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BS: Recipes - what are we eating?

leeneia 26 May 20 - 02:00 PM
Mrrzy 26 May 20 - 11:20 AM
Charmion 25 May 20 - 04:59 PM
Steve Shaw 25 May 20 - 03:34 PM
Dave Hanson 25 May 20 - 03:25 PM
Steve Shaw 25 May 20 - 02:04 PM
Stilly River Sage 25 May 20 - 01:05 PM
Steve Shaw 25 May 20 - 10:57 AM
Charmion 25 May 20 - 09:49 AM
EBarnacle 24 May 20 - 08:33 PM
Mrrzy 24 May 20 - 06:50 PM
leeneia 20 May 20 - 01:15 PM
EBarnacle 20 May 20 - 01:01 PM
Mrrzy 20 May 20 - 12:44 PM
Charmion 20 May 20 - 08:57 AM
Jon Freeman 20 May 20 - 05:51 AM
EBarnacle 20 May 20 - 01:34 AM
Charmion 19 May 20 - 06:58 PM
EBarnacle 19 May 20 - 02:01 PM
Steve Shaw 19 May 20 - 11:54 AM
Charmion 19 May 20 - 09:53 AM
Mrrzy 19 May 20 - 08:57 AM
Stilly River Sage 18 May 20 - 11:55 PM
Charmion 18 May 20 - 08:39 PM
Donuel 18 May 20 - 08:27 PM
EBarnacle 18 May 20 - 07:05 PM
Donuel 18 May 20 - 06:53 PM
Donuel 18 May 20 - 05:17 PM
Mrrzy 18 May 20 - 04:53 PM
Jos 18 May 20 - 02:25 PM
leeneia 18 May 20 - 01:13 PM
leeneia 18 May 20 - 01:11 PM
Mrrzy 18 May 20 - 01:00 PM
Charmion 18 May 20 - 10:39 AM
Stilly River Sage 17 May 20 - 10:51 PM
EBarnacle 17 May 20 - 06:28 PM
Steve Shaw 17 May 20 - 02:34 PM
Stilly River Sage 17 May 20 - 01:42 PM
Mrrzy 17 May 20 - 01:35 PM
Jos 17 May 20 - 12:13 PM
Steve Shaw 17 May 20 - 11:52 AM
Charmion 17 May 20 - 10:23 AM
Charmion 17 May 20 - 10:15 AM
Mrrzy 16 May 20 - 01:42 PM
EBarnacle 15 May 20 - 11:57 PM
Stilly River Sage 15 May 20 - 12:17 PM
Charmion 15 May 20 - 11:31 AM
Mrrzy 15 May 20 - 11:05 AM
Steve Shaw 15 May 20 - 10:38 AM
Charmion 15 May 20 - 10:19 AM
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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia
Date: 26 May 20 - 02:00 PM

Thanks for the flourless cake recipe, Mrrzy. I'll try that when we can have a group in the house again.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 26 May 20 - 11:20 AM

I always make my own salad dressing as bought one (here) always have sugar and/or cream. It's not for my coffee, dudes.

Also made a 9x13 pan of flourless chocolate cake topped with rolled-thin (cracked my rolling pin!) almond paste decorated with m&ms into an American flag, not forgetting the yellow *friiiiiiiiiiiiinge* (Hair lyric). Best flourless choc in a while:

12oz dark chocolate (340g)
3/4c unsalted butter (170 generous g)
6 large eggs
1c sugar (200 scant g)

Melt choc and butter and combine. Beat eggs till frothy, add sugar and beat for, like, 10 mn, while choc cools. Fold choc into eggs.

I used salted butter and cocoa to prep the pan as there is no salt in the recipe. Worked a treat.

Bake about a half-hour to 35 mn at 325°F/low side of 165°C.

I served with vanilla ice cream.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 25 May 20 - 04:59 PM

Well, I agree with you, Steve. I drank the other half of the bottle.

As it happens, I do use Elizabeth David's flambe thing -- it's part of the fun of a gas cooker, and I was thrilled when I finally learned the trick of it. But we'll have to disagree on the mushrooms -- after all, what's boeuf bourguinon but a beef stew with mushrooms?

