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BS: Gardening 2010

Related thread:
BS: Composting (38)


katlaughing 31 Dec 09 - 05:37 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 31 Dec 09 - 06:00 PM
Bobert 31 Dec 09 - 06:09 PM
Stilly River Sage 31 Dec 09 - 07:56 PM
LilyFestre 31 Dec 09 - 08:12 PM
Janie 31 Dec 09 - 08:14 PM
Janie 31 Dec 09 - 08:30 PM
katlaughing 31 Dec 09 - 11:26 PM
Darowyn 01 Jan 10 - 04:50 AM
LilyFestre 01 Jan 10 - 08:57 AM
maire-aine 01 Jan 10 - 09:02 AM
Maryrrf 01 Jan 10 - 11:04 AM
GUEST,Falco 01 Jan 10 - 12:10 PM
CarolC 01 Jan 10 - 01:04 PM
Stilly River Sage 01 Jan 10 - 05:48 PM
Richard Bridge 01 Jan 10 - 06:00 PM
Shanghaiceltic 01 Jan 10 - 06:31 PM
Stilly River Sage 02 Jan 10 - 04:04 PM
Janie 06 Mar 10 - 02:04 PM
Stilly River Sage 06 Mar 10 - 02:42 PM
Janie 06 Mar 10 - 04:34 PM
maire-aine 06 Mar 10 - 05:30 PM
Maryrrf 06 Mar 10 - 05:33 PM
Bobert 06 Mar 10 - 05:35 PM
maeve 06 Mar 10 - 06:08 PM
Stilly River Sage 07 Mar 10 - 01:24 AM
Stilly River Sage 07 Mar 10 - 04:14 PM
maeve 07 Mar 10 - 04:21 PM
Cuilionn 08 Mar 10 - 03:33 PM
Lizzie Cornish 1 08 Mar 10 - 04:14 PM
Janie 09 Mar 10 - 12:01 AM
Liz the Squeak 09 Mar 10 - 02:51 AM
Stilly River Sage 09 Mar 10 - 12:02 PM
mouldy 09 Mar 10 - 01:51 PM
Janie 13 Mar 10 - 12:49 AM
LadyJean 13 Mar 10 - 12:54 AM
Bobert 13 Mar 10 - 06:05 AM
Stilly River Sage 14 Mar 10 - 12:34 AM
Stilly River Sage 14 Mar 10 - 04:51 PM
Stilly River Sage 14 Mar 10 - 09:33 PM
Janie 15 Mar 10 - 01:17 AM
Alice 15 Mar 10 - 01:19 AM
Tinker 15 Mar 10 - 11:38 AM
Stilly River Sage 15 Mar 10 - 03:01 PM
Bobert 16 Mar 10 - 08:39 AM
maire-aine 18 Mar 10 - 03:59 PM
Stilly River Sage 18 Mar 10 - 04:17 PM
Bobert 26 Mar 10 - 04:40 PM
maeve 26 Mar 10 - 06:18 PM
Stilly River Sage 26 Mar 10 - 06:59 PM
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Subject: BS: Gardening 2010
From: katlaughing
Date: 31 Dec 09 - 05:37 PM

This coming year I want to have some Jolly Rancher Joker pansies. No one sells the plants around here, so I shall have to buy the seeds. I was looking at a website which sells them when I came across Cow-Pots, made from cow manure! Have any of you used them. I've used peat pots before, but these sound like a good thing.

Hope you regulars don't mind my starting this. The seeds were supposed to be started in Nov. for spring, so I figure I'd better get with it!


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Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 31 Dec 09 - 06:00 PM

I hope gardeners everywhere move toward the following native-gardening way...

