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BS: Recipes - what are we eating?

leeneia 08 Oct 20 - 11:55 AM
Charmion 08 Oct 20 - 09:16 AM
sciencegeek 08 Oct 20 - 07:11 AM
Mrrzy 07 Oct 20 - 10:55 AM
Charmion 07 Oct 20 - 10:19 AM
leeneia 06 Oct 20 - 10:10 AM
Stilly River Sage 05 Oct 20 - 10:53 PM
Mrrzy 04 Oct 20 - 01:21 PM
Raggytash 04 Oct 20 - 12:16 PM
Stilly River Sage 03 Oct 20 - 11:47 PM
Stilly River Sage 03 Oct 20 - 06:02 PM
sciencegeek 03 Oct 20 - 05:58 PM
Charmion 03 Oct 20 - 11:43 AM
Mrrzy 03 Oct 20 - 11:21 AM
leeneia 03 Oct 20 - 12:21 AM
Charmion 02 Oct 20 - 01:06 PM
Mrrzy 01 Oct 20 - 04:41 PM
Jos 01 Oct 20 - 03:07 PM
Charmion 01 Oct 20 - 02:08 PM
leeneia 01 Oct 20 - 02:05 PM
leeneia 01 Oct 20 - 01:48 PM
Charmion 29 Sep 20 - 10:44 AM
Raggytash 29 Sep 20 - 04:39 AM
Charmion 28 Sep 20 - 08:19 PM
Steve Shaw 28 Sep 20 - 06:59 PM
Stilly River Sage 28 Sep 20 - 04:16 PM
Jos 28 Sep 20 - 03:21 PM
Charmion 28 Sep 20 - 01:48 PM
Stilly River Sage 28 Sep 20 - 12:55 AM
Raggytash 27 Sep 20 - 02:14 PM
Stilly River Sage 27 Sep 20 - 12:33 PM
Charmion 26 Sep 20 - 02:39 PM
Charmion 24 Sep 20 - 10:36 AM
Mrrzy 23 Sep 20 - 03:55 PM
Stilly River Sage 23 Sep 20 - 10:35 AM
Dave Hanson 23 Sep 20 - 10:08 AM
Raggytash 23 Sep 20 - 08:44 AM
Mrrzy 23 Sep 20 - 08:15 AM
Donuel 23 Sep 20 - 08:14 AM
Raggytash 20 Sep 20 - 09:08 AM
Mrrzy 20 Sep 20 - 08:16 AM
Charmion 20 Sep 20 - 08:08 AM
Raggytash 20 Sep 20 - 06:18 AM
Stilly River Sage 19 Sep 20 - 04:16 PM
Charmion's brother Andrew 19 Sep 20 - 02:07 PM
Charmion 19 Sep 20 - 12:31 PM
Charmion's brother Andrew 18 Sep 20 - 12:14 PM
Charmion 18 Sep 20 - 09:58 AM
Stilly River Sage 18 Sep 20 - 09:41 AM
Dave Hanson 18 Sep 20 - 07:08 AM
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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia
Date: 08 Oct 20 - 11:55 AM

I hope your device works, Charmion. Won't it be nice to have meat that's been perfectly barbecued?
==========
My newspaper and its relatives are running a recipe contest with a top prize of $500. I have submitted four:

Beef Arm Roast with Cranberries
Cornish Hens with Dill
Chili for the Choir
Basil Bread

The recipes have to be original or one's own adaptation. I figure the chili and the bread are different enough to be adaptations.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 08 Oct 20 - 09:16 AM

Blue sky in Stratford, lamb shanks in the Kamado, fingers crossed.

I bought myself an electronic gadget that monitors both the cooking temperature inside the barbecue and the temperature inside the food. Today I’m giving it its maiden voyage. The leaflet that came with it says it was designed for “competition cooking” — what a laugh! I just care about not wasting some very expensive meat, not to speak of my valuable time.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: sciencegeek
Date: 08 Oct 20 - 07:11 AM

hard meatballs or dumplings like matzo balls is directly tied to how much compression they receive... which is why so may commercially made meatballs are so tough - the machine squeezes them too much...

the mixture needs to be blended but not overworked... then take whatever amount you need for the size you want and lightly roll in your hands to shape them...

adding breadcrumbs or shredded bread will lighten them if they are allowed to soak up moisture prior to forming the balls and cooking... just like a boiled pudding or dumpling, outside moisture penetration requires along period of simmering to fully cook and that's tough on the meat because the natural fats get removed in the process... it's a balancing act... just like all the seasoning should be in the mix before cooking, they will only pick up a small amount of flavoring from the cooking water, sauce or gravy unless the cooking process is a long one ... though using a pressure cooker may have a different result - never used one for that


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 07 Oct 20 - 10:55 AM

Sounds marvy.

