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Bob Dylan: Nobel laureate

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GUEST,Senoufou/Eliza 29 Oct 16 - 02:12 PM
Jim Carroll 29 Oct 16 - 01:51 PM
Peter the Squeezer 29 Oct 16 - 01:12 PM
Mrrzy 29 Oct 16 - 12:29 PM
GUEST,Senoufou/Eliza 29 Oct 16 - 12:05 PM
meself 29 Oct 16 - 11:45 AM
GUEST,pauperback 29 Oct 16 - 11:38 AM
Steve Shaw 29 Oct 16 - 11:35 AM
Steve Shaw 29 Oct 16 - 11:30 AM
GUEST,pauperback 29 Oct 16 - 10:39 AM
GUEST 29 Oct 16 - 09:39 AM
Steve Shaw 29 Oct 16 - 06:31 AM
Steve Shaw 29 Oct 16 - 06:24 AM
GUEST,Senoufou/Eliza 29 Oct 16 - 06:09 AM
GUEST 29 Oct 16 - 04:58 AM
GUEST,Pete from seven stars link 29 Oct 16 - 03:49 AM
GUEST 29 Oct 16 - 12:16 AM
GUEST,nock 28 Oct 16 - 10:10 PM
GUEST,nock 28 Oct 16 - 10:09 PM
meself 28 Oct 16 - 04:52 PM
Jeri 28 Oct 16 - 03:41 PM
meself 28 Oct 16 - 02:04 PM
voyager 28 Oct 16 - 12:58 PM
GUEST,pauperback 27 Oct 16 - 10:41 PM
Steve Shaw 27 Oct 16 - 08:04 AM
Vic Smith 27 Oct 16 - 07:54 AM
GUEST,Sidewinder. 27 Oct 16 - 07:27 AM
GUEST 27 Oct 16 - 06:47 AM
GUEST,pauperback 27 Oct 16 - 06:34 AM
Steve Shaw 27 Oct 16 - 05:42 AM
Steve Shaw 27 Oct 16 - 05:35 AM
GUEST,pauperback 27 Oct 16 - 05:32 AM
The Sandman 27 Oct 16 - 03:02 AM
Dave Sutherland 27 Oct 16 - 02:44 AM
GUEST,pauperback 26 Oct 16 - 07:37 PM
GUEST,pauperback 26 Oct 16 - 07:36 PM
GUEST,pauperback 26 Oct 16 - 07:34 PM
GUEST,pauperback 26 Oct 16 - 07:32 PM
keberoxu 26 Oct 16 - 07:22 PM
keberoxu 26 Oct 16 - 07:16 PM
Andy7 26 Oct 16 - 05:14 PM
The Sandman 26 Oct 16 - 04:44 PM
The Sandman 26 Oct 16 - 04:30 PM
GUEST 26 Oct 16 - 03:03 PM
Dave Sutherland 26 Oct 16 - 08:35 AM
GUEST,pauperback 26 Oct 16 - 05:00 AM
GUEST,pauperback 26 Oct 16 - 04:56 AM
Will Fly 26 Oct 16 - 04:26 AM
Jim Carroll 25 Oct 16 - 07:18 PM
GUEST,nock 25 Oct 16 - 07:08 PM
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Subject: RE: Bob Dylan: Nobel laureate
From: GUEST,Senoufou/Eliza
Date: 29 Oct 16 - 02:12 PM

Ok then Jim, what about his civil rights stance?
And while many of us were anti-war, ban the bomb etc, not everyone wrote as expressively as Dylan did. (Maybe the First World War poets, well before his time)

Interesting point Mrrzy. Is poetry found in song lyrics? Myself, I think it is. If one reads them without the music, they still resonate (for me anyway) and evoke sentiment and atmosphere.