"SUMMARY OF NATIVE-GARDENING TALK – 2009 THEORY-SLAM GIG

Green/eco-friendly gardening is native gardening, and vegetables, plus other consumables, should be the only exotic-flora we plant - as doing so can help limit food-miles, etc. By filling our other garden spaces with natives, we use less water and other resources, whilst aiding the native-fauna that, over the centuries, evolved with them. (Even high-nectar exotics, such as Buddleia, that are very attractive to SOME native-fauna, should be avoided, because they upset nature's/God's balance – God created evolution, too, that is.)

Our green gardens, with their vegies and natives, can be made still greener by the addition of compost heaps/bins; a wildlife pond – for native frogs, newts, and so on, rather than exotic goldfish; bee- and bird-boxes, plus carefully-selected feeders; rain- and grey-water vats; by growing everything organically - including thrifty home-propagation plus species-swapping; and by leaving some lush untidy patches, decaying branches, etc." (from here).


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Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 31 Dec 09 - 06:09 PM

Well, we have a nice pile of seed catalogues that are pourin' in... We're gonna definately do those "Cherokee Purple" tomatoes again this year...

We have, ah geeze, around 300 various azalea cutting and seedlings growing in the potting shed... We keep heat on in there (45 degrees) and grow lights 24/7... Some of the native azaleas are going to be redish... Yea!!!... There are so many pink ones that it's nice to get some red ones... We have grown them from seed...

The veggie garden is all plowed under for the winter... I plowed it to 15 inches which is as deep as my plow will turn over earth... Looking for a great veggie year...

Just cut the last of the brocolli after our first snow... Had to shake the snow off to find the heads but they were yummy... Spinich and lettuce are under the snow now... We'll see how they fared when it melts...

B~


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Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 31 Dec 09 - 07:56 PM

I haven't gotten some of my winter stuff in. I still might, because it grows nicely into the spring.

SRS


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Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: LilyFestre
Date: 31 Dec 09 - 08:12 PM

The seed catalogs are pouring in here too. We had a large, productive garden last year and I'm looking forward to having another one! The only things I know for SURE that we will be growing are Nash green beans (bush beans) and Providence corn. We bought the corn from a local Amish farmer this past summer and it's the best corn I've ever had! Yukon Gold and Kennebunc potatoes are a must too.

In the meantime, I'm having fun looking at all the varieties and specs. I'm searching for poblano peppers....had great success with them the summer before last but haven't been able to find the seeds (or plants) since.

YAY SPRING!

Michelle


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Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 31 Dec 09 - 08:14 PM

Kat, peat pots do just the same as cow pots, and are much, much less expensive. I don't know anything about the environmental impact of the production of peat pots. You would do just as well to use egg cartons, yoghurt containers, waxed milk cartons, or several layers of newspaper* folded into container shapes -in other words, recycle stuff that you have anyway and would either be throwing in the trash or into the recycle bin (if recycling is available in your area). Other than the newspaper*, which you can plant in the ground like you do with peat pots, the other containers can go into the recycle or trash bin after they have done their duty as seed-starting pots.

* Not sure about the composition of inks in newspaper anymore. Used to be concerns about heavy metals in the ink when used as grow pots or mulch. I might use newspaper pots to start non-edible plants in, but don't think I would use them for food crops, or plant the pot in the soil without doing some more research.


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Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 31 Dec 09 - 08:30 PM

My very fav catalog is Johnny's Selected Seeds.

Very slowly working on putting together a small raised plot under the trees to plant ferns - using the soil and roots of the annuals I dumped from pots this fall as the base and will add some topsoil and compost.

Traditionally I have spent New Year's day planting spring bulbs, but I still don't have the beds ready. But I do have leaves piled high in one part sun area that I know will turn into a flower garden sooner or later. Need to add blood meal to it. Have figured out where to set up the grow light shelves for seed starting, for whenever I do get beds actually built for veggies.

One of these days....

Still have kale doing well in pots that I planted this spring:>)


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Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: katlaughing
Date: 31 Dec 09 - 11:26 PM

Thanks, Janie!


