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BS: Language Pet Peeves

Bill D 05 Oct 10 - 05:04 PM
Anne Lister 05 Oct 10 - 05:04 PM
Bill D 05 Oct 10 - 05:19 PM
Steve Shaw 05 Oct 10 - 06:26 PM
Wesley S 05 Oct 10 - 06:48 PM
Bill D 05 Oct 10 - 06:53 PM
Ed T 05 Oct 10 - 08:07 PM
MGM·Lion 06 Oct 10 - 02:50 AM
John MacKenzie 06 Oct 10 - 04:18 AM
Anne Lister 06 Oct 10 - 04:19 AM
MGM·Lion 06 Oct 10 - 05:16 AM
Dave MacKenzie 06 Oct 10 - 06:35 AM
Black belt caterpillar wrestler 06 Oct 10 - 07:32 AM
DMcG 06 Oct 10 - 08:43 AM
Sarah the flute 06 Oct 10 - 08:44 AM
GUEST,leeneia 06 Oct 10 - 10:44 AM
GUEST,Patsy 07 Oct 10 - 09:36 AM
GUEST,greymaus 07 Oct 10 - 09:45 AM
Steve Shaw 07 Oct 10 - 10:01 AM
GUEST,leeneia 07 Oct 10 - 04:26 PM
Steve Shaw 07 Oct 10 - 05:30 PM
Crowhugger 07 Oct 10 - 06:04 PM
Mrrzy 22 May 19 - 12:06 PM
Mrrzy 22 May 19 - 12:06 PM
meself 22 May 19 - 12:42 PM
Donuel 22 May 19 - 01:14 PM
Joe Offer 22 May 19 - 02:22 PM
Thompson 22 May 19 - 02:52 PM
Jos 22 May 19 - 03:01 PM
Jos 22 May 19 - 03:05 PM
meself 22 May 19 - 03:08 PM
Mrrzy 22 May 19 - 03:28 PM
Nigel Parsons 22 May 19 - 03:50 PM
Nigel Parsons 22 May 19 - 04:00 PM
meself 22 May 19 - 05:17 PM
Steve Shaw 22 May 19 - 08:02 PM
Mrrzy 22 May 19 - 09:26 PM
meself 22 May 19 - 09:36 PM
Mrrzy 23 May 19 - 02:34 AM
Backwoodsman 23 May 19 - 02:51 AM
DMcG 23 May 19 - 05:07 AM
Donuel 23 May 19 - 06:10 AM
G-Force 23 May 19 - 06:33 AM
Mrrzy 23 May 19 - 11:23 AM
Steve Shaw 23 May 19 - 11:45 AM
leeneia 23 May 19 - 12:11 PM
Doug Chadwick 23 May 19 - 01:23 PM
Jos 23 May 19 - 01:42 PM
Steve Shaw 23 May 19 - 01:45 PM
Doug Chadwick 23 May 19 - 02:24 PM
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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Bill D
Date: 05 Oct 10 - 05:04 PM

Both my 'on-the-fly' spell checker and the one in my Opera browser allow ME to add words to their list, so I don't get 'beeped' at when I decide to type thru instead of through.

As to UK spelling vs. American...we in the colonies are fairly thrifty, and so many of our spellings are shorter....(leaving out that 'u' must save...oh...tons (not tonnes)..of printing ink and megabytes of HD space every year...


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Anne Lister
Date: 05 Oct 10 - 05:04 PM

I'm another wincer every time someone confuses few and less ... but the other irritant, which has me reaching for something to throw at the radio (which tends to be where I hear it most) is the phrase "mitigate against". Must be confusion with "militate against" but it makes no sense at all.
Oh, and the almost universal misuse of the phrase "beg the question".


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Bill D
Date: 05 Oct 10 - 05:19 PM

and.... it's **wreak havoc, not 'wreck' havoc.......arrrggghhhhh

(you want fun? Ask folks to provide the present tense of 'wrought'.
The are 2, depending on whether it's about God or material ...(wrought iron)


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 05 Oct 10 - 06:26 PM

Gosh yes, beg the question. Awful. Unfortunately, the sense in which it is now commonly used, to raise the question (why can't people just say that!), is so prevalent that it is now recognised as acceptable by certain authorities. Degradation rules OK...


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Wesley S
Date: 05 Oct 10 - 06:48 PM

Any establishment that offers "homemade" food. Unless the person who made the apple pie lives there it's not "homemade".


