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BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse

MGM·Lion 19 Nov 09 - 11:57 PM
Joe Offer 20 Nov 09 - 12:28 AM
MGM·Lion 20 Nov 09 - 12:45 AM
Janie 20 Nov 09 - 12:55 AM
GUEST,escapee 20 Nov 09 - 01:24 AM
Doug Chadwick 20 Nov 09 - 02:54 AM
Jack Campin 20 Nov 09 - 03:26 AM
Bryn Pugh 20 Nov 09 - 05:12 AM
Jim Carroll 20 Nov 09 - 05:18 AM
Steve Shaw 20 Nov 09 - 05:53 AM
MGM·Lion 20 Nov 09 - 06:03 AM
GUEST 20 Nov 09 - 06:36 AM
MGM·Lion 20 Nov 09 - 06:45 AM
Matthew Edwards 20 Nov 09 - 06:59 AM
Wyrd Sister 20 Nov 09 - 06:59 AM
MGM·Lion 20 Nov 09 - 07:50 AM
Matthew Edwards 20 Nov 09 - 08:08 AM
Acorn4 20 Nov 09 - 08:18 AM
Tug the Cox 20 Nov 09 - 08:20 AM
Bryn Pugh 20 Nov 09 - 08:26 AM
CET 20 Nov 09 - 09:02 AM
Bob the Postman 20 Nov 09 - 11:40 AM
Lonesome EJ 20 Nov 09 - 12:13 PM
katlaughing 20 Nov 09 - 12:59 PM
Bill D 20 Nov 09 - 01:01 PM
VirginiaTam 20 Nov 09 - 01:32 PM
Jim Carroll 20 Nov 09 - 01:47 PM
Wyrd Sister 20 Nov 09 - 05:19 PM
Tangledwood 20 Nov 09 - 05:36 PM
Dave the Gnome 20 Nov 09 - 05:51 PM
Little Hawk 20 Nov 09 - 06:14 PM
VirginiaTam 20 Nov 09 - 06:20 PM
Mrrzy 20 Nov 09 - 06:31 PM
Steve Shaw 20 Nov 09 - 07:02 PM
Steve Shaw 20 Nov 09 - 07:07 PM
Leadfingers 20 Nov 09 - 07:14 PM
MarkS 20 Nov 09 - 07:21 PM
Amos 20 Nov 09 - 07:27 PM
Jim Carroll 20 Nov 09 - 08:11 PM
Tug the Cox 20 Nov 09 - 08:55 PM
Bill D 20 Nov 09 - 10:16 PM
Little Hawk 20 Nov 09 - 10:29 PM
Donuel 20 Nov 09 - 11:05 PM
Little Hawk 20 Nov 09 - 11:17 PM
MGM·Lion 21 Nov 09 - 01:23 AM
Little Hawk 21 Nov 09 - 01:28 AM
MGM·Lion 21 Nov 09 - 02:01 AM
MGM·Lion 21 Nov 09 - 02:02 AM
Gurney 21 Nov 09 - 02:38 AM
MGM·Lion 21 Nov 09 - 02:56 AM
MGM·Lion 21 Nov 09 - 03:02 AM
Doug Chadwick 21 Nov 09 - 05:46 AM
VirginiaTam 21 Nov 09 - 07:38 AM
VirginiaTam 21 Nov 09 - 07:39 AM
Jim Carroll 21 Nov 09 - 09:05 AM
Uncle_DaveO 21 Nov 09 - 10:10 AM
Amos 21 Nov 09 - 10:14 AM
Jim Carroll 21 Nov 09 - 11:00 AM
VirginiaTam 21 Nov 09 - 11:21 AM
Jim Carroll 21 Nov 09 - 12:15 PM
Joe_F 21 Nov 09 - 06:05 PM
Steve Shaw 21 Nov 09 - 06:28 PM
Tangledwood 21 Nov 09 - 06:49 PM
Gurney 21 Nov 09 - 10:51 PM
Cuilionn 22 Nov 09 - 08:32 PM
Gurney 22 Nov 09 - 11:01 PM
GUEST,Charmion's brother Andrew 23 Nov 09 - 07:59 AM
Spleen Cringe 23 Nov 09 - 08:08 AM
Dave the Gnome 23 Nov 09 - 10:13 AM
Dave the Gnome 23 Nov 09 - 10:29 AM
Martin Harwood 23 Nov 09 - 12:20 PM
Doug Chadwick 23 Nov 09 - 02:53 PM
Amos 23 Nov 09 - 04:50 PM
Dave MacKenzie 23 Nov 09 - 05:17 PM
Midchuck 23 Nov 09 - 07:12 PM
GUEST,Bert 24 Nov 09 - 06:42 PM
Eric the Viking 24 Nov 09 - 07:03 PM
GUEST,seth in Olympia 24 Nov 09 - 09:38 PM
GUEST,Charmion's brother Andrew 24 Nov 09 - 10:18 PM
GUEST,Bob L 25 Nov 09 - 03:24 AM
Ruth Archer 25 Nov 09 - 05:12 AM
Dave the Gnome 25 Nov 09 - 06:49 AM
GUEST,seth in Olympia 25 Nov 09 - 10:06 AM
Ruth Archer 25 Nov 09 - 10:59 AM
GUEST,Steamin' WIllie 25 Nov 09 - 12:47 PM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 25 Nov 09 - 12:51 PM
Dave the Gnome 25 Nov 09 - 02:43 PM
VirginiaTam 25 Nov 09 - 04:31 PM
VirginiaTam 25 Nov 09 - 05:16 PM
Bryn Pugh 26 Nov 09 - 04:40 AM
VirginiaTam 29 Nov 09 - 04:59 AM
scouse 29 Nov 09 - 06:04 AM
rich-joy 29 Nov 09 - 11:25 PM
MGM·Lion 30 Nov 09 - 12:55 AM
Doug Chadwick 30 Nov 09 - 02:27 AM
michaelr 30 Nov 09 - 04:17 PM
Little Hawk 30 Nov 09 - 05:31 PM
Rowan 30 Nov 09 - 08:23 PM
MGM·Lion 30 Nov 09 - 09:06 PM
Little Hawk 30 Nov 09 - 10:23 PM
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Subject: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: MGM·Lion
Date: 19 Nov 09 - 11:57 PM