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Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Darowyn
Date: 01 Jan 10 - 04:50 AM

We have a new garden to set up and plant this year. The greenhouse is nearly ready to go into operation- you can't see through the glass for frost right now! I've built a small raised bed inside it that goes right down into the soil, and that will allow us to grow the more tender vegetables. We also have access to a strip of land beyond the back fence, between our garden and the Cows' field, and we are going to grow the root crops like potatoes, carrots, parsnips,beetroot etc there.
Still to do is the job of making the raised bed next to the greenhouse and garage for the salad crops and herbs. We also need to find somewhere to put the walnut tree, though there was an apple and a pear tree here already.
We made a front garden before the winter- it was just a mess of rolled hardcore for cars to park on before, but by the time we had planted all the plants we brought with us from the old place, it looks as if it will be fine. It's just a question of hoeing the weeds that have come in with the 12 tons of topsoil we put on there.
It's going to be a busy year. Can't wait to get started!
Cheers
Dave


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Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: LilyFestre
Date: 01 Jan 10 - 08:57 AM

We're big fans of Johnny's Selected Seeds too and also Territorial Seeds. It looks like the only places we will be able to get Providence corn is from NESeeds or Seeds of Change.

Michelle


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Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: maire-aine
Date: 01 Jan 10 - 09:02 AM

The herbs in the planter on the porch are still doing well, although the basil is gone. I have to bring it inside occasionally.


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Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Maryrrf
Date: 01 Jan 10 - 11:04 AM

The cold snap and snow finished off the lettuce, but I still have some kale (a little scraggly but edible) and the collards still look great. Also the parsley is just as green and healthy as it was before it was covered under a foot of snow. I've had navy beans, potatoes, carrots and assorted other odds and ends - celery, onions,a few tomatoes, etc (it was clean out the fridge day yesterday) simmering overnight in the crockpot, and just now went out and gathered generous amounts of kale, parsley and collards to add to the mix. It's looking like it will be just perfect for a quiet winter's day spent in the house.


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Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: GUEST,Falco
Date: 01 Jan 10 - 12:10 PM

Just heard, Broadcaster John Cushnie, a regular panellist on Gardeners' Question Time, has died following a heart attack.


A lovely man.


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Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: CarolC
Date: 01 Jan 10 - 01:04 PM

I'm experimenting with mini greenhouses made from sheep fencing (in an inverted U shape, like a quonset hut) with plastic over them. Right now I only have New Zealand spinach under one of them, and it did freeze when the temps went down into the 20s the other night (I will be covering it with a blanket tonight), but I plan to put some bubble wrap over them for insulation. I hope to be able to extend my growing season for some of the summer plants throughout the year this way. Our daytime temps are usually well above freezing, so the ground is usually warm enough for plant roots. My peppers, eggplants, and grape tomatoes were still growing and bearing until a few days before Christmas, so I have high hopes.


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Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 01 Jan 10 - 05:48 PM

The last half-dozen green tomatoes from late November are pinkening and will end up in soup one of these days. We had BLTs last week from tomatoes that ripened late from this year's garden. As long as you're patient and have those ripening acrylic things (they help, anyway) the tomatoes will eventually ripen.

SRS


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Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Richard Bridge
Date: 01 Jan 10 - 06:00 PM

I am not, of course, really here (and I note one person who reportedly is anathema above) but I successfully germinated a number of brugmansia sanguineae, and I do look forward to seeing those scarlet (and toxic) flowers come late summer/early autumn.

I do remember the old saw that one only gets really interested in the sex life of plants and non-human animals once one loses a direct interest in the sex lives of humans.


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Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Shanghaiceltic
Date: 01 Jan 10 - 06:31 PM

I have spent the last couple of days cutting down a leylandia type tree in the back garden. Bastard of a job as the tree roots seemed to go all the way to China. Got one more to go then we will get some sunshine in the garden. I started lopping the branches a couple of months back and a spider (white tip) that took offence in being evicted bit me on the arm. Gardening in Aus has its hazards...


