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BS: Recipes - what are we eating?

Mrrzy 16 Apr 20 - 10:50 PM
Stilly River Sage 16 Apr 20 - 11:33 AM
Mrrzy 16 Apr 20 - 11:05 AM
Stilly River Sage 15 Apr 20 - 09:45 PM
Mrrzy 15 Apr 20 - 05:05 PM
Stilly River Sage 15 Apr 20 - 01:56 PM
Mrrzy 15 Apr 20 - 09:44 AM
Stilly River Sage 14 Apr 20 - 08:58 PM
Donuel 14 Apr 20 - 07:35 PM
EBarnacle 14 Apr 20 - 03:04 PM
Mrrzy 14 Apr 20 - 02:59 PM
Mrrzy 14 Apr 20 - 08:34 AM
Donuel 14 Apr 20 - 08:21 AM
Stilly River Sage 14 Apr 20 - 12:58 AM
Donuel 13 Apr 20 - 11:04 PM
Donuel 13 Apr 20 - 09:57 PM
Thompson 13 Apr 20 - 06:26 PM
Stilly River Sage 12 Apr 20 - 09:19 PM
EBarnacle 12 Apr 20 - 09:01 PM
Mrrzy 12 Apr 20 - 07:01 PM
Thompson 12 Apr 20 - 06:59 AM
EBarnacle 12 Apr 20 - 12:14 AM
Mrrzy 11 Apr 20 - 11:10 AM
Stilly River Sage 10 Apr 20 - 09:54 PM
leeneia 10 Apr 20 - 06:45 PM
EBarnacle 10 Apr 20 - 06:32 PM
Stilly River Sage 10 Apr 20 - 11:40 AM
Charmion 10 Apr 20 - 10:57 AM
Mrrzy 10 Apr 20 - 07:09 AM
EBarnacle 09 Apr 20 - 11:27 PM
Donuel 09 Apr 20 - 07:35 PM
Stilly River Sage 09 Apr 20 - 05:48 PM
Mrrzy 09 Apr 20 - 11:25 AM
Dave Hanson 09 Apr 20 - 11:07 AM
EBarnacle 09 Apr 20 - 09:12 AM
Mrrzy 09 Apr 20 - 08:00 AM
leeneia 08 Apr 20 - 09:32 PM
Stilly River Sage 07 Apr 20 - 04:48 PM
Steve Shaw 07 Apr 20 - 01:23 PM
Donuel 07 Apr 20 - 10:37 AM
Charmion 07 Apr 20 - 09:49 AM
Mrrzy 07 Apr 20 - 12:09 AM
Steve Shaw 06 Apr 20 - 09:36 PM
Steve Shaw 06 Apr 20 - 09:28 PM
Stilly River Sage 06 Apr 20 - 09:26 PM
Donuel 06 Apr 20 - 08:46 PM
Steve Shaw 06 Apr 20 - 06:07 PM
Donuel 06 Apr 20 - 05:09 PM
leeneia 06 Apr 20 - 05:09 PM
Stilly River Sage 06 Apr 20 - 04:55 PM
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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 16 Apr 20 - 10:50 PM

Thanks. I ended up stirfrying the venison in a little butter, soy and worcestershire with some garlic and onion powders for thickening, marjoram and oregano, deglazing with white wine, then added a ton of mushrooms with thyme and cayenne and cooked them down, adding a bit of water here and there so all the spices went into a gravy, adding a large amount of sour cream and devouring it as stroganoff. Started at 8:10, scarfed by 8:30. Man. I do like cooking projects but sometimes I could just eat straight from the pan and save a minute.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 16 Apr 20 - 11:33 AM

I found it on Amazon, and after comparing a lot of ratings and container sizes, ended up buying a 16oz bottled from a company called "Spiceologist." It's very good and that much is close to a lifetime supply. It looks like that isn't available (it was also a reasonable price). Smoked paprika, 16 oz this is a US result, I'm not sure where you are doing your ordering from. I notice on a UK site where I order vet supplies that they have suspended taking orders right now because they can't guarantee that they'll be able to ship to the US.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 16 Apr 20 - 11:05 AM

I think today's project will be stuffed cabbage again with ground venison that my shopper subbed for the missing bison. My last attempt at stuffed cabbage was delish. However, I am totz out of paprika (sweet and hot Hungarian and smoked Spanish) - and Penzey's has been declared non-essential.

