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BS: Recipes - what are we eating?

Steve Shaw 27 Jul 20 - 12:50 PM
Charmion 27 Jul 20 - 12:01 PM
Bee-dubya-ell 27 Jul 20 - 09:20 AM
Charmion 27 Jul 20 - 09:13 AM
Thompson 27 Jul 20 - 05:49 AM
Thompson 27 Jul 20 - 05:44 AM
JennieG 26 Jul 20 - 11:38 PM
Stilly River Sage 26 Jul 20 - 11:00 AM
Mrrzy 26 Jul 20 - 08:07 AM
Bee-dubya-ell 25 Jul 20 - 02:08 PM
Mrrzy 25 Jul 20 - 01:21 PM
Stilly River Sage 23 Jul 20 - 09:21 PM
Mrrzy 23 Jul 20 - 06:48 PM
Mrrzy 23 Jul 20 - 04:30 PM
Charmion 23 Jul 20 - 11:23 AM
Mrrzy 23 Jul 20 - 10:54 AM
Charmion 23 Jul 20 - 09:31 AM
Mrrzy 22 Jul 20 - 04:14 PM
JennieG 22 Jul 20 - 07:46 AM
Jos 22 Jul 20 - 07:37 AM
Dave Hanson 22 Jul 20 - 07:28 AM
Steve Shaw 22 Jul 20 - 06:51 AM
Dave Hanson 22 Jul 20 - 06:18 AM
Steve Shaw 22 Jul 20 - 04:40 AM
Steve Shaw 22 Jul 20 - 04:27 AM
Mrrzy 22 Jul 20 - 12:25 AM
Charmion 21 Jul 20 - 10:02 PM
Steve Shaw 21 Jul 20 - 07:45 PM
Stilly River Sage 21 Jul 20 - 07:08 PM
Mrrzy 21 Jul 20 - 09:53 AM
Charmion 21 Jul 20 - 08:56 AM
Steve Shaw 21 Jul 20 - 04:46 AM
Charmion 20 Jul 20 - 09:14 PM
Steve Shaw 20 Jul 20 - 03:44 PM
Stilly River Sage 20 Jul 20 - 11:58 AM
Mrrzy 20 Jul 20 - 10:39 AM
Charmion 20 Jul 20 - 09:56 AM
Mrrzy 18 Jul 20 - 12:35 PM
Mrrzy 16 Jul 20 - 05:11 PM
leeneia 15 Jul 20 - 01:13 PM
Stilly River Sage 15 Jul 20 - 10:27 AM
Charmion 14 Jul 20 - 10:16 AM
Steve Shaw 13 Jul 20 - 08:53 PM
Stilly River Sage 13 Jul 20 - 08:37 PM
Steve Shaw 13 Jul 20 - 07:21 PM
Jos 13 Jul 20 - 04:47 PM
Charmion 13 Jul 20 - 04:13 PM
Mrrzy 13 Jul 20 - 02:34 PM
Donuel 13 Jul 20 - 09:48 AM
Charmion 13 Jul 20 - 09:32 AM
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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 27 Jul 20 - 12:50 PM

Roast cauliflower, eh? Try this Yotam one. For two people you need a big cauli or two smaller ones. Break them into florets, not too big, not too small and put into your biggest mixing bowl. Add the following to the bowl: three good glugs of extra virgin olive oil, a handful of pumpkin seeds, a nice chorizo ring, about 150g, cut into little rounds (skin it), a big teaspoon or more of paprika, about 30g of good-quality green olives roughly chopped up, two chopped-up red onions (leave them chunky) and a good seasoning of salt and pepper. Get in there with your hands and mix everything together. Get a baking tray about 30x40cm and line it with greaseproof paper. Dump the mixture on it and spread it out. Bake that in a hot oven, about 200C/425F for about 25-30 minutes, until the florets are nicely browned and softened, giving it a good stir about half way through. Serve it up in warm bowls with chopped fresh parsley sprinkled on top.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 27 Jul 20 - 12:01 PM

BWL, that mustard-based sauce you describe sounds like what I've been told is "mop sauce", to be applied to ribs and other barbecued cuts that have been dressed with a dry rub.