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Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 02 Jan 10 - 04:04 PM

We have a few warmer days finally (relative--40s, low 50s, is better than 20s) so I've been out working on bird feeders and taking down holiday lights. I have some trimming and planting to do also, but it's fairly quiet right now. I should try to get the next plank in to enlarge the amount of raised bed. I have a lot of dirt in the pickup for weight (and have needed it this year) but could use it and pick up some more while the weather is nice.

SRS


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Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 06 Mar 10 - 02:04 PM

The hellebore are about to bloom. Gonna fertilize azaleas this weekend and use dormant oil spray on some of them. A friend stopped by and gave me two hydrangeas he had rooted - an oakleaf and a smooth hydrangea. Which reminds me, I pegged an unusually colored hydrangea over at Dani's last year. Best get over to her place and see if it is rooted and ready to dig up.


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Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 06 Mar 10 - 02:42 PM

I mowed my front lawn last night. (I can feel it today.)

I've been transplanting strawberries in preparation for piling up some dirt and rearranging the beds; there will be more raised beds this year, to help with drainage. The rain last year really wiped out my eggplants, and were hard on the tomatoes for a while.

SRS


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Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 06 Mar 10 - 04:34 PM

One of the things I've been trying to figure out is what parts of my yard might be considered part shade, and what parts full shade. Found a good suggestion in a book I recently purchased. Before making a decisions about what to plant and where, he suggests planting petunias in different spots. Where the petunias bloom heavily can be considered full sun. Where they bloom OK but not heavily, is partial sun, and where they bloom very sparsely or not at all, is full shade.


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Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: maire-aine
Date: 06 Mar 10 - 05:30 PM

Snow is gone from most of the front yard, but still a lot left on the north side of the house. A few more days of sun, and the winter heaths (erica carnae) will be blooming.

Maryanne


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Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Maryrrf
Date: 06 Mar 10 - 05:33 PM

Today I borrowed a rototiller and tilled the garden patch. Some of the collards from last year had actually survived the snow and cold, but they were pretty scraggly so I plowed them under. Next week I'll plant some lettuce, maybe some onions, carrots, etc and see how they do.


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Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 06 Mar 10 - 05:35 PM

Still pushin' snow around here but seeds are ordered and should be here when we get back from New Orleans on March 22nd...

Oh yeah??? Maybe I didn't mention the New Orleans trip but that is where this year's azalea society convention is being held...

Other than taht, looks like we still have between 6 and 12 inches of unmelted snow (depending on where it is) so I reckon it will be here for another few days and the deck off our bedroom gets no sun so I think that snow will be here in July...

B~


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Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: maeve
Date: 06 Mar 10 - 06:08 PM

There are beets, carrots, chard, kale, carrots, and romaine lettuce growing in my covered rows.

m


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Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 07 Mar 10 - 01:24 AM

The strawberries are going to be more prolific than last year, based on the number that have sprouted in the garden. I planted three plants last year and probably have (at least) three dozen from those this year. There are some old carrots to dig up or till in, and onions in the garden that will probably be the first green onions (scallions) I'll use this spring. The oregano is still there, but took a pretty bad hit from the cold over the winter, so I'll trim it back. And I have to keep trimming the broken or cracked branches on the rosemary, so it stays healthy. The snow we had last month was very heavy and squashed a lot of plants.

I put a couple of bowls of beer out in the garden plot tonight, to see if the snails are moving around yet.

SRS


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Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 07 Mar 10 - 04:14 PM

No snails yet, so I might be able to put some bean seeds out and they could come up and get hardened before the snails become more active.

Rain today, good for the garden, and there are daffodils all over the place now.

SRS


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Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: maeve
Date: 07 Mar 10 - 04:21 PM

In partial answer to a question Kat sent me; the veggies I listed are those I planted last September and October. I covered the experimental rows with hoops and fabric row cover with clear plastic over the whole thing.

