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Great Coffee Houses

Related thread:
Favorite Chicago Club tales... (20)


Big Al Whittle 20 Dec 04 - 02:24 PM
dianavan 19 Dec 04 - 08:59 PM
Don Firth 19 Dec 04 - 03:17 PM
Don Firth 19 Dec 04 - 03:13 PM
kendall 19 Dec 04 - 02:22 PM
dianavan 19 Dec 04 - 01:26 PM
Don Firth 19 Dec 04 - 01:11 PM
jaze 19 Dec 04 - 11:37 AM
Peace 19 Dec 04 - 12:33 AM
Peace 18 Dec 04 - 10:20 PM
dianavan 18 Dec 04 - 09:37 PM
14fret 18 Dec 04 - 04:14 PM
robomatic 18 Dec 04 - 02:04 AM
GUEST,EMPTY MIND BUDDHIST, SAINT LOUIS, MISSOURI 18 Dec 04 - 01:32 AM
GUEST,Art Thieme 10 Sep 04 - 10:31 PM
Jerry Rasmussen 05 Sep 04 - 01:20 PM
Amos 05 Sep 04 - 12:36 PM
GUEST,JOANN FROM BOSTON 05 Sep 04 - 10:36 AM
GUEST,Guest, NYC 21 Feb 01 - 06:24 PM
Art Thieme 21 Feb 01 - 02:39 PM
Art Thieme 21 Feb 01 - 02:29 PM
GUEST,Blind desert Pete 21 Feb 01 - 02:05 PM
Hollowfox 17 Feb 01 - 03:01 PM
Deckman 17 Feb 01 - 12:17 PM
Deckman 16 Feb 01 - 08:58 PM
RoyH (Burl) 16 Feb 01 - 01:08 PM
McGrath of Harlow 15 Feb 01 - 08:03 PM
wdyat12 15 Feb 01 - 05:22 PM
RoyH (Burl) 15 Feb 01 - 12:46 PM
RoyH (Burl) 15 Feb 01 - 12:16 PM
Art Thieme 15 Feb 01 - 12:13 PM
RoyH (Burl) 15 Feb 01 - 12:09 PM
Gray Rooster 15 Feb 01 - 11:53 AM
Peter K (Fionn) 15 Feb 01 - 08:57 AM
Sourdough 15 Feb 01 - 04:55 AM
BlueJay 14 Feb 01 - 01:01 PM
Art Thieme 14 Feb 01 - 12:46 PM
Gray Rooster 14 Feb 01 - 12:09 PM
Lonesome Gillette 14 Feb 01 - 11:56 AM
Lonesome Gillette 14 Feb 01 - 11:52 AM
Gray Rooster 14 Feb 01 - 11:51 AM
Jim the Bart 14 Feb 01 - 10:53 AM
RichM 14 Feb 01 - 09:36 AM
Lonesome Gillette 14 Feb 01 - 06:15 AM
Lonesome EJ 14 Feb 01 - 02:04 AM
Mudjack 31 Jul 99 - 04:57 PM
Sourdough 31 Jul 99 - 12:55 PM
Mike Strobel 28 Jul 99 - 01:36 PM
Penny S. 28 Jul 99 - 12:33 PM
Roger the zimmer 28 Jul 99 - 11:45 AM
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Subject: RE: Great Coffee Houses
From: Big Al Whittle
Date: 20 Dec 04 - 02:24 PM

Anybody remember The Shades Coffe House in Reading - round about 1965. The residents were Mike Cooper and Derek Hall. mike played a National Steel and Derek, a Martin. Mike tours de force were leroy Carr and Scrapper Blackwell's Blues at Sunrise and Dinks Song. Derek could play all the stuff off the Bert jansch Blue album - or so it seemed to me.

I know Mike is a photographer for Folk Roots, but I've never seen Derek since. I moved away from Reading not long after. It was my first experience of a folk club. And it was bloody exciting!

thanks guys wherever you are.