Anybody got a good source for Hungarian paprika, in particular?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 15 Apr 20 - 09:45 PM

That's the difference between home baking and buying from commercial bakeries. And my next door neighbor texted "I didn't know homemade cinnamon rolls were so delicious!"

Dinner tonight, after weeding out front and not wanting to spend much time at the stove, was already boiled red potatoes, diced and added to a little oil in a skillet to brown around the edges. A healthy grind of black pepper and salt were all they needed. A small bowl of cottage cheese, a slice of ham, and several broccoli florets. Hit the major food groups. Topped off with a small Scotch. My first in a very long time. Nice.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 15 Apr 20 - 05:05 PM

They went crazy with the icing. After the 1st bite I took all the icing off, but it was still too sweet. I remain bummed.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 15 Apr 20 - 01:56 PM

I put a little icing on most of them, except for one friend. It's a basic roll dough rolled out and paint on melted butter then sprinkle cinnamon sugar. It actually isn't that much sugar per roll if you don't go crazy with the icing.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 15 Apr 20 - 09:44 AM

I got some cinnamon rolls from a local bakery but soooooo sweet as to be inedible, which I am still sorry about.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 14 Apr 20 - 08:58 PM

The last time I was in a large grocery store (over 2 weeks ago) they were up to their eyeballs in fresh chicken. Maybe it's a regional thing.

I'm glad to see someone else enjoys reading John McPhee. He really has had an amazingly long career with some fantastic subject matter. One of his first I read many years ago was Encounters with the Archdruid: Narratives About a Conservationist and Three of His Natural Enemies. It takes place (at least part of it) in the forest where I worked for a few years.

I made a batch of cinnamon rolls and gave them to three friends. The ones I kept here I had for dinner. I deliver hot baked goods right out of the oven, put into bags with tongs and delivered wearing gloves.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel
Date: 14 Apr 20 - 07:35 PM

With no chicken in the store I bought fresh turkeys. For the next couple weeks we have variations on a theme of turkey meat.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: EBarnacle
Date: 14 Apr 20 - 03:04 PM

I've been enjoying McPhee's "The Founding Fish" as a bathroom book. That way I get to enjoy it in small doses. The personal anecdotes mixed with history make a very flavorable [sic] book. Based on the article linked to and his personal history, I suspect that much of the content appeared in the New Yorker.
Despite the denigrating comment shad are fantastic eating, whether pickled or broiled. I prefer pickled, as shad are very bony, being of the herring family, and the pickling dissolves the bones.
My friend Andy, an inveterate fisherman, is of the catch 'em and throw back persuasion. He says that the hen shad have not arrived in the river as of this morning.
I say, why torture the fish unless you're going to do the respectful thing and consume it?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 14 Apr 20 - 02:59 PM

Ooh here is an idea: using frozen hash browns (thawed and dried) as a crust for a savoury pie.

Makes me wish I had some frozen hash browns.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 14 Apr 20 - 08:34 AM

That sounds scrumptious.

Any ideas for a pork loin?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel
Date: 14 Apr 20 - 08:21 AM

Banana Pecan pancakes was a great way to start the day.
1 thinly sliced banana and up to a 1/3 cup of crushed pecans, 3 eggs, heaping tbl of sour cream and milk until correct consistency, enough for 6 pancakes.
I used a little whipped cream instead of syrup.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 14 Apr 20 - 12:58 AM

Sounds like this is the year to set up a produce stand at the curb in the neighborhood. Your garden surplus will go on someone's table, whether you sell it or give it away is up to you.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel
Date: 13 Apr 20 - 11:04 PM

The food chain is not a machine, it is people and they are getting sick to the point where Smithfield plants even in South Dakota are shutting down.
The workers are mostly immigrants not likely to give info to an ER.
Houston we have a problem.

Society will have to change their habit of hate and exploitation or accept their own demise as a consequence of said beliefs.

The unintended consequences are a revenge only in our imagination but it is happening and only a better imagination can save us.