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Subject: RE: Bob Dylan: Nobel laureate
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 29 Oct 16 - 01:51 PM

Been away taking in the glories of the latest Ken Loach - was hoping to return to be bowled over with thought-provoking argument - ah well!!
Still only vacuous defence of something the |Master Himself has fessed up on.
"Dylan was anti-war, that alone would place him in the anti-establishment camp?"
Dylan's Anti-war stance came when it was a fashion item 'must' - I can find only one somewhat anodyne mention of Vietnam during thee whole of the decade that his government was soaking Vietnamese peasants in burning petrol and filling their air with carcinogenic Agent Orange (which was also killing off U.S. pilots)
C'mon' - even L.B.J. could sing 'We Shall Overcome with a straight face!!!"
Jim Carroll


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Subject: RE: Bob Dylan: Nobel laureate
From: Peter the Squeezer
Date: 29 Oct 16 - 01:12 PM

At our singaround a week ago yesterday, in honour of our new Nobel laureate, we sang the back seat of the school bus version of one of his songs -

"How many beans in a baked bean tin?
How many beans in the tin?

The answer my friend ......"


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Subject: RE: Bob Dylan: Nobel laureate
From: Mrrzy
Date: 29 Oct 16 - 12:29 PM

You're welcome, and I wonder if they put it back now that he has, imo, graciously, acknowledged the surprising but not, imo, undeserved honor.
The discussion going on amongst my kith&kin is whether lyrics are literature, not whether he deserved the prize. The only other category is promoting peace, and ending the last war on a continent trumps lyrics.
Speaking of which (get it?), I think part of this award is intended as a reminder to America of what we used to be about, and should go back to being about, again, imho. What do y'all think of that idea?


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Subject: RE: Bob Dylan: Nobel laureate
From: GUEST,Senoufou/Eliza
Date: 29 Oct 16 - 12:05 PM

Steve, I would have thought that, as Dylan was anti-war, that alone would place him in the anti-establishment camp? ('Blowing in the Wind' etc)


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Subject: RE: Bob Dylan: Nobel laureate
From: meself
Date: 29 Oct 16 - 11:45 AM

"Some will rob you with a six gun and some with a fountain pen" - Woody Guthrie. "Universal Soldier" - Buffy Ste.-Marie. One or two or three other misattributions on this thread, but I've forgotten what they are .....


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Subject: RE: Bob Dylan: Nobel laureate
From: GUEST,pauperback
Date: 29 Oct 16 - 11:38 AM

Well poor old ponderous me what is it? (And yes I know you can run circles round me so speak plainly)


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Subject: RE: Bob Dylan: Nobel laureate
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 29 Oct 16 - 11:35 AM

"He said left not leaves me speechless. For a know it all, you appear to have a rather strange understanding of grammar..."

Well, we won't mention this dreadfully-punctuated sentence of yours, shall we, Mr Hair-splitter? In fact, I know nothing. I come from Barcelona...


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Subject: RE: Bob Dylan: Nobel laureate
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 29 Oct 16 - 11:30 AM

Er, no it isn't...


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Subject: RE: Bob Dylan: Nobel laureate
From: GUEST,pauperback
Date: 29 Oct 16 - 10:39 AM

Maybe the chaff will evolve. As for addressing Dick, read a book, he's written quite a few. Steve Shaw, this is not a cause for sainthood it's a peace prize.


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Subject: RE: Bob Dylan: Nobel laureate
From: GUEST
Date: 29 Oct 16 - 09:39 AM

For such a literary giant he appears to have a rather strange understanding of "speechless."

He said left not leaves me speechless. For a know it all, you appear to have a rather strange understanding of grammar...


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Subject: RE: Bob Dylan: Nobel laureate
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 29 Oct 16 - 06:31 AM

It would be interesting to know precisely how Bob Dylan has distanced himself from the "establishment."

Again, the point has been made a couple of times in the thread this morning that Bob has produced dross (no-one's tackled Dick on that as yet). Unlike many greats, he has allowed his bad bits to stay public, not much evidence of suppression or revision. You could wonder whether he himself can actually see what's wheat and what's chaff.


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Subject: RE: Bob Dylan: Nobel laureate
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 29 Oct 16 - 06:24 AM

"In the misty crystal glitter of that wild and windward spray..."

