 AM
Charmion 07 Oct 20 - 10:19 AM
leeneia 06 Oct 20 - 10:10 AM
Stilly River Sage 05 Oct 20 - 10:53 PM
Mrrzy 04 Oct 20 - 01:21 PM
Raggytash 04 Oct 20 - 12:16 PM
Stilly River Sage 03 Oct 20 - 11:47 PM
Stilly River Sage 03 Oct 20 - 06:02 PM
sciencegeek 03 Oct 20 - 05:58 PM
Charmion 03 Oct 20 - 11:43 AM
Mrrzy 03 Oct 20 - 11:21 AM
leeneia 03 Oct 20 - 12:21 AM
Charmion 02 Oct 20 - 01:06 PM
Mrrzy 01 Oct 20 - 04:41 PM
Jos 01 Oct 20 - 03:07 PM
Charmion 01 Oct 20 - 02:08 PM
leeneia 01 Oct 20 - 02:05 PM
leeneia 01 Oct 20 - 01:48 PM
Charmion 29 Sep 20 - 10:44 AM
Raggytash 29 Sep 20 - 04:39 AM
Charmion 28 Sep 20 - 08:19 PM
Steve Shaw 28 Sep 20 - 06:59 PM
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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 13 Oct 20 - 09:20 AM

I love my silicone tube garlic peely thing.
Charmion, thank you for posting. I am thinking of suggestions but they all come up against the pandemic, like inviting peple over to cook something, or asking around the soup kitchens. I will keep thinking.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jeri
Date: 13 Oct 20 - 08:39 AM

If you keep the flour away from moisture and insects, it'll last forever. "Use by" dates are when the company that makes them will ensure quality, because they can't guarantee your storage conditions.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 13 Oct 20 - 07:26 AM

Howdy Charmion...

For what it's worth, I've always found that the use-by dates on bags of bread flour this end can be ignored for two or three months. Mind you, I use a bread machine. Dunno whether that makes any difference.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Raggytash
Date: 13 Oct 20 - 07:24 AM

If you have the space in the freezer make bread and freeze it.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 13 Oct 20 - 07:15 AM

Right now Iím hardly eating at all. Stress does that to me.

The regular crew here knows whatís happened in my part of the forest, so I wonít say more on that.

Iím looking at a pantry, fridge and freezer packed with food I know I will never eat now ó starting with all that brisket, now vacuum-sealed and neatly frozen. Big tins of tomatoes and chickpeas can go to the food bank, but what about two kilos of moong dal in a canister? Four kilos of bread flour?

I know I will eventually start making and eating bread again, but right now the very idea makes me feel ill. Whole-wheat flour is perishable ... What to do?

Suggestions would be welcome.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 13 Oct 20 - 06:11 AM

Incidentally, I abhor the practice of putting a bowl of grated Parmesan on the table to be passed around. The cook grates on the Parmesan, preferably at the table, but in the kitchen will do. And I don't expect to be asked for extra! Again, this is a battle I lost long ago...


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 13 Oct 20 - 05:34 AM

Someone once bought me a tiny ceramic dish with a very rough inner surface, to be used for rubbing garlic cloves. It's a lovely ornament full stop. One very useful piece of kit I have is a flexible silicone tube about three inches long. You put an unpeeled clove into it then roll it on the worktop. Miraculously, the clove emerges perfectly peeled and your fingers remain untainted.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 13 Oct 20 - 04:31 AM

Either bashing it with my meat mallet (putting cling film on top first) or squashing it with the flat of a knife. The second method is more eco-friendly, thought I'm so clumsy that bits of garlic usually end up shooting all over the kitchen. There's a garlic crusher in the drawer somewhere but it rarely sees the light of day.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 12 Oct 20 - 09:31 PM

What is your distinction between bashing and crushing? I bash mine *to* crush them. Or did you mean like in a garlic press? Infernal machines, those.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 12 Oct 20 - 08:28 PM

It would be interesting to hear others' takes on ragu/bolognese sauce recipes. What meat? Milk? Chicken livers? Wine? Herbs?