They made it through the winter and the fire and the late winter rain, ice, snow, temps well below freezing and wind that occasionally tore the covers off. When I return to the home place, I will check to see if the sugar snap peas survived.

m


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Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Cuilionn
Date: 08 Mar 10 - 03:33 PM

Maeve--

So good to hear that your row-covered veggies survived! I've just planted some experiments myself: carrots and spinach in cold frames in the hoop house we rigged up in early December. I'm also putting some peas to soak tonight. With this crazy early Spring (and the extra layers of protection afforded by the hoop house & cold frames), I'm guessing I needn't wait for Patriot's Day to plant peas. If I'm wrong, well, at least I'll have learned something whilst making the attempt!

--Cuilionn


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Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Lizzie Cornish 1
Date: 08 Mar 10 - 04:14 PM

I have daffadowndillies coming up in my garden. I've never had a garden with daffodils in, apart from in pots..but my new garden has them... :0)

Lily of the Valley too, I think, which remind me of my Dad, as they were one of his favourite, along with beautiful, bright dahlias...and his Peace Rose, how he loved that..

I'm reading Monty Don's 'My Roots' book at the moment, which is a collection of some of his newspaper articles. My goodness but he is SUCH an eloquent writer...and he writes in pictures, so much so that you can smell the earth, touch the frost and inhale the evening scent from the stocks...wonderful book!

The very beautiful, gentle and tender song...of love in a garden..
'Green Fingers' by Ian Lang on Ian's Myspace

And here's Monty, for those who've never heard of him before. He's a national treasure over here....Recently he had some mini-strokes, so has given up his gardening programmes, the physical ones anyway...He's just started some great programmes on the traditional crafts...

Monty on Youtube ' Around The World in 80 Gardens'


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Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 09 Mar 10 - 12:01 AM

Sweet Sis, she who is good at carpentry and has leftover plastic lumber from a new back porch, called this evening to say she has cut out the parts to build me a 3 x 9 and a 3x3 raised bed. Think I'm gonna ask her to stack the 3x3 on top of the 3x9 so have at least a small space with 10-12" of top soil. Between the clay, the rocks and the tree roots, can't do much digging down below the current soil surface.

She is such a willing blessing!


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Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Liz the Squeak
Date: 09 Mar 10 - 02:51 AM

Frost over the weekend has severely damaged the crocuses I didn't even know were flowering until I saw them stretched out, limp and lifeless on the soil.... :-(

It's taken the new leaves off my arums too... but hopefully they'll survive and grow again.

Otherwise it's all just a big brown and green mush of things I need to clear away but can't because I'm still supposed to be 'taking things easy'... I hate being ill.

LTS


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Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 09 Mar 10 - 12:02 PM

This morning's sunshine brought out my across-the-street neighbor to mulch some more leaves and tidy the yard. So we stood and visited for a while. That's another by-product of gardening--seeing your neighbors!

Daffodils all over the yard, but we're still impacted from the snow last month. I could see some damage with bugs in it on a juniper (after the snow weight broke the plant) so I'll go out later and trim out some of the middle of the shrub.

SRS


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Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: mouldy
Date: 09 Mar 10 - 01:51 PM

I have decided to oust just about everything from the raised side bed on the sunny side of the garden, and just leave the minarette fruit trees and the roses in the main bed. (This is Plan A). Hopefully then, most of the garden (which isn't big) will be productive to some degree.

Rhubarb is pushing its way up, and I've noticed some chard poking its head up. Must be an ungerminated seed or two from last year. Have not decided if I'd plant spuds this year. Anyway, it's the big dig-up needed first. It's just that I hate the cold from the ground numbing my feet through the soles of my wellies, and I just know, given the "wonderful" soil in my garden, that I'll be walking back to the house 3 inches taller than I went out!