Poetry as good as any. Cheers, Woody.


But on Friday, the Nobel Foundation said Dylan had called Sara Danius, Permanent Secretary of the Swedish Academy, telling her: "The news about the Nobel Prize left me speechless. I appreciate the honour so much."
Although the statement said it was unclear if Dylan would attend the prize-giving banquet in Stockholm, the UK's Daily Telegraph quoted him as saying: "Absolutely. If it's at all possible."
In an interview with the paper he described the prize as "amazing, incredible".
"It's hard to believe. Whoever dreams about something like that?" the paper quoted him as saying.


For such a literary giant he appears to have a rather strange understanding of "speechless." 😂


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Subject: RE: Bob Dylan: Nobel laureate
From: GUEST,Senoufou/Eliza
Date: 29 Oct 16 - 06:09 AM

I've come a bit late to this thread, but having read Good Soldier Schweik's post with the lyrics of "They stone you..." I felt the need to put in my twopence, for what it's worth.

I was young and ardent once (!) and well remember Dylan's songs, especially "Down in the basement..." and "They stone you..." The words absolutely resonated with me. As students we learned every word (Len Cohen's songs too) and sang along enthusiastically. I was studying the entire Works of Shakespeare, and practically all the classical literature, poetry and prose, including Chaucer, not to mention (well I will then) most French and even Latin works of literature and poetry. (My degree was an MA in French and English Literature)
Yet I still felt Dylan's songs and lyrics to be superb and evocative. They have a certain urgency and relevance about them. Even now, (old and past it) I can read the lyrics and feel the same as I did then.
Most great writers have produced mediocre works among the pearls, Dylan too. But his excellent stuff is just that....excellent.

I agree it was churlish of him to neglect acknowledgement of the honour, but I expect he (like John Lennon) didn't particularly see why he should have fallen on his knees with gratitude and grab the prize like a starving man. His whole life was centred around questioning the Establishment after all...


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Subject: RE: Bob Dylan: Nobel laureate
From: GUEST
Date: 29 Oct 16 - 04:58 AM

One of the things about poetry is that it doesn't need a melody.
Lyrics do.

What is good poetry? Critics differ.

My problem is that Dylan's words are dark, often paranoid and too clever.
Sometime they are cliched.

I like the earlier songs such as "Tomorrow is a Long Time".

"Blowin' in The Wind" is a pseudo political song saying really nothing new using stale images. It's as if it were written to sell to young lefties.

It's the image of the poet that Dylan represents like the actor image of James Dean.

Dylan looks the part, a Woody makeover.

Now to me the line "Some will rob you with a six gun and some with a fountain pen" is poetic, concise and serves agit-prop well. Agitprop has its place.

"Sound and fury signifying nothing"? At times. Dylan is undoubtably a good lyricist because his words sing. As a poet, if you speak them, do they speak well like his namesake Dylan Thomas?


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Subject: RE: Bob Dylan: Nobel laureate
From: GUEST,Pete from seven stars link
Date: 29 Oct 16 - 03:49 AM

Interesting , in light of above discussion that the link above has Dylan speaking of writing a hundred bad songs before writing a good one. That does seem both subjective and exaggerated for emphasis but I guess most of us know that feeling of not being satisfied with our own productions. It may well be fortuoutous that many songs deemed poor were preserved and largely appreciated by listeners.


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Subject: RE: Bob Dylan: Nobel laureate
From: GUEST
Date: 29 Oct 16 - 12:16 AM

'I was left speechless' : Bob Dylan breaks two-week silence over Nobel prize


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Subject: RE: Bob Dylan: Nobel laureate
From: GUEST,nock
Date: 28 Oct 16 - 10:10 PM

dear sir or madam can you read my book


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Subject: RE: Bob Dylan: Nobel laureate
From: GUEST,nock
Date: 28 Oct 16 - 10:09 PM

in ceremonies of the horsemen even a pawn must hold a grudge

talent/archaic measurement of weight of gold or silver

he has more money then all of you

backatcha paupers


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Subject: RE: Bob Dylan: Nobel laureate
From: meself
Date: 28 Oct 16 - 04:52 PM

For the benefit of future generations: my previous post with the 'last try' blickie links to a short talk from Rex Murphy, on Dylan, the Nobel, and his silence.