Dried cepes are available here, and I use those, too. I break up the slices of mushroom before pouring the boiling water on them; perhaps that's why I've never noticed them being unpleasant.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 25 May 20 - 03:34 PM

Spot on, Dave. A similar rule applies to tomatoes. You can't make a decent tomato sauce with rubbishy, chemical-golfball shop tomatoes. If the toms are a tad disappointing but not complete rubbish, a scant teaspoon of sugar works wonders. I'll use those little piccolo toms to make a sauce, otherwise I'll use tinned plum tomatoes as long as there's no added salt in them. And if you want to kill a tomato, keep it in the fridge. And there's good science behind that advice.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Dave Hanson
Date: 25 May 20 - 03:25 PM

Te golden rule is, if you wouldn't drink it, then it's not fit to cook with.

Dave H


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 25 May 20 - 02:04 PM

To avoid harshness, anything with added wine should be allowed to bubble cheerily with the lid off for five or ten minutes. You need to let all the alcohol evaporate. Golden rule no 2 is to use only decent wine. If you use bad wine, i.e. stuff you've bought but find is barely drinkable, as sure as eggs is eggs it will ruin your dish. In Italian cooking you'll often be advised to use the same wine you're going to drink.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 25 May 20 - 01:05 PM

I haven't had mushrooms in stew, but in dishes like beef stroganoff they are heavenly. Wine is good in stew and even in with the pot roast, but I don't put in huge amounts. A dollop will do.

I did my weekly take-out order on Friday and brought home a double order of beef fajitas from my favorite Mexican place up the street. They did mess up the order a bit; I asked for corn tortillas and they included flour instead. The corn is a much nicer flavor for those (and smaller so you limit how much you load up on - it's a good way to pace yourself with these things.) They also included the Mexican rice that I've never been particularly fond of and asked them to leave out. I suspect the trays of rice, refried beans, and fajita toppings are prepared somewhat ahead of time.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 25 May 20 - 10:57 AM

Now I find meself not in full agreement there. I find that wine can make stews harsh and can even dry out the meat. If a recipe calls for it, I do what Elizabeth David does, boil the wine first in a little saucepan and set fire to it until the alcohol has gone. And whoever thought it was a good idea to add cans of Guinness or cider to stews or a boiled ham should never be allowed near a kitchen again As for mushrooms in stews, no thanks. The texture is never right for me and the flavour has dissipated. I'll soak some dried ceps in a jug for half an hour then use just the liquid as part of whatever stock I'm using. You have to be careful to decant the liquid from its gritty dregs. It may seem like heresy but I don't use the actual fungi, which I find add nothing, but the soaking water is fantastic. I want my mushrooms sautéed in butter, seasoning and parsley, garlic even, and eaten on toast, or baked in cream with a pork chop a la Delia Smith. Rubbery boiled fungi are no things of beauty.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 25 May 20 - 09:49 AM

Hmm. Iceberg lettuce is a very fine thing in hot weather.

Since grocery shopping has become a damnable nuisance, I have returned to making our salad dressings at home. Last year, I put up some tarragon vinegar, and it is THE BOMB in a vinaigrette. I would also like to make bearnaise sauce (damnable computer won't spell in French), but the last time I did that I suffered a vigorous protest from my digestive system.

I made a beef stew the other day, thickened with red lentils (split masoor dal) instead of beurre manie. (Himself's niece and all three of her children have celiac disease, so I occasionally experiment with gluten-free food that is not an almost-but-not-quite imitation of the real thing.) The resulting sauce was a little grainier than I get with flour, but completely acceptable. Also, the lentils add protein without fat.

Of course, beef stew always tastes better with half a bottle of plonk in it, and rather a lot of mushrooms.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: EBarnacle
Date: 24 May 20 - 08:33 PM

Well, we opened one of the jars of pickled shad tonight. Apparently the flesh is too delicate for a multiday pickle. Oh, well, chopped herring makes a good spread for snacks and sandwiches.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 24 May 20 - 06:50 PM

I am renewing my love affair with... Iceberg lettuce.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia
Date: 20 May 20 - 01:15 PM

I like beets. I used to boil up a batch, peel them and cut them up, butter well and eat with whole wheat bread for lunch. Oh, and lots of black pepper.

That was when I was still a bride and hadn't learned that my husband hates them with a purple passion. He says they taste like dirt. He objects to how the house smells, hours after they've been cooked. When I understood that, I gave them up.

Later I learned that this serious dislike of beets seems to be a male thing. Too bad, because they seemed easy to grow. But what does it tell us that even the bugs won't eat them?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: EBarnacle
Date: 20 May 20 - 01:01 PM

When we were cleaning the shad, we reserved the livers, also. I had them along with our roe omelets this morning, prepared the same way as the roe. The taste was definitely stronger than the taste of the roe and a little bit like calf's liver. We will definitely be having it again.