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Bill D
Date: 05 Oct 10 - 06:53 PM

affect & effect....if you do not know the difference, please look it up. Like insure & ensure,it is NOT irrelevant.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Ed T
Date: 05 Oct 10 - 08:07 PM

Stores that advertise fresh products....only to find they were "previously frozen", or "freshened", whatever that means. Fresh does not mean anything anymore?


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: MGM·Lion
Date: 06 Oct 10 - 02:50 AM

The use of "anyone?" ~~ as in, "Let's have a thread about language. Pet-peeves, anyone?"

~Michael~


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: John MacKenzie
Date: 06 Oct 10 - 04:18 AM

The café across the way from me, has paninis on the menu !!!!

Man went to see his doctor. He said, "Doctor, I've got a 'orrible 'eadache"
The doctor said, "I suggest you take a couple of aspirates"


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Anne Lister
Date: 06 Oct 10 - 04:19 AM

Now you've got me started ... "Sea change"/ "Step change".
Sea change must have started with Ariel's song in The Tempest but what it has to do with change generally I don't know, but now we also have "step change". Surely it's all just changes? Permanent changes, transient changes, small changes ...


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: MGM·Lion
Date: 06 Oct 10 - 05:16 AM

Indeed, Ariel's 'sea change' in The Tempest has been greatly misunderstood and over-interpreted to mean 'a profound change'.

No such thing. In its context in the play, it simply means 'a change into something connected with the sea': as Ferdinand's father lies "full fathom five", Ariel sings, his bones are turned to coral, his eyes to pearls, and everything else about him suffers a similar 'sea change'. But the phrase sounds sorta romantic, don't it eh?; so has been over-defined to death.

~Michael~


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Dave MacKenzie
Date: 06 Oct 10 - 06:35 AM

I get annoyed by "fresh" milk, that's been pasteurised and homogenised. If had fresh milk and it's had nothing done to it, and probably still warm.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Black belt caterpillar wrestler
Date: 06 Oct 10 - 07:32 AM

People who say "decayed"(sic) when they mean "decade".

It's a noun so the stress is on the first syllable (very few exceptions in English). Other words that get mangled in the same way include "project" which often gets incorrectly pronounced the same way as the verb "to project" with the stress on the second syllable.

Rule of thumb: noun - stress first syllable, verb stress second syllable.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: DMcG
Date: 06 Oct 10 - 08:43 AM

Two of my favourites: "a quantum leap" - you mean we have made the smallest possible leap?

And an apostrophe one, such as I saw at the weekend "Coffee's and Teas"
If you can't decide whether there should be an apostrophe or not, at least have the courage to go one way or the other.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Sarah the flute
Date: 06 Oct 10 - 08:44 AM

My pet hates are....

Use of the word "There" by broadcasters. Why do they have to say at the end of the reporters piece ..."Fred Bloggs there" why not "Thankyou Fred Bloggs in Afghanistan" or wherever.

Use of the phrase "Give it up for....." Give what up ? Why not just say a round of applause for.

Weather forecasters using the phrase "as the day goes along" where is it going and along which route!!!

Sarah


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: GUEST,leeneia
Date: 06 Oct 10 - 10:44 AM

Something else about 'decade.' It's fuzzy and pretentious.

Why are journalists so in love with the word? They are supposed to get the facts.

So why do they write "Almost three decades have passed since Joe Blow was tried for the murder of Jim Dokes?" Why not say "Joe Blow was tried 28 years ago?" Even better, "in 1982."

That way, we know the reporter has checked the facts.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: GUEST,Patsy
Date: 07 Oct 10 - 09:36 AM

Adverts for special collections of CD'S in particular for a certain Rock compilation set and I wouldn't be surprised if the classic ones were similar. They insist that you can ONLY BUY IT HERE! surely that must be untrue when I know that I've had nearly every track on so many other compliations that I have either bought or have ever had bought for me. I think I must have about 5 or 6 albums with Boston's More than a Feeling and Free's Alright Now.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: GUEST,greymaus
Date: 07 Oct 10 - 09:45 AM

MY pet peeve? Everyone's apparent confusion when dealing with their/they're/there or whose/who's or your/you're.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 07 Oct 10 - 10:01 AM

"People who say "decayed"(sic) when they mean "decade"."

Misuse of Latin words or phrases, particularly where their use is superfluous. Omission of italics and square brackets where required.


Heheh. That's the beauty of threads like this. You gotta be so careful...


