mudcat.org: BS: Language Pet Peeves
Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafeawe

Post to this Thread - Printer Friendly - Home
Page: [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6]


BS: Language Pet Peeves

leeneia 15 Jun 19 - 10:17 PM
Mrrzy 14 Jun 19 - 11:01 AM
Tattie Bogle 13 Jun 19 - 05:30 PM
Mrrzy 13 Jun 19 - 12:51 PM
Tattie Bogle 13 Jun 19 - 03:53 AM
Jos 11 Jun 19 - 12:25 PM
leeneia 11 Jun 19 - 10:58 AM
Mr Red 11 Jun 19 - 03:52 AM
leeneia 10 Jun 19 - 06:01 PM
weerover 10 Jun 19 - 10:17 AM
DMcG 10 Jun 19 - 09:06 AM
Mr Red 10 Jun 19 - 08:51 AM
JennieG 10 Jun 19 - 02:28 AM
Tattie Bogle 08 Jun 19 - 07:58 PM
Mrrzy 08 Jun 19 - 03:03 PM
Jos 08 Jun 19 - 06:45 AM
Steve Shaw 08 Jun 19 - 06:30 AM
Steve Shaw 08 Jun 19 - 06:24 AM
Steve Shaw 08 Jun 19 - 06:23 AM
Nigel Parsons 08 Jun 19 - 06:04 AM
lefthanded guitar 08 Jun 19 - 02:11 AM
SamStone 07 Jun 19 - 10:48 PM
Steve Shaw 07 Jun 19 - 07:19 PM
meself 07 Jun 19 - 11:18 AM
Mrrzy 07 Jun 19 - 10:09 AM
Mrrzy 04 Jun 19 - 10:47 AM
Steve Shaw 04 Jun 19 - 01:45 AM
Nigel Parsons 03 Jun 19 - 07:23 PM
JennieG 03 Jun 19 - 04:56 PM
Tattie Bogle 03 Jun 19 - 01:39 PM
Mrrzy 03 Jun 19 - 08:58 AM
Jos 03 Jun 19 - 07:41 AM
JennieG 03 Jun 19 - 07:31 AM
Mrrzy 02 Jun 19 - 07:37 PM
Tattie Bogle 02 Jun 19 - 06:41 PM
Mr Red 02 Jun 19 - 10:47 AM
Mrrzy 02 Jun 19 - 08:15 AM
Doug Chadwick 02 Jun 19 - 03:10 AM
DMcG 02 Jun 19 - 02:20 AM
Steve Shaw 02 Jun 19 - 02:12 AM
Bill D 01 Jun 19 - 09:12 PM
Steve Shaw 01 Jun 19 - 05:45 PM
Nigel Parsons 01 Jun 19 - 04:58 PM
Jos 01 Jun 19 - 01:39 PM
Mr Red 01 Jun 19 - 10:55 AM
Jon Freeman 01 Jun 19 - 09:24 AM
Mrrzy 01 Jun 19 - 09:13 AM
Doug Chadwick 01 Jun 19 - 05:43 AM
DMcG 01 Jun 19 - 03:21 AM
Black belt caterpillar wrestler 01 Jun 19 - 03:04 AM
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:






Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: leeneia
Date: 15 Jun 19 - 10:17 PM

I dislike that, Mrrzy. "Womb-raider" sounds too much like a term from science fiction. What a horrible crime, made slightly worse for the family when Fox News tries to be trendy about it.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Mrrzy
Date: 14 Jun 19 - 11:01 AM

Fox News, reporting on an awful incident where a pregnant woman was murdered and the fetus[before]/baby[after] was kidnapped, used the term "womb-raider" in headlines when the baby died.

I was horrified and kinda impressed at the same time.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Tattie Bogle
Date: 13 Jun 19 - 05:30 PM

I have no pet peeve with that!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Mrrzy
Date: 13 Jun 19 - 12:51 PM

Tattie, this is now a music thread!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Tattie Bogle
Date: 13 Jun 19 - 03:53 AM

"Get-go": I don't watch much TV which is maybe why I haven't heard it.
I prefer " My get-up-and-go has got up and went"!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Jos
Date: 11 Jun 19 - 12:25 PM

Many years ago when I used to push a child along in a pram, the pram was designed so that the child would sit facing me, but did he want to sit and look at me? No, whenever possible (that is, when it wasn't raining) he liked to have the hood down so that he could turn round and see where we were going.

(There were no portable phones or electronic devices in those days, but even now I do not use one while walking along.)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: leeneia
Date: 11 Jun 19 - 10:58 AM

Excellent points, Mr. Red.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Mr Red
Date: 11 Jun 19 - 03:52 AM

I see it all the time on buses. Pushchair facing the front and the mother behind, fixed on the phone.
Less than half of them put the chair facing back, which is the correct way in case of a sudden stop. And it affords eye contact parent & child.