Having got into a somewhat silly spat with another Catter on another thread over nothing v much, the way we all do occasionally, & for which we have both since apologised, I so far forgot myself as to call him a 'pillock', largely because I thought he was being pompous so it was for the alliteration as much as anything else. Another poster took me to task for name-calling, which I admitted, though saying there are much worse names than that - quite a vanilla one, I thought it. But I offered, if it would make him happier, to emend it to "big girl's blouse", an euphemism for a foolish person which had some currency a few years back [did it go in the US also, or was it only over here?]

Looking back over my life, back to 1930s/40s, and remembering such denunciations of people's intelligence as 'twit', 'twerp', 'silly kipper' [a fave of my father's in my earliest childhood], it occurs to me that above-mentioned "big girl's blouse" must be the daftest of the lot.

Can anyone think of a sillier one?


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: Joe Offer
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 12:28 AM

There are some meanings of pillock that my sainted and brilliant mother-in-law would feel uncomfortable about, so I'm sure she wouldn't have used the word. But one word she used all the time to describe an annoying person was "pill," as in, "Oh, she's such a pill!"
Rest her soul. She was one hell of a woman (and I've got a pretty good mother-in-law this time around, too - both were born in 1915).
-Joe-


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: MGM·Lion
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 12:45 AM

Was she aware, I wonder Joe, that 'pill' in that sense means 'testicle'!? Following your clicky, I find that Wiki gives 'wazzock' as another 'mild expletive' for a foolish person; which is a good one. But I still wait to see if anyone can come up with one more altogether absurd in every way than "big girl's blouse". Anyone any idea of its origin, btw? I have simultaneously asked Michael Quinion, but of course don't know if he will feel able to reply.


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: Janie
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 12:55 AM

I had no idea of the origins "pill' until just this instance, curtesy of Joe's Wiki link. I am familiar with the the phrase "____is such a pill", but in these parts (southeast USA) it is generally used to indicate some one who is a spoilsport, ie too literal or staid or proper - without a sense of humor.

Never, ever before heard "big girl's blouse until opening this thread.

I swan, I learn something new everyday!


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: GUEST,escapee
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 01:24 AM

I'd thought a "pill" was difficult to deal with in the way that unpleasant medicine is." a bitter pill to swallow " Could a "big girl's blouse" button or zip up the back, in a most inconvenient way? Never heard the term 'til tonight.
I'm afraid I'm too impatient for playful euphemism so I tend to go quickly to direct and unflattering frontal attack. I paid my UAW dues, and I was entitled to direct (truthfully) unflattering attacks on my bosses.They were'nt clever or subtle and were usually anotomically impossible, but the bosses caught the drift that the hourlyworkers did not consider the supervisory or managerial levels quite fully human or competent to run the company


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: Doug Chadwick
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 02:54 AM

In the same vein as "big girl's blouse", an implied threat from a third person could be dismissed as "he's nowt but a shirt button".

DC


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: Jack Campin
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 03:26 AM

Ya PRINGLE!!!! (Schoolkids insult, Glasgow, 1980s).

I think it says you're dorky enough to wear a Pringle sweater, though I suppose it might mean that in some way you resemble a Pringle crisp.


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: Bryn Pugh
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 05:12 AM

A common insult in the environs of Liverpool is "dickhead".


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 05:18 AM

One I am rather fond of here in Ireland is when somebody is accused of 'acting the maggot'.
Jim Carroll


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 05:53 AM

Mard arse: grumpy person.


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: MGM·Lion
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 06:03 AM

Plenty of examples concerned with clothing, indeed, for which thanx. but still none I feel to compare with that OP idiocy of mine, BGB. & still no-one with explanation of how it originated or even what it is supposed to mean. After all, what can whoever it was originated the phrase have actually meant by calling someone a Big Girl's Blouse. Not even clear to me whether it means a blouse big enuff to be worn by a big girl, or whether the actual insult is just the girl's-blouse bit, with the 'big' just an intensifier, as when one might call someone a Big Fool. Any theories as to that particular wrinkle?


