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BS: Fish recipes

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Max Johnson 28 Sep 11 - 07:38 AM
lefthanded guitar 27 Sep 11 - 12:32 PM
gnu 26 Sep 11 - 04:00 PM
kendall 26 Sep 11 - 03:29 PM
gnu 26 Sep 11 - 02:00 PM
JohnInKansas 25 Sep 11 - 03:40 PM
gnu 25 Sep 11 - 07:13 AM
GUEST,kendall 25 Sep 11 - 06:45 AM
Mrrzy 24 Sep 11 - 07:41 PM
gnu 24 Sep 11 - 01:41 PM
JohnInKansas 23 Sep 11 - 08:43 PM
GUEST,Dani 23 Sep 11 - 08:18 PM
Mrrzy 23 Sep 11 - 04:13 PM
gnu 23 Sep 11 - 11:47 AM
MMario 22 Sep 11 - 07:51 PM
kendall 22 Sep 11 - 07:50 PM
jacqui.c 22 Sep 11 - 07:32 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 22 Sep 11 - 07:05 PM
gnu 22 Sep 11 - 05:44 PM
kendall 22 Sep 11 - 04:32 PM
Max Johnson 22 Sep 11 - 12:43 PM
gnu 22 Sep 11 - 12:40 PM
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Subject: RE: BS: Fish recipes
From: Max Johnson
Date: 28 Sep 11 - 07:38 AM

Hi LG.

I can't remember where I read about Dover Sole's flavour 'improving' over a day or two. Also, I've never kept it that long, so can't expand - I just thought it was interesting.
Dover Sole is generally reckoned to have the best flavour of all soles, although the only other sort I've had is Lemon Sole. If I were you I'd definitely try it - what's to lose?
According to the fishmonger's daughter (!) Dover Sole has a short season here because the bay is shallow and the soles don't like the cold water which runs off from the lake district hills when it rains.

The fishmonger's is now is one of only two Morecambe boats still netting brown shrimps in the bay, most of which are cooked in a huge kettle on board immediately they come out of the sea. Potted cold with butter and mace, 'Morecambe Bay Potted Shrimps' are a delicacy in the UK - better than caviare and twice as expensive, but they're reasonably priced bought as loose shrimp in the town. I prefer my own recipe, which is:

Fry the shrimps gently for 1 minute in butter with finely chopped red chilli.
Spoon them onto a lettuce leaf.
Add a little salt and white pepper.
Magic.


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish recipes
From: lefthanded guitar
Date: 27 Sep 11 - 12:32 PM

Belated reply to Max Johnson.

I don't know if Letterman is available in the UK, he's a talk show host in the vein of (the late lamented much beloved) Johnny Carson - he has a scathing wit, great guests, and his humor is also often absurd, unexpected and hilarious. He also has jmho the best musical guests of any network talk show. Ranging from the likes of Cee Lo Green to Steve Earle to Emmy Lou Harris. Wide variety, but all top of the line talent.

And along with what you said, he and the chef made a point of saying the Dover sole is expensive and not always available.The chef seemed to feel that Dover was the only right fish for this-but I've looked here for weeks and can't find it. I think I'll try the lemon sole since I never see the Dover here. I think the almonds will be a nice touch. Didn't know it was a classic recipe. Lucky you to have your own private fishmonger

When you say the flavor develops a flavor over time- do you mean it gets 'deeper' or fisher? I don't like fishy fish. I'm with you tho, as far as saving it in the fridge...brrr....perish the thought...I make the fish the minute I get it home.


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish recipes
From: gnu
Date: 26 Sep 11 - 04:00 PM

Nah... fact is, two of the fish guys... I chat them up, tell them dirty jokes, always leave em laughing. The weekend kid was there when I bought the scruff. But, I know HE didn't package it. I'll let one package go on accounta when I ask these guys about the seafood, they are honest with me. They even tell me when they are gettin good deals in and when to buy. Thery treat me pretty good and I don't wanna piss THEM off over $6. Another $6 and we'll talk... but not in public. I wouldn't cut off my claw to spite my tail eh?


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish recipes
From: kendall
Date: 26 Sep 11 - 03:29 PM

False advertising. Put it on Facebook.