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Subject: RE: Great Coffee Houses
From: dianavan
Date: 19 Dec 04 - 08:59 PM

Probably didn't miss you but do not remember you. BTW I my hair is no longer brown. Its sort of brownish with silver streaks and red highlights. I'm also not as smiley as I was as a young woman. Those sure were fun times. I remember the International Fountain and the Horiuchi mural. Yes, the United Nations Pavillion was a treat... but mostly I remember the hot chocolate at the Last Exit.


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Subject: RE: Great Coffee Houses
From: Don Firth
Date: 19 Dec 04 - 03:17 PM

By the way, I have a low voice (bass), played a classic (nylon-string) guitar, and walked with a pair of aluminum forearm crutches. Probably not easy to miss in a crowd.

Don Firth


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Subject: RE: Great Coffee Houses
From: Don Firth
Date: 19 Dec 04 - 03:13 PM

Do you mean the Seattle Center Hootenannies at the Seattle Center in 1963? Not far from the big fountain. Some held in front of the Horiuchi mural, some in Center House. Before that, during the Seattle World's Fair in '62, Sunday afternoon multi-performer concerts at the United Nations Pavilion. Small fountain in the pavilion. I bellowed me li'l lungs out at both places.

". . . long, dark hair, long legs and a big smile." Hmm!!   

Don Firth


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Subject: RE: Great Coffee Houses
From: kendall
Date: 19 Dec 04 - 02:22 PM

The Side Door in Brunswick Maine.


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Subject: RE: Great Coffee Houses
From: dianavan
Date: 19 Dec 04 - 01:26 PM

We probably have run into each other. Remember me? I'm the skinny one with the long, dark hair, long legs and a big smile. ;>) Oh yes, times have changed!   

Yes, I remember the Pamir House but I don't remember the Quequeg. Oddly enough, our boat was named Quequeg. Do you remember the hootenanys at the fountain?

I left Seattle in 1969 and went to Europe. When I returned, I moved to Vashon Island and then on to B.C. Do you still live in Seattle?


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Subject: RE: Great Coffee Houses
From: Don Firth
Date: 19 Dec 04 - 01:11 PM

Yeah, dianavan, I remember the Last Exit. Down on Brooklyn Avenue, just south of East 40th Street.

Were you around Pamir House, the Queequeg, or the Eigerwand over on the Ave? I sang a lot at both Pamir House and the Queequeg a lot between '61 and '65. Maybe we've actually run into each other.

Don Firth


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Subject: RE: Great Coffee Houses
From: jaze
Date: 19 Dec 04 - 11:37 AM

The Main Point outside Phila. was a great place. I only got there twice to see Tim Buckley and Murray McLaughlin.


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Subject: RE: Great Coffee Houses
From: Peace
Date: 19 Dec 04 - 12:33 AM

(The Golem is no longer in operation--I think.) It was the brain child of Mike Regenstrief who hosts and provides Folk Roots/Folk Branches, CKUT Radio, Montreal. Great guy and dedicated folk supporter--and deep well of knowledge about folk.


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Subject: RE: Great Coffee Houses
From: Peace
Date: 18 Dec 04 - 10:20 PM

The Yellow Door in Montreal.

The Golem in Montreal.


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Subject: RE: Great Coffee Houses
From: dianavan
Date: 18 Dec 04 - 09:37 PM

Does anyone remember the Last Exit in Seattle (mid-60's). They served coffee, hot chocolate and apple pie. Great music and poetry.


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Subject: RE: Great Coffee Houses
From: 14fret
Date: 18 Dec 04 - 04:14 PM

Hi everyone,
Hope you don't mind an englishman contributing?
I only managed to play in places on the eastern seaboard.
Venues such as Dallas Kline's places in Connecticutt and New Caanan (I know, also Conn.), Caffe Lena
(3 times), The Chelsea House, Vermont, The Cherry Trees, Philly and on to the Gene Shay show, courtesy of my friend Saul Broudy, Bob ?'s music shop in Norfolk, VA, another near Lake Peekskill plus some bars etc; and festivals. Also a freebie in the Citicorp building in NYC! Through the courtesy of Paula Ballon. It was nearly 100% great. Generous hospitality, warm welcomes and great audiences.
I'd love to do it again? Who do I have to bribe?

I know things change but I hope that 'scene' hasn't, much. (?)
I'll never forget the people and places.