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: GUEST
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 06:36 AM

By all accounts it was one of Hylda Baker's catchphrases:

'Born on 4th February 1908 in Farnworth...Hylda Baker was very tiny at 4ft11inches but had tremendous energy and she worked her way up the entertainment ladder via the Music Halls, where she played a fast-talking gossip, aided by her gormless on-stage 'stooge' Cynthia (always played by a man). She developed a string of catch-phrases such as 'She knows, you know', "You big girl's blouse' and 'Be soon', and she became a master of the malapropism and double entendre – such as "I can say that without fear of contraception" and "You haven't had the pleasure of me yet".'
http://www.prideofmanchester.com/comedy/hyldabaker.htm


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: MGM·Lion
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 06:45 AM

Thank you, Guest. Still don't know quite what she meant by it, but that certainly seems to be the origin. Wonder why it should suddenly have caught on about - what[?] - 10? - years ago,, when, judging by her d.o.b, it must have been ongoing for a while by then; or whether the 'big' is descriptive or intensificatory. But certainly a start — many thanks again.

Any other, equally daft, ones? In the Forest of Dean, where my wife cane from, btw, 'mard' means 'spoilt' [presumably = marred], so 'mard-arse' would mean spoilt brat.


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: Matthew Edwards
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 06:59 AM

The Oxford English Dictionary also (indirectly) credits Hylda Baker with the earliest use of the phrase; it cites the script of the Granada TV programme Nearest and Dearest; Series 2, Episode 1, [July 8 1969].
Eli [Jimmy Jewel] 'Go round talking like that, you'll be hearing from our solicitor.'
Nellie [Hylda Baker] 'He is our solicitor, you big girl's blouse.'

Matthew


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: Wyrd Sister
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 06:59 AM

Sorry, guest was me post-Secret-Santa-ing.

No, no idea what she meant, but it has been used throughout my lifetime. Her tone of voice said all that was needed.

'Mardy' in Yorkshire is used by children to children who cry easily, want things their own way, won't share or join in. "Mardy bum, Mardy bum, tell your mother to smack your bum" was our 1950s taunt. Presume mardyarse is just a cruder version taken up by adults.


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: MGM·Lion
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 07:50 AM

Many thanks still, Wyrd & Matt. So it goes back 40 years — but I had never heard it till it had its spasm of exposure in the mainstream slang of the time about 10 years ago - just so happens that wasn't one of the progs I watched. Wonder why — I always loved Jimmy Jewell [& Ben Warris!]. Did it never, in all that time, occur to any of you to wonder exactly WHAT she meant by it? To my [enquiring] mind, her tone of voice did precisely NOT say all that was needed — but then, I always think I must somehow be related to that Dickens character, Clennam in Little Dorrit, who 'wants to know, you know'.


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: Matthew Edwards
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 08:08 AM

Well I've always assumed that the phrase represented a fine example of what I was taught in my English Grammar as a Figure of Speech 'Container for the Thing Contained' i.e. Nellie was calling Eli "a big tit!".

Matthew


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: Acorn4
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 08:18 AM

The only thing that can get me to be verbally abusive is driving through London, so much so that I refuse to do it these days.

I remember calling some idiot in a 4 x 4 a "fat four eyed f***pig", which I was quite proud of as it came off the cuff.


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: Tug the Cox
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 08:20 AM

Mardy is founf throughout the east Midlans/South Yorkshire. It relates to marred = spoilt, and is usually used to taunt people who complain if they don't get their own way. Most common phrases are Mardy Baby, and Mardy Bum.
    Peter and Iona Opie provide a map of its geographical provenance.


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: Bryn Pugh
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 08:26 AM

One I have introduced the people in the East Midlands to, when someone is trying to impose his/her will on folk, without lawful or other authority, other than strength of personality :

Coming the "See you next Tuesday"

(C*NT).

I have posted previously that I abominate that word.


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: CET
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 09:02 AM

I remember my father using the phrase "thick as a bull's foot", which is more poetic than ridiculous. Is that a Welsh regionalism?

Another one, which I am pretty sure is peculiar to the Canadian Forces (and a bit out of date now - last year I heard a middle aged officer reminiscing about it) is "ya frggin' jabony". That too is probably poetic. My best source on such matters (Charmion) says it is a contraction of "Jesus bonehead".


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: Bob the Postman
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 11:40 AM

I have never encountered the term "mardy" before but mightn't it be derived from "merd" meaning "shit"? This would account for compounds like "mardy-bum". And I wonder if the term "smarty-pants" is derived from "mardy-pants"?

Another ridiculous term of abuse: one ex-Brit teacher in our junior high school would occasionally berate a pupil with "you silly pudding".


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: Lonesome EJ
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 12:13 PM

I have always liked Goofball. It's a colorful term which can be used almost affectionately when referring to members of one's own family.


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: katlaughing
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 12:59 PM

Bryn, we hear "dickhead" out here in the west a lot, too.

My friend in WY has an expression I find myself using a lot, "Put my/your shirt in the dirt." Kind of means, something took you by surprise or impressed you or showed you up. As in my grandson so astounded me by what he said, as a six year old, he put my shirt in the dirt.

He also "beats to socks off me" when we play UNO and thinks it is hilarious!


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: Bill D
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 01:01 PM

My mother used to refer to us boys as "Yayhoots" (never saw it in print...that just a phonetic rendering)

We always took the context to mean something like "tedious, irrepresible, but sort of tolerable because I don't have much choice"

as in, "Will you two yayhoots stop that noise and get IN here for dinner!"


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: VirginiaTam
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 01:32 PM

In the late 1960's and early 70's the word for someone who had done or said something dumb was "doofus."

When I lived in West Virginia in late 70's I heard the phrase "ignernt equals seven times ignorant" more than once.