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish recipes
From: gnu
Date: 26 Sep 11 - 02:00 PM

Buddy, I am 20 minutes from salt water. I gets me seafood fresh. The problem I had this time was that the fish guy in the grocery chainstore cut up fish that was at least three days old and sold it as fresh in a plastic package. I am STILL pissed off.


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish recipes
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 25 Sep 11 - 03:40 PM

If you live in Kansas you are not going to get fresh Haddock, sole, flounder or Salmon

If you get salmon, it was likely caught on a small boat that spends one to three or four days out, with one day's worth of ice on board when it leaves port to start fishing. By the time it gets back to the market dock, the catch has laid in a hot hold for a couple of days, and doesn't even see a refrigerator for up to a week.

Local markets for other fish, where people claim to get "fresh fish" are generally similar.

In Kansas, the deep sea fish are caught by large "industrial complex" fishing machines with onboard ice-makers, dumped onto ice within moments of being caught, and usually frozen within a very short time after being brought on board. They may be briefly thawed for processing and packaging, but then are immediately re-frozen and remain well cared-for all the way to the market. Most is sold frozen, but even if thawed for sale as "fresh fish" it's thawed "on ice" and kept refrigerated in the display case.

It's hard to make a case for who gets the freshest fish.

Of course most of the catfish is locally farmed, or comes from farms within half the distance the local coastal fish boats go to get in and out of port. The catfish at the market is arguably fresher than what you might catch for yourself and bring home in the beer cooler from the boat.

For the "local market" fishing industry "fresh" is a euphemism for "it won't stink much if you rinse it off good;" but of course a lot of people here like "imported beers" whose distinctive "imported flavor" is really just the "stale beer" edge, so who's to argue.

John


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish recipes
From: gnu
Date: 25 Sep 11 - 07:13 AM

How true Kendall. Friday, I thawed two lovely salmon tail fillets I had bought (I bought 4 packages at a very good price and froze 3 - they are okay if you use them within two months). Upon opening the package, I could smell them. The one on the bottom, not entirely visible in the package, was slightly discoloured at the base. The "packaged date" was the day before I bought them but they HAD to be several days old. They went in the garbage. If the next package smells like fish, it'll be going back to the store.


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish recipes
From: GUEST,kendall
Date: 25 Sep 11 - 06:45 AM

I've heard a few people say they don't like fish. That's like saying they don't like wine. Which fish? which wine?

I think the problem there is that they have never had FRESH fish. Fresh fish does not smell like fish. If you live in Kansas you are not going to get fresh Haddock, sole, flounder or Salmon. It's like Guinness, it doesn't travel well.


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish recipes
From: Mrrzy
Date: 24 Sep 11 - 07:41 PM

One lesson: if they say Rest it on paper towels to remove the moisture, don't skip that step.

The fish burgers *eventually* fried, but it wasn't crispy.


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish recipes
From: gnu
Date: 24 Sep 11 - 01:41 PM

BTW... I don't use any herbs with my breaded fried haddock, which is this eve's repast. What herbs do you use jac?


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish recipes
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 23 Sep 11 - 08:43 PM

Asian Carp tacos?

The article emphasises the difficulty of getting people to eat a repulsive fish like carp, however I've found the smaller fresh water carp here quite tasty. Complaints about the many small bones are included in the articls, although the bone numbers and structures are almost identical to the cult-fish salmon, which is an oily, nasty tasting trash fish whose only difference from carp is a slightly less vegetarian diet.

giggle - giggle - tee hee

John


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish recipes
From: GUEST,Dani
Date: 23 Sep 11 - 08:18 PM

Jacqui, don't they call that 'Manhattan-style'? Not sure why...

It sounds delicious, except for the nasty squid.

I can vouch for Kendall's chowder!

Dani


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish recipes
From: Mrrzy
Date: 23 Sep 11 - 04:13 PM

Fish in oven with lemon and tomato slices, a little oil, yum.

Also in toaster oven if you're one eater.

All fish any time. Squid in its own ink was good in Catalonia...


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish recipes
From: gnu
Date: 23 Sep 11 - 11:47 AM

jac... "I fry haddock in canola oil having coated it in breadcrumbs with herbs, no egg."

Me too and it's deeelicious.


