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london folk songs

The Sandman 11 Apr 11 - 11:34 AM
GUEST 13 Apr 11 - 11:54 AM
GUEST 13 Apr 11 - 04:23 PM
GUEST 18 Apr 11 - 02:00 PM
GUEST 03 May 11 - 06:13 AM
GUEST 12 Sep 11 - 08:47 AM
Jack Campin 16 Aug 17 - 12:06 PM
Steve Gardham 16 Aug 17 - 03:36 PM
GUEST,Bobbie Hanvey 15 Feb 18 - 03:19 PM
GUEST,Wm 15 Feb 18 - 04:11 PM
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Subject: RE: london folk songs
From: The Sandman
Date: 11 Apr 11 - 11:34 AM

It is probable that the "Eagle" mentioned in the song's third verse refers to The Eagle freehold pub at the corner of Shepherdess Walk and City Road mentioned in the same verse.
I disagree that it first appeared in America can you back up this with substantiated fact
this is my opinion
This song can only be traced back to the mid-nineteenth century, when a music sheet acquired by the British Library in 1853 described a dance, 'Pop! Goes the Weasel', which was, according to the music sheet, 'An Old English Dance, as performed at Her Majesty's & The Nobilities Balls, with the Original Music'. It had a tune very similar to that used today and only the words "Pop! Goes the Weasle".[1] There is evidence that several people tried to add lyrics to the popular tune. The following verse had been written by 1856 when it was quoted in a performance at the Theatre Royal:

    Up and down the City Road
    In and out the Eagle
    That's the way the money goes
    Pop! goes the weasel.


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Subject: RE: london folk songs
From: GUEST
Date: 13 Apr 11 - 11:54 AM

the london merchant
bedlam boys


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Subject: RE: london folk songs
From: GUEST
Date: 13 Apr 11 - 04:23 PM

the oak and the ash


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Subject: RE: london folk songs
From: GUEST
Date: 18 Apr 11 - 02:00 PM

the press gang as sung by ewan maccoll


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Subject: RE: london folk songs
From: GUEST
Date: 03 May 11 - 06:13 AM

rolling up rolling down the river (tilbury)


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Subject: RE: london folk songs
From: GUEST
Date: 12 Sep 11 - 08:47 AM

been a while .came across this one in a book of midlands songs lord marlborough


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Subject: RE: london folk songs
From: Jack Campin
Date: 16 Aug 17 - 12:06 PM

I'd like the WORDS for "Buggering Oates, Prepare Thy Neck". All I can trace is part of one verse. Anybody got a singably complete version?


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Subject: RE: london folk songs
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 16 Aug 17 - 03:36 PM

Even a large number of folk songs that don't mention London were very likely written there, even moreso the further back you go. That's where the majority of printers lived and thus where the ballad writers also lived. The ones we actually know the names of actually all operated in London. And hence the large number of ballads offered here. For instance the ballad, 'The Bonny Bunch of Roses-O', we are given a graphic account of an interview with the author by Henry Mayhew in one of his London Labour books.


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Subject: RE: london folk songs
From: GUEST,Bobbie Hanvey
Date: 15 Feb 18 - 03:19 PM

I recorded folksinger Tony Mc Auley singing The Enterprise of London Town many years ago and can’t find the tape. First two lines of the song are, ‘The Enterprise of London Town it was that good ship’s name
She was loaded with gold and with indigo and from Peru she came....
Maybe the song has a different title. Tried to find it on line. No luck


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Subject: RE: london folk songs
From: GUEST,Wm
Date: 15 Feb 18 - 04:11 PM

And hence the large number of ballads offered here. For instance the ballad, 'The Bonny Bunch of Roses-O', we are given a graphic account of an interview with the author by Henry Mayhew in one of his London Labour books.
I'd be really interested in reading this. Can you point me to the citation? Thanks!


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