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Subject: RE: Great Coffee Houses
From: robomatic
Date: 18 Dec 04 - 02:04 AM

When I first visited it in the 80's, the Sourdough off the Spit in Homer, Alaska. You could nurse a cup and do the crossword in one of the most scenic spots on earth.

In downtown Anchorage, Sidestreet Espresso on F, a block down from Darwin's Theory.


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Subject: RE: Great Coffee Houses
From: GUEST,EMPTY MIND BUDDHIST, SAINT LOUIS, MISSOURI
Date: 18 Dec 04 - 01:32 AM

"THE EXIT" COFFEEHOUSE IN THE FORMER GASLIGHT SQUARE IN SAINT LOUIS RAN ITS RUN FROM THE MID TO LATE 1960S.
BY 1968, IT HAD CLOSED, ALONG WITH THE REST OF THE "SQUARE"; LOCATED AT THE INTERSECTION OF BOYLE AND OLIVE.
IT WAS CHARACTERISTICALLY SAINT LOUIS; THAT IS , IT DID NOT LAST LONG AS IT IS TYPICALLY THE SAINT LOUIS THING TO DO.

BUT FOR THOSE OF US WHO WERE FORTUNATE TO HAVE BEEN THERE, IT WAS THE WONDERFUL YEARS OF OUR LIVES. NOSTALGIA IS A PAINFUL EMOTION. A KIND OF THE "WAY WE WERE" AND WE CAN NEVER GO BACK TO THE HOT SUMMER NIGHTS WHEN GASLIGHT SQUARE WAS THE FOCUS OF OUR EXPERIENCE.
TODAY, THE ENTIRE COLLECTION OF BUILDINGS IS GONE AND REPLACED BY A HOUSING DEVELOPMENT CALLING ITSELF GASLIGHT SQUARE, BUT IT IS NOT.
IT IS AS IF IT NEVER WAS THERE AND IT NEVER HAPPENED;
WHEN YOU LOOK AT IT TODAY.
-PATRICK GENNA, 18 DECEMBER 2004, SAINT LOUIS, MISSOURI


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Subject: RE: Great Coffee Houses
From: GUEST,Art Thieme
Date: 10 Sep 04 - 10:31 PM

It's hard to believe but enough time has passed since this thread started for a kid to start and graduate from college. I only hope that they were able to find coffeehouses in which to hang out, study, sleep, find love and comaraderie and then give those commodities back. Like Desert Pete said, "You've got to prime the pump!"

Art Thieme


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Subject: RE: Great Coffee Houses
From: Jerry Rasmussen
Date: 05 Sep 04 - 01:20 PM

What a delightful thread! It brings back so many good memories of places I heard wonderful musicians, and sometime had a chance to perform, myself. In the Village, my favorite coffee house was the Gaslight Cafe, where Dave Van Ronk ran a Monday night hootenanny. Easy Rider.. I was there two or three nights when Mississippi John Hurt sang at the Gaslight. Was that you sitting over at a corner table?

And annamill.. we must surely have crossed paths in villatge coffee houses. I spent much of my free time there from 1960-064. If you waited on me, I hope I tipped you liberally.

My favorite New Haven coffee house, vixen, was the Pickin' Parlor, where I heard Elizabeth Cotton one glorious evening.

Jerry


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Subject: RE: Great Coffee Houses
From: Amos
Date: 05 Sep 04 - 12:36 PM

A vote of thanks to the Guest above for refreshing one of the wonderful threads of all Mudcat time. Wish I had an answer for Jio12, but I do not. Perhaps someone from the Boston region in the 60's can answer.



A


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Subject: RE: FEENJON
From: GUEST,JOANN FROM BOSTON
Date: 05 Sep 04 - 10:36 AM

HI. I CAME ACROSS YOUR SITE SEARCHING FOR INFO ON FEENJON CAFE IN THE 60'S. MY SISTER WORKED AT FEENJON IN THE EARLY 60'S. HER NAME IS ANN MARIE AND SHE LOOKED JUST LIKE JOAN BAEZ. SHE CAME FROM THE BOSTON AND CAMBRIDGE AREA. MY SISTER HAD LONG DARK BROWN HAIR AND VERY PRETTY AND SORT OF TALL. DO YOU REMEMBER HER??   MY E-MAIL IS Jio12@aol.com.