I learned about barbecue from an elderly lady who grew up in North Carolina.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Bee-dubya-ell
Date: 27 Jul 20 - 09:20 AM

Mrrzy, a mustard-based barbecue sauce is simply a mix of prepared mustard, vinegar, and water to which various spices are added. The recipe I use is heavy on chili powder. Adding sweeteners, ketchup, or tomato sauce is a controversial practice that may offend purists.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 27 Jul 20 - 09:13 AM

Dunno, Thompson, but we North Americans are very firmly conditioned to keep eggs in the fridge for fear they will go bad while our backs are turned. I've been told that the washing commercially produced eggs are subjected to removes an important protective coating from the shells, but I really don't know whether or not that is hooey.

It is worth noting that, before the electric refrigerator, milk for domestic consumption came only in pint and quart bottles, and eggs were sold in twos, fours and sixes -- i.e., enough for one household for one day. As well as the convenience of weekly (rather than daily) grocery shopping, post-war advertisements for refrigerators stressed the "safety" and "modernity" of the all-electric kitchen, free also of the dreaded gas-fired cooker with a pilot light.

In the country village where my family lived during the 1950s, electricity was more than a little iffy. My mother used to complain about how the farmers would bring down the grid by all turning on their milking machines (also a brand-new thing) at the same time -- right when she was cooking supper. Refrigerators were small and inefficient, and freezers were so rare that Mr Daly the grocer rented lockers in his walk-in freezer. This practice was so important to the villagers that people who were heading out for groceries said they were "going to the Locker".


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson
Date: 27 Jul 20 - 05:49 AM

Incidentally, going back to Leenia's comment about never being willing to eat a raw egg, are American eggs more dangerous than European?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson
Date: 27 Jul 20 - 05:44 AM

I've been meaning to try roast cauliflower, which friends tell me is ace; however, they vaguely say "Just add your own spices and stuff and a spritz of oil". I'm a little cowardly about what spices and stuff might be good - advice, please… Steve Shaw? Everyone?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: JennieG
Date: 26 Jul 20 - 11:38 PM

For lunch today we had some of the cauliflower and chorizo soup made yesterday in the slow cooker......and it is jolly good. I used to add bacon to cauli soup but will use chorizo in future; it improves the colour (it's not grey now!) and does wonders for the flavour.

I used the leftover cauli in the fridge, plus half a reasonable sized cauli, chopped (so about 3/4 of a whole cauli). Roughly chopped one onion, roughly sliced two chorizo sausages (each about 4-5 inches), fried them together for about five minutes first then added to the cauli. The rest of the home-made chicken stock - over half a litre - plus a litre of commercial stock plus a couple of teaspoons of chicken stock powder. It needed a bit more water, a couple of cups max. Simmer until cauli is soft, allow to cool for safety, then smoosh it with a stick blender. There's enough for a few lunches.

As today's weather is bloody cold, very windy and rainy, soup was a good choice for lunch.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 26 Jul 20 - 11:00 AM

Uh oh - asking about American barbecue sauce is opening a HUGE kettle of worms - it deserves its own thread. It falls into a couple of categories: what meat are you discussing and how was it cooked, and what sauce are you serving with it (or marinating in).

Charles Kuralt, the late CBS news moderator/travel reporter had an essay about North Carolina BBQ that compared it to other types around the US, and while it may not be lost forever, I can't find it at the moment. It is a short but seminal study of the state of smoked/grilled meat in the United States.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 26 Jul 20 - 08:07 AM

Mustard-based bbq sauce? Tell us more...?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Bee-dubya-ell
Date: 25 Jul 20 - 02:08 PM

Courtesy of Facebook, I got the recipe for the mustard-based barbecue sauce used by the defunct restaurant that was my favorite during my younger days. I've been eating a lot of stuff with barbecue sauce on it. Not just meats, but darned near everything. Except donuts.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 25 Jul 20 - 01:21 PM

Sounds marvy!