Last night's dinner was lobster ravioli in a sauce Lady Hillary created. The remainder will be made up with oysters. Po' boys tonight, perhaps. We may put it over pasta if we don't go with the po' boys.

Yes, we like our seafood.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 20 May 20 - 12:44 PM

Rhubarb yum. Beets not unless in borscht, then yum.
Defrosted some noodles in spaghetti sauce and made more spag sauce to go with (as frozen part was way more noodles than sauce).

Upon tasting defrosted noodles, discovered they were with chili. Oops. Shoulda made more chili.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 20 May 20 - 08:57 AM

I love rhubarb, and one of the few things I regret about our current abode is that our shady garden lacks a good sunny spot in which to grow it.

Old-fashioned Ontario recipes for fruit pies and cobblers often include rhubarb to add tartness, an inheritance from the early 19th century when lemons were an expensive foreign indulgence. I have a wonderful recipe for a summer "shrub" or fruit drink that uses rhubarb juice boiled into a syrup and flavoured with orange and clove. Wonderful on a hot day mixed with plain seltzer, club soda or Perrier.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 20 May 20 - 05:51 AM

I love beetroot and have had the odd successful year (it’s been hit and miss for some reason) growing our own. Just boil, rub the skin off and slice. The beetroot must be small and young though. Our neighbour will sometimes give us some larger older ones and they just come out sort of woody in taste and texture. I gather they may be OK baked but I’m not sure I’ve tried that.

We have grassed over one bed in the vegetable plot and put some 5 (for now, it would take a couple more) 50cm containers there instead. I believe 2 of these are destined to have rhubarb in them. I hope it does well. Each to their own of course but it is well liked round here.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: EBarnacle
Date: 20 May 20 - 01:34 AM

Yes, vinegar can be an ingredient in beet borscht. You can vary the taste by using different vinegars. A touch of horseradish can also be worked in.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 19 May 20 - 06:58 PM

The last time I went to a Ukrainian church bazaar, the list of lunch offerings definitely said “borscht” and definitely had nothing that looked like beetroot. I thought I had merely missed it.

Perhaps the silkiest home-made soup I have ever had the pleasure to sip was a Polish borscht as deep red as a fine claret, with a blob of sour cream in the middle of the bowl. It had just the slightest tang of vinegar, or perhaps lemon juice. Of course the recipe was a closely held family secret. I did not dare to ask.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: EBarnacle
Date: 19 May 20 - 02:01 PM

Borscht seems to be a generic Eastern European word for soup, just as caldo is in Spanish.
My grandmother used to make a fantastic beef and cabbage borscht, either with or without beans. She also made beet borscht, which my grandfather loved with sour cream. My palate was not developed enough at that age to appreciate it.
My favorite "grandma soup" was a thick chowder [in the original sense] which I eventually learned was a lentil soup. Again, she made it either with or without beef, depending on her mood or her plan for the rest of the meal.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 19 May 20 - 11:54 AM

There are very few things I don't like, but I must admit that I'm not overly keen on beetroot. Perhaps a corned beef and beetroot butty once in a while, but that's about it. Could be something to do with the fact that it, er, goes right through me...

I also tend to steer clear of anything with rhubarb in it, though I'd be polite enough to eat it if you served it up. One thing, probably the only thing, I would eat only if you held a gun to my head is apple sauce, or anything else with sloppy cooked apple. If the cooked apple stays in pieces I'm OK, otherwise you know what you can do with it!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 19 May 20 - 09:53 AM

Borscht is indeed a beet soup, Mrrzy. But it's made in a variety of styles, some rustic and robust, others sleek and sophisticated.

I have some silicone loaf molds that I decided were okay for fruitcake but not for bread because the sides flex. Now, a loaf pan liner made of silicone -- that just might work.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 19 May 20 - 08:57 AM

I thought borscht was a beet soup.

The lava cakes were a bit salty. Recipe said a sprinkle of salt on each one but there is no other salt in the recipe so next time I will use unsalted butter for buttering the tins. Also I cocoa-ed rather than floured the buttered tins.

Also first use of silicone muffin tin liners. Worked a treat. We'll see how they do in the dishwasher...