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Subject: RE:Who can solve the supply chain question?
From: Donuel
Date: 13 Apr 20 - 09:57 PM

The supply chain runs on 2 seperate tracks; grocery and commercial (institutions and restaurants).

People fearing lock down and insufficient supplies put stress on the grocery side and the commercial side has much less demand and are destroying food at the source like milk, eggs and plowing ripe crops under. Yes much of it rots.

People are not accustomed to buy eggs by the gross or 40 lbs packages of chicken. The commercial track always had their own distributors and packaging.

Federal intervention is sorely needed to turn things around or severe food shortage may derail rich nations. We could have neither bread or circus. Inaction will lead to the most dire scenarios we dare not imagine.

I have already seen two lanes of cars waiting in 10 mile long lines for 20 lbs of free food bank food.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson
Date: 13 Apr 20 - 06:26 PM

This one?
Armand Charest: "You take a shad. You put it in a pressure cooker with a brick. you cook it for eight hours. Then you throw away the shad and eat the brick."


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 12 Apr 20 - 09:19 PM

They’re In the River

Sapidissima

If you're not a subscriber to The New Yorker you may have to look for these at your library, but John McPhee has written about shad and shad roe several times over the years.

I cut up some (previously) boiled red potatoes tonight and pan friend them to crisp edges and had them with a piece of pan fried in butter Copper River salmon; I think it's the last piece frozen last summer. And for the first time in at least two months, I had a beer with dinner. While I was recovering from surgery on narcotics, no alcohol was allowed, and I didn't want to drink any when I was on a lot of Tylenol.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: EBarnacle
Date: 12 Apr 20 - 09:01 PM

Well, we're not dining on Shad tonight or making pickled shad or any of the other pleasures, like shad roe, that are associated with catching a fish. We ere at several locations and only saw two fish landed today. We will make another try when they are running stronger--perhaps next week. A lot of broken surface walking, though.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 12 Apr 20 - 07:01 PM

Imma try a chicken salad tonight. I have a thigh I kinda dredged in onion and garlic powders, cumin and cayenne for chicken broccoli from lunch, a few grapes, chopped celery and almonds, maybe some green peppers, sour cream lemon dressing with fresh dill. We shall see.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson
Date: 12 Apr 20 - 06:59 AM

Used to make yogurt; best way of getting it to set in a cold climate was putting it in the bed with the hot blanket on and the duvet over it for a few hours.

Everyone in Ireland seems to be frenetically digging lazy beds and putting in potatoes, and reclaiming gardens and starting food seeds. The weather has been glorious for the whole lockdown period so far, but today some much-needed rain has arrived and the gardens and hills and fields are going "Aaaah!"

I'm trying to get scorzonera going. This is a long, sweet root, which is perennial and provides years of good eating; it's sweet-tasting (kind of like salsify) but is supposed to be good for diabetes.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: EBarnacle
Date: 12 Apr 20 - 12:14 AM

I just noticed. The output should be 2 pints per half gallon of milk. The milk we use is organic as we seem to get the best result and are lactose intolerant. We use the firm stuff in place of sour cream or cream cheese [try it with lox on a really good sour rye.]
Just got word--the shad are running. Off to the Delaware tomorrow.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 11 Apr 20 - 11:10 AM

Some like it hot, leeneia! Totz optional, the cayenne.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 10 Apr 20 - 09:54 PM

Over the years I've made a lot of yogurt, using the directions in a Middle Eastern cookbook (heat the milk, mix the starter, put it in a large bowl topped with a plate wrapped in several layers of towels and leave it on the counter overnight. It's magic by morning.

However, I have a gourmet discount grocery warehouse where they have the high-end yogurt (often quite thick, with no thickeners, just cultured, several brands) for extremely reasonable prices (an $8 pint for $1.50, for example) and cases of 12 cups for $2 each (the whole case) so I get the Siggi's flavors that way and am very happy with the quality.

