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BS: Recipes - what are we eating?

BobL 20 Dec 18 - 03:00 AM
Donuel 19 Dec 18 - 10:16 PM
Steve Shaw 19 Dec 18 - 06:15 PM
Jos 19 Dec 18 - 05:53 PM
Donuel 19 Dec 18 - 05:22 PM
Stilly River Sage 19 Dec 18 - 11:52 AM
Steve Shaw 18 Dec 18 - 02:06 PM
leeneia 18 Dec 18 - 01:41 PM
SamStone 17 Dec 18 - 03:32 PM
Thompson 17 Dec 18 - 01:54 PM
Stilly River Sage 17 Dec 18 - 10:14 AM
Steve Shaw 17 Dec 18 - 04:37 AM
Jos 17 Dec 18 - 01:37 AM
leeneia 16 Dec 18 - 11:44 PM
Big Al Whittle 16 Dec 18 - 06:00 AM
Thompson 16 Dec 18 - 06:00 AM
Jos 16 Dec 18 - 05:20 AM
Tattie Bogle 15 Dec 18 - 07:34 PM
leeneia 15 Dec 18 - 03:14 PM
Stilly River Sage 14 Dec 18 - 11:42 AM
Thompson 13 Dec 18 - 04:46 AM
JennieG 13 Dec 18 - 12:12 AM
Stilly River Sage 12 Dec 18 - 11:57 AM
SPB-Cooperator 12 Dec 18 - 11:01 AM
Charmion 12 Dec 18 - 10:53 AM
Thompson 10 Dec 18 - 06:14 AM
Jon Freeman 09 Dec 18 - 09:14 AM
Steve Shaw 08 Dec 18 - 08:50 PM
Joe_F 08 Dec 18 - 06:05 PM
Donuel 08 Dec 18 - 04:58 PM
Steve Shaw 08 Dec 18 - 12:13 PM
Jon Freeman 08 Dec 18 - 11:01 AM
Stilly River Sage 08 Dec 18 - 10:34 AM
Jon Freeman 08 Dec 18 - 10:24 AM
Steve Shaw 07 Dec 18 - 07:53 PM
Steve Shaw 07 Dec 18 - 07:47 PM
Jos 07 Dec 18 - 06:21 PM
keberoxu 07 Dec 18 - 05:57 PM
Donuel 07 Dec 18 - 10:46 AM
Charmion 07 Dec 18 - 09:40 AM
BobL 07 Dec 18 - 02:31 AM
Thompson 06 Dec 18 - 09:47 AM
Charmion 05 Dec 18 - 10:31 AM
BobL 05 Dec 18 - 02:43 AM
Donuel 04 Dec 18 - 06:55 PM
Charmion 04 Dec 18 - 09:03 AM
Donuel 04 Dec 18 - 08:31 AM
Jos 03 Dec 18 - 04:55 AM
Thompson 03 Dec 18 - 03:28 AM
BobL 03 Dec 18 - 03:14 AM
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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: BobL
Date: 20 Dec 18 - 03:00 AM

Peanuts, groundnuts, monkey nuts, goober peas or (according to Wiki) pindars.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel
Date: 19 Dec 18 - 10:16 PM

ground nuts? What on Earth do you call carrots?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 19 Dec 18 - 06:15 PM

Groundnuts are peanuts. Groundnut oil is an excellent neutral oil that has a high smoke point.

Our bog-standard lasagne uses a typical bolognese ragu, made with a mix of minced pork and beef, browned then added to a soffritto which includes pancetta as well as onions, carrots and celery. Add all that together with canned plum tomatoes and a good splash of chicken stock. Season well and simmer for as long as you like. I might add a glass of white wine that I've boiled and burned the alcohol from. Some recipes demand chicken liver and milk, but not for me. Mrs Steve insists on garlic, but I'm averse to crushed cloves so I might peel and bash with my fist about eight cloves which go into the mix. As for herbs, either leave them out or just add a sprinkle of dried oregano near the end. Dried basil has no place in any decent kitchen. I'll let you off if you chuck in some fresh basil leaves near the end.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 19 Dec 18 - 05:53 PM

Groundnuts/peanuts are seeds, from which oil is extracted, or they can be eaten raw, roasted or made into peanut butter.
If you plant a raw one in a pot you can watch the plant grow, and produce a pea-like flower, from which what looks like a stem will grow and extend downwards until it reaches the soil, where it deposits the seed - in effect, the seed plants itself in the ground, hence the name 'groundnut'.
(I've never heard of potato oil.)