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 18 May 20 - 11:55 PM

My neighbor regularly offers me some of her chicken salad (I like it on crackers), so I know she usually has celery around. I use it so rarely it always goes bad before I can make more than one recipe (I'm not particularly fond of it, but the flavor is part of some dishes, so I don't just eliminate it.) I'll ask her if I can get a couple of the individual stalks and make another batch of Pasta e Fagioli. I have everything else in the pantry or freezer, and I have some beef broth I made a few days ago I want to use. In hot weather, sometimes a bowl of soup and a slice of bread is all you need for a meal.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 18 May 20 - 08:39 PM

How western, Donuel?

I live in western Ontario, and I love borscht. I don’t care if it’s the Russian kind, the Ukrainian kind, the Polish kind or the kind they make in delis in Montreal, it’s great stuff.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel
Date: 18 May 20 - 08:27 PM

I did not think it possible to make borsh edible to a western pallet.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: EBarnacle
Date: 18 May 20 - 07:05 PM

Perhaps when the elk comes through, we'll give sauerbraten a go. Thanks for the idea. Found a recipe that includes garlic. We may try that one.

Questions of garlic, cucumbers, etc. are a matter of personal preference and should not be inflicted on others. If you do not like an ingredient, that's your problem. I used to hate beets and brussels sprouts until someone taught me how to make them properly. Now, I make borscht both with and without beets, depending on how I feel that day.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel
Date: 18 May 20 - 06:53 PM

The boy who cryowulf said the vessel with the pestle has the pear wine that is poison, the Palace chalice with the pellet has the brew that is true.
Which ones for you?
RE: images
More hot dog than being sausages but hot sausage is better than dog and beans.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel
Date: 18 May 20 - 05:17 PM

I made that last month leenia.
Flounder in panko last night.
Super hearty veg soup tonight


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 18 May 20 - 04:53 PM

If you smelt your roe it ain't fresh.

Sorry. Couldn't resist.

Halved a recipe for 12 muffin-sized lava cakes but it made 8, mighta made 10 but I tried to keep it down to 6. Recipe here, in French.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 18 May 20 - 02:25 PM

I, too, enjoy sneezing but sometimes it just isn't a good idea - not just if you are about to meet the queen, but when you don't want to be heard, or when you are doing something delicate with flour or icing sugar and you don't want to send most of it flying round the kitchen. (I'm pretty sure the sneeze comes back later, so you won't be missing out.)


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia
Date: 18 May 20 - 01:13 PM

Images of cryowurst:

https://bit.ly/2WEPvXw


Link shorted via bitly. --mudelf


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia
Date: 18 May 20 - 01:11 PM

Last week I made bean soup. My mother made it this way with ham hocks, but the DH wanted more meat, so I modified it. I use a slow cooker because it does something magical to the sausage, giving it a delicious, velvety texture. Also it causes the spices in the sausage to escape and flavor the entire batch.
=============
Ingredients: one pound of dried baby lima beans. 2 bay leaves, 1/2 of a good-sized yellow onion, one package of cryowurst. Optional carrots

What is cryowurst? It is our own name for mild, firm sausage which is about one-inch in diameter and is packed as one long link in plastic. I like the Eckrich brand. Bought on sale and put in the freezer, it keeps a long time.

Soak the beans overnight in cool water. Next day, put a liner in the slow cooker, and add the beans. Add 5 cups of water.

Cut the cryowurst into pieces about 1/2 inch thick. Cut those pieces in half, if you wish. Chop up the half-onion, not too fine.
If you want carrots, chop them now. Put the wurst, onion, carrots and two bay leaves into the slow cooker and cook on low. After about 4 hours, check to make sure there is enough water. If not, add some.

Cook for a long time, (8 hours?) till the beans are tender. (There is no need to take the beans out and run them through a blender.)

This makes enough for two generous meals for two people. We like it with cornbread.

Let diners add salt and pepper at the table.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 18 May 20 - 01:00 PM

I *love* sneezing. I wouldn't stop one.

My delivery Chinese was great, and I didn't cook it.

Today preparing for duck legs with garlic green beans, lava cakes for dessert, for Thing1 tonight. Thing 2 will have spaghetti and salad, with more lava cakes for dessert too, Wednesday. Their actual bday is tomorrow but I am busy.

What I want to know is, *who* gave *my* twins permission to turn 25? Don't they realize that is 625 parent-years?!?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 18 May 20 - 10:39 AM

The huge pork ribs were just as delicious cold, with cornbread and salad, as they were hot. But they would not meet Suthun standards for tenderness, requiring full exercise of the teeth despite being very thoroughly cooked.

