mudcat.org: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafeawe

Post to this Thread - Printer Friendly - Home
Page: [1] [2] [3]


Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)

Jim Carroll 01 Apr 20 - 03:39 AM
Stilly River Sage 31 Mar 20 - 10:53 PM
Donuel 28 Mar 20 - 02:34 PM
Stilly River Sage 28 Mar 20 - 11:29 AM
Sandra in Sydney 28 Mar 20 - 02:33 AM
Stilly River Sage 28 Mar 20 - 12:32 AM
Helen 27 Mar 20 - 07:55 PM
Donuel 27 Mar 20 - 07:19 PM
Donuel 27 Mar 20 - 07:18 PM
Helen 27 Mar 20 - 05:47 PM
Helen 27 Mar 20 - 05:12 PM
Sandra in Sydney 29 Feb 20 - 09:07 AM
Stilly River Sage 29 Feb 20 - 08:59 AM
Iains 20 Feb 20 - 03:12 AM
Stilly River Sage 19 Feb 20 - 08:32 PM
Sandra in Sydney 19 Feb 20 - 06:56 PM
Donuel 01 Feb 20 - 04:19 PM
Donuel 28 Jan 20 - 05:53 PM
Steve Shaw 28 Jan 20 - 08:00 AM
Stilly River Sage 27 Jan 20 - 10:53 PM
Sandra in Sydney 27 Jan 20 - 07:39 PM
robomatic 27 Jan 20 - 07:04 PM
Steve Shaw 27 Jan 20 - 06:55 PM
Bill D 27 Jan 20 - 06:24 PM
Stilly River Sage 27 Jan 20 - 03:04 PM
Steve Shaw 14 Jan 20 - 07:54 PM
Stilly River Sage 14 Jan 20 - 06:48 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 14 Jan 20 - 06:31 PM
Stilly River Sage 14 Jan 20 - 03:17 PM
Sandra in Sydney 04 Jan 20 - 01:24 AM
Stilly River Sage 04 Jan 20 - 12:51 AM
Sandra in Sydney 03 Jan 20 - 08:21 PM
Stilly River Sage 03 Jan 20 - 11:58 AM
Iains 19 Dec 19 - 04:51 AM
Stilly River Sage 18 Dec 19 - 12:04 AM
Donuel 17 Dec 19 - 09:14 PM
Donuel 17 Dec 19 - 08:23 PM
Bill D 17 Dec 19 - 08:17 PM
Sandra in Sydney 17 Dec 19 - 06:37 PM
Iains 17 Dec 19 - 03:26 PM
Stilly River Sage 17 Dec 19 - 02:22 PM
Iains 17 Dec 19 - 01:04 PM
Stilly River Sage 17 Dec 19 - 12:05 PM
Donuel 14 Dec 19 - 04:00 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 14 Dec 19 - 03:57 PM
Donuel 14 Dec 19 - 03:54 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 14 Dec 19 - 03:22 PM
Donuel 14 Dec 19 - 03:11 PM
Donuel 14 Dec 19 - 01:20 PM
Stilly River Sage 14 Dec 19 - 12:06 PM
Share Thread
more
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:






Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 01 Apr 20 - 03:39 AM

We moved to West Clare in Ireland 20 years ago and have visited here since the early 70s, yet have never ceased being amazed by the archeological wonders of 'The Burren', fifteen miles from our doorstep
It is 250 km of limestone plateau covering most of North Clare covered with Bronze Age remains and ruined medieval churches as well as containing some rare plants in the grikes (limestone (fissures)
New sites are being worked on and opened up for public access fairly regularly and it is so respected that, after a long battle, the council was forced to close a hideous car part, visitors centre that it began to construct a few decades ago
It features on the programme of our local History Society regularly, both as a lecture topic and on our guided tour programmes
POULNABRONE DOLMEN and THE CLIFFS of MOHER tend to be overused but both are well worth a visit when the crowds have gone home
The cliffs are said to be the highest in Europe - they aren't but they've got a better publicity tear - they are in Donegal
Like all worthwhile visitors spots, it's great to take an overview, but it takes time to see the really place

The Traditional music of Clare is rightly reputed to be the best in Ireland, but the true officiados avoid Doolin like Covit 19 - that's where the visitors with 12 string guitars and Bodhrans go to listen to (or talk over) each other - try Ennis off better still (he boasted) Miltown Malbay
Well worth an Google Earth (or Bing) viewing, or better still, an as-long-as-you-can-manage visit
Caed mile failte (he said in his best Liverpool Irish)
Jim Carroll