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Subject: RE: Great Coffee Houses
From: GUEST,Guest, NYC
Date: 21 Feb 01 - 06:24 PM

Gray Rooster: are you Rene Lawrence??? My God, if you are, I sure am glad I decided to look at the Mudcat. Do you still do Transcontinental Breakdown? I can't get that tune out of my mind after all these years. I've tried to play it, but even my nimble fingers can't. What year was it? 1959? Please respond. You were the best guitarist I'd ever heard. And what, you were 9 or 10?


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Subject: RE: Great Coffee Houses
From: Art Thieme
Date: 21 Feb 01 - 02:39 PM

Of course, Stevie Goodman's base was Earl Pionke's Chicago folk mecca the Earl Of Old Town. Steve said that when Mr. Kristofferson brought Paul Anka in to hear him at the Earl, he (Steve) took 'em all to the Fifth Peg to hear John Prine. Anka gave both air tickets to New York that night. Somehow, Samantha Eggar was a part of the entourage---and they all went to breakfast after the club closed at 4:00 AM. (5:00 AM was closing time on Saturday nights).

Art


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Subject: RE: Great Coffee Houses
From: Art Thieme
Date: 21 Feb 01 - 02:29 PM

Pete,

THE FIFTH PEG was a bar on Armitage---a block down and across the street from the Old Town School Of Folk Music (909 W. Armitage). Aside from being the place I got tossed out of for decking a drunk who was coming on to my wife when she was 8 months pregnant (all I did was push him and he went down--really) this folk club was the place where JOHN PRINE did his first good gigs that led to him & Steve Goodman being found by Paul Anka. Kris Kristofferson brought Anka in to hear them I think.

But the Fifth Peg was a hangout/wateringhole for the students from the school. That was a unique and a strange era. (1970 ??)

Art Thieme


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Subject: RE: Great Coffee Houses
From: GUEST,Blind desert Pete
Date: 21 Feb 01 - 02:05 PM

Art or Bart: Do either if you remember a Chi coffee house called the 5th peg? FullertonAve? my memory of those days is real shakey.


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Subject: RE: Great Coffee Houses
From: Hollowfox
Date: 17 Feb 01 - 03:01 PM

Besides the Caffe Lena, the Capitol District (that's anywhere within about 50 miles of Albany, NY), let's not forget the 8th Step (which is in it's second location, and has never had eight steps in it, anywhere), and Mother's Wine Emporium across the Hudson River in Troy, New York.


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Subject: RE: Great Coffee Houses
From: Deckman
Date: 17 Feb 01 - 12:17 PM

I'm surprised that no one from Seattle has jumped on this yet. Starting in the mid 1950's we had a slew of wonderful coffee houses that were very folk music friendly. The most famous of all was of course,"The Pamir House" or "P" house as we called it. John Timmins started it. In fact, just few years we had a 30 (I believe) re-union. JOhn showed up, as well as a host of the famous performers from the early days: Don Firth, Nancy Quense, Mike Leib, Walt Robertson, and many more. Other great coffee houses were: The Place Next Door, The Corraberie (sp?), The Door, The Matador.

Also, today in Yakima, "Grants Pub" is very friendlt to live performers. CHEERS, Bob Nelson


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Subject: RE: Great Coffee Houses
From: Deckman
Date: 16 Feb 01 - 08:58 PM

refresh


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Subject: RE: Great Coffee Houses
From: RoyH (Burl)
Date: 16 Feb 01 - 01:08 PM

Correct McGrath, I'd forgotten that one. I'm trying to remember the name of another London place that had parrots in the window. Joan & Rena Swankie used to sing there. Any ideas? There was a bloke called Curley used to run some late-nighters in London Too, any ideas on that?


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Subject: RE: Great Coffee Houses
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 15 Feb 01 - 08:03 PM

burl didn't mention The Partisan in Soho, which was a great folk place (and movement place generally) at one time in the early 60s. Martin Winsor, Redd Sullivan, John Baldry, and others. They used to take advantage of the fact that a lot of the public transport stopped early (and still does) to have all nighter folk-sessions lasting in the cellar, lasting until the bleary dawn. Great place to spend the night.