Not sure about why. Perhaps something to do with fat content of the meat? Age and/or breed of the donor pig?

I have never eaten shad roe, living as I do more than a thousand miles from the Atlantic coast. Is it one of those delicacies that is available for two or three weeks of the year, and does not travel? (Like smelt used to be, until the invention of flash freezing ...)

Elk are farmed here in Ontario, and we have become depressingly casual about dining on elk rump, which makes the world's best sauerbraten by far. Yes, I know it's not supposed to need all that marinating, especially when it's from a farm, but it sure tastes great.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 17 May 20 - 10:51 PM

Sounds like quite a culinary adventure!

several weeks ago I found some really nice frozen Sockeye salmon filets at my favorite discount grocery and bought a few, but I wish I'd bought more. They are so good! Had one for dinner tonight. Now I'm thinking about shopping tomorrow - I bought some corn on the cob last week that turned out to be wonderful, and I'm hoping they still have some this week. We take turns shopping so I'm going to see if my ex wants some also. I try not to go out more than once a week, and I keep a note on the calendar about where I went in case it ever becomes important. These are hard times, especially in a state with numbers continuing to rise and a governor who is "opening up the state."


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: EBarnacle
Date: 17 May 20 - 06:28 PM

Yesterday, Lady Hillary and I were out in West Nowhere, Pennsylvania for a couple of major parts for her '81 Celica GT. He pretty much lives off the land, says he never has to buy red meat. There is a herd of elk on his property nd he is hoping to get one this year. If he bags one, we agreed that we would swap a couple of pounds for one of my homemade knives. We've never had elk before but he says it tastes better than venison and does not need to be as heavily marinated.

On the way home we stopped in Phillipsburg, NJ just as the fishermen were hauling out. They gave us a couple of roe shad. We cleaned them when we got home. As I ruptured one of the roe sacs in the process, we had a shad roe omelet for breakfast with the bacon used for cooking and some homemade yoghurt on the top. A breakfast fit for a king, or for George Washington, who adored to eat shad. The flesh from the two fish we were given went into the pickling jars last night. Two fair sized shad became four quart sized mason jars of fish. Later this week we will see how well the pickling dissolved the bones in the first batch.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 17 May 20 - 02:34 PM

You can stop a sneeze by firmly pinching both sides of your nose twixt finger and thumb, about half way up. Grand if you're just about to shake hands with the Queen. Otherwise, let it all hang out with a massive, orgasmic roar (going into total body-relax mode just before the sneeze). You'll see what I mean, and the Pope can't complain about that...


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 17 May 20 - 01:42 PM

It's funny, the trick that usually has been helpful (because the un-sneezed sneeze is so uncomfortable) is to look at a light source to get the sneeze to follow through. That's now best done only at home when you're alone! :)


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 17 May 20 - 01:35 PM

Appalachian yak, local! I was also amazed. Yeah, super-lean, tastes more like venison or even lamb to me, rather than bison.

I think tonight I shall support a local restaurant and order delivery.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 17 May 20 - 12:13 PM

Stilly River, if you feel a sneeze is about to happen you can stall it by pressing your upper lip directly below your nose. It seems to cut off the message between your brain (the part of it that works without your permission) and the sneeze muscles.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 17 May 20 - 11:52 AM

I think it may be better to slow-cook ribs for a couple of hours in the oven first, marinated in stuff and wrapped in foil, then finished on the barbie.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 17 May 20 - 10:23 AM

Mrrzy: ground yak? Are you ordering your groceries from Katmandu, or perhaps Ulan Bator?

I imagine it's like bison: beef, but leaner and denser.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 17 May 20 - 10:15 AM

I fired up the barbecue yesterday for a feed of ribs that I bought at the farmers' market, open again at last. These were the largest pork ribs I think I have ever cooked, far longer and meatier than the "baby" back ribs sold at the supermarket. After cooking for nearly two hours, the meat had not achieved the falling-off-the-bone state considered desirable in barbecue circles, but Lord, it was delicious.

I guess they came from a Large White hog in the prime of muscular life, rather than the usual adolescent pigling.