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish recipes
From: MMario
Date: 22 Sep 11 - 07:51 PM

jacqui that sounds delicious....

I basically take fish any way I can get it.


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish recipes
From: kendall
Date: 22 Sep 11 - 07:50 PM

Squid. yuk. a fishy tasting catheter.


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish recipes
From: jacqui.c
Date: 22 Sep 11 - 07:32 PM

I make a good seafood stew, although Kendall doesn't like it. (More for me). I just take what fish and shellfish I can find, generally haddock, shrimp, scallops and squid tentacles and slowly cook them with tinned crushed tomatoes, garlic and herbs. i occasionally get a piece of monkfish to add to the mix.

I fry haddock in canola oil having coated it in breadcrumbs with herbs, no egg. There's never any left but we do have access to very fresh fish.

Kendall's salmon is wonderful - I wouldn't even try to take that job away from him.


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish recipes
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 22 Sep 11 - 07:05 PM

Looking at the decreasing fish yields from the oceans, it is time to confine ourselves to farmed fish.


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish recipes
From: gnu
Date: 22 Sep 11 - 05:44 PM

LEOMN JUICE? LEMON JUICE? BLASPHEMY!!!!!! The King needs no spice of any kind.

"My specialty is seafood chowder."

Right then... spit it out. If it's YOUR specialty, *I* want YOUR recipe. I make a mean seafood chowhhdah, but I'd bet money yours is a wee tad better.

Having said that, I couldn't give you my recipe... it just happens.


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish recipes
From: kendall
Date: 22 Sep 11 - 04:32 PM

Mackerel and Tuna are related. In fact, in this part of the world, Tuna are called Horse Mackerel. Mackerel are abundant here in the summer. Jacqui just came home with two cans of Mackerel from CHINA! I hope no one we know saw her buy them.She could be deported.

Salmon is indeed the king of fishes. I get to do the cooking on Salmon day.
Simply place a Salmon fillet or Salmon steaks on a sheet of parchment in a pan, mix some butter and lemon juice, melted, pour it over the fish, add a some pepper and broil for about 20 minutes.
Steaks require turning after about 10 minutes.

My specialty is seafood chowder.


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish recipes
From: Max Johnson
Date: 22 Sep 11 - 12:43 PM

Hi - I'm not familiar with Letterman, not sure if it's shown in the UK? But Sole a la Meuniere is a classic, so it won't change much. The almonds are bling, but so is my suggestion of preserved lemon. It works because it's simple and the main thing is to get the brown butter right.

I imagine any flatfish might work although it might be a waste of Turbot, but Dover Sole is generally considered to be the best - and very expensive. I'm lucky in that our nearest fishmonger in Morecambe has his own boat, but the soles that I buy are smaller than those that a restaurant might sell (if they can get them).
Interestingly (no, really!), Dover Sole is apparently one of the few fish in which the flavour will develop over 24 hours, so best not to eat it absolutely fresh. I confess that I've never kept one till the next day.


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish recipes
From: gnu
Date: 22 Sep 11 - 12:40 PM

Atlantic Canada sole flesh is snow white. Suitable?


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish recipes
From: Penny S.
Date: 22 Sep 11 - 12:28 PM

I think lemon sole would be OK. don't know the gray sort. (Lemon is the name of a sand bank, I think.)

Penny


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish recipes
From: lefthanded guitar
Date: 22 Sep 11 - 11:29 AM

Max, I saw that exact recipe on, of all places, Letterman* where a renowned NYC chef(whose name I naturally forgot) was doing a cooking segment.It looked mouthwatering. Only difference is they added slivered almonds to the butter- I'd like to try this but I don't see Dover sole around, just lemon or gray. Would that work?


*Dave decided to wear the fish as a tie (lmao) before he put it in the pan- but I don't think that's necessary to the recipe. ;)


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish recipes
From: Max Johnson
Date: 16 Sep 11 - 05:54 AM

Dover Sole only has a short season locally, but I like Dover Sole a la Meuniere, which sounds flashy, but isn't. In fact, you can hardly call it a recipe:

Take a skinned Dover Sole and brush it on top with melted butter.
Dip it in plain, well seasoned flour on both sides. (A Meuniere is a lady miller).
Pat it so that it's only lightly coated.
Grill it (or fry it).
Pour over browned butter. (Butter heated in a pan and starting to go brown. If it's gone black, it's buggered).
Squeeze of lemon juice and serve immediately.