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 31 Mar 20 - 10:53 PM

I clipped this some time ago to add to a site I work on, but it is a great one for this thread also:

5,200-year-old grains in the eastern Altai Mountains redate trans-Eurasian crop exchange

Most people are familiar with the historical Silk Road, but fewer people realize that the exchange of items, ideas, technology, and human genes through the mountain valleys of Central Asia started almost three millennia before organized trade networks formed. These pre-Silk Road exchange routes played an important role in shaping human cultural developments across Europe and Asia, and facilitated the dispersal of technologies such as horse breeding and metal smelting into East Asia. One of the most impactful effects of this process of ancient cultural dispersal was the westward spread of northeast Asian crops and the eastward spread of southwest Asian crops.

http://www.geologypage.com/2020/02/5200-year-old-grains-in-the-eastern-altai-mountains-redate-trans-eurasian-crop-exchange.html


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 28 Mar 20 - 02:34 PM

Australia started off in Antarctica https://youtu.be/UkDzSZfWFAQ

Land of glaciers

It's still moving about 20 feet Northeast per 20 years.
One day Australia will approach Hawaii.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 28 Mar 20 - 11:29 AM

Those who have traveled through the Texas panhandle know that the region is a flat plain, cut by the passage of water (to create such marvels as Palo Duro Canyon. But north of Amarillo there is an ancient buried mountain range that pushed to the surface and is the source of metamorphic minerals (rubies, etc.) and in Central Texas there are remnant ancient mountains that have igneous granite, quartz, tourmaline, silver, etc. and topaz. While topaz is number 9 on the Moe hardness scale (diamond being 10), it formed in igneous areas, versus diamonds as carbon under pressure in metamorphic areas. Who knows, maybe one day they'll find diamonds in the Texas Panhandle.

Anyway, this riff is offered up as an appreciation of ancient rocks that stick up out of the newer surrounding stuff. It can be very interesting.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 28 Mar 20 - 02:33 AM

Uluru from wikipedia

Uluru is an inselberg, literally "island mountain".[6][7][8] An inselberg is a prominent isolated residual knob or hill that rises abruptly from and is surrounded by extensive and relatively flat erosion lowlands in a hot, dry region.[9] Uluru is also often referred to as a monolith, although this is a somewhat ambiguous term that is generally avoided by geologists.[10]

The remarkable feature of Uluru is its homogeneity and lack of jointing and parting at bedding surfaces, leading to the lack of development of scree slopes and soil. These characteristics led to its survival, while the surrounding rocks were eroded.[10]

For the purpose of mapping and describing the geological history of the area, geologists refer to the rock strata making up Uluru as the Mutitjulu Arkose, and it is one of many sedimentary formations filling the Amadeus Basin.[6]


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 28 Mar 20 - 12:32 AM

I love looking at landscapes using Google Earth. I pulled it up just now to look in north Quebec to get a link to some of the glacial scars, then noticed Lac Manicouagan, a circular lake with land in the middle. But that's not a volcanic area, so I looked it up. Wow! It's a meteor crater!

https://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manicouagan_crater
If you plug this into Google Earth or maps you should go straight to it.
51°27'24.83" N 68°43'43.84" W

What a pleasure, a site that I can go do more reading about. Thanks for reopening this, Helen. In this case, it would be for an armchair geologist or astrophysicist or whoever it is who explores meteors - but wait! This might be part of a "multiple-impact event." From Wikipedia:

The Manicouagan crater may have been part of a multiple impact event which also formed the Rochechouart crater in France, Saint Martin crater in Manitoba, Obolon' crater in Ukraine, and Red Wing crater in North Dakota. The five craters form a chain, indicating the breakup and subsequent impact of an asteroid or comet,[5] like the impacts of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 on Jupiter in 1994.


The Wikipedia site has several links in that paragraph.

Enjoy!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Helen
Date: 27 Mar 20 - 07:55 PM

Well, I was quoting the Mungo website on the "over 50,000 years" but I recall seeing an article recently which placed them here at around 60,000 years.

I don't think glaciers had anything to do with the formation of Uluru. I'd have to do a bit of searching to find out more, but I'd be surprised if we had glaciers slap bang in the centre of Australia.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 27 Mar 20 - 07:19 PM

or not?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 27 Mar 20 - 07:18 PM

I can see the ice age glacial scour marks in parllel that indicate direction. The glacier that carried that rock must have been a mile or more high. The rock dropped and the glacier scrubbed it from above.