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: GUEST,leeneia
Date: 07 Oct 10 - 04:26 PM

"apparent confusion when dealing with their/they're/there or whose/who's or your/you're..."

I think most people understand these forms. Mistakes happen because people are typing fast.

John MacKenzie: I just got your joke about the aspirates.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 07 Oct 10 - 05:30 PM

"Adverts for special collections of CD'S"

Tee hee. Watch those damned apostrophe's now!


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Crowhugger
Date: 07 Oct 10 - 06:04 PM

Yes, Songbob, and there's even Canadian English option sometimes. It accepts labour and neighbour as correct, but also realize, digitize etc. And it won't object to the nouns pretence, defence and practice.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Mrrzy
Date: 22 May 19 - 12:06 PM

Ok:

There is no such thing as a stray bullet. It's not as if you left the door open and it got out.

NPR has started saying "in about 10 mn from now" -- pick one, people.

Merde alord I had several more in mind when I refreshed this thread.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Mrrzy
Date: 22 May 19 - 12:06 PM

(alors)


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: meself
Date: 22 May 19 - 12:42 PM

One that always irks me is the way the news media, at least in North America, use the noun 'suspect'. It originally meant, 'a person suspected of having committed a certain crime'; now it would seem to mean, 'a person who has definitely committed a certain crime but who has not yet been convicted in a court of law' - so you get reports such as, 'The suspect broke into the house and killed two people. Police arrested the suspect, John Smith, yesterday." Kinda defeats the purpose of using the term 'suspect', doesn't it?


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Donuel
Date: 22 May 19 - 01:14 PM

For a dyslexic there are no pet peeves with language. It is more like a painful aneurism. We have to give 400% effort 25% of the time just to be average.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Joe Offer
Date: 22 May 19 - 02:22 PM

What word would you suggest instead of "suspect," meself? Seems to me, that until a person is proved guilty, he/she is still a suspect and should not be assumed to be the perpetrator. That's why we have courts.
-Joe-


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Thompson
Date: 22 May 19 - 02:52 PM

Is there a rule that all American films (and it's beginning to infest others) must have the line "Listen up"?


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Jos
Date: 22 May 19 - 03:01 PM

So the report should say "The perpetrator broke into the house and killed two people. Police arrested the suspect ..."


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Jos
Date: 22 May 19 - 03:05 PM

... and as a contribution:

I am getting increasingly fed up with the use, in plays, soaps, and such like, of "Well good luck with that ...".


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: meself
Date: 22 May 19 - 03:08 PM

Exactly, Jos. (Did you read what I wrote, Joe?). The 'unknown' (or at least, unconvicted) perpetrator is the - wait for it - 'perpetrator' (or 'offender' or 'criminal'). The 'suspect' is the person suspected of having been the perp. As I say, if you are saying that the suspect committed the crime, you are saying that the suspect committed the crime - so it defeats the purpose of calling them the 'suspect', which would be presumably to allow for the presumption of innocence.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Mrrzy
Date: 22 May 19 - 03:28 PM

Law and Order does not punish the offenders, as they claim, boom boom, but the suspects.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Nigel Parsons
Date: 22 May 19 - 03:50 PM

Exactly, Jos. (Did you read what I wrote, Joe?). The 'unknown' (or at least, unconvicted) perpetrator is the - wait for it - 'perpetrator' (or 'offender' or 'criminal'). The 'suspect' is the person suspected of having been the perp. As I say, if you are saying that the suspect committed the crime, you are saying that the suspect committed the crime - so it defeats the purpose of calling them the 'suspect', which would be presumably to allow for the presumption of innocence.

If the 'suspect' is unconvicted, then it isn't reasonable to describe them as the 'perpetrator', as that has yet to be confirmed.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Nigel Parsons
Date: 22 May 19 - 04:00 PM

Going back even further:
"apparent confusion when dealing with their/they're/there or whose/who's or your/you're..."
I think most people understand these forms. Mistakes happen because people are typing fast.

NO! people don't type 'fast', they type quickly.
'Fast' is an adjective (he was a fast runner) not an adverb (he ran fast).
It may only be used as an adverb when given the meaning "firm" or "solid", as in to "stand fast" or to "hold fast". Biblically "He hath made the round world so fast that it cannot be moved"

Yes, I know the language moves on, but changing the meaning of words dilutes the ability to make clear, unambiguous comments.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: meself
Date: 22 May 19 - 05:17 PM

"If the 'suspect' is unconvicted, then it isn't reasonable to describe them as the 'perpetrator', as that has yet to be confirmed."