Andrea


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Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 13 Mar 10 - 12:49 AM

I forget, mouldy - where are you?


I am noticing that very few of the dogwoods in my yard have any flowerbuds on them this year. the tips where they occur look broken off.   Most of them are infected with Dogwood Anthracnose to some degree, and I have taken a couple of them down because of the extent of the disease, but I am not aware that it prevents bud formation. The tips where the buds should be are there, but no buds are evident on 3 of the trees, and are sparse on the others.

Any ideas?


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Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: LadyJean
Date: 13 Mar 10 - 12:54 AM

The snowdrops I planted last fall are up! And the crocuses are coming in. In that my yard was under two feet of snow last week, I think that's pretty good.
I have 8 lavender plants that the company I ordered them from sent two months before I wanted them. Any thoughts on keeping them alive until I can plant them? (Besides keeping the cats away. That's a given.)


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Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 13 Mar 10 - 06:05 AM

Once you see the bark at the trunk of the dogwood split and then fall completely off, it's a goner... My recipe for goners is Mr. Chainsaw follwed by Mr. Match... I donno... Maybe it's just me but I kinda think that burning diseased plants is the best way to prevent whatever is in 'um from gettin' in their neigbors...

Meanwhile, we'll be in N.O. by this evening for the annual azalea convention so I reckon we'll be buying several new plants (other than azaleas) over the next few days 'cause one thing I learned about plants is that there's always room for one more in the car...lol...

B~


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Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 14 Mar 10 - 12:34 AM

I started moving some dirt around in the bed that was new last year, in preparation for putting in planks along one side to raise part of it (it's on a slope--this will result in a terrace). I dug up some weeds and found a bunch of last year's carrots. If they're carrot sized and look like carrots but were in the ground for a really long time, do you think they'll be like carrots, or like wood? I started them from seed, so in theory they could have sprouted during the late fall or winter, but I know some of these carrot tops were out there in the bed all summer and fall. I just didn't need them so they stayed put. For now I've washed them, cut off the tops, and they're in the fridge. About 2 quarts.

SRS


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Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 14 Mar 10 - 04:51 PM

This afternoon I started taking out a cactus that has proved to be a lot more work than I expected. I've made two trips to city hall to pick out boxes from the paper recycle bin to load up with the pads from this huge thing. I'm leaving a pretty pickly pear that grows from a single trunk, but this big sprawling thing can be so ugly when it is full of weeds that are almost impossible to get out of it.

SRS


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Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 14 Mar 10 - 09:33 PM

I put a photo of the cactus filled boxes on my Facebook page. I ought to dig out the particulars for the Mudcat gardeners group and post it there, just to nudge that thing back to life again.

SRS


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Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 15 Mar 10 - 01:17 AM

I have steadfastly resisted pressure from ex-hubby and son to plant prickly pear. My mind fills with passages from the journals of the Lewis & Clark expedition of the terrible effects of prickly pear spines on the feet of all of them as they moved up the Missouri River. Besides that, although it grows well enough here, it seems incongruous in a yard or garden on the NC Piedmont.


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Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 15 Mar 10 - 01:19 AM

Good decision, Janie, you wouldn't want to deal with prickly pear in the garden. A real "pain" to weed around.


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Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Tinker
Date: 15 Mar 10 - 11:38 AM

Just walked through the garden after the punishing winds and rain all weekend and we were truly blessed. There are a quite a few small branches to pick up once the precipitation finally ends and the sun comes out tomorrow. The daffodils have sprouted and buds are showing.

Slightly off topic our major damage was to the second floor ceiling where the horizontal rain forced it's way into the middle of the house! No water in the attic or on the 3rd floor. Seems to be drying up just fine, but a bit of a puzzler.


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Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 15 Mar 10 - 03:01 PM

Weather is a huge factor on a gardening thread, Tinker!