Mine has half pork, half beef, one 400g tin of tomatoes for every pound of meat, about 50g diced pancetta per pound of meat, a large white onion per pound of meat and some bashed garlic cloves (never minced or crushed). I start off with a soffritto of fairly finely-chopped carrots, celery and that white onion in equal amounts. The pancetta goes in with that as well. After about twenty minutes the meat goes in, stirred and broken up until it's browned all through, then the garlic. Then the tomatoes go in, with a teaspoon of sugar, along with about 130ml chicken stock to each pound of meat and some seasoning. I'm a bit reluctant to add wine so I don't add much, and red or white, who cares. I don't add any herbs until the very end when I chuck in some torn basil leaves. The whole lot is simmered for about three hours uncovered. No milk or chicken livers for me.

There are heated family disputes here. If it were down to me I'd leave out the garlic, but I've had to compromise, adding it bashed but never crushed. I refuse to add any dried herbs. No compromise there. They insist on red wine, so I use it, but a splash only. My son objects to the pork (not on religious grounds), but he doesn't seem to notice that I've used it. My five-year-old grandson objects to the "green bits" (the basil), as Daddy uses the horrendous dried stuff which doesn't show up green. And they all want it served on spaghetti, which is anathema. It has to be pappardelle or fettuccine for me, but I lost that one long ago. I throw the pasta into the sauce and mix thoroughly, whereas my son heaps the sauce onto the middle of a pile of spaghetti. Useless. And there's only one way to eat it, and that's slurped with a fork only. I smirk in the general direction of anyone employing a spoon, or, worse, a knife. At least we're all agreed that freshly grated Parmesan is de rigeur. None of that inferior grana padano muck, and definely never ready-grated. A little drizzle of the best olive oil on top is nice, along with a little scattering of baby basil leaves, but such things are optional.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 12 Oct 20 - 04:26 PM

I did hope I had accidentally made pegao! But no.

And it is not coming out. Tricks? It was a new pot.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 12 Oct 20 - 10:38 AM

Well Dave, there are many glories in this beautiful, remote bit of north Cornwall, but, sadly, Asian grocers' stalls are not among them. Maybe I should convert a piece of flower bed that's never seen an Allium into a garlic patch...


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Dave Hanson
Date: 12 Oct 20 - 02:17 AM

I buy garlic at any Asian grocers stall in Westgate Market in Bradford, it's 5 times the quality and 10 times cheaper than any British supermarket, they sell it by the pound, not 30 or 35 pence per clove which is a total rip off.

Dave H


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: sciencegeek
Date: 11 Oct 20 - 07:16 PM

Steve... I had a similar problem with damp clay soils and cold wet spring weather that changes to baking heat - so I went to raised beds and container cropping... I found non woven growing bags of differing sizes and grow my Egyptian onions, garlic and other kitchen crops in them using potting mix, sand and compost... they are easy to fill, move around and being porous they don't drown my seedlings and not expensive to buy in bulk. I just put in 100 saffron crocus bulbs in a bunch of them and they are taking off just fine.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 11 Oct 20 - 04:39 PM

I'm blessed with white rot fungus in my soil, which has black spores that live for twenty years. So I can't grow onions, leeks or garlic. I can buy pretty good leeks and onions these days, but I lament the quality of shop garlic. Very hit or miss.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 11 Oct 20 - 01:27 PM

Today is the day to make dill pickles.

My garden produced mostly tomatoes, peppers, and cucumbers this year. I'm freezing peppers (the poblano are really happy right now and growing profusely; I'll pick them right before the first frost to get the most size on them). Last night I made chicken fajitas with a bunch of those poblanos, onion, and shredded chicken. The garlic in it was also from my garden. There were some years when the onions were also from the garden, but this year they're a bit too deep and behaving more like leeks.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 10 Oct 20 - 03:53 PM

Rice cooked to crisp not quite scorched condition on the the bottom of the pan is called "pegao" and is fought over in Puerto Rican families. The rice is scooped onto a plate and the crisp part is set on top and everyone dives for it when the plate is set on the table. Woe to the cook who puts that pot in the sink before the rice is chipped out!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 10 Oct 20 - 02:51 PM

Said rescued leftover rice, with its odor of the burned bottom, tasted like it had been cooked on the barbie. Wonderful! *Not* recommending the recipe, however.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 09 Oct 20 - 11:31 PM

I am reporting back.