As a non parent, I once read that engaging in what the child is interested in allows them to learn faster. Ignoring or deflecting them with other things, doesn't. When in the company of a toddler I tend to follow their interest, now.

Some understand, some don't. As Winston Churchill said "The two most important jobs in life are given to amateurs, parenthood & citizenship"


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: leeneia
Date: 10 Jun 19 - 06:01 PM

This is more than a peeve. i am dismayed at parents of young children who are so absorbed in their electronics or their own conversations that they completely ignore their young child.

The process by which a little one (age one to five) acquires language is one of the most amazing things in all of nature. In addition it's interesting, gratifying or adorable to participate in.

Two days ago I pre-boarding an airplane, and two parents with a little girl were getting aboard just ahead of me. Her parents allowed her to step on the jetway, with its slope and its sudden steep ramps while staring at a small electronic screen. Soon she stopped looking at held up a hot pink teddy bear. Three times she asked, "Is this a stuffed toy?" Nobody answered the first two times. Finally her mother said yes.

If a parent had simply said "Don't interrupt" that would have been better than pretending she doesn't exist. And really, what is so important that you can't stop yacking long enough to see your child safely down a jetway and into the plane?

Then she asked three times, "What animal is it?" Her mother said "You figure it out." That's not going to teach her anything.

As we approached the door into the plane, they allowed her to pull on a metal bar covered with a bright yellow coating. Didn't observe what she was doing, didn't tell her to stop. Didn't explain that parts of an aircraft are not toys and are not to be touched. In short, no parenting was going on.
===============
Ya know, a lot of people are irritated by teen-agers' "up-talk." I think up-talk reflects the insecurity of young people who do not feel confident that an adult is listening to them. They put a question in every utterance because they are unconsciously asking "Are you paying any attention? Do you hear me? Are you there?"


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: weerover
Date: 10 Jun 19 - 10:17 AM

I agree with DMcG on mistakes in general, we all make them, but I frequently find basic errors in textbooks intended for the teaching of English in schools, which I consider unforgiveable.

I am somewhat surprised that Tattie Bogle has never encountered "the get-go". I believe we are fairly close geographically, and I have heard it many times, though usually on TV.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: DMcG
Date: 10 Jun 19 - 09:06 AM

I don't worry at all about my spelling and grammar on Mudcat - I am not producing a work of literature, after all. But I do expect professional documents to be to higher standard. I got a bit of sales promotion that said this:

"Cruises here bring to your holiday a balance of both nature and elegant grounds."

There is *some* semblance to English...


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Mr Red
Date: 10 Jun 19 - 08:51 AM

And what about starting an answer with "So..........."

I find it distracting, in a way that "Ah" or "Well",** and "yes" isn't off-putting. Yet they serve the same purpose, a delay while the answerer (sic) can collect their thoughts - usually on a subject they know well.

So........... it is a modern affectation, and as Folkies, Traditionalists,** and old Fogies we find strange on our ears.

Language morphs all the time. Consider words for being "in fashion/good", hip, hot, cool,** and wicked - all words with contra contexts.

** Pedants'*** corner - note use of the Oxford comma.

*** note use of the Oxford Grocer's**** apostrophe.

****yes, yes. There are more than one Oxford Grocer, but only one who misspells "'" AFAIK.





So.......... I'll get my côte


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: JennieG
Date: 10 Jun 19 - 02:28 AM

A turn of phrase which is cropping up more and more - here in Oz, at least - is "forced to do such and such". A news item yesterday about a boat sinking was "survivors forced to cling to wreckage". This morning's local rag has a front page story "police forced to taser man involved in brawl". That's just two instances of what are becoming more and more usages of "forced to".

The stories would be more succinctly told "survivors cling to wreckage" and "police taser man" but perhaps they would then lack a little drama, and some folk like to milk all the drama they can from their stories.

I know language is a living thing, constantly changing and evolving.....and while I do enjoy some current terms and words, I don't have to always like where it is going or some of the stops along the way.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Tattie Bogle
Date: 08 Jun 19 - 07:58 PM

Well where have I been hiding? I have NEVER EVER in ma puff heard ANYONE say "from the get-go"! And yet you say it's commonplace?
Yes, I have heard, and would use myself "from the word go" or "from the off" but no, nay, never "from the get-go". Could be a song in that?.......