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Subject: RE: Bob Dylan: Nobel laureate
From: Jeri
Date: 28 Oct 16 - 03:41 PM

Rex Murphy nailed it.


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Subject: RE: Bob Dylan: Nobel laureate
From: meself
Date: 28 Oct 16 - 02:04 PM

last try


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Subject: RE: Bob Dylan: Nobel laureate
From: voyager
Date: 28 Oct 16 - 12:58 PM

To offer 'Another Side of Bob Dylan' to this lengthy literary critique audience here are a few of his great recordings (several bootleg cds) -

Collection of Dylan CDs


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Subject: RE: Bob Dylan: Nobel laureate
From: GUEST,pauperback
Date: 27 Oct 16 - 10:41 PM

Descent of you. And what effect were you looking for?


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Subject: RE: Bob Dylan: Nobel laureate
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 27 Oct 16 - 08:04 AM

Well there's a lot of it admittedly, but Dick has made the point that a good deal of dross has emanated from Bob's pen. One way of demonstrating the sheer amount of that dross is to show it to us. Crude but effective! It's certainly caused a fair bit of buttock-shuffling around here.


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Subject: RE: Bob Dylan: Nobel laureate
From: Vic Smith
Date: 27 Oct 16 - 07:54 AM

Having just struggled through this thread for the first time, there is is one question that I would like to ask.....

Is there a Nobel prize for cut'n'paste?


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Subject: RE: Bob Dylan: Nobel laureate
From: GUEST,Sidewinder.
Date: 27 Oct 16 - 07:27 AM

"Sooner or Later, one of us must know......."

Regards

Sidewinder.


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Subject: RE: Bob Dylan: Nobel laureate
From: GUEST
Date: 27 Oct 16 - 06:47 AM

Couldn't resist steve


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Subject: RE: Bob Dylan: Nobel laureate
From: GUEST,pauperback
Date: 27 Oct 16 - 06:34 AM

Ah Diddums, sorry, i didn't mean to sneak-up on you like that, (don't you hate when that happens?) Heheh


~K~


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Subject: RE: Bob Dylan: Nobel laureate
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 27 Oct 16 - 05:42 AM

Well the aspiration of art is to enlighten, to edify through knowledge and insight. It sounds like Ben Jonson was being snobbish. Ignorance is one of the human attributes that art confronts, not sees as its enemy. The logical conclusion of Jonson's remark is that the safest bet is to "just give the punters what they want." I've even heard that said in pub sessions!


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Subject: RE: Bob Dylan: Nobel laureate
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 27 Oct 16 - 05:35 AM

We are not detractors. We are sceptical critics. Dick is throwing out example after example of his awfulness - not difficult - but not saying that all his work is worthless. So far, Bob's fans have responded by telling us that we don't get it and that his music "evokes feelings," etc., or by simply getting all shirty and defensive. Dick talks about consistency. It's a good bet that most great artists have delivered themselves of plenty of turkeys, but the difference is that they tend to suppress them, throwing on the fire manuscripts or canvases they've spent months agonising over or making painstaking revisions. It seems that Dylan doesn't really care about the quality or consistency of his output in that way (by their fruits...). It's all out here, the good, the bad and the ugly. It's for us to pick over it while he's off elsewhere. No artistic reaching out. What it has all consistently done is make him quite well off. No difference in aspiration there from other artists, of course, but most are far more solicitous as to their reputation and legacy and are far less offhand about their output (he's actually rubbished his!) - and far more responsive to its recipients.


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Subject: RE: Bob Dylan: Nobel laureate
From: GUEST,pauperback
Date: 27 Oct 16 - 05:32 AM

Your comparing a 20 year old's work to a 70 year old's work then suggesting the prize meaningless? Ben Jonson was right: the enemy of art is ignorance.