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Subject: RE: Great Coffee Houses
From: wdyat12
Date: 15 Feb 01 - 05:22 PM

The Club 47 in Cambridge during the sixties was my favorite haunt. Sometimes I was lucky enough to sit up front. I remember one night Tom Rush was thumping out tunes from his "Blues, Songs, and Ballads" repertoire when all of a sudden one of his fingerpicks flew off and landed in my lap. I jumped up and gave him his fingerpick back, he nodded, and kept on playing without missing a beat. I'll never forget that night.

wdyat12


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Subject: RE: Great Coffee Houses
From: RoyH (Burl)
Date: 15 Feb 01 - 12:46 PM

Hi Art - ref 'Godfrey Daniels' as a euphemistis swear word. In England we say 'Gordon Bennett' for the same purpose. Said with enough vehemence it really works. Ref old coffee houses, wasn't there one once, somewhere in Canada, called The Bohemian Embassy. Great name.


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Subject: RE: Great Coffee Houses
From: RoyH (Burl)
Date: 15 Feb 01 - 12:16 PM

I can recall when London had the Troubadour, Bunjie's, The Witches Cauldron, and more. Manchester had The Left-Wing, Exeter had The Left Bank(in Paris Street)Nottingham had Jules et Jim, and there was a folk coffeebar in Liverpool but I can't remember it's name.These all go back to the late 50's, early 60's. In America I've sung at Focus2, The Chelsea House,Godfrey Daniel's, Main Point, 8th Step, Cafe Lena, and had a ball in all of them. Never made it to The Ark, which I'm sad about given it's reputation. Is it still going? I musn't miss out the Fiddler's Green, Toronto. That was great. Burl


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Subject: RE: Great Coffee Houses
From: Art Thieme
Date: 15 Feb 01 - 12:13 PM

I think I'm gonna find that old "Demise of The No Exit Coffeehouse" thread and resurrect it just to keep it closer to this good thread.

Art Thieme


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Subject: RE: Great Coffee Houses
From: RoyH (Burl)
Date: 15 Feb 01 - 12:09 PM

I can recall when London had the Troubadour, Bunjie's, The Witches Cauldron, and more. Manchester had The Left-Wing, Exeter had The Left Bank(in Paris Street)Nottingham had Jules et Jim, and there was a folk coffeebar in Liverpool but I can't remember it's name.These all go back to the late 50's, early 60's. In America I've sung at Focus2, The Chelsea House,Godfrey Daniel's, Main Point, 8th Step, Cafe Lena, and had a ball in all of them. Never made it to The Ark, which I'm sad about given it's reputation. Is it still going? I musn't miss out the Fiddler's Green, Toronto. That was great. Burl


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Subject: RE: Great Coffee Houses
From: Gray Rooster
Date: 15 Feb 01 - 11:53 AM

Sourdough (and all), when I was going to Figaro's, there was live music. Not paid or set up in advance. Just happened. They were pretty tolerant. And yes, it was full of artistic intent and delivery.

I can't remember the man's name (Charles?) who managed the place at that time, but he was black and a friend of my brother's. He had part of his finger missing (Air Force accident I think). He introduced me to a chess player or two and I won and lost while playing songs like Down and Out, Deliah's Gone and St. James Infirmary among others. At times, other voices and guitars would chime in from various locations throughout the place. Very impromptu. A poet would rant or growl. Wine would appear on the table. A flute would haunt the air. Classic combustion. I miss it.


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Subject: RE: Great Coffee Houses
From: Peter K (Fionn)
Date: 15 Feb 01 - 08:57 AM

Hadn't realised how predominently American the coffee house has become since its heydey in 17th/18th century London. Fraid I've only skimmed this entertaining thread, but are The Shambles, Roger the Zimmer and Penny the only posters to take the discussion beyond America's boundaries?

I remember seeing those same people at that same venue Shambles. I also saw some of them - and Ralph McTell,Tim and Maddy Prior and Martin Carthy - at a nearby place just beyond Soho, called Bunjies - another alcohol-free zone I seem to remember, unless I was always there at the wrong time of day.