Good with fried potato and a green salad.

This is particularly good with slivers of preserved lemon, which goes with fish, chicken, North African dishes and is expensive to buy and very simple and cheap to make.


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish recipes
From: Monique
Date: 16 Sep 11 - 04:36 AM

Easy made tuna or salmon pie for a picnic (or as a main dish with a salad)
Mix a tuna or salmon can (can be done with previously cooked fresh fish but it would be a shame to use fresh fish this way IMO) with crème fraîche or sour cream (not half and half, it'd be too watery), add salt and a good amount of pepper. Line a tart pan with pie crust, spread Dijon mustard so you have a thin layer of it, pour the mixture, sprinkle with grated cheese and bake at medium heat for 25/30min


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish recipes
From: Ed T
Date: 15 Sep 11 - 07:39 PM

Why not mackerel?

Mackerel-japanese

more mackerel



the beautiful, fast and healthy mackerel


Lovely mackerel



Korean grilled mackerel

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Subject: RE: BS: Fish recipes
From: GUEST,Dani
Date: 15 Sep 11 - 07:07 PM

Not being a huge fennel fan, I was surprised I loved this when I cooked it by accident. I think cod would be perfect:

preheat oven to pretty damn hot
take a couple of fresh fennel bulbs, cut some pretty fronds off and set aside
slice up the bulbs and remaining fronds and spread them in a baking dish
lay the fish on the fennel, sprinkle with a little salt and pepper
slice up an orange, juice another
pour the juice over the fish, then layer the slices pretty on top
maybe add a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil if you want, but not necessary
roast until it's flaky... won't take long

Dani


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish recipes
From: gnu
Date: 15 Sep 11 - 02:41 PM

I learned this recipe first hand from a fine chef in Flat Bay Brook, Newfoundland.

Land one Brilliant Salmon and beat the nose in unmercifully until the wardens can't measure it to prove it's not a grilse. Jump in the pickup truck with the unconnected tag through the gills and the guy riding shotgun ready to connect the tag if the wardens show up. Honk the horn as you pull into the yard so the wife knows you need her RFN so she can get the salmon cut up into two inch chunks and into the stew pot with the salt beef, spuds, turnip, carrots, onions, whatever, REAL quick. Simmer boil 20 minutes.

Best tasting salmon ever.


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish recipes
From: lefthanded guitar
Date: 15 Sep 11 - 01:20 PM

I may have posted this before but it's the only way I'll make salmon now.

Make a marinade from:
Sesame oil
Garlic cloves
Parsley
Soy sauce
Honey or maple syrup (I've even substituted brown sugar)

Pour the marinade over the salmon and store in fridge in a pan or zip lock; and let baste for several hours, overnight if possible.

I have used NON hydrogenated margerine (like Olivio) for the sesame oil, and left out the parsley. Amounts you ask?? Just use your judgment. Blame it on both my grandmas and my ma- no one in our family bothered to measure anything. ;D

Cook til done at about 400 degrees, baste occasionally. I like my fish WELL done and this recipe works for that.


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish recipes
From: Penny S.
Date: 15 Sep 11 - 03:08 AM

I haven't seen finnan haddie for years. But big herring have just turned up in the supermarket, so I've been eating soused herring for a week. I got the shop to scale and fillet the fish.

Put a bay leaf and half a slice of onion on the tail end of each fillet, and roll it up, securing with a couple of cocktail sticks. Put in an ovenproof dish, sprinkle with pickling spices and cover with a mix of half malt vinegar, half water. Cook at 180 degrees C for about 30 minutes. Cool and keep in the fridge for up to a week. (Actually, I slow cooked mine.) Have the windows open. The entire house smells of vinegar.

Eat with salad - watercress is good - mashed up on toast works too.