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel
Date: 19 Dec 18 - 05:22 PM

I assume a ground nut is the same as a pomme d'terre.
Out here in the wilderness it is called a potatow.

Simple eggs can be made delicious by a clever hand.
Eggs do not deserve to be assulted by ketchup or hot sauce.
A sprinkling of tarragon and smidge of ground fennel do wonders


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 19 Dec 18 - 11:52 AM

I'm almost finished with a lasagna I made a few days ago of various things that needed using. Tomatoes from the garden, ripening in the house slowly after the first frost in October and now simmered long enough to use for sauce (wearing vinyl gloves I squirt them out of the skins that go into the compost bowl). Some ricotta and mozzarella from the freezer from the last time I made lasagna, and the very wet tomato mix was added to a couple of containers of marinara sauce that had been in the fridge long enough they needed to be finished off soon.

I didn't have any lasagna noodles in the house so I took a box of spaghetti and used it (dry) to make a layer after the eggplant and cheese and sauce layers. More cheese and sauce and then bake it till everything is done. The spaghetti is just fine in there, though it doesn't have the consistency of the large flat pasta, but it tastes good.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 18 Dec 18 - 02:06 PM

42nd anniversary so we're having steak, home-made oven chips (par-boiled in salty water then baked very hot in groundnut oil), broad beans from the freezer, home-grown, and some roasted cherry toms. I must have ribeye but Mrs Steve gets a piece of sirloin because she doesn't like trimming away the sinew (I just scoff the lot). There will be blood. And Rioja.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia
Date: 18 Dec 18 - 01:41 PM

Back to our roots - bratwurst and sauerkraut. We indulged in fresh bratwurst shipped by Usinger's in Milwaukee and cooked it right away. Then we put it in the deep freeze.

To precook: poke sausage in several places with a sharp fork. Put in a skillet with water halfway up the sides. Bring water to a boil, then turn down to simmer. Turn sausage over after 15 mins. Simmer for maybe 30 mins. Freeze.

To prepare: Place brats in heavy saucepan. Rinse sauerkraut and spread over brats. Sprinkle with caraway seeds. Add 1/4 water or white wine. Simmer till heated through.

You can eat it on a bun or not, as you prefer. Have chopped onion and good mustard on hand.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: SamStone
Date: 17 Dec 18 - 03:32 PM

being diabetic because of Agent Orange (and i don't mean trump) lots of salmon and steamed veggies


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson
Date: 17 Dec 18 - 01:54 PM

Thanks, Leenia. I use rubber gloves for icky and sticky things, like taking the skins off roast peppers, but I'm afraid I just use the same ones I use for washing up the pots and things that don't go in the dishwasher. I had a pair of 'dirty jobs' rubber gloves for anything germy and non-food, but the demon puppy Oscar seems to have found and destroyed them; must get a new pair.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 17 Dec 18 - 10:14 AM

I have a low-power 1-quart crockpot I like to set up overnight to cook my oatmeal for the day or enough for a few days (it reheats well). I forgot the crockpot so I'll slow-cook it in a saucepan on the stove, into which I chop up figs or dates or throw in a handful of raisins, trying to not burn cereal onto the bottom of the pan.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 17 Dec 18 - 04:37 AM

I browned a cheap hunk of brisket in my Le Creuset, set it aside, put some strips of pancetta into the pan to render, added chunks of carrot, celery and onion, fried for ten minutes, added a mug full of porcini water along with the chopped fungus, added a glass of red wine which I'd boiled and burned the alcohol from, a bit of seasoning and a bunch of fresh herbs, put the brisket back in and left it in a slow oven for thee hours. I had to hurry up so as not to miss the Liverpool kickoff. Delicious.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 17 Dec 18 - 01:37 AM

If you never wash up you are saving on detergent and using less fuel to heat water, so you can set them against the plastic waste (just make sure those bags and gloves don't end up in the sea).


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia
Date: 16 Dec 18 - 11:44 PM

Hi, Thompson. A slow-cooker liner is a tough bag of some clear, synthetic material that withstands high heat. that you put in the slow cooker to keep food from getting cooked on to the ceramic. It saves a lot of scrubbing.