I eat a lot of oatmeal and prepare it with brown sugar and a lot of milk over the top; I use My Fitness Tracker to keep track of the amount of calcium (also calories, but the calcium is the thing that is most important right now as someone with osteopena). This gives me almost 50% of the calcium I need in a day. Yogurt is another part of that routine.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia
Date: 10 Apr 20 - 06:45 PM

Your dinner sounds delicous, Mrrzy, though I for one could not handle cayenne pepper. I like to saute brussels sprouts too. I cut them in half, brown on one side, steam for a while, then sprinkle with lime juice and black pepper.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: EBarnacle
Date: 10 Apr 20 - 06:32 PM

SRS, we are glad you are improving. Do you use commercial or homemade yoghurt? We use about a tablespoon of Chobani Greek yoghurt as a starter. It comes in tubes and does not seem to go bad. Depending on how long you let it sit in your incubator [oven with the light on] before draining the whey off, you can set it for any firmness you like. 1/2 gallon of milk makes about a pint of really good stuff. We use the A1 or A2 whole milk for the best results.

Spring is upon us and we await a call from our friend who lives on the banks of the Delaware River. He has promised to call when the shad beginning running so we can catch our own. Pickled shad, slow broiled shad roe wrapped in bacon. [If broiling, watch for the bones as shad are a variety of herring] Now that's heavenly!

One thing about fishing is that it's one of the few social sports you can enjoy while maintaining a 2 meter distance between participants. [I prefer 2 meters to six feet because we are Ham radio operators.]


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 10 Apr 20 - 11:40 AM

I'm making a second batch of rolls this week, and around midday my ex will pick them up when he delivers groceries for me. Since he uses a place called the UPS Store (in the US - they serve as a private post office so his parcels aren't left on his porch where they too often were being stolen) he goes once a week, and then pops across the street to the little but generally well-stocked Aldi. He always used to go to Albertson's or Walmart on adjacent corners at the same major intersection, but I guess people assume because they're large they'll have more stuff, yet they're routinely stripped of many staple items. I told him about shopping at Aldi because I couldn't walk well through those big stores right after the knee surgery, and I was finding they weren't low on most things. They do post limits, which helps. I think he's a convert to the idea that the little stores are simply doing a better job at keeping up their supply.

I couldn't face another homemade dinner last night and then decided what I really needed was breakfast for dinner. I made a Dutch Baby (with an 8" skillet I preheat it in the oven, then drop in 2T of butter to melt before pouring in the batter (1 large egg, 1/4 cup flour, 1/4 cup milk, whisked until smooth). Bake 20 minutes at 425o. (I find with this oven that about 18 minutes is enough - you can judge by the amount of brown around the rim of the thing.) Pour over a little maple syrup (I use Mapleine and make a home version) and beside it I had two strips of thick-sliced bacon. And since I have a couple of ripe bananas I made a small banana/strawberry/yogurt smoothie as a chaser.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 10 Apr 20 - 10:57 AM

We're eating our way through the freezer.

Cornish hens are a very fine thing. I like to spatchcock them (split up the back, break wishbone, lay flat) and roast them on a rack, rubbed with olive oil and liberally sprinkled with sea salt and herbs. Many recipes call for a very hot oven, but I have found that 375 degrees Fahrenheit works very well, with convection.

One Cornish hen is a slap-up meal for one person, with leftovers if s/he is neither greedy, nor my husband on any given day. I swear that man has a hollow leg.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 10 Apr 20 - 07:09 AM

Made my first roasted crispety shaved Brussels sprouts, crowded the pan so not all were crispety but yum. Will have to try again with larger pan. In same oven also roasted first try at a single cornish hen, trying to cook for one. Bottom skin not crispy so next time will put on rack because also yum.
Brussprouts were flavored by soaking some crushed garlic, cayenne and coarse salt in a little olive oil and tossing them in that. Ground coarse black pepper over.
Hen had some more crushed garlic, cayenne and marjoram in cavity, plus ground coarse salt on outside after rubbing with olive oil.
Tried to time it to come out of oven at same time but veg were done first so 3 courses: veg, then all the salty crispy skin off the bird, then the bird itself.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: EBarnacle
Date: 09 Apr 20 - 11:27 PM

This AM we did a visual on the oven. It turned out that the lower element had fractured. Whatever, the refrigerated turkey was delicious. As it's just the two of us, about 3/4 of the meat has gone into the freezer.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel
Date: 09 Apr 20 - 07:35 PM

We haven't done any shopping or take out for over a month. We could ration for a couple more months. At the peak of infection my wife wants to get curbside comfort food Friday. Wegmans is better stocked than Giant or Safeway. There are limits on everything but my tastes are either so prosaic or strange they had everything on our list.