Penny


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish recipes
From: Deckman
Date: 06 Sep 11 - 11:25 PM

Speaking of fish ... we were as I recall? This morning at 6:00, I was standing on the Mukilteo beach watching the Humpies (that's a brand of salmon folks) jumping 20 feet in front of me. I hooked and lost two. Then 40 feet in front of me, rose a huge 300 pound sea lion, with a salmon in his mouth. I yelled at him and he gave me the flipper. Oh well ... maybe tomorrow morning will be better! bob (deckman)nelson


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish recipes
From: Beer
Date: 06 Sep 11 - 11:00 PM

There are some great great recipes being posted. Following the thread closely.
ad.


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish recipes
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 06 Sep 11 - 09:18 PM

Regarding scaling of fish, I never ran into the problem much early on since the only fish considered edible around my area was catfish, and you skin them.

When a few of us found out that carp are actually pretty good, most people scaled them, but I found that they're among the fish for which "flavorful elements" are contained in the skin, and a better (to my taste) flavor resulted by skinning rather than just scaling.

If you really like a little "fishy aftertaste" scaling is okay even for carp. The amount of flavor difference varies with the kind of fish.

The small "unconnected" bones in carp are pretty much identical to those in salmon, so recipes are mostly kind of interchangeable, although I haven't known any rabid advocates of smoked carp. (If you smoke 'em right all you taste is the smoke, so it doesn't much matter what roadkill you use.)

Almost any fish that's "filleted" will have "meat only" since with a good fillet knife you can run down the spine and then flop it over using the last bit of skin for a "hinge" and then run back inside the skin to get the "clean meat." Several fish I've encountered have a rather "tender skin" that doesn't strip off by pulling on it, but the fillet knife will "follow the skin" even on those if you want it removed.

If you can see, or feel, scales, you'll generally want to scrape them off. Whether to leave the skin depends on your taste in flavoring for most fish. For fish that otherwise need scaling, filleting to remove both the big bones and the skin at the same time (and avoid the scaling step entirely) is the quickest way to clean 'em.

Since catfish aren't flat much of anywhere, a fillet knife doesn't work well on them, so it's still back to the square-nosed pliers and some pickin' and yankin' to strip the skin off. Fortunately the skin on most 'cats is tough enough to peel off by pullin' on one end of whatever comes loose first (not quite as easy as a fat rabbit, but lots easier than for squirrels).

People around here used to ask "do you scale 'em or skin 'em" about armadillos, but I've always considered that one a bad joke. Since we heard recently that a fair number of people actually do eat them, I'm not so sure; but I very much doubt I'm ever gonna need an answer.

John


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish recipes
From: gnu
Date: 06 Sep 11 - 08:58 PM

No recipe... just wanted to freeresh this one. I am sure there are more recipes to come.


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish recipes
From: Ed T
Date: 05 Sep 11 - 09:54 PM

I prefer fish cakes made with dried salt fish (soaked to remove the salt, because I like the flavour. But< I suspect fresh cod, addock or another non oily fish could be used with a somewhat similar result.

A good fish cake recipe


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish recipes
From: Bobert
Date: 05 Sep 11 - 08:54 PM

Thankx, ClaireBear, the recipe sounds great... Pass on the country line dancing, tho...

B;~)


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish recipes
From: gnu
Date: 05 Sep 11 - 07:04 PM

Here is the first blurb from the first site that came up when I put my googles on Joe.... "Salmon skin is in fact edible, although it may not be terribly exciting, depending on how the salmon was prepared. The scales of salmon are not edible, however, so if you plan to eat the skin of salmon you are preparing, make sure that it is well scaled. While the scales will not kill you, they can cut your mouth or become lodged in your throat, causing extreme discomfort."

Take that about ten feet further into your intestines... even at your young age. OWWWWWW!!!

I have eaten unscaled salmon but I shant discuss the drunken circumstances. I am fine, thanks for asking. But, I scale mine completely and LOVE the skin. It's dEEElicious.


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish recipes
From: Joe Offer
Date: 05 Sep 11 - 06:32 PM

Hi, gnu-
I suspect that my supermarket fish department scales all the fish they sell, which is why I didn't know they needed scaling.