It is made by Reynolds, the company which makes aluminum foil and Reynolds Oven Bags.
==========
when my mother-in-law turned 70, she announced that she was not going to cook anymore. She had cooked for 50 years and was sick of it. I didn't want to follow her example, so I asked myself how I could make cooking more fun.

I decided that I like cooking but dislike cleaning up, so I decided to buy four things:

Reynolds Oven Bags
Reynolds Slow Cooker bags
parchment paper to put under roasting meats
disposable gloves for handling icky things.

I don't often use the gloves, but occasionally they are truly worth it. For example when yanking the purple gobbets out of a raw chicken.

If anybody comments that I am using up natural resources, I can tell them that I drive an 11-year-old car, I have no television, no cable, no boat...on balance I figure I can spoil myself a little.

Another thing I did is buy two cartons of Rubbermaid storage boxes. They stack nicely and are tough.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Big Al Whittle
Date: 16 Dec 18 - 06:00 AM

None of this foreign muck.

We've booked into the Balti House for Christmas,


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson
Date: 16 Dec 18 - 06:00 AM

What's a slow cooker liner?

Horror story in the Guardian: unsold human food, still in its plastic packaging, is routinely thrown into the mix while making animal food, meaning that meat eaters may be harmed by the plastic the animals ingest and digest.

"More than 650,000 tonnes of unused food, from loaves of bread to Mars bars, are saved from landfill each year in the UK by being turned into animal feed. The system that strips off the plastic wrappings canít capture it all, and so in the UK a limit of 0.15% of plastic is allowed by the Food Standards Agency. The official EU level for plastic permitted in animal feed is zero although in reality many other countries operate within the same 0.15% limit."

Meanwhile, I made borscht last night: chopped onions and beetroots, belly of pork (I'd thought those strips in the freezer were spare ribsÖ), celery and a big bunch of dill, and a chopped-up cabbage at the end; stock. It was tasty, but I think I'd put in the cabbage earlier and chop it finer in future, and maybe grate the beetroots before cooking them.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 16 Dec 18 - 05:20 AM

Leeneia, if you ever cook for me, could I ask you just to leave the fat on my share, PLEASE


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Tattie Bogle
Date: 15 Dec 18 - 07:34 PM

Scots wha hae leftovers tae use up: Random Scran
Piece of previously cooked cod loin, sprouts, leeks, cauliflower (all also previously cooked!) Baked beans, requested by grandchildren for THEIR tea but hardly ate a random few.
Throw randomly on plate, grate strong cheddar cheese over the whole lot equally randomly.
Randomly select 2 minutes on random poweer setting (full) on microwave and zap!
Haute cuisine!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia
Date: 15 Dec 18 - 03:14 PM

We just had a Sunday dinner on a Friday. I like this idea - a fine meal, good company, and no driving at night.

Here's the main dish: Trim the obvious fat from a beef chuck roast, then place it in a slow cooker. Place whole cranberries all over the top surface of the beef. Cook 8 to 10 hours on low, till tender. Let cool some, then put in fridge overnight.

Next day, remove fat. Slice meat, warm in oven. Just before dining, add 1 tsp molasses to the sauce. Optional: add 1/4 tsp cinnamon to the sauce. Serve with noodles.
===========
Notes: I like to use a slow-cooker liner for easier cleanup.
Use the rest of the molasses to make gingerbread, ginger cookies and BBQ sauce. Some people put butter and molasses on pancakes, too.

After dinner, we played music in the living room.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 14 Dec 18 - 11:42 AM

Salmon was brined overnight and is now in the smoker out on the front porch. This is for a friend, who brought the fish over here because I have the smoker.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson
Date: 13 Dec 18 - 04:46 AM

Scots? Wha? Hey!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: JennieG
Date: 13 Dec 18 - 12:12 AM

A favourite Ozzie Christmas treat is made from a commercially-made dark fruit cake. Break up the cake in a bowl and stir in enough sherry (or orange juice if serving it to kids) to make it pliable enough to roll into balls somewhere between a walnut and a golf ball in size. Drizzle melted white chocolate or white icing on top, and decorate with bits of red and green lollies/candy/sweets, depending where in the world you live. Serve in paper cases - they look like mini Chrissie puds.