50,000 years! There are some possible indications of man at 75,000.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Helen
Date: 27 Mar 20 - 05:47 PM

Technically this probably doesn't count as an archaeological site in that I don't think anyone has dug around it looking for clues to the past but as a link to the history of our land it stacks up as one of the biggest and best:

Uluru aka Ayers Rock

For some impressive photos of the rock drag the little yellow sightseeing icon from bottom right to the Sunset Viewing Area to the right and below the rock.

But an important archaeological site in Australia is
Lake Mungo in NSW

Mungo National Park

"Scientists have discovered artefacts of this ancient culture dating back over 50,000 years across the expanses of the last ice age. This makes Mungo one of the oldest places outside of Africa to have been occupied by modern humans since ancient times."

I have said before that making some visits to outback Australia has been the highlight of my travels and I was privileged to visit Lake Mungo on a bus tour arranged through our University. We had a man who had studied indigenous people, an historian and the bus driver was a geologist. We also visited Wilpena Pound which is an impressive rock formation.

In all of the three places it was not just the sightseeing aspect which impressed me. It was the spiritual power of those places and the connection going back over 50,000 years for the indigenous people of our land.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Helen
Date: 27 Mar 20 - 05:12 PM

I decided to refresh this thread because during social isolation we can't travel in real life but we can do it virtually.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 29 Feb 20 - 09:07 AM

thanks, stilly


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 29 Feb 20 - 08:59 AM

You don't have to go far, some of you, to check out this lost bit of history: Long-Forgotten Secret Passageway Discovered In A Wall At U.K. Parliament

Within the wood paneling of a hallway in the British House of Commons, there was a small brass keyhole.

Members of Parliament and staff walked past the tiny hole each day. The rare person who noticed the hole took it for an electrical cabinet.

Enter a team of historians planning the much-needed restoration of the Palace of Westminster, which is home to the House of Commons and the House of Lords. The oldest part of the estate, Westminster Hall, dates to 1099 and is still in use.

The team was at the Historic England Archive poring over some 10,000 uncatalogued documents relating to the palace when they found something interesting: plans for a doorway in the cloister behind Westminster Hall.

Back at the palace, they found that tiny keyhole in the wood paneling — just where the plan suggested it would be. They had a key made so they could open the door – and they discovered a secret passageway 360 years old. . . .


If you can't read the rest of the story from outside the US let me know and I'll paste it in later.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Iains
Date: 20 Feb 20 - 03:12 AM

https://gisgeography.com/lidar-light-detection-and-ranging/


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 19 Feb 20 - 08:32 PM

Will LIDAR work to look under water?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 19 Feb 20 - 06:56 PM

Rats were the 'first curators' at Sydney museum Hyde Park Barracks Rat infestations may have been a nightmare for convicts at Sydney's Hyde Park Barracks in the 1800s, but today historians are grateful for the rodents.
Scuttering beneath the floorboards, the rats hoarded scraps of fabric, food and personal treasures.
Researchers joke that these rats inadvertently became the barracks' first curators.
The material looked like big piles of dusty, dirty rubbish when it was discovered in 1979, but archaeologists were thrilled upon closer inspection.
"It turns out the accumulated rat nests contained more than 80,000 archaeological artefacts that had been trapped under the floorboards and undisturbed for up to 160 years," said Beth Hise from Sydney Living Museums.

A short history of the Hyde Park Barracks with links to other articles on Sydney's Living Museums, including archaeology & history of music in these former homes & Government buildings.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 01 Feb 20 - 04:19 PM

The 2 mile high glaciers over N America and Europe were mostly melted by 10 K BC. The inundation covered an area of 10,000,000 sq. mi., the size of China and Europe combined. The archeological ruins of the prior seaside civilizations would therefore be under water today. What google earth technologies allows us a peek underwater?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 28 Jan 20 - 05:53 PM

Speaking of glass jars ancient Egypt had glass jars and perhaps windows


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 28 Jan 20 - 08:00 AM

There's a thread on it above the line, Maggie. Maybe someone thought you could get a tune out of it... :-)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 27 Jan 20 - 10:53 PM

I saw this mentioned somewhere but can't find it now. Archaeologists have found a bottle with nails in it - if they want to find a modern version of that, my work bench and just about every family workshop probably has something similar. Suspected ‘Witch Bottle’ Full of Nails Found in Virginia

    In 2016, archaeologists excavating sections of a southern Virginia interstate unearthed dinnerware and a brick hearth at a Civil War encampment called Redoubt 9. Near the hearth, they found a blue glass bottle made in Pennsylvania between 1840 and 1860. Eerily, the vessel was filled with nails.