While loading I will play 'Don't stand so close to me' followed by 'Come a little bit closer'.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 09 Apr 20 - 05:48 PM

It's kind of late to plan to order out today, but I'll look into picking up something for dinner tomorrow. I'm tired of my own cooking, though what I've been coming up with is fine. I miss eating out. I get sandwiches sometimes, Chinese fairly often, and there's a Mexican restaurant up the street from me that I always go to for sit down meals, but I'll think about what I want to carry out.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 09 Apr 20 - 11:25 AM

Penzey's brand of Berbere spice has made people's eyes bleed. I find it wonderfully hot.

Anybody ever tried one of those steak-of-the-month mailed meats things? Several here: https://www.cnn.com/2020/04/02/cnn-underscored/best-meat-delivery-service/index.html


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Dave Hanson
Date: 09 Apr 20 - 11:07 AM

Currently I'm on an adventure to create the hottest chilly burger I can create,any good recipes out there ?

Dave H


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: EBarnacle
Date: 09 Apr 20 - 09:12 AM

Getting set up for last night's seder was an adventure. First the good, Using Nyafat and sesame oils, the matzoh balls came out both light an solid. a friend asked where I found Nyafat. It was in a sealed jar in the back of the fridge. Looking it up on line, I later found that the product had been discontinued mere than a dozen years ago,
Now the ugly. After sticking the turkey in the oven, we discovered that the heating elements had failed. We ended up with fillet of flounder. Good, but not what we had planned. As the turkey had become partially cooked, we fiddled with the controls and got some heat from it, to the point that the turkey cooked very slowly and was quite juicy to be eaten tomorrow.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 09 Apr 20 - 08:00 AM

I want Joe Offer to stroll through *my* yard!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia
Date: 08 Apr 20 - 09:32 PM

You may recall that I said I would cook bread in the slow cooker because we have no oven right now.

It worked, in the sense that it finally produced some edible bread. I had to cook it for far longer than the video said, and I had to take it out and turn it over. The final product is rather rubbery, but since I toast it every morning, that's not so bad.

Fortunately Amazon shipped my new supply of yeast earlier than they said they would, so now I can go back to my reliable bread machine.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 07 Apr 20 - 04:48 PM

I'm late in starting raised beds but I've removed the edge fence stuff from my old garden and have a number of bedding plants I'm keeping alive in pots until I get the soil redistributed. We have a long growing season here so a late start isn't a huge problem (though we just had Easter and my neighbor swears by not planting tomatoes until Easter.) Gardening has become all the rage now, clearing out area nurseries, so I'll probably have to start some crops from seed. I have a stash of old seeds and hopefully some of them are viable.

Today for lunch I finished the last of the eggplant Parmesan I made last fall and froze in a single-portion Pyrex covered dish. It actually made two portions because I haven't been eating as much after the surgery. As I get more active I'm sure that will change. The eggplants came from my yard. (I got high points a few years ago when Mudcat's Joe Offer came through town and we walked out to the garden and I picked an eggplant to use for dinner.)

I brewed some green tea with lemon balm the other day; it's my "house tea" this time of year because lemon balm escaped a pot years ago and grows all around the patio. It's only a light hit of caffeine so I can drink it in the afternoon. The ice in the freezer is made by an automatic ice maker, and most of it has sublimated in the freezer without being used. I've tossed the batch and turned on the rapid ice button. I dropped a cube and the puppy picked it up and skittered out of the kitchen with it like I was going to take it away from her. Such a cutie!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 07 Apr 20 - 01:23 PM

If your garlicky stuff is growing in grass, it could be crow garlic, Allium vineale, which has fairly tall wiry stems, bulbils as well as flowers and a few leaves that look a bit like chives. In the US it's an invader from this side of the pond. You can use it like garlic, but it's a tough old thing and the flavour and smell is very strong and unsubtle. If it gets into pasture and is grazed by animals, the meat and milk takes on a disagreeable garlic whiff. If it grows in grain crops and is harvested with the grain, the same taint happens. It's not my favourite plant.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel
Date: 07 Apr 20 - 10:37 AM

Well the stuff in the yard (lbs of it) sure smells good when I mow it.
Its a natural yard so it is mostly purple and white violets, garlic stuff, and various grasses. Most people would consider these plants as weeds.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 07 Apr 20 - 09:49 AM

Himself made naan the other day, in an iron skillet like bannock. It's delicious and rich -- easy to eat too much, but worth the calories. The dough is made with ghee and yoghourt.