Made tough beef again despite marinating and pounding. I should stick to other meats. Don't know what I do wrong with beef. The stew was *delish* though.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 07 Oct 20 - 10:19 AM

Stilly, I would make your sorta frittata in a non-stick skillet, but I'm lazy like that.

I'm waiting for a dry day to try a new cooking technique: "smoke braising". I found an interesting recipe for lamb shanks with, as the author puts it, "Asian flavours"; the shanks are half-immersed in a spiced marinade of soy sauce, sesame oil and Shaoxing wine and cooked in a smoker burning at about 225 degrees Fahrenheit for 8 to 10 hours. I hate tending the barbecue in the rain so I have put it off twice, but even in the fridge the thawed lamb shanks won't keep much longer. Environment Canada promises only "30% chance of rain" tomorrow (it's raining pitchforks today), so here's hoping.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia
Date: 06 Oct 20 - 10:10 AM

That sounds like a delicious and healthful, recipe, SRS, especially on a cool autumn day like today.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 05 Oct 20 - 10:53 PM

I regularly make a dish with onion, green peppers, broken up Italian sausage, cut up zucchini or calabash or yellow squash, and tomato sauce. Instead of diced tomatoes I used a can of pureed tomatoes that needed to be used and it came out a bit thick and intense, so I cooked a pot of pasta to stir in and it came out pretty good. I also dropped some balls of mozzarella that needs to be used (fresh) and grated a fair amount of Parmesan to give it a little kick. It'll take a while for the skillet to soak before it all comes off.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 04 Oct 20 - 01:21 PM

The flank steak was yum, despite adventure.

It is the only cut of beef I make well. Most of my steaks are tough.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Raggytash
Date: 04 Oct 20 - 12:16 PM

Easy remedy Stilly River Sage, cook the potatoes in one pan and the onions in another and then mix!!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 03 Oct 20 - 11:47 PM

I make a pan-fried sliced potato regularly, sauté in olive oil usually, and lots of spices added, including smoky paprika. Today I was looking at the potato recipes in the book above and spotted "Lyonnaise potatoes." I tried making it according to that recipe and didn't end up with what it suggested I would - apparently if you mix everything just right and cook really slowly the bottom browns and it cooks together enough to be "flipped over like an omelet." Didn't happen, and it came out a little too caramelized, but is still edible. I then turned to YouTube.

The version I see there uses either uncooked or or sliced previously boiled potatoes, plus the onions and the butter and salt and pepper. And I'll make it in the way I do my regular pan-fried potatoes, just adding the onion after the potatoes have partly browned so they don't burn. (The recipe demonstrated on "Cooks Country" will work just fine for me, but no layer of potatoes like the book suggests.)


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 03 Oct 20 - 06:02 PM

I was thumbing through recipes in my old Fanny Farmer Cookbook and noticed one I've never even read through on the same page as my favorite sweet potato recipe (deLux, with marshmallows).

It's a potato (Irish) recipe that I'll give a try and if it works I'll report back.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: sciencegeek
Date: 03 Oct 20 - 05:58 PM

just had my first bowl of stuffed pepper soup, something I've only seen locally here by Lake Erie...

nice thick soup perfect for this cold, damp day and seems simple enough to make at home:

diced green pepper, ground beef, rice, diced onion, chopped tomato and some canned tomato sauce or puree... saute ingredients and then long simmering or use crock pot... minimal seasoning and serve with fresh bread

to me, it tastes better than having stuffed peppers which never seemed to meld the flavors in an enjoyable fashion


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 03 Oct 20 - 11:43 AM

I have made that mistake more than once, Mrrzy. Somehow, it never happens in a spot where the fall-out won't land under and behind the stove or fridge. Murphy's Law in action.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 03 Oct 20 - 11:21 AM

Farmer's market, Charmion. I have been eating the Uncured but might try the Smoked next time.
How it can taste like both bacon and lamb simultaneously is beyond me. Sooooo goooooood.