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Subject: RE: Great Coffee Houses
From: Sourdough
Date: 15 Feb 01 - 04:55 AM

I think the archtype of Beat coffee houses was the Cafe Figaro in Greenwich Village. It reminded me of a bit of literature trivia.

There was no live music at the Figaro. Maybe that's whythere were always tables filled with people talking earnestly about life, art, ethics, and theology.

While I was a college student, I workd at a place called the Living Theatre up on the corner of SIxth Avenue and Fourteenth Street but I lived in the VIllage. Through an odd working out of coincidence, I was working with Judith Malina and Julian Beck in a play that was an off-Broadway hit and very highly regarded in the Village. When I joined the company, the play had already been running for several yeas. The Living Theatre was one of the central nodes of what was called the hip scene in New York at that time. Just having a job there transformed me, at least in my own mind, into a real Villager. Hell, I even had a nodding acquintance with Jules Feiffer and went out twice with a waitress from the Figaro.

We'd finish up at the Living Theatre around eleven and then we would head out for a place to talk, drink, meet friends and make new ones - all while remaining cool.

One of my favorite place was the Cafe Figaro on the fabled corner of Bleeker and McDougal. There was always the possibility of incredible conversations. The effect of sitting and listening to Paul Goodman, Alan Ginsburg, Maya Deren, a lot of abstract expressionist painters, Martha Graham dancers and uncounted writers was not lost on this eighteen or nineteen year old New Hampshire boy.

The mention of graffiti and The Figaro in an earlier mesage reminded me of somethng I saw in Figaro in the late '50s. By the pay phone on the wall someone had scrawled "It's better to have flunked your Wasserman than never to have loved at all." For those of you to whom the words "Wasserman Test" mean nothing, you should know that it was the syphlis test of that time.

In the context of the period it was funny and was far more memorable than another graffito scrawled in the same hand just below it. It asked a question that would in a few years become a household word, "Who's afraid of Virginia Wolf?"

I can't say from first hand knowledge that Edward Albee first saw the phrase there and decided to use it as the title of a play je was writing. He had already written The Sandbox and Zoo Story which were, I think, one-acts and was writing every day. His roommate at the time was Paul Goodman so I know that Albee used to spend time at the Figaro and if he ever used the phone he would have seen it for sure.

Even though the play and then the movie, Whose Afraid of Virginia WOlf gererated tremendous interest, I have never seen I have never ever seen a mention of that graffito. Remember, you heard about it first on Mudcat.

Sourdough


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Subject: RE: Great Coffee Houses
From: BlueJay
Date: 14 Feb 01 - 01:01 PM

So, LEJ, that makes two old haunts we have in common: Muddy's and the Little Bear. I'm pretty sure Muddy's went by the wayside, but you never know, maybe it was resurrected. Sure was a great place, with all the books, games, talented folks, and food. Thanks for the memory jog. BlueJay


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Subject: RE: Great Coffee Houses
From: Art Thieme
Date: 14 Feb 01 - 12:46 PM

We had a thread here a while ago about the "last days" of The NO EXIT coffee house in Chi. THOSE DIDM'T HAPPEN. The place was saved when Brian and Sue Kozin were able to sell it to Michhael James, the owner of The Heartland Cafe only half a block away. "The Exit" is now cleaner and painted white. Some music is back. The brown burlap is gone from the walls. The smoke it less. The graffitti is pretty much gone from the bathroom walls. Blind Jim Brewer, who sang his Mississippi acoustic blues Wednesday nights for so long, has passed on. I played at the place for 37 years and then couldn't any longer. (For some perverse reason I was hoping to make 40 years.)

Recently I went by there and the place looks nice. But the ghost of Kerouac has left as far as I could see. I do suspect that is as it should be in this new millennium.