I made a kind of ratatouille for one... Half a zucch, half an onion, whole smallish tomato, all sliced thin. Melted some snail butter into small round glass dish, rubbed around pan. Put slices in, vertically, all the zucch first then tomato between most, then onion between most. Crushed several small garlic cloves, stuck randomly down inside. Sliced some more snail butter on top, put in 350° toaster oven for 30-35 min, then put a fresh tuna steak next to it, with butter and a dash of smoked paprika. Took whole lot out after another 10-15 mn.
The ratatouille needed a little salt but boy, what a yummy lunch. I have about half the ratatouille left.

Snail butter: parsley shallot garlic some coarse salt, either food-processed or chopped/minced to within an inch of their lives, mix with softened butter, roll in parchment paper into log shape, freeze in ziploc bag. Take a slice off slightly-softened log whenever you want. I go through a batch a month, roughly, made with a double-sized [to Americans] brick of European salted butter. That is why I did not salt my ratatouille, but next time I will.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 23 Jul 20 - 09:21 PM

A peach cobbler just came out of the oven, made with a combination of peaches from the freezer and a large can from the pantry. I wish I had ice cream. Stores close early now, but maybe tomorrow I can go through the dairy store drive through and get a pint of hand-packed vanilla. Even with the cornstarch in the recipe it's still like peach soup. Mmmmm!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 23 Jul 20 - 06:48 PM

Read this article on using kitchen gadgets in new ways, and lemme tell you, trying to get corn off the cob using a Bundt pan did not even work a little bit. And I am still cleaning the Bundt pan. The kernels squished and clung to the cob, I ended up with some corn juice and just went back to the knife.
But some ideas were cool!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 23 Jul 20 - 04:30 PM

I don't have cable either, this one showed up on PBS over the air.

Yeah, I agree wholeheartedly with just making the recipe and not trying to find a long way round.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 23 Jul 20 - 11:23 AM

I don't watch cooking shows -- no cable -- but I once owned a cookbook by Paul Prud'homme. He was one of the chefs swept by the no-fat, no-salt, no-sugar fads, so that'll be where I saw it.

I gave that cookbook away when I saw the huge efforts (and vast lists of ingredients) he prescribed in his quest for ways to imitate traditional dishes without cooking them the traditional way. I concluded that I would rather make them the traditional way and just eat less.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 23 Jul 20 - 10:54 AM

Yeah, I think the concept is you don't need [the lovely] fat *and* shorter cooking time as the flour is already cooked.
I saw it in that New Orleans chef show, so yeah, we might have seen the same source.
He did it in a 375°F oven with flour laid out less than an inch high and not within an inch of the sides of the sheet pan, stirring occasionally. Once it's toasted, the flour keeps, so I might toast some just to see ce que ça donne. I'll report back, if I do. I don't usually thicken with flour but it looked yummy, somehow, done this way.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 23 Jul 20 - 09:31 AM

Mrrzy, I think I remember an American -- perhaps Cajun? -- recipe calling for dry (or dark) roux, but I have never used it myself. Toasted flour would not clump the way the raw article does when added to hot liquid, but its flavour would be comparatively strong.

However ... I would not like the job of toasting dry flour even in a very low oven. It would take very close watching, and some of it would scorch anyhow. On the whole, the whole idea strikes me as something to do only if flour is the only potential thickener you have and even bacon fat is pretty scarce.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 22 Jul 20 - 04:14 PM

I like the leaves all taken apart and roasted, toss in oil and whatever you like first. Don't crowd the pan.

But meanwhile -and this us why I like cooking shows- y'all ever heard of, or use, a dry roux? Toast plain flour in hot oven till dark, use for thickening but later in recipe than a usual roux?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: JennieG
Date: 22 Jul 20 - 07:46 AM

Get some sprouts, cut in half lengthwise discarding any wrinkled outer leaves. Slice thinly across the width - I don't use the last bit, the thick stalk, just the finely sliced leaves. Slice a couple of bacon rashers, more or less, into very thin strips.