We got the recipe from an email sent out by the Stratford Chef School, a local institution doing its bit to make isolation less onerous. The recipe was adapted from a commercial source by one of the instructors, a chef and bread guru named Eli Silverthorne, who if there's any justice should get the keys to the city if not the Order of Canada.

The recipe is a bit long so, if anyone of you lot would like it, drop me a PM.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 07 Apr 20 - 12:09 AM

Read the Redwall books for ideas.

The curry arroz con pollo was not as good as the original curry...


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 06 Apr 20 - 09:36 PM

Just look up Allium ursinum, Maggie.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 06 Apr 20 - 09:28 PM

No, nothing like. Ramsons has broad lanceolate leaves whereas chives has cylindrical leaves, like grass at casual glance. Ramsons, garlicky aroma. Chives, more oniony and not at all garlicky.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 06 Apr 20 - 09:26 PM

This is what I'm talking about.

There are lots of wild chives and onions that sound a lot like what you describe. "Society garlic," for one.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel
Date: 06 Apr 20 - 08:46 PM

Are they the same as chives?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 06 Apr 20 - 06:07 PM

Maggie, I think that Jack may have been referring to the leaves of wild garlic, aka ramsons, Allium ursinum. They are sprouting all over the place in partly-shaded woods and hedges right now, and, as far as I know, only the leaves are used, and you have to bag them over about six weeks through mid-spring. They have a lovely, fresh, subtle garlicky aroma, and the leaves are used in a good number of recipes. Naturally, Jack can speak for himself.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel
Date: 06 Apr 20 - 05:09 PM

Don't poke the bear or chef. Some maestros can be rather intense.
The older we get, the more spicy and colorful foods become satisfying and stimulating.
Look at the uncensored expressions on the face of little kids eating a more than usual seasoned food. Its agony or ecstasy.

They say its not the steak, its the sizzle. Bull, some dishes are just for show like turkey wings flambe'.

Oh, from memory a quick and easy way to fumigate your entire apartment is to put a can of Boston Brown Bread in the microwave for 20 minutes instead of 20 seconds.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia
Date: 06 Apr 20 - 05:09 PM

Mrrzy, no need to worry about miscegenation between the curry chicken and the arroz whatever. The world that can accept curry wurst can accept anything. Or how about Tex-Mex won ton? I vow to you I have seen a recipe for that.
==========
I am trying to combine cooking during a kitchen re-do with life under Covid quarantine. My yeast supply is down to 1.5 teaspoons. I eat cracked-wheat bread, the only bread with good fiber in it for breakfast, almost every day. Here I sit - low on yeast and no oven.

So I have combined a recipe from "Artisan Bread with Steve" (see his YouTube videos) with directions from another YouTube on how to bake bread in a crock pot. The beauty of Steve's recipes is that each one takes only 1/4 tsp of yeast.

If you are looking for something fun to do, check out Steve's artisan, no knead bread.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 06 Apr 20 - 04:55 PM

Jack, no need to freeze the garlic. The best way to store the wild garlic is to pull the whole plant (or dig - my garlic always seems to grow quite deep) and knock off the worst of the dirt and save the corms to use for planting elsewhere later (or knock some back in the same hole so more plants sprout next year.) I let the batch of plants stand in a large bucket in the laundry/mud room and dry over a couple of weeks till the moisture has all moved to the garlic bulbs or simply dried out; cut off the tops, leaving a couple of inches of neck for easier handling. I knock off any remaining dirt then put them into a craft grocery bag and store them on a dark shelf in the pantry. They will last a year or two that way. I dug up some wild garlic in the woods across the road from me years ago and over time have it come in in several areas of the yard. It's actually a wild leek, or is referred to as a hardneck garlic.


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