Art Thieme


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Subject: RE: Great Coffee Houses
From: Gray Rooster
Date: 14 Feb 01 - 12:09 PM

And in Dallas, TX:

(THEN) Moon Alley

The Rubyiat (perhaps spelled Rabayat or Rubyait) but definitely after Omar

Mother Blues (gasp!!!) Yes in the back bar at "her" first location

(NOW) Uncle Calvin's (listening)

Cafe Brazil (Central Expy. location)

Sons of Hermann Hall (old fashioned in the round on Thursday nights, sometimes three rooms going at once)

Houston, TX (NOW) Anderson Fair (the oldest continuously operated music venue in Texas)

Galveston, TX (NOW) The Old Quarter Acoustic Cafe

Ft. Worth, TX (NOW) Trinity Coffee House

Flower Mound, TX (NOW) Coffee Klatch

Mmm, I better stop. Fingers want to play guitar now.


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Subject: RE: Great Coffee Houses
From: Lonesome Gillette
Date: 14 Feb 01 - 11:56 AM

When I moved to Tucson from Boston in the late 80's (Im back in Boston) I found no coffee house type venues, a few came and went but nothing much. But there is still a strong folk scene there. I wound up going to lots of music party things that wouldn't be jam sessions but would have someone do a solo set, then a band might play, whatever... it was real cool, I've never seen that around here in Boston, but I think it might happen, I just don't know about it. I remember playing with my folk band in some backyard in the desert and the place would be just packed, granted they were there to drink beer mostly but if that same band was in Boston we'd have a tough time to get any gigs. What's my point? I don't know.hehe

Oh, "The Hillbilly Ranch" mentioned earlier sounds excellent. I live right near that site, I can't imagine anything like that happening around this area now. Bluegrass in downtown Boston? HA!


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Subject: RE: Great Coffee Houses
From: Lonesome Gillette
Date: 14 Feb 01 - 11:52 AM

When I moved to Tucson from Boston in the late 80's (Im back in Boston) I found no coffee house type venues, a few came and went but nothing much. But there is still a strong folk scene there. I wound up going to lots of music party things that wouldn't be jam sessions but would have someone do a solo set, then a band might play, whatever... it was real cool, I've never seen that around here in Boston, but I think it might happen, I just don't know about it. I remember playing with my folk band in some backyard in the desert and the place would be just packed, granted they were there to drink beer mostly but if that same band was in Boston we'd have a tough time to get any gigs. What's my point? I don't know.hehe


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Subject: RE: Great Coffee Houses
From: Gray Rooster
Date: 14 Feb 01 - 11:51 AM

And, back to the Village, let us not forget: Café Basement and Figero's.


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Subject: RE: Great Coffee Houses
From: Jim the Bart
Date: 14 Feb 01 - 10:53 AM

In and around Chicago in the early 70's, there was an odd combination of bars/coffee houses that I got started in; these were the "folk clubs" that you just don't seem to find around anymore. I was too young for places like the Gate O Horn. The Barbarossa, the Saddle Club, Orphans, Minstrels, the Bulls all had local musicians and gave newcomers a chance. The Quiet Knight had the very best national and international acts, as well as local artists who had proven themselves. The Earl of Old Town, where I went to hear Bob Gibson and was introduced to a "new kid in town" who sang his latest song "City of New Orleans. Within a month everyone was singing Steve Goodman songs.

Two places that were truly unique were the Ranch in downtown Chicago and Durty Nellies in suburban Palatine. The Ranch ran music from 7:00 until 4:00 AM. They had a "Sons of the Pioneers" style western band playing forty minute sets and usually someone with an acoustic playing the twenty minute breaks. I got to do the breaks for a short time and it was like going to country music grad school. The regular band (The Sundowners)played there six nights a week for thirty years. They were a full volume set of the encyclopedia of country music, and with forty minutes between sets, you did nothing but eat the chili, listen and learn. This place was in the basement of an office building right by the Greyhound bus station and got a weird mix of business men, "ladies" and sailors coming in or going out of Great Lakes Naval Training Center. The first time I sang "I'm So Lonesome I Could Cry" and the dance floor filled up, I knew I had to be doing something right.

There are still a few of the old coffeehouses around the Chicago area. No Exit is still running. The Two Way Street Coffeehouse in Downers Grove just celebrated 30 years and is going strong. I get to play a night there March 30th and I'm thrilled.