My daughter used to call me "a goober", whenever I fell into a state of obtuseness about anything she was talking about.

There is always Homeresque and having a Doh moment.

I think this topic may border on folklore, so maybe deserves to be above the line?


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 01:47 PM

Not exactly a 'term' of abuse - just abuse applied with skill.
When I was an apprentice one of my mentors was a man just coming up to retirement, Jack Warrington.
He did his level best to make me a good tradesman, but at the time I was more interested in music than I was of being an electrician.
One day when I was proving particularly obtuse he turned to me and said thoughtfully, "You know, when you were born I think they must have thrown the wrong bit away"!
Treasured it always and used it often.
Jim Carroll


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: Wyrd Sister
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 05:19 PM

Oh Jim, that goes with 'you were behind the door when they/God handed out...'


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: Tangledwood
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 05:36 PM

My Londoner father often called me a daft haipath (that's what it sounded like to me). It was only very recently I realised that was probably "halfpennies-worth". Of what I don't know.


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: Dave the Gnome
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 05:51 PM

Mard arse insn't a grimpy person. Mard is soft (or nesh to go more native) so a mard arse is someone who whinges or moans at the least little discomfort.

A wassock is a bucket or pile of shit with a crust on.

So, shurrup yet great whinging wassock

:D (eG)


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: Little Hawk
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 06:14 PM

"sodding" and "sod", as in "You stupid sodding bastard!" or "You bloody sod!". What the heck is that about? I always thought that sod was a layer of grass and earth for putting on a new lawn.

It seems to be a popular British term of abuse. Does anyone have an explanation? Or a derivation?

Then there's "tosser" which is downright hilarious to North American ears. I have been called a tosser by certain sodding old gits on this forum, and I thoroughly enjoyed it. ;-)


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: VirginiaTam
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 06:20 PM

tosser seems equivalent to loser

sod and sodding derivation of sodomy or Sodomite.


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: Mrrzy
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 06:31 PM

For boobs: sweater cows.


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 07:02 PM

"Yer all right you but yer shit stinks. Nothing personal." A fabulous insult once hurled at me at university in the 60s. Naturally I didn't deserve it.


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 07:07 PM

It's interesting that such sayings as "G'day, you old bastard!" or "He's been ill for weeks, the poor bastard" are actually terms of endearment in Oz.


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: Leadfingers
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 07:14 PM

'He's all mouth and trousers' is a lovely self explanatory expression I rather like .


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: MarkS
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 07:21 PM

A sample from northeast US ethnic taunts, as in "you....."

Schmuck, schlemiel, for the Jewish guys
Garvone for the Italians
Kayoodle for the Eastern Europeans (I think)

And my Irish grandmothers favorite "Were you ahint the door when the Lord gave out brains?"

How did you taunt the other ethnics in your old hood?

Msrk


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: Amos
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 07:27 PM

On the margin I am fed up with being asked "What's up"? when the enquirer means, instead, to say, "Hello". And I am also pretty tired of "Hey" as a substitute for "hello", and I am thoroughly overdone on being told "no problem" when the person means to say "you're welcome".

"'S up?

"Oh, hey. 'S up.

"Nothin'. You?

"Same ole..."

"Thanks fer asking anyway."

"Oh, no problem."

Gaaahhhhhhh!!!!

A


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 08:11 PM

Perhaps it's time to clear up a life-long mystery.
One of the common terms of abuse in the Liverpoolof my youth (including members of my family) was to call somebody a 'swine's melt'; does anybody know if this has any basis in animal husbandry?
Jim Carroll


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: Tug the Cox
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 08:55 PM

Daft Ha'porth ( halfpenny worth) is affectionate, only used with friends and loved ones, the 'ha'porth' automatically reduces the effect of the 'daft'


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: Bill D
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 10:16 PM

"you're welcome"

This is becoming a vanishing, almost obsolete phrase. The ONLY TV person I see use it regularly is David Schuster on MSNBC.

"No problem" or just a parroted return 'thank you' is about all you hear.... sad commentary on usage.


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: Little Hawk
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 10:29 PM

Hey, Amos! 'S up? ;-)

I have a friend who always says, "Hey" when he means "hello" or "How are you?" He'd drive you nuts. He's on this forum, but I am sworn not to reveal his name. He even answers the phone, "Hey" when you call him. He once sent me an email.

It said: Hey

I replied: Hey what?

He replied: Just hey.

I said: Hey to you to.

And so on....

But when will texting reduce the word "Hey" to just "HY" to save time?


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: Donuel
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 11:05 PM

From my angle a pillock would be a shmuck,
an effeminate smuck would be a shmendrick
a clumsy shmuck would be a schlemiel,
a slinger of string - shtik fleysh mit oygn

Which brings me to the etiology of my name which I try to live up to.
"Hak," or "huk," comes from a verb meaning "to knock." What's the connection? Imagine a boiling teakettle. The more it boils, the emptier it gets, and the louder and more annoyingly the lid bangs. The very popular phrase "Hak mir nisht ken tshaynik" literally means "Don't knock me a teakettle." Figuratively, translated it means "you don't have to shut up completely, but I'd really appreciate it if you'd stop rattling on about the same damned thing all the time."

Regarding Sarah Palin and her legions who are shtik fleysh mit oygn, cockinyam: I can see it from here.