You're missing the point - which I realize I muddied with my parenthetical "(or at least, unconvicted)", but we don't have an 'edit' feature. The point is, if you say that a suspect broke in and killed somebody, and that John Smith is the suspect in question, you are saying that John Smith broke in and killed somebody. So much for 'presumption of innocence". It completely defeats the purpose of using the term 'suspect'. At the same time, you're saying, nonsensically, that whoever may have committed the murder is merely a 'suspect'. If, however, you say that a perpetrator/offender/assailant/criminal broke in and killed someone, and John Smith is the suspect, there is no confusion.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 22 May 19 - 08:02 PM

"Is there a rule that all American films (and it's beginning to infest others) must have the line "Listen up"?"

Dunno, but there does seem to be a rule that any rudely interrupted steamy sex scene in an American film betrays the fact that the woman is still wearing bra and knickers and the man is still wearing underpants...

Back to the topic...


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Mrrzy
Date: 22 May 19 - 09:26 PM

There is a lot of overuse of "alleged" too. If you're caught doing it you are no longer the alleged doer.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: meself
Date: 22 May 19 - 09:36 PM

Re: "Listen up!". These are among the first words spoken in The Revanant - set in the later 1700s. In fact, the expression has not been traced back to any earlier than 1930s, as far as I know.

Of course, the same movie gave us a fiddler playing Ragtime Annie - which has been traced all the way back to 1923, according to The Fiddler's Companion.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Mrrzy
Date: 23 May 19 - 02:34 AM

Oh, let's not start with movie anachronisms. In Amadeus, Mozart had an American accent that wouldn't develop for a century. (I didn't say let's not *continue* with the anachronisms...)


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Backwoodsman
Date: 23 May 19 - 02:51 AM

There seems to be a growing practice, among BBC presenters, to pronounce a leading ‘s’ as though it was followed by ‘h’ - so, ‘shtrong’, ‘shtudent’, ‘shchool’, etc.

Drives me nuts. Anyone else noticing it?


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: DMcG
Date: 23 May 19 - 05:07 AM

A growing one for me is statement as an adjective, as in a recent John Lewis advertisement for 'a statement sofa'. My sofa can keep its statements to itself, thank you. The only statement I am happy for it to make is that I like to sit down occasionally.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Donuel
Date: 23 May 19 - 06:10 AM

Mrzzy is not a suspect. He is a person of interest, in a good way.
bearded bruce is a 'person of interest' in a bad way.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: G-Force
Date: 23 May 19 - 06:33 AM

One that gets me here in the UK is the pronunciation of the 'oo' vowel sound. When I was growing up (in the South East anyway) it was like 'oooh', whereas now it is commonly like the French 'y' or the German 'u-umlaut' sound. So for example 'food' sounds more like 'feud'.
This seemed to start about 20 years ago with young females - perhaps they thought they were sounding sexy, I don't know. But now it has spread - you hear it all the time on TV.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Mrrzy
Date: 23 May 19 - 11:23 AM

Misuse of "after" as in They died after being hit by a train. No, they were killed by a train. If you survive for a while you can die after. If you die right then, it isn't after.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 23 May 19 - 11:45 AM

What about the tendency for young people to fail to open their mouths properly when enunciating a word such as "book," thereby rendering it "berk"...and altering the short "i" sound at the end of words to "ee" as in "monee" and "societee" and industree"... And politicians who say "...going forward" deserve to be twatted right on the nose!


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: leeneia
Date: 23 May 19 - 12:11 PM

Using definitive when definite is meant.
Unravel when untangle is meant.
"The next level" What is that supposed to be?


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Doug Chadwick
Date: 23 May 19 - 01:23 PM

...and altering the short "i" sound at the end of words to "ee" as in "monee" and "societee" and industree

But it IS "monee", "societee" and "industree", at least where I come from. I can't recall anyone saying "moni".

DC


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Jos
Date: 23 May 19 - 01:42 PM

'Misuse of "after" as in They died after being hit by a train'

The version of this (often heard in regional television news bulletins) thst worries me is: "They were killed after being hit by a car" - as if they were lying in the road in pain and somebody came along and finished them off.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 23 May 19 - 01:45 PM

I'm a northerner, Doug. We talk proper up yon.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Doug Chadwick
Date: 23 May 19 - 02:24 PM

I'm a northerner, Doug.

So am I.

DC


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