So I read a lot of recipes and then did my own thing, which was to sear the roast on all sides in duck fat then put it in a loaf pan on top of some sliced onion and shallot. Then I put on top onion powder and garlic powder to thicken the eventual gravy, and marjoram oregano savory, stuck a tomato in chunks down the sides, and poured in red wine about 2/3 up, lid on, into 275 oven. After about 45 mn I flipped it, took it out of the oven after about another 45 mn, took roast out onto foil and poured sauce into saucepan to boil down while I sauteed some asparagus in snail butter. Sliced roast into 4, put the two middle underdone slices back into the oven for 15 mn while guest and I ate the ends which were perfect with the asparagus and soubise [render onions in butter, toast rice, add (2xrice, the more rice the less liquid) hot broth, reduce to low, cook 20mn without lifting lid]. So that was at about 7:30 that I turned the oven and asparagus and sauce burners off and we ate.

And it was *delish* - chewy but not tough, not all all dry. Asparagus rules, soubise sopped sauce, success.

Then we had some chocolate-covered things and watched an odd Australian movie, then we talked about grief for a while, then we had some ice cream, then guest left at about 11. At which point I realized I had never turned off the burner under the rice.

Luckily I always make a lot of rice so there will be leftovers for fried rice. And the burner was on Low...


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 09 Oct 20 - 07:37 PM

If itís twined, itís rolled. If you donít see any fat innit, I suggest wrapping it with bacon and roasting it gently in a low oven, about 300F. Use a meat thermometer to ensure that itís well done but not overdone.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 09 Oct 20 - 12:58 PM

It says it is a roast. I think it might be twined so it might also be rolled. No bone. About 2 lbs.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 09 Oct 20 - 12:21 PM

You could do hand pies. Apple turnovers. Cranberry bars.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 09 Oct 20 - 12:11 PM

What cut is your hunk of boar, Mrrzy? Is it marbled with fat, or very lean? Does it have bones?

My experiment with electronic monitoring of the barbecue was more frustrating than helpful. The gadget has two probes, one for the food and the other for the air at grill level inside the barbecue. The aneroid thermometer mounted in the dome of the kamado has a sensor that reaches well into the interior space, but it is several inches above the grill and, of course, only about two inches from the inside of the dome itself, which was losing heat to the chilly outside air.

The electronic sensor clipped to the grill reported a temperature some 30 to 50 degrees Fahrenheit above the temperature shown on dome thermometer. What to think?

The lamb shanks were good. Not great, but good. Himself thought they were boffo, but his appreciation was not affected by the effort I had to invest in the preparation, not to speak of the (not inconsiderable) cost of the charcoal. The next time I cook lamb shanks like that, I'll put them in the oven and save myself a lot of trouble and mess.

For my next trick, by Monday I have to confect a Thanksgiving dessert that is (a) portable and (b) not pie. Suggestions?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 09 Oct 20 - 10:40 AM

Chili for the choir? Lotsa beans?

Ideas for my boar roast?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 08 Oct 20 - 06:10 PM

Good luck with the competition!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia
Date: 08 Oct 20 - 11:55 AM

I hope your device works, Charmion. Won't it be nice to have meat that's been perfectly barbecued?
==========
My newspaper and its relatives are running a recipe contest with a top prize of $500. I have submitted four:

Beef Arm Roast with Cranberries
Cornish Hens with Dill
Chili for the Choir
Basil Bread

The recipes have to be original or one's own adaptation. I figure the chili and the bread are different enough to be adaptations.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 08 Oct 20 - 09:16 AM

Blue sky in Stratford, lamb shanks in the Kamado, fingers crossed.