Small adventure of the day: decided to pound my flank steak flatter before marinating it. Stuck it in the big ziplock [unsealed] bag I was gonna use for marinating it, and pounded it. It got a little bigger but not a lot thinner, but hey. Took meat back out of bag and put all the dry stuff in (onion and garlic powder, hot paprika, marjoram oregano savory, salt) and picked up the bag to mix those before adding oil and vinegar, and it went EVERYWHERE ... I had split the bottom of the bag pounding, and not noticed.

So got what was left into a new bag, mixed, added some vinegar and a a little more oil, mushed in all into a paste, spread it out around the bag, put the meat in, squished it all around, it is now sitting in the fridge. I will flip and resquish every few hours till dinnertime.

Cleaning up was a riot. Someone is gonna have to move my stove, a bunch went between it and the counter. And my socks smell marvy!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia
Date: 03 Oct 20 - 12:21 AM

Re: the beef

There will be enough fat to make the dish rich and tasty.

If beef is cooked in the slow cooker for a long time, a tough, burned-on ring will form all the way around. Both my slow cookers are quite heavy and awkward to handle. So I use a liner.

A few years ago I decided that after fifty years of cooking I could spend a little money making cleanup easier. So I buy the following:

slow-cooker and oven-roasting bags
parchment paper for under roasting meats
disposable gloves for really icky jobs
non-stick spray as necessary

I don't want to be a person who gets too old and tired and quits cooking.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 02 Oct 20 - 01:06 PM

And where do you obtain lamb bacon, Mrrzy? The idea has appeal, I must admit.

This weekend, I shall try braising lamb shanks in our new Kamado Joe cooker. I have a recipe, and I'm not afraid to use it. (Yes, a pan is involved, and it sits on the grill. The idea is to infuse the braising shanks with delicious smoke flavour.)

I am still learning about effective use of charcoal in the kamado; only the largest chunks are truly efficient because of the need for airflow through the fuel basket. After 20 years of cooking on a gas grill hooked into the house fuel supply, I'm still coming to terms with the price of charcoal, especially the large-lump kind the kamado needs. Guess what? It's the most expensive kind there is.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 01 Oct 20 - 04:41 PM

Lamb bacon. Just sayin.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 01 Oct 20 - 03:07 PM

And don't remove the fat - even if you can't bring yourself to eat it, the meat will taste all the better for having been cooked with it.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 01 Oct 20 - 02:08 PM

Why bother with the liner, Leeneia? Washing a crock-pot isn’t all that difficult, surely?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia
Date: 01 Oct 20 - 02:05 PM

I should mention that one must be careful with slow-cooker liners. They save a lot of clean-up, but if you lift the batch out of the pot while still in the liner, the liner can break, possibly dumping the hot food and causing bad burns. (I've had one break, but I wasn't burned.)

To refrigerate the food, the best idea is to set the cooker in the sink, then lift the bag out while slipping the bowl under the bag as it comes out. Use a thin bowl, such as a steel one.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia
Date: 01 Oct 20 - 01:48 PM

Here's a recipe I invented for chuck roast. You need to buy a bag of cranberries in the autumn.

one slow-cooker liner
one chuck roast
some cranberries
1 Tablespoon molasses
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon

Line the slow cooker. Remove excess fat from the chuck roast, place it in the cooker. Place cranberries all over the top of the meat. Slow-cook on low 8 -9 hours or until tender. Just before dining, remove the roast to rest a while. Stir in the molasses. Wet the cinnamon and add to the liquid.

Slice the meat across the grain and serve with noodles.

(I like to chill the meat overnight and remove the fat from the liquid.)


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 29 Sep 20 - 10:44 AM

I use Steve's technique for pot-roast, Raggy, usually with a cut we in Canada call a chuck roast that is otherwise good for little but hamburger.