And it's no, nay, never, - - -
No, nay from the get-go
Will I play the go-getter
In your game of get-go


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Mrrzy
Date: 08 Jun 19 - 03:03 PM

There was a thing for awhile where one said So (something that can't be so), such (something that can't be such), wow. Took me forever to get it right. So effort, such wrong, wow. But now nobody uses it.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Jos
Date: 08 Jun 19 - 06:45 AM

I do wish people would say 'inspiring' instead of 'inspirational'.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 08 Jun 19 - 06:30 AM

And if you want to know one of my pet peeves it's the use of asterisks in swear words. Even The Guardian doesn't permit them. I sometimes use them sarcastically, for example in the expression "Trump is a complete and utter b*ast*ard." That method also comes in handy on those websites that automatically replace your swear word with a different word.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 08 Jun 19 - 06:24 AM

I meant "No it isn't." Grr.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 08 Jun 19 - 06:23 AM

No it doesn't. At least in the written word, one is a neutral request for an explanation. The other is highly-nuanced, and, depending on context, might imply surprise, derision, shock or outrage. In the spoken word, much would depend on how you express either.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Nigel Parsons
Date: 08 Jun 19 - 06:04 AM

Similarly Whatever the f*** does that mean? is just a longer way to ask "What does that mean?"


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: lefthanded guitar
Date: 08 Jun 19 - 02:11 AM

Prefacing a sentence with the inane phrase "Not for nothing, but......" Whatever the f*** does that mean?! I've even asked people who say it, and they don't know.


This is seconded in irritating language by the phrase " Not to talk about it... but...." And then, of course, they talk about it.

Shaddup. ;)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: SamStone
Date: 07 Jun 19 - 10:48 PM

luv it when the eastenders say "neiver" for neither


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 07 Jun 19 - 07:19 PM

Thing is, with us old fogies we'd tend to think that the old is better than the new. Therefore "from the word go" is better than "from the get-go." But I'm not so sure. Looked at utterly objectively, which is a very bad thing to do, both expressions are equally bad, or equally good. So I'm going with the flow. And you know me...


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: meself
Date: 07 Jun 19 - 11:18 AM

"From the get-go" does not appear in print until the 1960s, apparently. Some think it morphed from the expression, "From the word 'go'"; personally, I think the similarity is coincidental (due to the opposing rhythmical stresses in the two expressions; 'the GET-go' would not naturally emerge from 'the word GO').

Another theory is that it is an abbreviated version of "Get ready, get set - GO!"

Yet another theory has it as coming from the clunky formation "getting going" - I think "get going" more likely.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Mrrzy
Date: 07 Jun 19 - 10:09 AM

Also why does ouster mean ousting?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Mrrzy
Date: 04 Jun 19 - 10:47 AM

Yeah, I remember my dad saying get-go, and I'm old. Ish.

This reminds me of my sisters quizzing mom on modern (in the 60's) slang, and after each phrase, mom said That's over my head. Then they said something (I forget what) and mom says wait, I don't understand that one. "Went over her head" went over her head! We died laughing.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 04 Jun 19 - 01:45 AM

You may as well give up on things such as get-go. It's standard English now. As a matter of fact, though I'd never write it, I quite like it and I use it all the time.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Nigel Parsons
Date: 03 Jun 19 - 07:23 PM

"Pet Peeves"?
You can't, he's a poltergeist, so incorporeal. (at least according to J K Rowling)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: JennieG
Date: 03 Jun 19 - 04:56 PM

When the news is sung they can add as many extra syllables as they like.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Tattie Bogle
Date: 03 Jun 19 - 01:39 PM

@Jos: and if they don't win their match they "crash out"! (No, they just lost a game!!)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Mrrzy
Date: 03 Jun 19 - 08:58 AM

That extra syllable is highly folksong-y (the t-uh-rain pulled away on that g-uh-lorious night)... I have not yet had to yell at my radio over it. Yet.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Jos
Date: 03 Jun 19 - 07:41 AM

Another that has been really getting on my nerves is "from the get-go"

(often pronounced "from the gecko").


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: JennieG
Date: 03 Jun 19 - 07:31 AM

Many newsreaders here add an extra syllable to words beginning with 'thr', perhaps for emphasis.....for example, "three" becomes "the-ree" and "threat" is now "the-reat", etc.

It is annoying. I have become one of those Olde Phartes who yells at the TV because of things such as this.

Also - when did a sporting match become a "clash"? Something else to yell about......