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Subject: RE: Great Coffee Houses
From: RichM
Date: 14 Feb 01 - 09:36 AM

In Ottawa (Canada) Rasputin's Café on Bronson Avenue has been the home of folk music here for the last 20 years.

The owner, Dean Verger, has been instrumental ;) in bringing hundreds of acts, local, national and international to the community.
There's a full list of performers who have appeared, at the café's website:
http://www.cyberus.ca/~rasputin/

I am proud to be among this group; yours truly was once part of a local bluegrass group called "Toy Heart"...

Rich


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Subject: RE: Great Coffee Houses
From: Lonesome Gillette
Date: 14 Feb 01 - 06:15 AM

Bannon's Spa in Haverhill MA. been there at least 30 years, likely much more. No live music there, just coffee and donuts and some raunchy characters. I spent a good part of my childhood in there, my dad's hangout. He wouldn't be caught dead near any of those hippy joints. eric


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Subject: RE: Great Coffee Houses
From: Lonesome EJ
Date: 14 Feb 01 - 02:04 AM

The Walt Robertson thread brought this one back to mind. Bongos, goatees, berets, poetry and the atmosphere of infinite possibilities....


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Subject: RE: Great Coffee Houses
From: Mudjack
Date: 31 Jul 99 - 04:57 PM

Starbucks, OHhh... It has to be a "Coffee House" I tend to call a lot of venues coffee house but more correctly it should be Acoustic Music Venue. A bar converted from the old stables it was at the University of California Riverside with it's "Folk Concerts at the Barn" Sunday nights. Who's who of folk music has performed there. The good folks who produced the concerts are very dear friends of mine and I have a life time of graditude to them for their efforts. They stopped the series about 18 months ago due to the UCR demanding more rent money and constantly adding more restrictions as time went on. I know Sandy has been there, thats where I met him many years back. It had a bar atmoshere but emphasis were on the music and a very quiet setting. I remember how depressed I became when I decided to leave the area and suddenly it donned on me what I might not be able to replace in my life, will there be another Barn? I hav'nt found it yet.
My other folkie hang out was "The Starvation Cafe". Patrick managed to serve up some poor man's soup and coffee. Very Bohemian for the 80's and 90's. Avante Garde was the theme but bluegrass and folk would intertwine the programs.
Just as I got interested in performing music,The Penny U in San Bernardino CA was closing it's doors. That was a real BUZZ and hooked me on the "live music" scene. It was thr predesessor to the above clubs.
Mudjack


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Subject: RE: Great Coffee Houses
From: Sourdough
Date: 31 Jul 99 - 12:55 PM

Joe Offer,

On behalf of everyone who reads this thread, thank you for removing the duplicate messages. (It was very embarrassing). I have no idea what happened.

Sourdough Current holder of the Duplicate Postings Championship

Sourdough Current holder of the Duplicate Postings Championship


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Subject: RE: Great Coffee Houses
From: Mike Strobel
Date: 28 Jul 99 - 01:36 PM

Today, in Rochester, New York it is : 12 Corners Coffeehouse ( Though it is much more like a concert hall), Blue Sundays Coffeehouse, Java Junction , Weider Hall Art Gallery........................Now in the early seventies in Buffalo there were ( still are ) 2 taverns which featured a lot of folk music : The Central Park Grill and The Tralfamadore Cafe.


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Subject: RE: Great Coffee Houses
From: Penny S.
Date: 28 Jul 99 - 12:33 PM

We had Elizabeth's Coffee Bar in Dover. No live music, but a crowd of young people around a table in a carrel after church on Sunday evening, talking about anything and everything, the whole evening on one coffee in one of those shallow glass cups, or an ice cream float in summer. (Does anyone know if it is true about aspirin in Coca Cola?). Then it turned fast food, and uncomfortable chairs, and out as quick as you can. They don't make places like that any more. Not over here, at any rate.

Penny

Have you noticed Pete M isn't back yet?


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Subject: RE: Great Coffee Houses
From: Roger the zimmer
Date: 28 Jul 99 - 11:45 AM

Oh, yes, the Kardomah in Corporation St , B'ham, the National Milk Bar in Aberystwyth, where did my youth go? [and did he take my wallet?]


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