Brisket is the cut used for pastrami, known here (and very popular) as Montreal smoked meat, so it isn't widely available in supermarkets -- the delicatessen people grab most of them. But our local Sobey's occasionally gets a shed-load of large hunks of meat, such as whole beef tenderloins, so I always look in the Deal of the Day area when hunting and gathering. This brisket is the first I have ever seen that was not a special order and the centrepiece of somebody's garden party. I ascribe its appearance to the growing popularity of American-style barbecue, by which I mean low-temperature cooking with smoke.

Such a huge cut of meat is what I call rich people's economy. With the more common whole beef tenderloin, for example, you pay a risible price per pound and break it down yourself, thus obtaining at least a dozen servings of fillet steak plus super-lean off-cuts to put in your mince. BUT you have to be able to cough up a substantial sum (more than Cdn$75.00) without time to plan for it, you need freezer space to store what you don't eat immediately, and you need the kitchen skills to cut it up and trim it correctly, and then cook it properly.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Raggytash
Date: 29 Sep 20 - 04:39 AM

Steve has it right Charmion.

My Grandmother would put it in the oven before she went to Mass at 8.30 ready for Sunday Lunch at 1 O'clock.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 28 Sep 20 - 08:19 PM

So.

Following instructions from an Australian caterer's video (the only one with the camera pointing down at the meat so I could see what she was doing), I separated the flat of the brisket from the point, and took off a lot of the fat, concentrating on the big hard lumps that don't render out. Leaving a substantial quantity behind, I still removed about two kilos of fat from 6.5 kilos of brisket.

The two pieces -- flat and point -- are now in the freezer until the appropriate occasion comes up.

Meanwhile, in another part of the forest, I made a leek and potato soup (also contains celery, onion and carrot, so not canonical) using stock from a ham hock I cooked a couple of weeks ago to go with beans. With thyme, black pepper and a little allspice, the flavour is quite boffo.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 28 Sep 20 - 06:59 PM

When discussing brisket we should be clear as to whether we're talking about cooking it "flat" or cooking it rolled. Mrs Steve and I wouldn't cook huge hunks of brisket as we'd never munch our way through it all. My ideal, for two, would be a piece weighing about a kilo or just a bit over. One hot, one cold. And it would invariably be rolled and tied in our house. I agree about leaving the fat on, though I always insist that there is only a limited amount of sinew inside the roll.

I brown the brisket all round in my Le Creuset deep casserole with butter (snug fit necessary) then remove the meat. In the meaty pan I then add some roughly chopped carrot, onion and celery, along with about 100g of pancetta cubes, frying that lot hotly for about five minutes. If it needs more butter, it needs more butter. Then I need some stock, enough to go halfway up the piece of beef. I don't go a bundle on stock cubes, so I might make a veg stock by boiling up any scruffy celery, carrots and onions I have, along with a bay leaf, thyme and parsley, and, crucially, the soaking water from a handful of dried ceps (beware sand in the bottom of your ceps soaking water). You can chuck the mushrooms in as well if you like, but that isn't to my taste.

Put the brisket back in, on top of the veg, and season well. You definitely need a bouquet garni (a bunch of parsley, thyme and a bay leaf, tied with string). Add the stock up to halfway up the joint. Bring it to the simmer. Stick the casserole, lid on, in a low oven (maybe 130 C) for a good four hours. The lid should be really well sealed, so a piece of foil on the pan, then the lid, is good.

About once an hour, turn the brisket over.

This is grand with mashed potatoes and a simple green veg. You'll have all the sumptuous gravy you need.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 28 Sep 20 - 04:16 PM

You must keep the fat if you're going to cook the brisket barbecue fashion. I used to buy sandwiches from an early version of a food truck (back in the 1980s) - the guy told me that sometimes people brought him meat to barbecue for them but they'd cut off too much fat and he'd have to find some extra from one of his to add to it, to keep the meat tender through the slow process.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 28 Sep 20 - 03:21 PM

My first bit of advice regarding brisket would be DON'T cut the fat off. It's delicious. Especially after long slow cooking.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 28 Sep 20 - 01:48 PM

So, Raggytash, with respect to brisket, you belong to the European/Jewish faction that prefers to braise? Do you know anything about “breaking down” a packer brisket — I.e., separating the flat from the point?

I’m more and more convinced that I should freeze the whole thing and cook it whole, when we have the five thousand to feed.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 28 Sep 20 - 12:55 AM

I eat a lot less meat than I used to. At one time it was a chicken breast on each plate along with the rest of the meal and the entire breast would be eaten by each person. A steak, a large pork chop.