In closing I would like to give a shout out to robo and family who are still stuck in a place that was easy to enter but hard to escape; ("a viste pgire af dir").

and if that weren;t enough Cohongo has been known to say You are uglier than a monkey's armpit.


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: Little Hawk
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 11:17 PM

Chongo's been known to say a lot of strange things. He sometimes calls someone he doesn't like a "bindle stiff". That's an expression that was last popular in the 40s, I think, and it means that the guy is a total dissolute bum and ne'er-do-well. He calls a flashy dame with "round heels" a "proskirt" or a "chippy". He talks about "pearl divin' at the local hash house" which means "washing dishes at the local greasy spoon". He says "Drift!" which means "Get lost!" He's got a million of 'em.


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: MGM·Lion
Date: 21 Nov 09 - 01:23 AM

'Tosser', for your info, = 'wanker', which = masturbator — from English vulgarism 'to toss off', which means to masturbate to orgasm. Quite a cogent phrase, actually, when you come to think of it [no pun or double-entendre intended in that 'come', honest!]


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: Little Hawk
Date: 21 Nov 09 - 01:28 AM

Yes, I know what it means...but it still sounds unintentionally hilarious to a North American. A North American cannot get upset if you call him a tosser. Trust me. He will simply be amused.


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: MGM·Lion
Date: 21 Nov 09 - 02:01 AM

... which surely demonstrates what a lot of tossers you lot over there are when it comes to appreciation of real abuse..


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: MGM·Lion
Date: 21 Nov 09 - 02:02 AM

... not to mention big girl's blouses...


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: Gurney
Date: 21 Nov 09 - 02:38 AM

I've always thought the American equivalent of 'tosser' is 'jerk.' I believe wazzock is a an Adze (adz'ook.) If you see one standing on its head, you'll see why.

'Nong' is the Kiwi/Aussie version of the same type of person.


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: MGM·Lion
Date: 21 Nov 09 - 02:56 AM

Ah, yes, thanks Gurney. "Jerk off" is the US equivt of "toss off", isn't it? Both v good phrases, in fact & not the sort liable to lead to too much mutual incomprehension.


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: MGM·Lion
Date: 21 Nov 09 - 03:02 AM

... tho it is my impression that 'jerk' has emerged more into mainstream than 'tosser'. Until recently, 'tosser' would not have been usable in society [probably still isn't, in fact]; whereas "what a jerk!" seems to me the sort of thing one might even have heard in 1930-40s movies — something William Bendix might have said in one of the McGehrins·From·Brooklyn films, e.g: presumably the Hays Office being too ingenuous & innocent to recognise its true origin?


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: Doug Chadwick
Date: 21 Nov 09 - 05:46 AM

One of the common terms of abuse in the Liverpool of my youth (including members of my family) was to call somebody a 'swine's melt

I was born and brought up in Liverpool and it wasn't common enough for me to have heard it. In fact, I can safely say that I've never heard it anywhere before reading it here.


DC


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: VirginiaTam
Date: 21 Nov 09 - 07:38 AM

'Tosser', for your info, = 'wanker', which = masturbator

Either I have been misinformed or that is the current common meaning.

I have discovered that tosser might be drunkard and derivative of toss pot, which was the ceramic mug in which beer was served.


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: VirginiaTam
Date: 21 Nov 09 - 07:39 AM

Oh and that definition alone might make this thread eligible for above the line.

;~)


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 21 Nov 09 - 09:05 AM

Mystery solved;
I had searched the English slang dictionaries, completely neglecting to take into account my Irish ancestry.
This s from Bernard Share's 'Slanguage'
Jim Carroll

Hoor's/whore's/whoor's melt [n. phr., hoor implying female + melt 1. Derog. term. 1961 Dominic Behan, Teems of Times and Happy Returns: '"Go on, yeh rotten whore's melt! Yer people turned [see turn 2.] Protestant for soup durin' the famine!'" 1989 Hugh Leonard, Out after Dark: "'An' sure God is good, and the whoor's melt won't have a minute's luck.' 1992 Sean O'Callaghan, Down by the Glenside, Memoirs of an Irish Boyhood: 'But it was of Parnell [see the Uncrowned King of Ireland] that he spoke most: "A king," he called him, "A hero who would have freed Ireland," but for the opposition of the black-hearted "hoors' melts".'
2. Complete mess, as in make a hoor's melt of [vb. phr.].


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: Uncle_DaveO
Date: 21 Nov 09 - 10:10 AM

'swine's melt'

Hog melts are boar's testicles, sort of an equivalent of "Rocky Mountain Oysters". I used to see them in meat shops in what I like to call "neighborhoods no longer in fashion". Maybe to this day, I don't know.

I don't know if hog melts are inspected meats any more. If not, they would seldom be available in commercial meat markets.

No reference to whores necessary here, and they wouldn't have them anyway.

Dave Oesterreich


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: Amos
Date: 21 Nov 09 - 10:14 AM

"All hat, and no cattle" for pretentious self-aggrandizers.


A


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 21 Nov 09 - 11:00 AM

Thanks for that David.
In Ireland, the term 'hoore' is sexless and can be used as a term of admiration as well as abuse.
The late Taoiseach (Prime Minister) Charles Haughey, is still referred to as 'a cute hoore' in recognition of his skill at dodging corruption charges, for which he would almost certainly have been found guilty.
The term is often applied to localities, 'a cute Cork hoore' probably being the most common.
Jim Carroll


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: VirginiaTam
Date: 21 Nov 09 - 11:21 AM

I use the term little man in a big hat for male managers evidencing Bonaparte syndrome. For women showing same, I just call 'em "bitch." Takes one to know one.