I met the trash guys at the curb this morning. It was still dark and I sure didn't want them ruining their day by tangling with my cactus pads. They protested that they could do it, but I took care of the bags (knock one against a knee and spines would go through the plastic) and a couple of the open boxes. I know they were surprised, but I considered their taking that stuff without warning above and beyond their job description.

The remaining big plant out there is a spineless prickly pear that grows upright. I have some sharp native stuff that grows down on the ground and is usually covered with grass. That may come out, but since so much of it was destroyed in the prairie near us, I hate to completely get rid of it (I transplanted it from there before they scraped the earth bare). I don't know if there are specific regional differences in the types, but if I get rid of it in my yard, I'll place it somewhere that it can continue to grow uninterrupted on the remaining prairie area.

SRS


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Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 16 Mar 10 - 08:39 AM

Another day of garden touring here in New Aww'leens... Went to three yesterday and came back with 7 nice azaleas and one nandina (maroon)...

Went to Buddy Lee's, hybridizer of the Encore (3 blooms per season) Azaleas and saw his operation... Got one of his newbies... NHot in the trad yet... Can't remember the name right off but everyone is sleeo deprived so memories ain't all that great...

Interesting how folks growing seasons are so different...

SRS is 2 months ahaed of us in the Mid-Atlantic...

B~


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Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: maire-aine
Date: 18 Mar 10 - 03:59 PM

It has been beautiful today, so I got out and raked leaves off of the heathers & heaths and the herb garden. Also trimmed off the old stems in the perennial border. The chives are up about 3-inches, and the thyme & oregano are doing well.

Maryanne


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Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 18 Mar 10 - 04:17 PM

This is the time of year when I take a break from work by stepping outside for a few minutes, and before long I have a pile of weeds somewhere. I just can't resist getting those fast growing spring grass weeds out of the beds before their roots are too tough to pull by hand.

SRS


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Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 26 Mar 10 - 04:40 PM

Well, well, well...

Geeze... Looks as if winter might be on its way out so...

Cleaned up the asparagus patch yesterday and fertilized it... We'll add a few more plants this year...

Our spinich and kale survive nicely under the 60 inches of snow we got this past winter and so we weeeded around those two rows and fertilized...

Tomorrow is "seed day"...

Looks like next Friday will be the best day for "mergal" (morelle mushrooms) hunting... Coolish and wet for the next 3 days and then 60's... That's mushroom weather...

We're going to put in about 30 criptomeria raticans along a old fence row that we took out to install our deer fence but also have a contract to furnish and plant 40 for a guy in Ohio who is moving here and needs a screen on the land he had bought...

Picked up a couple native azaleas outside of Ashville last week so we are closing in on having at least one of each of "x number" that exist...

Chicken litter (manure) has gotten scarce because new regs are not requiring it be cleaned out after each flock but I have a line of some anyway...

Tractor needs some work on the control valve for the front bucket --- both had a hard winter!!!

We have a monster stump pile to burn (10 feet high 25 feet wide and about 60 feet long)... Reckon you be able to see it on the Sputnik website when I light it...

That's about it...

B~


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Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: maeve
Date: 26 Mar 10 - 06:18 PM

Sounds good, Bobert.

We stopped by the home place yesterday after TL got out of work. While he worked on chainsaw repairs, I planted some more snap peas, spinach, sweet peas, and carrots (thanks, seed donors!) before fitting row cover and plastic film over hoops to shield them from the much colder and more seasonable weather we're experiencing now.

Narcissus 'Rijnveld's Early Sensation', dwarf iris 'Harmony', deep purple crocus, and several kinds of snowdrops are in bloom.

m


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Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 26 Mar 10 - 06:59 PM

I mowed the front today, and cleaned out the hay in the dogs' kennel, so I'll use their old hay in the garden to mulch around stuff. And this weekend comes a big push on the garden. I think we finally have time to plant several things. Next week come the tomatoes. :)

SRS


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