I baked a chicken breast with ribs yesterday and stored it in the fridge to use for the next couple of days. I picked up some hot fresh corn tortillas this evening so I shredded part of that breast (about 2/3 of the meat), seasoned it, and rolled it into eight tortilla "flautas" that are fried in shallow oil. Two is plenty for a meal, topped with guacamole, sour cream, some hot sauce and some chopped iceberg lettuce (good for dishes like this because it adds a crisp topping). There are three more meals to go from the rest I stored in the fridge, and the rest of the chicken might go in a sandwich, might be sliced and put in marinara sauce on pasta, etc.

There are still times I will eat a larger portion of the protein part of the meal - it more often has to do with fish than meat.

Have others noticed this tendency? I think for me it has to do with cutting back on meat because of awareness of how meat is processed, handled, and most importantly, raised. Meals usually cost less with less meat, and certainly I get a lot more groceries for the dollar if I'm not buying meat every trip to the grocery store. And it isn't healthy to eat as much as we used to.

I haven't caught up with every post lately, so apologies if you've already discussed this recently.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Raggytash
Date: 27 Sep 20 - 02:14 PM

With a brisket I would dice some onions, some carrots, a touch of leek, a bit of celery and braise the brisket for several hours.

My grandmother, who was a superb cook, would add Barley.

As a child I hated Barley (and still do) but I defer to her abilities so a hand full of Barley would add a touch.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 27 Sep 20 - 12:33 PM

I have a tub of fresh mozzarella balls that I've been drawing down slowly before they're too old. I also have some commercially organic grape tomatoes that are the only store-bought tomatoes that actually taste like the home-grown ones. And I have a pot of basil sprouts and every day or two I thin a couple of the sprouts out and make a salad, drizzled with balsamic vinegar.

I enjoy various forms of sweet potatoes (the Beauregard variety is what we get here most often) and I'm going to boil then mash a couple of large ones. Add a little orange juice, some pumpkin pie seasonings, and it's almost dessert with no added sugar. At Thanksgiving I make that in a large casserole and top it with browned marshmallows, a classic illustration of "gilding the lily."


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 26 Sep 20 - 02:39 PM

I purchased a whole brisket today. It was on special (that‘s my story and I’m sticking to it). I may yet come to regret this.

My current cunning plan is to separate the layers of meat — the flat and the point — and trim off the excess hard fat, and freeze the pieces for future reference.

Any advice youse all might have to offer is eagerly anticipated.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 24 Sep 20 - 10:36 AM

I have not maintained, let alone improved, the pastry skills I learned in my teens, when I could produce quite excellent flaky pastry with two knives and a fork. Those days are long gone; now, I can knock together a pie dough (plain pastry to you, Raggy) with the help of a food processor, but puff pastry and filo (phyllo) are well beyond me. It took me a while to conquer my pride, but the frozen article is just fine, especially since Himself doesn't have to listen to me swearing half the afternoon.

Today supper will be Kaessler, or smoked pork chops, a local delicacy. I dunno what breed of pig they come from, but Kaessler tend to be sizable; Himself (who favours Big Food) came home from the market once with a specimen so large that I could barely squeeze it into the grilling pan.

We had our first frost last weekend, so w have probably seen the last of the sweet corn for this year. Sad ...


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 23 Sep 20 - 03:55 PM

Yes it is probably correctly spelled phi something lambda something!

I saw my mom make it by hand so I have reason to be afraid...


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 23 Sep 20 - 10:35 AM

Same thing, different spelling. I've made it from scratch - once - that's why I buy it now.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Dave Hanson
Date: 23 Sep 20 - 10:08 AM

Did you mean ' filo ' pastry ? Mrrzy ?

Dave H


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Raggytash
Date: 23 Sep 20 - 08:44 AM

My good lady got a phone call from our Daughter-in-law, could Nick make me some of his wonderful Chilli-con-Carne.

8 portions will be delivered to her this afternoon, two portions will be kept for to-nights meal.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 23 Sep 20 - 08:15 AM

I have puff pastry in my freezer. Also phyllo. Afraid to try either, really. But I have a virtual recipe swap coming up...