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 21 Nov 09 - 12:15 PM

Another Liverpool saying comes to mind;
"If you can't fight, wear a big hat".
Thanks for the reminder Virginia.
Or; "tuppence trying to look over threepence".
Jim Carroll


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: Joe_F
Date: 21 Nov 09 - 06:05 PM

You're a wit and a half, you are.


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 21 Nov 09 - 06:28 PM

Can anyone explain to me how the ostensibly insulting expression "he's the dog's bollocks" has come to mean entirely the opposite of what one might suspect?


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: Tangledwood
Date: 21 Nov 09 - 06:49 PM

I assumed it followed the intent of "the cat's whiskers" or "the bee's knees", importing different parts of the anatomy.

Tug the Cox - Thanks for the reassurance! :)


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: Gurney
Date: 21 Nov 09 - 10:51 PM

Steve, if you look at it from the point of view of the dog, washing them, it makes sense! Helps if you've owned a dog.
Likewise, as Tanglewood says, the cat's whiskers.

I've never worked out 'the bee's knees.' They just carry pollen there.


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: Cuilionn
Date: 22 Nov 09 - 08:32 PM

Heard from an elderly (lady?) my partner was transporting to a doctor's appointment last week: "He's so full of himself, he thinks he's King Sh*t from Turd Harbour."

The previous week, during a similar errand, the same client described herself as having been, "busier than a three-balled tom in a cathouse."

I'm beginning to think my partner takes on these jobs just to hear what this wild old woman might say next...


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: Gurney
Date: 22 Nov 09 - 11:01 PM

Must have been a wild one in her day, Cuilionn.


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: GUEST,Charmion's brother Andrew
Date: 23 Nov 09 - 07:59 AM

One should always keep one's ear cocked in the presence of sergeants-major, one never knows what novel abuse they will coin. Our BSM was passing on instructions to the NCOs near the battery kitchen one day late in 1976. Wanting some coffee and realizing he was without cup, he turned to Hutchison, the battery clerk, and instructed him to retrieve it. Hutchison hiked off to the wagon lines, whence we heard the burping and farting of the BSM's ancient 3/4 ton truck "Sadie" firing up. Hutchison faithfully followed the track plan, eventually arriving in Sadie at the battery kitchen. When he halted, the BSM could be heard bellowing, even at the far end of the gun line, "You saucer-headed c*******er, I told you to bring me my cup and you brought me my truck. You ****ing saucer-head!" And so "saucer-head" passed into battery, then unit, then regimental parlance, and is still occasionally used on people with apparently vacant brain pans anywhere in the Canadian artillery.


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: Spleen Cringe
Date: 23 Nov 09 - 08:08 AM

I think this one is from North Staffordshire (at least the person I know who uses it is). For someone or something useless: neither feather nor arse nor hole-in-the-ground.


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: Dave the Gnome
Date: 23 Nov 09 - 10:13 AM

What is the background of 'If you can't fight, wear a big hat'? I heard it years ago in the Mancheter area as well and never understood it. Something to do with one of the big wars?

DeG


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: Dave the Gnome
Date: 23 Nov 09 - 10:29 AM

Just had a rethink - Maybe from earler that the plain WW1 uniforms - Did the Generals wear big hats while sat commanding the troops from the rear?

DeG


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: Martin Harwood
Date: 23 Nov 09 - 12:20 PM

From childhood in Edinburgh:

"May yer next shite be a hedgehog"
"bam-heid"
and if some one's in a bad mood (or a "raj") "who shat in your cornflakes?"


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: Doug Chadwick
Date: 23 Nov 09 - 02:53 PM

What is the background of 'If you can't fight, wear a big hat'?

The way I've always taken it is :-   try to look tough, even if you're not.

You get insects that have the same sort of stripes as wasps but can't sting. It's a good defence so long as what is trying to eat you thinks that you can sting them.

A big hat will make you look taller than you are.


DC


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: Amos
Date: 23 Nov 09 - 04:50 PM

I am partial to some of the Mexican insults we pick up here in the SW US, including calling someone a pendejo or conjo, or a cabron. (Respectively, a pubic hair, a female pudendum, and a goat). They are also liberal with smirches on one's immediate ancestry, as in hijo de puta (son of a bitch, or of a whore) or maricón - homosexual, a particularly strong insult in the land of macho.

A few other choice expressions:

Tu eres más feo que el culo de un mono - You are uglier than the butt of a monkey
Tu hermano no tiene la ingle - Your brother has no groin
Tu madre es muy gato y feo - Your mother is fat and ugly.


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: Dave MacKenzie
Date: 23 Nov 09 - 05:17 PM

From my childhood In Edinburgh, the ultimate insult was to call someone English.


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: Midchuck
Date: 23 Nov 09 - 07:12 PM

One should always keep one's ear cocked in the presence of sergeants-major, one never knows what novel abuse they will coin.

While in recruit traning, working on the manual of arms, I heard our drill instructor tell one of the troops that he was handling his rifle "like a monkey screwing a football."   I've used that line many times since.

(He was, of course, referring to an American football. A soccer ball would still be funny, but not as much, I think.)