Heat a small saute pan, and throw in (not literally, of course - more like gently place in pan) your bacon and sprouts. Cook, stirring, until bacon is done and sprouts are tender. Season to your taste. Yum.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 22 Jul 20 - 07:37 AM

I love sprouts, but it would never ever occur to me to look for frozen ones, or to use them if I did come across them by accident.
And I much prefer fresh peas rather than the frozen ones everyone else seems to take for granted.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Dave Hanson
Date: 22 Jul 20 - 07:28 AM

I agree about frozen sprouts Steve, they always defrosted very soggy.

Dave


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 22 Jul 20 - 06:51 AM

I like 'em done any which way, as long as they're those nice tight ones and not overcooked. Never from frozen. It don't work.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Dave Hanson
Date: 22 Jul 20 - 06:18 AM

I love Brussel sprouts, par boiled then sauteed in garlic and chilli.


Dave H


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 22 Jul 20 - 04:40 AM

In any family gathering it's axiomatic that someone "won't like" something you had in mind to serve up. With us, one person won't eat prawns. Another can't stand peas. Another, broad beans. Someone else, tuna. Yet another, cauliflower. "Er, does this have anchovies in it?" Olives...blue cheese...raw tomatoes...parsnips...chorizo...And don't get me started on Brussels sprouts...


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 22 Jul 20 - 04:27 AM

The tourist areas of Italy have spag bol on their English-translated menus, but Italians don't eat that. Ragù of that sort needs a ribbon pasta or lasagne. Another Brit outrage is to dump the spaghetti on a plate then just pile the sauce on top. Yikes.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 22 Jul 20 - 12:25 AM

I think it might be Murrican. But bol in Italy would never be matched with spag. Wrong shaped pasta for the sauce's consistency.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 21 Jul 20 - 10:02 PM

Feeding the family is often a mixed blessing. Among my many reasons to enjoy the company of The Brothers and their excellent wives is that they happily eat what I set before them with evident pleasure and no argument. But the relative who still wants to smoke at the table, or eats only this and never that and has a new food phobia at every visit ... That’s when one must flex that hospitality muscle and tough it out.

I get the impression that spag bol is not actually Italian at all, but Brit, like chicken tikka masala. Is that in fact true?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 21 Jul 20 - 07:45 PM

We have family here. They all believe in spag bol except for me. I make tons of ragù which I freeze, ready to go. My ragù is half pork, half beef. They've never heard of ragù with pork in it. Yes, that red thing is a piece of carrot. My ragù starts with a soffritto of onion, celery, carrot and pancetta. Theirs are just onion, minced garlic (ugh) and beef. My ragù shouldn't have garlic in it but Mrs Steve insists, so I bash a few cloves with my fist and throw them in. My ragù doesn't have herbs, but theirs has dried basil. I'd rather hack off the family jewels with a rusty machete than add dried basil, so I offer torn fresh basil leaves at the end. They think I'm mad. Bolognese sauce served with spaghetti does not exist in Italy, so I offer the finest pappardelle instead. Nope, it has to be spaghetti. Anyway, it was a triumph. A plethora of empty dishes!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 21 Jul 20 - 07:08 PM

The afternoon was spent mowing and trimming the back yard and it's in the low 90s (this is a "cool spell") so a big dish of salty potato chips and a bottle of Topo Chico sparkling mineral water hit the spot for a late afternoon snack.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 21 Jul 20 - 09:53 AM

The chicken skin on a roast chicken doesn't usually make it to the table [say I, licking blistered fingers]. Cook's perks.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 21 Jul 20 - 08:56 AM

I love chicken skin, too. Those diet nazis who threaten coronary collapse if we eat a gram of avoidable fat have a great deal to answer for.

But why steal it? I eat chicken skin right in front of God and everybody, even going so far as to take it from Himself's plate, and so far have not suffered for the practice. (Himself is known to wield his cutlery defensively when he detects untoward interest in the grub in front of him.) Is Mrs Steve so fierce a competitor?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 21 Jul 20 - 04:46 AM

As an avid consumer of chicken skin in whatever state it's in (as I've cooked the bird, I steal skin in any case during that resting phase in a most surreptitious way...), I'll stick with giving it a rest...