A plate of these makes a nice gift, if you are into edible givings.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 12 Dec 18 - 11:57 AM

The best kind of meal possible - whatever is served - an invitation from the neighbor next door to join her for (in this instance) pot roast after helping her with some yard work.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: SPB-Cooperator
Date: 12 Dec 18 - 11:01 AM

Tonight, something quick and simple - fried turkey meatballs and new potatoes with a good dollop of butter.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 12 Dec 18 - 10:53 AM

Thompson, from its other recipes, I gather that The Scots Kitchen considers vague grittiness to be a feature, not a bug. Its recipe for haggis is fit to fright the French, containing as it does items that are not legal for sale in Ontario.

I have come down with bronchitis and, if it goes the way it usually does, I will lose all olfactory function within the next 24 to 48 hours. During the taste-free days, I will live on tea and toast.

Now that we live in beautiful, leafy Stratford, Ontario, we are within shouting distance of a genuine grist mill that still produces whole-meal flour. Our bread game, always of a high standard, has consequently gone up yet another notch. I make a 100%-whole-wheat sandwich loaf that is, if not to die for, certainly something to live on. Made with flour from the Arva mill, it has a nutty flavour and a firm (but not stodgy) texture that is delicious when fresh and just magnificent as toast. I got great results with standard commercial flour (Robin Hood "Best For Bread"), but the stone-ground flour is notably better.

If I bake today, while still compos mentis, I might survive to next week ...


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson
Date: 10 Dec 18 - 06:14 AM

Charmion, I tried that whiskey-honey-cream-oatmeal thing with pinhead oatmeal one time but found it vaguely gritty. I just use the ordinary oatmeal you make porridge with.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 09 Dec 18 - 09:14 AM

Iíve just been looking at an earlier comment about keeping metal utensils away from cookware.

I admit to damaging one stainless steel pan with a potato masher but I guess I accepted I was going to do that and I donít use that one for things that stick. Iíve tried with the others but, eg. with last set of visiting family, I did a sort of ďself serviceĒ from the pans. I put a couple of plastic ones out but they were swapped for metal ones, etc. and Pip is the type who can grab the nearest object to hand even if that means a metal knife vs a non stick frying pan (which now is the only thing I have that is non stick coated).

Anyway, sheís asked me to replace some wooden tools for her Christmas present from me (likely to be more used by me but if thatís what she wants I donít argue) so Iíve bought a set of wooden handled ones with silicon tools and a couple of silicon desert spoons. Iím not sure whether that will help lead to more care but time will tell.

Favourite pan (if a less dedicated type is allowed to have such things) btw is a 16cm Vogue Tri wall (aluminium sandwiched between stainless steel) one which I use for gravy and sauces. It seems to heat more evenly that the Judge ones and less likely to stick (not that Iíve had major problems cleaning the others). I didnít get a lid (metal and sold separately) for this one but retained a glass lid from an older discarded saucepan that is a good fit if needed.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 08 Dec 18 - 08:50 PM

I've been on my own today and have got pissed off with one thing and another, so I did meself a trough of comfort food tonight which I scoffed out of a huge bowl in front of a repeat of Chas & Dave's Christmas special on the telly.

You need a fairly small roasting tin or Pyrex dish if it's just for one. Oil it well.

Boil about 350g waxy potatoes, unpeeled, for about twenty minutes.

Meanwhile, take about 75g pancetta or streaky bacon (unsmoked for me, but hey) and cut the rashers into inch-long pieces. Grate about 50g Parmesan. Take about 150g of a melting cheese. Gruyere, fontina, mozzarella or taleggio will all fit the bill, though, as I didn't have any of those, I used provolone dolce. Cut the cheese into small slices.

Drain the spuds, let them cool slightly then slice them up. Put the spuds into the bottom of your oiled roasting dish. Insert the pieces of cheese and bacon roughly into the spud layer. Sprinkle with the grated parmesan, making sure that there's a bit left to go on top. Finally, sprinkle a hood dollop of olive oil on top.

Bake for about 30 minutes at about 180C.