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Subject: RE: Bob Dylan: Nobel laureate
From: The Sandman
Date: 27 Oct 16 - 03:02 AM

I expect consistency of good writing to be one of the considerations that a judge should think about when awarding a prize, in my opinion Dylans writing is a Curates Egg good and bad in places.
I do think Miles Davis played enjoyable music, and i have seen evidence that Picasso could draw, none of them were awarded the Nobel prize for Literature, but why not, the prize has evidently become meaningless


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Subject: RE: Bob Dylan: Nobel laureate
From: Dave Sutherland
Date: 27 Oct 16 - 02:44 AM

You think this is a great song?
No - I think it is one of his poorer efforts; I was just expressing surprise that this one had been overlooked by his detractors on this forum.


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Subject: RE: Bob Dylan: Nobel laureate
From: GUEST,pauperback
Date: 26 Oct 16 - 07:37 PM

My patron saint is a-fighting with a ghost. He's always off somewhere when I need him most.


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Subject: RE: Bob Dylan: Nobel laureate
From: GUEST,pauperback
Date: 26 Oct 16 - 07:36 PM

Strange how people who suffer together have stronger connections than those who are most content.


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Subject: RE: Bob Dylan: Nobel laureate
From: GUEST,pauperback
Date: 26 Oct 16 - 07:34 PM

We live in a political world
Where mercy walks the plank,
Life is in mirrors, death disappears
Up the steps into the nearest bank.


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Subject: RE: Bob Dylan: Nobel laureate
From: GUEST,pauperback
Date: 26 Oct 16 - 07:32 PM

You can always come back, but you can't come back all the way.


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Subject: RE: Bob Dylan: Nobel laureate
From: keberoxu
Date: 26 Oct 16 - 07:22 PM

Joan Baez, to the Arizona Republic.

"I think his manners suck, and his words deserve the Nobel Prize.

"Well, wouldn't you call back and say "Gee, thanks" if you got the Nobel Prize?
You know, 'I got the message'!"


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Subject: RE: Bob Dylan: Nobel laureate
From: keberoxu
Date: 26 Oct 16 - 07:16 PM

The dogs bark, and yet the caravan moves on....


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Subject: RE: Bob Dylan: Nobel laureate
From: Andy7
Date: 26 Oct 16 - 05:14 PM

Here's an amusing Dylan/Nobel clip from a BBC radio comedy about the forthcoming US election (listen from 09:00):

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b07z7290


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Subject: RE: Bob Dylan: Nobel laureate
From: The Sandman
Date: 26 Oct 16 - 04:44 PM

Dave please explain who is supposed to be stoning people when they are playing their guitar or riding in their car or all the other places, and are you in agreement with the idea that everybody must get out of their head on drugs?.


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Subject: RE: Bob Dylan: Nobel laureate
From: The Sandman
Date: 26 Oct 16 - 04:30 PM

Well, they'll stone ya when you're trying to be so good
They'll stone ya just a-like they said they would
They'll stone ya when you're tryin' to go home
Then they'll stone ya when you're there all alone
But I would not feel so all alone
Everybody must get stoned.
Well, they'll stone ya when you're walkin' 'long the street
They'll stone ya when you're tryin' to keep your seat
They'll stone ya when you're walkin' on the floor
They'll stone ya when you're walkin' to the door
But I would not feel so all alone
Everybody must get stoned.
They'll stone ya when you're at the breakfast table
They'll stone ya when you are young and able
They'll stone ya when you're tryin' to make a buck
They'll stone ya and then they'll say "good luck"
Tell ya what, I would not feel so all alone
Everybody must get stoned.
Well, They'll stone you and say that it's the end
Then they'll stone you and then they'll come back again
They'll stone you when you're riding in your car
They'll stone you when you're playing your guitar
Yes, but I would not feel so all alone
Everybody must get stoned.
Well, they'll stone you when you walk all alone
They'll stone you when you are walking home
They'll stone you and then say you are brave
They'll stone you when you are set down in your grave
But I would not feel so all alone
Everybody must get stoned.
You think this is a great song?