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 20 Jul 20 - 09:14 PM

Steve, I normally agree with you on resting a roast chicken, but this Marcella recipe is an exception. If the stars are in alignment, the skin puffs up most marvellously, and it’s nice to get it to the table like that — it deflates within a few minutes.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 20 Jul 20 - 03:44 PM

I don't agree with carve and serve immediately. A rest of up to half an hour is extremely beneficial in m'humble.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 20 Jul 20 - 11:58 AM

Cooking is piecemeal right now; a fillet of haddock for dinner last night, an omelette for lunch, the morning oatmeal in a crockpot. There haven't been any large cooking operations beyond the steam-producing canning of a case and 1/3 of homegrown tomatoes (16 pints). The irony of canning is that it happens when the house is already too hot.

I made hummus last week that has been a nice late afternoon snack before a light dinner.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 20 Jul 20 - 10:39 AM

I am a big fan of poking holes in things and sticking them into poultry cavities. Cherry tomatoes in game hens, lemons in chickens, larger tomatoes in ducks...


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 20 Jul 20 - 09:56 AM

Himself affects to dislike grilled tomatoes, Mrrzy, but I bet he'll like your Mum's recipe.

We had ferocious thunderstorms with tornado warnings yesterday, so no barbecue. Instead, I roasted the Sunday dinner chicken Marcella Hazan's way, with a lemon inside.

Heat the oven to 375F.

Take a chicken of medium size -- 1.5 to 2 kg (three to four pounds), pat it dry, and pull out the pad of fat from the vent. Take one large or two small lemons and stab them through and through with a skewer, making at least 20 holes in each. Put the lemon(s) in the cavity of the chicken and close the vent with a skewer. Truss the chicken just tightly enough to keep the legs and wings from sprawling, and set the chicken breast down on a rack in a smallish roasting pot. Salt and pepper all the surfaces you can reach, and put the blob of fat on the chicken's back.

Roast for half an hour, then turn the chicken over. Salt and pepper again, and baste if you feel like it. Roast for another hour or so, cranking up the heat to 400F for the last 20 minutes to brown the breast. Total roasting time should be 25 to 30 minutes per pound, or a hair over an hour per kilo. Carve and serve immediately.

If you're a bit of an overachiever, you could ream the lemon and use the juice in soup, especially avgolemono.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 18 Jul 20 - 12:35 PM

Tomates provençales:

Slice tomato[es] in half, set skin-side down/cut side up on baking dish. Salt, pepper, some parsley, some basil, more garlic, glug of olive oil on cut sides. Bake in hot-ish oven, 15-20 mn. Then don't try to eat them, they are little pools of lava. Wait. Have patience. THEN eat.

Most recipes have bread crumbs but mom's never did.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 16 Jul 20 - 05:11 PM

I would like to thank whoever taught me that picking over crabmeat for shells is best done in a *metal* bowl, so you can *hear* the shell pieces your eyes and fingers missed.
So had crab set aside in lime juice, chopped a shallot, crushed some garlic, cut up a half-zucchini and a defrosted cod fillet into pieces that ranged from small dice to large chunks. Melted a rather lot of butter, turned on kettle, cooked shallots in the butter with some smoked paprika and a smidge of cayenne, after a bit added garlic, after a bit added zucch, tossed till small zucch pieces almost done, then added rather a lot of white wine, cooked down till big zucch chunks almost cooked, added fish, tossed till big fish pieces almost done, then added some boiling water and chicken [better than] bouillon, and when it came back to the boil added the crab and lime juice, stirred, turned off, did something else for about 5 mn, then ate. Yum, yum, yum.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia
Date: 15 Jul 20 - 01:13 PM

Mac & cheese with Italian sausage in it. I like that idea, Stilly.

We still don't have a stove (renovation) so I can't roast or bake. But recently I bought a flat piece of rump roast and loaded it with lemon pepper. Put it in the slow cooker and strewed sauteed garlic thereupon. Cooked it on low about 7 hours. Probably could have been six.