I ate mine with some peas as I needed the vitamins. Lovely it was.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Joe_F
Date: 08 Dec 18 - 06:05 PM

Tonight it will be lamburger, Sicilian spinach, rutabaga, tea, & icecream.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel
Date: 08 Dec 18 - 04:58 PM

I have dried ghost pepper. Anyone ever use it?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 08 Dec 18 - 12:13 PM

I agree about the salmon, and keta is lower in those omega-3 oils as well. I didn't have enough sockeye. But actually keta is fine in the arrabbiata, I promise you, and it's much cheaper this end. When I have sockeye I want it nicely seasoned and fried in butter, skin side down to start with, with home-made oven chips (parboiled unpeeled wedges, roughed up, coated in groundnut oil and roasted for 20 minutes in a fierce oven), tenderstem broccoli and some oven-roasted cherry tomatoes with basil.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 08 Dec 18 - 11:01 AM

I've tried 2 meals in the multi cooker so far, both slow cook.

The first, a sort of red lentil, chick pea and carrot stew came out well. The recipe I based it on called for pasta at a later stage but, not having any, I tipped some arborio rice in and gave the mix about a 15 minute quick cook on "stew" instead. It was popular enough to be asked to do it again.

I started an attempt at a spicy/curry veg meal in the early hours of this morning (couldn't sleep). I've got this one quite wrong. The veg (potato, carrots, parsnip and sprouts) have cooked OK but I've wound up with way too much, rather insipid liquid. I knew there would be no evaporation but the veg themselves seem to have added somewhat to the liquid. I think I'm going to have to try to rescue this one using a pan on the cooker and aim to be wiser next time.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 08 Dec 18 - 10:34 AM

"Keta" is also called "dog salmon" up in the Northwest and Alaska. Go with the sockeye, or go home. It doesn't have nearly as much flavor or color. It's okay if you don't have anything else, but if you have a choice, go with sockeye.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 08 Dec 18 - 10:24 AM

I think Iíll be helping to make a nut roast early next week. My parents had decided on stuffed butternut squash halves from Tesco for the main part of their Christmas dinner. There were a lot of problems with the Tesco Christmas order which also included a bit of turkey for me. It started with the butternut squash item being ďunavailableĒ on the first day Tesco opened their Christmas area and after the order finally got placed, it got wiped by a regular grocery order and all the Christmas delivery booking slots had gone for another attempt at ordering.

Anyway, after some debate, we decided to go for something home made instead and have opted to try this nut loaf which I think looks good. The deal is that I will get all the ingredients prepared and laid out. Pip will then take over. The plan is to freeze until Christmas eve/day.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 07 Dec 18 - 07:53 PM

Dammit, I should have said that you need around four tablespoons of olive oil. Also, you can use diced chicken breast instead of salmon, though you do need to stir-fry it for a minute or two before adding to the sauce. Not hard, though, is it!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 07 Dec 18 - 07:47 PM

We've had salmon arrabbiata tonight. I basically follow Gino d'Acampo's recipe but not slavishly.

For two people you need some fresh keta or sockeye salmon, not tinned, about 300g. Take off the skin (easiest when the salmon is half-thawed). Cut the fish into 1cm dice.

Put your pasta on to boil in salted water. I use pennone rigate for this. I'm not too keen on those little penne tubes but suit yourself.

In the meantime sautťe gently two sliced cloves of garlic (do NOT crush) and your own personal predilection of dried chilli flakes in a pan of extra virgin olive oil. The dish is supposed to be pretty spicy so don't hang back too much. After a few minutes add at least one can of plum tomatoes. Only the best will do. I usually add a few more plus a goodly dollop of sun dried tomato paste. At the same time add a good handful of chopped fresh parsley and some seasoning. Let that lot simmer uncovered for a few minutes (or you can make the sauce in advance, which is what I did tonight).

Two minutes before the pasta is ready, turn the heat up a tad under the sauce and throw in the salmon, heat it through for a minute or two then turn off the heat. Have faith, the fish is perfectly cooked. Drain the pasta (keeping a cupful of the water) and toss into the sauce. Mix well, adding a bit of pasta water if needed, and serve. No Parmesan on fish (a mortal sin in Italy). A goodly drizzle of your finest extra virgin olive oil on top is paramount, as it is on most pasta dishes and pizzas. This dish is so quick and easy, and it couldn't be healthier. And it's utterly delicious.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 07 Dec 18 - 06:21 PM

"I don't recall that they sold food, though"

What, not even haggis?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: keberoxu
Date: 07 Dec 18 - 05:57 PM

There used to be a retail shop north of Harvard Square,
in Cambridge, Massachusetts,
called "Atholl Brose."
It stocked everything Scottish
and provided access to a tailor
who could custom-fit you for a kilt.