I bought myself an electronic gadget that monitors both the cooking temperature inside the barbecue and the temperature inside the food. Today Iím giving it its maiden voyage. The leaflet that came with it says it was designed for ďcompetition cookingĒ ó what a laugh! I just care about not wasting some very expensive meat, not to speak of my valuable time.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: sciencegeek
Date: 08 Oct 20 - 07:11 AM

hard meatballs or dumplings like matzo balls is directly tied to how much compression they receive... which is why so may commercially made meatballs are so tough - the machine squeezes them too much...

the mixture needs to be blended but not overworked... then take whatever amount you need for the size you want and lightly roll in your hands to shape them...

adding breadcrumbs or shredded bread will lighten them if they are allowed to soak up moisture prior to forming the balls and cooking... just like a boiled pudding or dumpling, outside moisture penetration requires along period of simmering to fully cook and that's tough on the meat because the natural fats get removed in the process... it's a balancing act... just like all the seasoning should be in the mix before cooking, they will only pick up a small amount of flavoring from the cooking water, sauce or gravy unless the cooking process is a long one ... though using a pressure cooker may have a different result - never used one for that


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 07 Oct 20 - 10:55 AM

Sounds marvy.

Made tough beef again despite marinating and pounding. I should stick to other meats. Don't know what I do wrong with beef. The stew was *delish* though.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 07 Oct 20 - 10:19 AM

Stilly, I would make your sorta frittata in a non-stick skillet, but I'm lazy like that.

I'm waiting for a dry day to try a new cooking technique: "smoke braising". I found an interesting recipe for lamb shanks with, as the author puts it, "Asian flavours"; the shanks are half-immersed in a spiced marinade of soy sauce, sesame oil and Shaoxing wine and cooked in a smoker burning at about 225 degrees Fahrenheit for 8 to 10 hours. I hate tending the barbecue in the rain so I have put it off twice, but even in the fridge the thawed lamb shanks won't keep much longer. Environment Canada promises only "30% chance of rain" tomorrow (it's raining pitchforks today), so here's hoping.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia
Date: 06 Oct 20 - 10:10 AM

That sounds like a delicious and healthful, recipe, SRS, especially on a cool autumn day like today.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 05 Oct 20 - 10:53 PM

I regularly make a dish with onion, green peppers, broken up Italian sausage, cut up zucchini or calabash or yellow squash, and tomato sauce. Instead of diced tomatoes I used a can of pureed tomatoes that needed to be used and it came out a bit thick and intense, so I cooked a pot of pasta to stir in and it came out pretty good. I also dropped some balls of mozzarella that needs to be used (fresh) and grated a fair amount of Parmesan to give it a little kick. It'll take a while for the skillet to soak before it all comes off.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 04 Oct 20 - 01:21 PM

The flank steak was yum, despite adventure.

It is the only cut of beef I make well. Most of my steaks are tough.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Raggytash
Date: 04 Oct 20 - 12:16 PM

Easy remedy Stilly River Sage, cook the potatoes in one pan and the onions in another and then mix!!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 03 Oct 20 - 11:47 PM

I make a pan-fried sliced potato regularly, sautť in olive oil usually, and lots of spices added, including smoky paprika. Today I was looking at the potato recipes in the book above and spotted "Lyonnaise potatoes." I tried making it according to that recipe and didn't end up with what it suggested I would - apparently if you mix everything just right and cook really slowly the bottom browns and it cooks together enough to be "flipped over like an omelet." Didn't happen, and it came out a little too caramelized, but is still edible. I then turned to YouTube.

The version I see there uses either uncooked or or sliced previously boiled potatoes, plus the onions and the butter and salt and pepper. And I'll make it in the way I do my regular pan-fried potatoes, just adding the onion after the potatoes have partly browned so they don't burn. (The recipe demonstrated on "Cooks Country" will work just fine for me, but no layer of potatoes like the book suggests.)


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 03 Oct 20 - 06:02 PM

I was thumbing through recipes in my old Fanny Farmer Cookbook and noticed one I've never even read through on the same page as my favorite sweet potato recipe (deLux, with marshmallows).