Peter


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: GUEST,Bert
Date: 24 Nov 09 - 06:42 PM

My Grandma from the East End of London would say.

Daft as arseholes and twice as nasty.
Wouldn't know his prick from his thumb if it didn't have a nail on it.
Pozzy arsed bastard.
Looks like a bundle of arseholes tied up ugly.


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: Eric the Viking
Date: 24 Nov 09 - 07:03 PM

He's got eyes like battling dogs bollocks...was a favourite of a good friend. My mum used to say, "They think their shit don't stink". In the 70's calling someone, Mazda= thick. (Cos Mazda lamps stay brighter longer...so said the advert) In the 80's a "Slaphead"= thick, sort of chavish (they hadn't been invented then but...) You know when you slap yer head and go Doooh! He's got his thumb up his arse! (Slow) And (truthfully not by me) "Eh you, fishbox fanny". To certain girls.


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: GUEST,seth in Olympia
Date: 24 Nov 09 - 09:38 PM

To call someone a "dickhead" has been current in the Pacific Northwest since I first heard my daughter use it to describe an unpleasant person in about 1984. Wasn't used growing up in the 1950's midwest. Still very common, especially if you are under thirty
seth


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: GUEST,Charmion's brother Andrew
Date: 24 Nov 09 - 10:18 PM

You must mean, "You're all hunched over like a bear-cub fucking a football."-- Ed Dobson, late of the Canadian Airborne Regiment, 1977


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: GUEST,Bob L
Date: 25 Nov 09 - 03:24 AM

To answer Gurney, "The Bee's Knees" = "The Business" in cod Italian.


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: Ruth Archer
Date: 25 Nov 09 - 05:12 AM

"'Mardy' in Yorkshire is used by children to children who cry easily, want things their own way, won't share or join in. "Mardy bum, Mardy bum, tell your mother to smack your bum" was our 1950s taunt."


For a contextualisation of "mardy" and "mardy bum", I refer you to the following highly reliable source. Ladies and gentlemen, I give you Yorkshire's own Arctic Monkeys:


Mardy Bum


And for those who don't speak Sheffield (especially the Americans contributing to the thread, or southerners), here is a translation:


Well now then Mardy Bum
I've seen your frown
And it's like looking down the barrel of a gun
And it goes off
And out come all these words
Oh there's a very pleasant side to you
A side I much prefer
It's one that laughs and jokes around
Remember cuddles in the kitchen
Yeah, to get things off the ground
And it was up, up and away
Oh, but it's right hard to remember that
On a day like today when you're all argumentative
And you've got the face on

Well now then Mardy Bum
Oh I'm in trouble again, aren't I
I thought as much
Cause you turned over there
Pulling that silent disappointment face
The one that I can't bear

Why can't we just laugh and joke around
Remember cuddles in the kitchen
Yeah, to get things off the ground
And it was up, up and away
Oh, but it's right hard to remember that
On a day like today when you're all argumentative
And you've got the face on

And yeah I'm sorry I was late
but I missed the train
And then the traffic was a state
And I can't be arsed to carry on in this debate
That reoccurs, oh when you say I don't care
but of course I do, yeah I clearly do!

So laugh and joke around
Remember cuddles in the kitchen
Yeah, to get things off the ground
And it was up, up and away
Oh, but it's right hard to remember that
On a day like today when you're all argumentative
And you've got the face on


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: Dave the Gnome
Date: 25 Nov 09 - 06:49 AM

Similar in Lancashire, as I said before. Mard=soft. To be super mard is to be nesh:-)

DeG


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: GUEST,seth in Olympia
Date: 25 Nov 09 - 10:06 AM

From the same daughter that gave us " dickhead", " dillhole". No idea as to the exact meaning, except that it's not good. " Dillhole" can be used in a teasing/affectionate way with someone you are close to. "Dickhead" by contrast, is only used in a pejorative, dismissive way about a third party, not in the room, who has proven untrustworthy and/or stubborn and difficult to deal with.
seth


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: Ruth Archer
Date: 25 Nov 09 - 10:59 AM

DeG, I think the Arctic Monkeys' lyrics refer to being in a strop, not soft. That's certainly how it was used by my Brummie in-laws: my daughter was often said to be "in a mard".


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: GUEST,Steamin' WIllie
Date: 25 Nov 09 - 12:47 PM

I was brought up knowing what Mardy meant, and it was in common use.

I moved all of 8 miles and when my sons were at school, they were accustomed to hearing Manny instead, meaning the same.

I did write a topical parody once many years ago with mardy in it, but be buggered if I remember what, where, why.   I do recall performing it at the time at The Boundary, Worksop though.

Ridiculous terms of abuse? I remember Tony Capstick having the BBC in a tizz when they wanted him to perform on Top of the Pops and they had issues with the word Wassock.

My favourites have always been Breadhead, duckspunk, Tha's like a one legged bloke at an arse kicking content and that old favourite, Miss Great Britain 1924.


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
Date: 25 Nov 09 - 12:51 PM

"Twonk" "Banana" "Ninny" I use all of these quite frequently.

"Mardy" is definitely grumpy.