Asparagus and mushroom pilaff on the side. Urp.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 16 May 20 - 01:42 PM

Was going to make soup with ground yak and all the veg I still had a little of (tail end of cabbage, last brussels sprouts, handful of spinach, half an onion, last garlic cloves of the head) so I melted some butter with paprika-marjoram-oregano (my current go-to trio), a little white wine and some chicken broth, but I forgot the yak and made a marvy veg soup. Seriously yum. With the end of the sour cream. I now have a lot of room in my fridge!
My freezer, on the other hand, is bursting at the seams. I have apparently narrowed my hoarding to just there. I have got to stay away from the farmers' markets for a while!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: EBarnacle
Date: 15 May 20 - 11:57 PM

stuffed cabbage with spinach and mushrooms tonight. we were going to have the spinach tomorrow but a few of the leaves started to go bad. Raisins in the stuffed cabbage--nice and sweet. Orange sauce with the cabbage.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 15 May 20 - 12:17 PM

Funny; I know I'm coming down with something when lemon smells like soap instead of like lemon (not lemon scented soap, it tends to smell more like one of the blue brands). So far all are healthy in my small but dislocated world, though several of us are struggling to keep the seasonal allergies from getting to the sneezing point. These days that scares people.

I'll be harvesting my elephant garlic (actually some kind of a leek) soon. It keeps for a very long time (I'm still using garlic from two years ago). Keep it in a brown paper bag in a dark cool (but not refrigerated) place. Mine lives in the pantry.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 15 May 20 - 11:31 AM

I know I'm sick when my idea of Lucullan fare is a poached egg on toast, and tea is the only beverage with appeal.

Please be well soon, Steve. Your opinions are valued, if not always complied with. (Still mincing garlic sometimes over here.)

BTW, Steve, how do you use garlic in a vinaigrette? I put a clove or two in a bowl with some large-grain salt and smush it to paste with a pestle. Does that technique meet the Shaw Standard?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 15 May 20 - 11:05 AM

Feel better soon Steve Shaw! Eggs are marvy. Also soups. Hot soups.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 15 May 20 - 10:38 AM

Funny, Maggie, my son's just the same with onions. When I'm chopping up onions/carrots/celery for anything I like to keep the pieces quite big. I like texture in food. I don't really understand the concept of "finely chopped" or, with garlic, "minced." ;-)

Anyway, I've been really badly poorly for over a week so, if I eat at all, I'm eating soft and bland. I didn't realise how much I liked porridge and scrambled eggs. I am well on the mend, I hasten to add, though the wine stockpile is holding up well.

I could eulogise all day about cooking eggs... So cheap, so easy, so quick, so tasty...


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 15 May 20 - 10:19 AM

No, Mrrzy, we don't want a cutting board with a built-in scale and knife-sharpener. At least not in this parish, where a good chopping board is one that can go in the dishwasher.

Today, in this parish, supper will include pears poached in wine. Because Friday.

The ingredients are: six firm, ripe pears that are not Bartletts (Bosc are best), plonk wine, the rind of a lemon, half a cup of sugar, and either a small piece of cinnamon bark or two or three whole cloves.

Find some completely undistinguished red wine, such as the kind that comes in a box or a Tetrapak. Depending on the size of your pot and your pears, you may need two bottles. If you have a bottle of crap white wine, you can use that for one bottle, but you will want red for the other.

Put the wine, the sugar and the spices in a steel or enamelled saucepan, bring it to a boil and simmer for five minutes.

While the wine is heating, peel the pears. If you are not a French cuisine purist, slice them in half and remove the core with a melon-baller. (If you are a French cuisine purist, leave the cores alone or remove them from the blossom end of the pear, which is fiddly and likely to waste too much pear. Either way, leave the stem on.)

If the pears are whole, stand them in the bottom of the pot and string the lemon rind around them. If the pears are halved, ensure that they are completely immersed and get the lemon rind in there any old how. Simmer very gently until the pears are just tender.

Put the pears in the wine into the fridge to chill, preferably overnight. In the morning, remove the pears from the wine with a slotted spoon; you will notice that they are now a robust shade of purple. Strain the wine back into the saucepan and boil it down into a light syrup; it should not quite coat a spoon. Cool the syrup and pour it back over the pears.

If you did this with whole pears, serve them standing upright in a pool of syrup; if the cores are still in, your diners will hold the stem with one hand and ply the spoon with the other. Halved and cored, these pears are ambrosial set on top of a scoop of vanilla ice cream with the syrup ladled over.


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Mudcat time: 15 August 10:27 AM EDT

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