-Joe-


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish recipes
From: Deckman
Date: 05 Sep 11 - 06:19 PM

The very best part of kalakeille , fish head stew, is the eyeballs. The old timers compete for them ... they steal them out of other people's bowls ... true story. (they're supposed to bring good luck ... and it's difficult NOT to vercook them as they're supposed to crunch when you eat thm). bob(deckman)nelson


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish recipes
From: gnu
Date: 05 Sep 11 - 06:05 PM

Joe... really? Most salt water fish, except some bottom feeders are scaled here. I wouldn't think of not scaling such if I was gonna feed it to anyone over 40 years old.

I LOVE the skin, but I would never serve it or eat it unscaled. Even to a young pup like you.


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish recipes
From: Deckman
Date: 05 Sep 11 - 06:01 PM

I have a bumper sticker on one of my guitar cases which says: "No One Can Prepare You For Your First Raw Oyster" ... no one has tried to steal my guitar since. bob(deckman)nelson


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish recipes
From: Bat Goddess
Date: 05 Sep 11 - 05:09 PM

Tom does an incredible creamed finnan haddie. (Which includes a wee drop of a smoky single malt.) Alas, we can't get finnan haddie as readily as we used to. I am soooooo hungry for kedgeree!

Linn


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish recipes
From: Joe Offer
Date: 05 Sep 11 - 04:38 PM

I didn't know about scaling salmon, gnu. I thought they had digestible scales. This page says it's not necessary to scale salmon, but it doesn't say whether the scales are edible. This page is more interesting, and seems to indicate that it's better if fish are scaled.
I guess my supermarket (or their supplier) must scale their fish when they fillet them, because I've never had a problem. By the way, I get excellent fish at Raley's Supermarkets in Sacramento, and my parents get great fish as Publix markets in Florida. You wouldn't think a supermarket would be a good place to buy fish, but my (late) mom said that Publix sold such a huge volume of fish that it was always fresh. Makes sense.

-Joe-


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish recipes
From: gnu
Date: 05 Sep 11 - 03:10 PM

From the web...

HADDOCK BUBBLY BAKE
2 lbs. of white haddock fillets
1 can cream of mushroom soup
1 onion sliced
1 cup grated mozzarella or cheddar cheese
Lay haddock fillets in bottom of glass oven proof dish. Cover with sliced onions.
Spread can of cream of mushroom soup over all.
Lastly, spread grated cheese over it all.
Bake in preheated 350 oven for about 40 minutes until fish is done. (You'll be able to tell it's done when fish separates into flakes easily.)
This is an old time Nova Scotia (Canada Recipe)

I cook this for 40 minutes, THEN add the cheese and cook for another 20 minutes with no cover. If I don't use cheese, which I don't as it's too much salt, I leave it covered and cook for one hour or until I see bubbles in the centre.

I love breaded fried (canola oil) haddock. I just use bread crumbs... no egg.


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish recipes
From: Beer
Date: 05 Sep 11 - 02:56 PM

Here is a very simple batter that I have been using for a while. Think I found it on the internet but not sure. Maybe a magazine. I also tried it a few weeks ago with clams deer fried. Just perfect.
ad.

1 cup of all purpose flour
1/2 cup of milk
1/2 cup of water
1/4 cup of baking powder
1 teaspoon of salt

try it. I bet you will go back to it.


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish recipes
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 05 Sep 11 - 02:47 PM

Gnu, never counted the crackers, but 5 or 6. Not too many, or the dish is dry. This is a meal we make when we haven't got time to think about anything time-consuming, and we do it without a set recipe.
Can be served with any vegetable, or a salad (sliced carrots, red onion and tomato, lettuce Feta cheese, a little olive oil and salt to taste- our usual with most meals).


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish recipes
From: GUEST,leeneia
Date: 05 Sep 11 - 02:23 PM

Thanks for the info and recipes, everybody.

John, if the phillipines are like other places where people have proliferated, there is probably some kind of feral creature which will serve as crocodile food. Pigs come to mind.

Where my sister-in-law lives, it's deer. Deer in the gardens, deer in the driveways, deer on the roads...


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish recipes
From: gnu
Date: 05 Sep 11 - 02:15 PM

Q.... what quantity of Breton crackers?


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish recipes
From: gnu
Date: 05 Sep 11 - 01:12 PM

Q... sounds like another one I shall be trying.

JiK... that is one BIG sallymander! Crocodile Dundee himslef would crap his pants if that rig came outta nowhere.


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