Took it out. Refrigerator overnight. Sliced thinly across the grain, removed fat, made sandwiches. Excellent. Tomorrow we will use the rest with noodles and the liquor from the cooking.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 15 Jul 20 - 10:27 AM

It's really hot here now but I finally got some good cheese so I'm thinking a batch of macaroni and cheese, with crumbled Italian sausage in it, would be a quick dish. It reheats fairly well (add a little milk, microwave at a medium high and stir several times).


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 14 Jul 20 - 10:16 AM

Professional cooks make "white" and "brown" meat stocks, the difference being whether the bones have been roasted before going into the pot.

White stock is for all those dishes in which the meat flavour is subordinate to vegetables, such as most veggie soups (leek & potato, carrot & ginger), or the meat is mildly flavoured -- pork, most poultry, rabbit -- and the primary flavouring is mildly acidic (especially white wine, lemon, lime and apple) or aromatic (e.g., tarragon, oregano, marjoram or thyme). Brown stock is for dishes with caramelized ingredients, especially onions and seared red meats, and bitter flavourings, including the tannins in red wine. Of course, lots of exceptions apply, especially for non-European cuisines.

French onion soup is traditionally made with the beef shin that on other days would go into the pot au feu, and the onions must be carefully browned (caramelized) before the stock goes into the kettle. It's a "poor folks" dish that reached its present form in 19th-century Paris, where people crowded into industrial neighbourhoods would eat in cheap brasseries because their inadequate homes did not provide much in the way of cooking facilities. I think its popularity in North America is almost entirely due to Julia Child and Simone Beck; I imagine that Elizabeth David and her cohort probably did the same in Britain.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 13 Jul 20 - 08:53 PM

Agreed, though oddly I don't have much call for beef stock in my cooking. I don't think that you really need to roast bones for a chicken stock. I don't suppose you can beat a damn good beef stock for French onion soup...


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 13 Jul 20 - 08:37 PM

If you have bones you want to make broth with then it is much improved if you bake them before you put them in a pot with liquid. Especially beef bones.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 13 Jul 20 - 07:21 PM

If I have a chicken carcass I boil it up for a couple of hours with whatever scrappy bits of onion, celery and carrot I have to hand. A bay leaf will go in there, along with some fresh thyme and some black pepper. Not salt. Parsley if I have it. Strain that lot and you have lovely stock. It should go without saying that the chicken should be free-range. If I have the giblets they can go in, but not the liver.

I won't use that awful Marigold vegetable bouillon. Used in the recommended amounts, it's way too salty. For veg stock I boil up some scrappy old outer celery stalks, some carrots with their peelings, an onion or two, a bay leaf and whatever herbs I have. Super!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 13 Jul 20 - 04:47 PM

Just what I was thinking - stock is an ingredient.
If I wanted a light supper and was offered a bowl of broth and some crusty bread - well that's what I have just eaten. If I was offered a bowl of stock I might be less enthusiastic, even with crusty bread.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 13 Jul 20 - 04:13 PM

I’ve been cooking a long, long time, and I first heard the phrase “bone broth” about 2015. As far as I can tell, it’s what I’ve always called stock, or meat stock, if I’m talking to vegetarians.

Now, stock and broth are different things. Stock is what you get when you put bones and vegetables in water, boil them for an extended period, and strain out the solids. It becomes broth when you add it to fresh ingredients and cook ‘em up into soup. Concentrate and clarify it, and you get bouillon. Concentrate it to a gluey consistency and the result is demi-glace.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 13 Jul 20 - 02:34 PM

Ran across an article on the diff between stock (made with bones) and broth (made with meat), so there is no such thing as "bone broth" - true?

Discounting veg stock/broth for this question.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel
Date: 13 Jul 20 - 09:48 AM

Love swordfish but in the last 20 years they have gone from huge adult steaks to tiny baby steaks and I don't have the heart to buy it anymore.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 13 Jul 20 - 09:32 AM

On the rare occasions when I have seen swordfish for sale in Canada, it was fresh (or at least not frozen), cut into steaks, and paralytically expensive. About the only wild-caught fish we can afford nowadays is local pickerel and smelt, in season, or haddock trucked from the coast. The last time I bought cod, it came from Iceland and cost the earth.

Sigh.


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