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Mrrzy
Date: 02 Jun 19 - 07:37 PM

Nice! Turlututu chapeau pointu! (That was the exercise for the English speakers)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Tattie Bogle
Date: 02 Jun 19 - 06:41 PM

OK, Mrzzy, I did qualify my last post by saying that the French 'Vu" is not the same as "view". How we were taught to say it requires considerable oral contortions: put your lips forward as if you were going to say a "oo" sound, but then say "ee" instead, and you'll get that odd cross between the 2 sounds, for which there is no English comparison!
Parfait, ou non?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Mr Red
Date: 02 Jun 19 - 10:47 AM

Mispronunciation and enjambed rhymes for comic effect are all the funnier. Mind you Cole Porter did it all the time to make the yric more fluid and flowing.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Mrrzy
Date: 02 Jun 19 - 08:15 AM

Well, for off rhymes, Tom Lehrer wins. Uncut, and unsubt [riff] tle.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Doug Chadwick
Date: 02 Jun 19 - 03:10 AM

Maybe Higgins was singing tongue in cheek?

I think you are being too generous, Mrrzy. In any other film, poetic licence would allow the rhyming of hung with tongue - but not this one. The lyricist simply got it wrong and the director didn't pick it up.

DC


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: DMcG
Date: 02 Jun 19 - 02:20 AM

Sort of, Bill. I would say it is one of the glories of the English language that we can use pretty much any word as a noun, verb, adjective, adverb ... and bring out a 'tone' that would otherwise go unnoticed. In the hands of a skilled poet or writer this can be wonderful.

Most of us, though, are not skilled poets or writers...


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 02 Jun 19 - 02:12 AM

Like when an Olympic athlete fails to medal...


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Bill D
Date: 01 Jun 19 - 09:12 PM

I despise the trend of *verbing* nouns... :"Our staff has surfaced some new data."


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 01 Jun 19 - 05:45 PM

You're all worrying far too much. What you should be worrying about is the fact that Nigel failed to insert a full stop in his last post.. Cheers! :-)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Nigel Parsons
Date: 01 Jun 19 - 04:58 PM

How can there be more than one one?
In binary notation numbers are represented by a series of ones and zeros


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Jos
Date: 01 Jun 19 - 01:39 PM

I don't usually take any notice of sports results, but I have noticed lately that instead of winning cups and trophies teams 'lift' them. It sounds as if they stole them.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Mr Red
Date: 01 Jun 19 - 10:55 AM

'The suspect broke into the house and killed two people. Police arrested the suspect, John Smith, yesterday." Kinda defeats the purpose of using the term 'suspect', doesn't it?

Yes and No. Languge is fluid and meanings morph.

Gay has meant, over a period of several hundred years, variously sexually active as in "brisk young widow" to happy about life with no sexual connotations, to the modern appropriation.

As Nigel Rees was won't to say in his books: "bad meanings drive out good"

Hung is ambiguous without context (sexual connotations rear up (sic) again), whereas hanged is more specific. And I am hanged if I know why!
I know which I prefer to be!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 01 Jun 19 - 09:24 AM

As far as I can see from Chambers and the Oxford Dictionary Online, people may be “hung” or “hanged” but the latter is rather more common.

The Oxford one goes on to explain:   
The reason for this distinction is a complex historical one: hanged, the earlier form, was superseded by hung sometime after the 16th century; it is likely that the retention of hanged for the execution sense may have to do with the tendency of archaic forms to remain in the legal language of the courts


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Mrrzy
Date: 01 Jun 19 - 09:13 AM

English-speakers can't pronounce the French "u" of vu, but nobody I've heard say it [Yogi Bera] pronounces it with a y (vyu). They [English speakers] do not differentiate vous (voo) and vu (voo).

As a native French speaker I have no problem with that. See Paris, above.

Maybe Higgins was singing tongue in cheek?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Doug Chadwick
Date: 01 Jun 19 - 05:43 AM

"People are hanged. Pictures are hung."

It is particularly grating in My Fair Lady, a film specifically about the correct use of English, when Rex Harrison sings (or, rather, says)

By law she should be taken out and hung,
For the cold-blooded murder of the English tongue.


DC


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: DMcG
Date: 01 Jun 19 - 03:21 AM

Steve is right about how language evolves and changes, but it can be confusing. A moment ago I read Pixar has dropped a trailer for a new film. In 'old-think' that means the trailer has been cancelled, removed, has gone. In 'new-think' it means it is now available.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Black belt caterpillar wrestler
Date: 01 Jun 19 - 03:04 AM

And what about "very unique". How can you have degrees of uniqueness?

Robin


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate
Next Page

 


You must be a member to post in non-music threads. Join here.


You must be a member to post in non-music threads. Join here.



Mudcat time: 15 June 10:31 PM EDT

[ Home ]

All original material is copyright © 1998 by the Mudcat Café Music Foundation, Inc. All photos, music, images, etc. are copyright © by their rightful owners. Every effort is taken to attribute appropriate copyright to images, content, music, etc. We are not a copyright resource.