It's a potato (Irish) recipe that I'll give a try and if it works I'll report back.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: sciencegeek
Date: 03 Oct 20 - 05:58 PM

just had my first bowl of stuffed pepper soup, something I've only seen locally here by Lake Erie...

nice thick soup perfect for this cold, damp day and seems simple enough to make at home:

diced green pepper, ground beef, rice, diced onion, chopped tomato and some canned tomato sauce or puree... saute ingredients and then long simmering or use crock pot... minimal seasoning and serve with fresh bread

to me, it tastes better than having stuffed peppers which never seemed to meld the flavors in an enjoyable fashion


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 03 Oct 20 - 11:43 AM

I have made that mistake more than once, Mrrzy. Somehow, it never happens in a spot where the fall-out won't land under and behind the stove or fridge. Murphy's Law in action.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 03 Oct 20 - 11:21 AM

Farmer's market, Charmion. I have been eating the Uncured but might try the Smoked next time.
How it can taste like both bacon and lamb simultaneously is beyond me. Sooooo goooooood.

Small adventure of the day: decided to pound my flank steak flatter before marinating it. Stuck it in the big ziplock [unsealed] bag I was gonna use for marinating it, and pounded it. It got a little bigger but not a lot thinner, but hey. Took meat back out of bag and put all the dry stuff in (onion and garlic powder, hot paprika, marjoram oregano savory, salt) and picked up the bag to mix those before adding oil and vinegar, and it went EVERYWHERE ... I had split the bottom of the bag pounding, and not noticed.

So got what was left into a new bag, mixed, added some vinegar and a a little more oil, mushed in all into a paste, spread it out around the bag, put the meat in, squished it all around, it is now sitting in the fridge. I will flip and resquish every few hours till dinnertime.

Cleaning up was a riot. Someone is gonna have to move my stove, a bunch went between it and the counter. And my socks smell marvy!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia
Date: 03 Oct 20 - 12:21 AM

Re: the beef

There will be enough fat to make the dish rich and tasty.

If beef is cooked in the slow cooker for a long time, a tough, burned-on ring will form all the way around. Both my slow cookers are quite heavy and awkward to handle. So I use a liner.

A few years ago I decided that after fifty years of cooking I could spend a little money making cleanup easier. So I buy the following:

slow-cooker and oven-roasting bags
parchment paper for under roasting meats
disposable gloves for really icky jobs
non-stick spray as necessary

I don't want to be a person who gets too old and tired and quits cooking.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 02 Oct 20 - 01:06 PM

And where do you obtain lamb bacon, Mrrzy? The idea has appeal, I must admit.

This weekend, I shall try braising lamb shanks in our new Kamado Joe cooker. I have a recipe, and I'm not afraid to use it. (Yes, a pan is involved, and it sits on the grill. The idea is to infuse the braising shanks with delicious smoke flavour.)

I am still learning about effective use of charcoal in the kamado; only the largest chunks are truly efficient because of the need for airflow through the fuel basket. After 20 years of cooking on a gas grill hooked into the house fuel supply, I'm still coming to terms with the price of charcoal, especially the large-lump kind the kamado needs. Guess what? It's the most expensive kind there is.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 01 Oct 20 - 04:41 PM

Lamb bacon. Just sayin.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 01 Oct 20 - 03:07 PM

And don't remove the fat - even if you can't bring yourself to eat it, the meat will taste all the better for having been cooked with it.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 01 Oct 20 - 02:08 PM

Why bother with the liner, Leeneia? Washing a crock-pot isnít all that difficult, surely?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia
Date: 01 Oct 20 - 02:05 PM

I should mention that one must be careful with slow-cooker liners. They save a lot of clean-up, but if you lift the batch out of the pot while still in the liner, the liner can break, possibly dumping the hot food and causing bad burns. (I've had one break, but I wasn't burned.)

To refrigerate the food, the best idea is to set the cooker in the sink, then lift the bag out while slipping the bowl under the bag as it comes out. Use a thin bowl, such as a steel one.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia
Date: 01 Oct 20 - 01:48 PM

Here's a recipe I invented for chuck roast. You need to buy a bag of cranberries in the autumn.

one slow-cooker liner
one chuck roast
some cranberries
1 Tablespoon molasses
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon

Line the slow cooker. Remove excess fat from the chuck roast, place it in the cooker. Place cranberries all over the top of the meat. Slow-cook on low 8 -9 hours or until tender. Just before dining, remove the roast to rest a while. Stir in the molasses. Wet the cinnamon and add to the liquid.