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Subject: RE: Bob Dylan: Nobel laureate
From: GUEST
Date: 26 Oct 16 - 03:03 PM

They say princes learn no art truly, but the art of horsemanship. The reason is, the brave beast is no flatterer. He will throw a prince as soon as his groom.


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Subject: RE: Bob Dylan: Nobel laureate
From: Dave Sutherland
Date: 26 Oct 16 - 08:35 AM

Jim – you do realise that some of us are aware of who Jack Speedwell was and therefore we are acutely aware of his feelings towards Bob Dylan. Jack Speedwell's alter ego took plenty opportunity to use existing tunes to fit his own words – and no problem with that; but to focus on what was one of Dylan's very early works, which didn't feature on a major album, but seemed to make up the residue of his written work during that youthful period is unnecessary in the extreme. The same way as the present detractors have focussed on "Wiggle, Wiggle" probably his worst ever song which opens one of his worst albums. How have they missed "Rainy Day Women"? In various publications of the day there are songs by Jack Speedwell's alter ego and his friends that don't quite match his great works. BTW well said Will; do they also "get" Picasso, Pharaoh Sanders, Roy Harper, and Miles Davis??


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Subject: RE: Bob Dylan: Nobel laureate
From: GUEST,pauperback
Date: 26 Oct 16 - 05:00 AM

I think that Italian cat Beethoven had a shack there


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Subject: RE: Bob Dylan: Nobel laureate
From: GUEST,pauperback
Date: 26 Oct 16 - 04:56 AM

Frisco Californ - the beat town, ever heard of it?


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Subject: RE: Bob Dylan: Nobel laureate
From: Will Fly
Date: 26 Oct 16 - 04:26 AM

Steve (and others)- out of curiosity, what do you make of Joyce, particularly "Ulysses" and "Finnegan's Wake"? I've had a crack at "Ulysses" no less than three times over the years, but rarely got beyond half a dozen pages. Now, I've read that the best way to understand the book is to just let the words flow in one continuous rhythm - without a conscious attempt at understanding - and let the ideas wash into your mind. Doesn't particularly work for me, but I get the idea. So I fail the Joyce test.

Apparently "Finnegan's Wake" is one of the most famous, unread books of all time - perfect for a Nobel Prize, wouldn't you say?


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Subject: RE: Bob Dylan: Nobel laureate
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 25 Oct 16 - 07:18 PM

"maybe Jim and other folks who don't like Dylan. "
It really isn't a matter of liking or disliking him - I dislike lots of music and lots of singers, but that's down to my taste - not what they are providing for their fans.
I tried to like Dylan so hard in the early days - I really did - if, for no other reason than the fact that all my mates did.
Nothing - chewing gum you chewed on for a bit which, after a short time, lost its taste - like the bit Tommy Steele stuck on his bedpost overnight.
I worked hard at trying to understand what he did and after several years, came to the conclusion that it was totally pretentious - as phony as the guff spouted by wine buffs.
My opinion was vindicate by his own confession that what he wrote had no meaning.
It really would help here if one of his fans addressed what he had to say about his work.
I was very taken by what I believe to be a brilliant anonymous piece of satire on Dylan which appeared in one of the better folk magazines of the 1960s.
It reflects Dylan's work when he was regarded as a folk singer – another of those strange anomalies is that, while he got to the point where he openly moved from Folk to Pop, and said as much when he wrote:
"Strike another match, go start anew
And it's all over now, baby blue"
His fans never did and continued to argue for him being "folk", which he had openly rejected.
I believe this did a great deal of damage to real folk music – damage it never really recovered from in Britain and the U.S.
Jim Carroll