    At first, the team didn’t know what to make of the bottle, theorizing it was perhaps just a place to collect spare nails. Now, however, experts suspect the container may be a “witch bottle”—one of less than a dozen such protective talismans found in the United States to date, according to a statement from the College of William & Mary.

    Witch bottles originated in England during the 1600s, when a witch panic was overtaking Europe. Per JSTOR Daily’s Allison C. Meier, the charms were believed to use hair, fingernail clippings or urine to draw in evil spirits that were then trapped in the bottle by sharp objects like nails, pins or hooks. An alternative theory regarding the vessels suggests they were used not to fight bad luck, but to attract good luck, longevity and health.

    Placed near a hearth, metal items enclosed in the bottles would heat up, making them more effective. A witch bottle filled with fishing hooks, glass shards and human teeth, for instance, was found in an English pub’s chimney last November. . .


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 27 Jan 20 - 07:39 PM

citizen science.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: robomatic
Date: 27 Jan 20 - 07:04 PM

This is fascinating stuff. Once between flights in an airport I met a guy who had seen Youtube videos of white (Beluga) whales in Alaska and, according to him, noticed something that no one else had. He'd observed that while the whales had no dorsal fins, they were able to contract their bodies along their sleek sides and form them into a kind of triangular cross-section effectively giving their spine-side a more vertical shape. His observations had gotten him a free trip to Alaska to tell people about it.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 27 Jan 20 - 06:55 PM

Hadrian's Wall doesn't anything like follow the modern-day Scottish border. Its western end is pretty close but the eastern end is almost 70 miles south of the border. It's very unlikely that the wall was built to keep out (or in) the ravening hordes. In fact, passage across the wall was probably fairly free, and its function was more likely to be something akin to a customs border. I'm amazed and disgusted with myself that I've never seen it (even though I've crossed its path a good few times).


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Bill D
Date: 27 Jan 20 - 06:24 PM

I think Scotland is just as happy that Hadrian built that wall.

"No, nothing of interest up here. Those sheep in the south will keep you busy."


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 27 Jan 20 - 03:04 PM

From Reddit, "The Roman Empire at its height, superimposed on modern borders" https://www.reddit.com/r/MapPorn/comments/etzi6v/the_roman_empire_at_its_height_superimposed_on/


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 14 Jan 20 - 07:54 PM

I had a problem with "Ragusa" on the map, a town which I know from Sicily. Having been forced to look it up, I discovered that it's also the ancient name for Dubrovnik. So I've learned something today!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 14 Jan 20 - 06:48 PM

Many things aren't shown, this is the Big Picture wide-ranging stuff. There was lots of trading in the Americas, literally from North to South and between the coasts.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 14 Jan 20 - 06:31 PM

Not shown on the map from SRS, Aborigines were probably trading with Malay people back then.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 14 Jan 20 - 03:17 PM

This will keep a few of you busy. Crank up the Google Earth and start exploring. (You might want to save a copy of this map in case the link isn't durable.)

You're welcome. :)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 04 Jan 20 - 01:24 AM

yes!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 04 Jan 20 - 12:51 AM

Down the rabbit hole, eh?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 03 Jan 20 - 08:21 PM

thanks, Stilly, that link led me to other good info


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 03 Jan 20 - 11:58 AM

Archaeologists find a Roman London Bridge in a very short video added to British Pathé.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Iains
Date: 19 Dec 19 - 04:51 AM

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/news/2015/03/150325-underground-city-cappadocia-turkey-archaeology/

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/news/2016/05/20160511-Maya-Lost-City-Canadian-Teen-Discover-Constellations-Archaeology-Satell

I wonder how that Mayan City?is going to play out.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 18 Dec 19 - 12:04 AM

I probably saw this in Smithsonian when it first came out and forgot all about it. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/gobekli-tepe-the-worlds-first-temple-83613665/


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 17 Dec 19 - 09:14 PM

I am a huge Globeki Tepi fan. Some distance away in Turkey there is an underground city with ventillation and room for livestock that is nearly 20 stories deep.

I've climbed cliffside dwellings and seen pictures of mountain top temples in Nepal, Peru, underground cities and now underwater cities. We are damn clever animals especially in trying to escape other predatory people or enviorments. We are now looking to interplanatary travel while our ancestors were more advanced in building with 'unliftable stone'.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 17 Dec 19 - 08:23 PM

Admiral O Voyus says it is clear that sea levels were significantly lower in the past. In addition to the underwater architecture already mentioned, there are structures remaining off of Japan, Cuba, India, China, Argentina and HERE


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Bill D
Date: 17 Dec 19 - 08:17 PM

When I was in college in the 1960s, I remember a lecture noting that Mohenjo-daro in India and Harappa in what is now Pakistan were some of the earliest known major cities known. Other excavations find evidence of settlements, but very few large ones.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 17 Dec 19 - 06:37 PM

wikipedia on Yonaguni Monument

thanks to all who post here, I've seen so many interesting pages & bookmarked several more pages.