Slice the meat across the grain and serve with noodles.

(I like to chill the meat overnight and remove the fat from the liquid.)


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 29 Sep 20 - 10:44 AM

I use Steve's technique for pot-roast, Raggy, usually with a cut we in Canada call a chuck roast that is otherwise good for little but hamburger.

Brisket is the cut used for pastrami, known here (and very popular) as Montreal smoked meat, so it isn't widely available in supermarkets -- the delicatessen people grab most of them. But our local Sobey's occasionally gets a shed-load of large hunks of meat, such as whole beef tenderloins, so I always look in the Deal of the Day area when hunting and gathering. This brisket is the first I have ever seen that was not a special order and the centrepiece of somebody's garden party. I ascribe its appearance to the growing popularity of American-style barbecue, by which I mean low-temperature cooking with smoke.

Such a huge cut of meat is what I call rich people's economy. With the more common whole beef tenderloin, for example, you pay a risible price per pound and break it down yourself, thus obtaining at least a dozen servings of fillet steak plus super-lean off-cuts to put in your mince. BUT you have to be able to cough up a substantial sum (more than Cdn$75.00) without time to plan for it, you need freezer space to store what you don't eat immediately, and you need the kitchen skills to cut it up and trim it correctly, and then cook it properly.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Raggytash
Date: 29 Sep 20 - 04:39 AM

Steve has it right Charmion.

My Grandmother would put it in the oven before she went to Mass at 8.30 ready for Sunday Lunch at 1 O'clock.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 28 Sep 20 - 08:19 PM

So.

Following instructions from an Australian caterer's video (the only one with the camera pointing down at the meat so I could see what she was doing), I separated the flat of the brisket from the point, and took off a lot of the fat, concentrating on the big hard lumps that don't render out. Leaving a substantial quantity behind, I still removed about two kilos of fat from 6.5 kilos of brisket.

The two pieces -- flat and point -- are now in the freezer until the appropriate occasion comes up.

Meanwhile, in another part of the forest, I made a leek and potato soup (also contains celery, onion and carrot, so not canonical) using stock from a ham hock I cooked a couple of weeks ago to go with beans. With thyme, black pepper and a little allspice, the flavour is quite boffo.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 28 Sep 20 - 06:59 PM

When discussing brisket we should be clear as to whether we're talking about cooking it "flat" or cooking it rolled. Mrs Steve and I wouldn't cook huge hunks of brisket as we'd never munch our way through it all. My ideal, for two, would be a piece weighing about a kilo or just a bit over. One hot, one cold. And it would invariably be rolled and tied in our house. I agree about leaving the fat on, though I always insist that there is only a limited amount of sinew inside the roll.

I brown the brisket all round in my Le Creuset deep casserole with butter (snug fit necessary) then remove the meat. In the meaty pan I then add some roughly chopped carrot, onion and celery, along with about 100g of pancetta cubes, frying that lot hotly for about five minutes. If it needs more butter, it needs more butter. Then I need some stock, enough to go halfway up the piece of beef. I don't go a bundle on stock cubes, so I might make a veg stock by boiling up any scruffy celery, carrots and onions I have, along with a bay leaf, thyme and parsley, and, crucially, the soaking water from a handful of dried ceps (beware sand in the bottom of your ceps soaking water). You can chuck the mushrooms in as well if you like, but that isn't to my taste.

Put the brisket back in, on top of the veg, and season well. You definitely need a bouquet garni (a bunch of parsley, thyme and a bay leaf, tied with string). Add the stock up to halfway up the joint. Bring it to the simmer. Stick the casserole, lid on, in a low oven (maybe 130 C) for a good four hours. The lid should be really well sealed, so a piece of foil on the pan, then the lid, is good.

About once an hour, turn the brisket over.

This is grand with mashed potatoes and a simple green veg. You'll have all the sumptuous gravy you need.


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