Speedwell's confessions cont.
I discover Bobbie Dylan's secret
Jack Speedwell.
Jack Speedwell, disguised as a down-at-heel literary man and rogue journalist, haunts the purlieus of the British folk scene.
Originally a foundling, Speedwell was brought up and educated by lay-brothers attached to an obscure sect of Jehosophart's Wetnoses. By training and temperament he was destined to spend his life writing inoffensive squibs for Song and Dance, organ of the EFDSS. Captured by sinister Chinese agents, he is subjected to prolonged brainwashing and then let loose upon the unsuspecting world of the folk revival. There, carrying out the post-hypnotic commands of his erstwhile captors, he embarks upon the foul task of filtering the poison of ideas into the atmosphere of love and togetherness which surrounds the revival. One of the main targets for his hatred is the boy-genius, B. Dylan. Speedwell never questions the blind forces which urge him on to destroy the public image of this brilliant youth until one day he reads a review written by the famous seminarist, the Reverend Sydney Carter, D.D. and, as a result, his mind is restored to its former balance. Horrified by the realisation of the damage which his evil criticism must have wrought upon virgin minds, Speedwell determines to make amends by publicly confessing his sins.   NOW READ ON:

Consider this couplet from God on your side:

Though they murdered 6 million, in the ovens they fried,
The Germans now too have God on their side,

The tremendous sweep of this couplet, with the extraordinary simplicity of the diction, cannot he matched outside of McGonigal's immortal poem on The Tay Bridge Disaster:

So the train mov'd slowly along the Bridge of Tay
Until it was about mid-day,
Then the central girders with a crash gave way,
And down went the train and passengers into the Tay.

The Storm-fiend did loudly bray
Because ninety lives had been taken away,
On the last Sabbath Day of 1879,
Which will be remembered for a very long time.

Note the way that both these masters make use of the evocative phrase. What could he more stirring than the frying image in Bobby's poem? Everyone in these islands who has ever queued for fish-and-chips and idly read the frying schedule above the great pans will he moved by it.
But Bobby's tremendous craftmanship is seen at its best in Fare thee well, my own true love; the song on which The Leaving of Liverpool was based. The opening stanza is a model of economy:

Oh, it's fare thee well, my darlin' true,
I'm a-leavin' in the first hour of the morn;
I'm off for the Bay of Mexico,
Or maybe the coast of Californ.

The omission of the final "i-a, is a touch of genius, and by effecting it, Bobby Dylan has opened up the road to a completely new and simplified rhyming system.
Just think of its immense possibilities when applied to British place-names; for example:

Do not weep for me, my dear,
For soon 1'll be returning;
By tomorrow afternoon
I'11 be back with you in Birming.

Again:
Goodbye, old girl, I'm leavin' you,
It's back to my old ranch;
Soon I'll be in Calif
Leaving you in Manch.
Or:
Mother, mother, I am hungry,
What is on the shelf?
Alas, dear daughter, times are hard
Now we are in Belf.

It is equally effective in other metrical forms, such, as:

Aberd, Aberd,
Prettiest place I ever heard.

In the second stanza of Fare thee well, Bobby introduces yet another brilliant literary innovation in the phrase:

I'm a'travellin' on a path-beaten trail.

"Path-beaten trail" -what tremendous possibilities are opened up by this kind of usage. For example:

0, my dearest darling, pity my achin' feet
As I proceed upon my way, down the roady street.

Or:
One day I will come back to you,
Along the streety avenue.

These examples by no means exhaust Bobby's amazing ingenuity, there are similar revolutionary ideas of composition to he found throughout all his work; British songwriters would do well to study them.
There! I feel better for having written that. It is as if a great burden had been removed from my shoulders and it is my fervent hope that my humble words will have the effect of wiping out all those dreadful things I once wrote about Bobby. Soon I will he completely cleansed of all my uncharitable tendencies for, in the near future, I intend to make restitution to Joanie, too. Yes, Joanie-pony, one day I will he worthy of you and people will point at me and say "There goes the most amiable fellow in the world."

Folk Music magazine; Vol. 1 No 10. 1964


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Subject: RE: Bob Dylan: Nobel laureate
From: GUEST,nock
Date: 25 Oct 16 - 07:08 PM

thanks steve. he's just not there.


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