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: Dave the Gnome
Date: 25 Nov 09 - 02:43 PM

Funny old thing, regional variations, aren't they? Anyone read Bill Brysons 'Mother Togue'? He makes the point, as an American living a lot of the time in England, that for all Britain is tiny compared to the US, the variations in dialects are vast. One very interesting (well, to us triva nerds) point was the use of 'twenty one' and 'one and twenty'. Aparently, up the east side of England from Suffolk to Yorkshire it changges every twenty miles. I have never come across it but I have no reason to disbelieve the esteemed Mr. B.

The transfer of mard from being in a strop to being soft is an odd one indeed. Bearing in mind that a lot of people around my area (Salford, Lancs) cane from the midlands during a miners strike you would have thought that it would have carried the meaning. Maybe it was purposely corrupted. My Grandad, refered to anyone foppish (such as me in my teen years!) by saying 'Thi favvors a Staffurdshur mon'. So he saw anyone from Staffordshire as soft, even though his granparents came up in the same migration. Maybe the word was picked up by local Lancastrians and used to taunt the strike-breakers? Wonder if the same is true in Yorkshire?

Isn't language wonderful and long may it be so varied:-)

DeG


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: VirginiaTam
Date: 25 Nov 09 - 04:31 PM

dingleberry

don't ask... it's disgusting

asshat

often used by my daughters about stupid guys


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: VirginiaTam
Date: 25 Nov 09 - 05:16 PM

OMG - just looked up asshat

Head so far up own ass you are wearing your ass as a hat.

God I am exactly the Goober that my daughters called me.


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: Bryn Pugh
Date: 26 Nov 09 - 04:40 AM

One from when I was about 17 :

"Trouble wi' 'im, 'e thinks 'is arse'ole's a perfume factory".


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: VirginiaTam
Date: 29 Nov 09 - 04:59 AM

bugly - butt ugly
fugly - fucking ugly
fingugly - same as previous


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: scouse
Date: 29 Nov 09 - 06:04 AM

One I remember was "Your a Twollop" I'm a Scouser but I don't think it's scouse!! Any Helpers!!

As Aye,

Phil.


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: rich-joy
Date: 29 Nov 09 - 11:25 PM

re Amos' comments on Nov 20th re "no problem " instead of "you're welcome" :

It's taking over Down Under too : this "No probs / not a problem / no problem".   We used to say "No Wurries"(Worries), or alternatively, "She's right, mate" ....

"Dickhead" has long been a very common descriptor in Oz (er .... does that mean we have a lot of them?!). ... and to a lesser extent, "Knobhead".   

"Bloody Nong" used to be common in the 50s. Then "you little Twerp" and "Twit" were popular in the 60s. "Piehead" and "Pillock" also.
"You bloody sod" I think goes back to at least WWII ....

"Fishbrain" or "Fishwit" seem to have been taken over by "Dickbrain" and "Fuckwit" - or perhaps it's just the circles I move in?? :~)



Slight thread creep here, but I hafta say how much my partner and I hate "Buddy" : it's OK for Nth Americans, and it's OK for Scuba Divers, but to be called Buddy in Oz reeeeeally grates!!!


Cheers!
R-J


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: MGM·Lion
Date: 30 Nov 09 - 12:55 AM

'Twerp' & 'twit' seemed slow migrating to Oz if they were current there in 60s, as stated above. I remember them here in England from 1940 — I have a vivid memory of having been denounced as both by team-mates for an inadvertent handball during a game of football when I was 8 years old in Worthing (also, simultaneously, 'flop').

I can date this so precisely because it was during my first couple of days at Goring Hall School. Funny the discrete & trivial experiences that one's memory randomly stores.


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: Doug Chadwick
Date: 30 Nov 09 - 02:27 AM

One that I always likes is "you silly great barmpot" for someone acting in a ridiculous, foolish manner.

I don't use it myself, nor do I know anybody who does, so I don't when where I got it from. Perhaps I've been watching too much "Last of the Summer Wine". For me it sits up there alongside "Wazzock"

DC


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: michaelr
Date: 30 Nov 09 - 04:17 PM

For far-fetched insults, none can beat The Bard. I was given a pack of Shakespeare playing cards, each of which bears an elaborate insult from one of his works.

Example: You are one that converses more with the buttock of the night than with the forehead of the morning.

Cheers,
Michael


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: Little Hawk
Date: 30 Nov 09 - 05:31 PM

How about "twaddler", "shuffler", and "fetcher"? I like those. They imply a great deal in a brief and effective fashion.


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: Rowan
Date: 30 Nov 09 - 08:23 PM

'Twerp' & 'twit' seemed slow migrating to Oz if they were current there in 60s, as stated above. I remember them here in England from 1940

Rich-joy commented on their currency, rather than their onset, in the OZ 60s; I recall them both being current in Melbourne in the 40s but perhaps the circles I moved in were more vulgar than hers. "Nong" was also current around me at that time and occasionally applied to me by my father, who wanted me to be less bookish and more "hands on" in the ways he was.

I don't recall hearing "dickhead" before the 60s but when it appeared it was accompanied (in more polite conversation) by Richard Cranium.

Cheers, Rowan


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: MGM·Lion
Date: 30 Nov 09 - 09:06 PM

Quite, Rowan. But my point was that 'twit' & 'twerp' HAD been current in 40s Britain, but had gone well out of style, as slang will, by the 60s, however much they had persisted in Oz.


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Subject: RE: BS: Ridiculous terms of abuse
From: Little Hawk
Date: 30 Nov 09 - 10:23 PM

100!!!!!!!!!!

Ah, that felt good...


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