I've been buying 2 magazines over the past year or so as my local libraries no longer get archaeology magazines (shock, horror, no regular archaeology!) & a growing pile of magazines when I'm trying to downsize. Fortunately I have a friend who volunteers on archaeological sites ...

Current World Archaeology - Archaeological Institute of America
Current World Archaeology

sandra


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Iains
Date: 17 Dec 19 - 03:26 PM

Not disputing some are old news. Others are more recent news. If the accepted dating of gobekli tepi is 12000BP then I would anticipate many more underwater discoveries. It is probably no exaggeration to say we know more of the surface features of Mars than the underwater features of our own planet.
The Yonaguni Island Submarine Ruins are subject to controversy as to whether they are manmade or natural.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 17 Dec 19 - 02:22 PM

Archaeological materials underwater are old news, Iains, New World and Old, with divers finding Mayan relics in an underwater cave and Robert Ballard has pushed those limits even further with discoveries of the ancient ruins under the Black Sea. To say nothing of Alexandria, Egypt, many Greek ruins, all sorts of Mediterranean stuff, etc.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Iains
Date: 17 Dec 19 - 01:04 PM

I am leaning toward India as the heart of ancient civilization. Now I will look at the genetic records, architecture and dates to see if my guess is reasonable.

Conventional archeology holds that the Romans built Baalbek. They may have built the temple to jupiter However this sits atop 3000ton dressed megaliths. Funny the Romans left no written record of how they moved those megaliths. Even stranger they had the technology to move them.
But this is a pattern repeated throughout the world, ancient ruins are built on top of carefully dressed megaliths. Frequently the basal craftmanship is of far greater quality than the overlying constructions.
This suggests to me that conventional archeology needs to get out and about more and rethink a few basics. Gobekli Tepi has given them a bit of a poke in the eye as far as shifting boundaries back is concerned. In the last 20000 years sea level has risen 400feet. How many ruins lie under the sea? I suspect a paradigm shift is in the offing.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 17 Dec 19 - 12:05 PM

This one is out of this world: Indian Moon Lander Crash Site located by an amateur astronomer.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 14 Dec 19 - 04:00 PM

Ramses II does look buff.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 14 Dec 19 - 03:57 PM

Could follow its construction (will be the biggest museum in the world, I think), as priceless items are moved across Cairo from the old museum.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 14 Dec 19 - 03:54 PM

WHY ? What do we look for?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 14 Dec 19 - 03:22 PM

Check the Grand Egyptian Museum's construction, not far from the pyramids.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 14 Dec 19 - 03:11 PM

Back on Earth there are many early Olmec sites but the Mayans have on occaision built on top of other ancient structures so even lidar can not show everything.

The Olmec people interest me the most since they are the most global cosmpolitan ancient civilization I have ever seen. There are quite a few links with India Hindu statues of various gods like Garuda and Shiva as well as stone heads with African features. Europeans, not so much.

I am leaning toward India as the heart of ancient civilization. Now I will look at the genetic records, architecture and dates to see if my guess is reasonable.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 14 Dec 19 - 01:20 PM

I was comparing photos of the polar regions of Saturn and Jupiter and noticed a profound similarity. Saturn has a north polar vortex that is in the perfect shape of a hexagon. Jupiter has a brand new polar storm of 6 hurricanes that trace a hexagon shape, all surrounding a central storm. There are obviously forces that resolve into a hexagon shape around planetary gas giant polar regions. THE questions are how and why.

Ancient images of the hexagon and star of David as well as Gurjiefian and Kabalistic cosmology may have no bearing but there is an intriguing cosmic question here.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 14 Dec 19 - 12:06 PM

Lidar! Another way to get sucked into the close details using Google Earth. It's also very good for hard science.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate
Next Page

  Share Thread:
More...


You must be a member to post in non-music threads. Join here.


You must be a member to post in non-music threads. Join here.



Mudcat time: 1 April 8:37 PM EDT

[ Home ]

All original material is copyright © 1998 by the Mudcat Café Music Foundation, Inc. All photos, music, images, etc. are copyright © by their rightful owners. Every effort is taken to attribute appropriate copyright to images, content, music, etc. We are not a copyright resource.