They had a shelf of books, some written in Scots,
like "The Shriek of the Maws."

I don't recall that they sold food, though.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel
Date: 07 Dec 18 - 10:46 AM

Richard Wade
known to his friends as Dick Wad has been named Ass. Deputy to Facebook public relations to change minds instead of changing Facebook.


Some recipes will always taste bad no matter what you think about them.
Like Sticky Bitter Bottom Buns, changing the name won't help until you change the recipe.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 07 Dec 18 - 09:40 AM

Okay, BobL, point taken. You can't expect good results if you don't use good ingredients.

That said, I still insist that fruitcake (any old fruitcake) is a suitable destination for Red Label Johnny Walker.

Thompson, I believe the dessert you describe is Atholl Brose. I have an elderly cookbook called "The Scots Kitchen"; its version of the recipe calls for the finely ground oatmeal that I know as "pinhead" oats. Is that what you mean by porridge oats?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: BobL
Date: 07 Dec 18 - 02:31 AM

Charmion, any old rum will do for any old fruitcake.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson
Date: 06 Dec 18 - 09:47 AM

A nice alcoholic dessert is made by soaking porridge oats in whiskey and honey then whipping in cream just before serving it. Don't give the driver any.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 05 Dec 18 - 10:31 AM

By the time it's in a fruitcake, any old rum'll do, BobL.

A nice but misguided person once gave me a bottle of Red Label Johnny Walker. The stuff is undrinkable, but it was boffo in fruitcake.

I agree with you on the subject of Southern Comfort in a fruit salad, but we don't eat fruit salad often enough to justify the purchase of an entire bottle of Southern Comfort. I have no experience of Archer's peach schnapps, which may not be available in Ontario.

Tonight's supper will be my sister-in-law's vegetarian lasagne. Himself came home with rather a lot of striploin steak the other day (bin-end sale at the butcher, I gather), so a veg-heavy dish feels like a good idea. It's remarkably like a normal lasagne, but with no meat in the sauce; you could feed it to your lacto-ovo vegetarian teenager without incident. It has three kinds of cheese, though, so the calorie count is not inconsiderable.

And it makes six servings, so that's dinner tonight and two days' worth of lunch.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: BobL
Date: 05 Dec 18 - 02:43 AM

Sailor Jerry rum in my cookbook.

While we're on the subject, a good addition to fruit salad is a 50:50 mix of Archer's peach schnapps and Southern Comfort. Just enough to moisten, not marinade!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel
Date: 04 Dec 18 - 06:55 PM

Grand Marine' or Drambuie is my choice.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 04 Dec 18 - 09:03 AM

Yes, fruitcake. I'm a week late starting ours, but I'll get going this afternoon. It's a two-day process in which the fruit macerates overnight in brandy (or other hooch) and the juice of two lemons and two oranges.

I don't ice it: that's not the Canadian style. (Fruitcake is the only thing that's naked at Christmas in Ontario.) Also, the fondant-marzipan icing is very fiddly to make and apply, not to mention expensive (the price of almond paste these days!), and it doesn't travel well, especially in the mail.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel
Date: 04 Dec 18 - 08:31 AM

Tried the beets under the chicken with vegetables recipe. The carrots and all were good but beets are still to 'earthy' for me.

The leftover red sauce may be a good violin stain with varnish but may not be color fast.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 03 Dec 18 - 04:55 AM

Christmas cake is traditionally made on the last Sunday in November to give it several weeks to mature. Every member of the household has a turn stirring the mixture and making a wish.
I used to ice the cake with a vaguely flat covering of white icing, a small model fir tree, and footsteps in the 'snow' made with a silver charm of a boot. (Must do it again sometime.)


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson
Date: 03 Dec 18 - 03:28 AM

In my day a Christmas cake was iced with about a centimetre thick layer of marzipan, covered by hard white sugar icing, decorated like a Roman temple. Not so much nowadays when weíre all influenced by German and Polish customs.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: BobL
Date: 03 Dec 18 - 03:14 AM

a "normal" cake would be stale after a week

A sponge cake might be stale after a week, but a fruit cake improves with a bit of keeping. Especially if fed with small doses of liquor at weekly intervals.

And yes, a "Christmas cake" is essentially a rich fruit cake, decorated appropriately.


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