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel
Date: 23 Sep 20 - 08:14 AM

Its so cold I made chili con carne' with real fresh chili peppers. The heat is subtle but long lasting with a pleasant quintesence.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Raggytash
Date: 20 Sep 20 - 09:08 AM

Making puff pastry is fairly easy ........... but time consuming.

Rough puff pastry is even easier.

However ..........

On this occasion I cheated and bought some.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 20 Sep 20 - 08:16 AM

Ooh I *love* tournedos rossini. Imma try that soon, thanks for the memory.

I have no wish to try making beef wellington. Love the dish but yeah, no.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 20 Sep 20 - 08:08 AM

Oh, Raggytash. You’re my kind of guy.

I have never managed to put all my various cookery skills together sufficiently to mount a Beef Wellington. It’s the pastry part — everything else is well within my capabilities.

Do you make your own puff pastry, or buy it frozen? (First or seventh dan black belt?)

When I want to get fancy with fillet steak and pâté, I go with the comparatively easy Tournedos Rossini.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Raggytash
Date: 20 Sep 20 - 06:18 AM

Beef Wellington for us tonight. A nice 2lb 2oz piece of fillet with chicken liver Pate and pureed mushrooms in a puff pastry parcel.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 19 Sep 20 - 04:16 PM

Yes - I thought about ants when I read the story about picking fruit (thinking he was lucky if there weren't ants). We were staying with my in-laws in the West Palm Beach area of Florida where mango trees grow easily. On a walk we tried picking some but the fire ants were vicious. We suffered for the fruit we did manage to pick.

Today I was at the gourmet discount grocery I visit for bulk items and the "Saturday Market" that opens into the warehouse had lots of carts and pallets of fruit, including some mangos that were mostly too soft but I found a few that were just right. They aren't the usual green/orange ones but they aren't the yellow ones either. Amazingly smooth consistency and a nice sweet slightly tart flavor. Eaten leaning over a kitchen counter and plate, undressing not required.

I picked up vegetables also, and berries, etc. I found several pounds of mushrooms and the dehydrator is now running. Saturdays can sometimes be a zoo down there but I timed it to get in and out in 15 minutes and people stayed pretty well spaced.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion's brother Andrew
Date: 19 Sep 20 - 02:07 PM

You were likely still correct on both points. Maybe the wartime RN was different, but one can still be a leading seaman and tasked as the Petty Officer of the Watch, and that can be a task assigned as an extra duty (master corporals are regularly scheduled to serve as Base Duty Sergeants). Dad recounted the story when I had asked him if he had ever had to do extras.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 19 Sep 20 - 12:31 PM

I stand corrected on the rank and reason. The rest of the story stands.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion's brother Andrew
Date: 18 Sep 20 - 12:14 PM

Dad told me he was a leading seaman and doing extra duties for leaving something unsecured. He did his rounds with a rifle with its bayonet fixed, and the amusement largely came from the way he used the weapon to extend this reach for the fruit, which were in trees with biting insects (ants of some variety, as I recall, so likely a symbiotic relationship).


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 18 Sep 20 - 09:58 AM

My father, who served in the British navy during the Second World War, ate his first mango in 1943 at a shore station near Mombasa. Beached for a short time between a radar course in South Africa and his next ship, he took his turn as Petty Officer of the Watch, which meant supervising the base defence force. He chose to conduct his hourly tour of the perimeter sentry posts by way of the mango trees that grew all over the area, much to the amusement of the Kenyan soldiers who did the actual guarding.

I suspect that, after four years of war and Royal Navy rations, he would have stopped at little to get his hands on freely available fresh fruit.

When we asked how one eats a mango, he said, "First, take off your clothes and get into the bathtub."


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 18 Sep 20 - 09:41 AM

That sounds like one excellent mango, Don! In her book Under the Tuscan Sun, Frances Mayes described eating some fresh Italian pears that were so good you "needed to eat them in private."

I find mangos purchased from stores where they sell a lot of them and sell to customers who really know their mangoes means I get the best mangoes. So I shop at the Asian or Halal market and they're usually much better (probably handled correctly and allowed to ripen properly). This usually means not storing them in a refrigerated space.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Dave Hanson
Date: 18 Sep 20 - 07:08 AM

Should have said, low fat low flavour.

Dave H


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