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Obit: actor Patrick McGoohan (13 Jan 2009)

Fiolar 15 Jan 09 - 08:06 AM
Bonnie Shaljean 15 Jan 09 - 08:08 AM
Dave Sutherland 15 Jan 09 - 08:32 AM
Big Al Whittle 15 Jan 09 - 08:45 AM
Nigel Parsons 15 Jan 09 - 08:46 AM
wysiwyg 15 Jan 09 - 08:50 AM
Jack Blandiver 15 Jan 09 - 08:55 AM
Georgiansilver 15 Jan 09 - 08:58 AM
kendall 15 Jan 09 - 09:01 AM
JJ 15 Jan 09 - 09:09 AM
Jack Blandiver 15 Jan 09 - 09:24 AM
Ron Davies 15 Jan 09 - 09:46 AM
Ron Davies 15 Jan 09 - 09:49 AM
katlaughing 15 Jan 09 - 10:39 AM
Will Fly 15 Jan 09 - 10:40 AM
GUEST,Tunesmith 15 Jan 09 - 03:50 PM
catspaw49 15 Jan 09 - 03:58 PM
GUEST 15 Jan 09 - 08:48 PM
Big Al Whittle 15 Jan 09 - 09:01 PM
katlaughing 15 Jan 09 - 10:39 PM
robomatic 15 Jan 09 - 10:54 PM
Big Al Whittle 17 Jan 09 - 06:03 AM
Big Al Whittle 17 Jan 09 - 09:55 AM
Donuel 17 Jan 09 - 11:42 AM
Ron Davies 17 Jan 09 - 01:00 PM
Donuel 17 Jan 09 - 01:29 PM
fat B****rd 17 Jan 09 - 03:11 PM
Phil Edwards 18 Jan 09 - 12:56 PM
bubblyrat 18 Jan 09 - 02:53 PM
GUEST,Bob Ryszkiewicz 18 Jan 09 - 04:15 PM
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Subject: Obit: Patrick McGoohan
From: Fiolar
Date: 15 Jan 09 - 08:06 AM

Sadly another great one has passed away. Patrick McGoohan probably best remembered for the TV series "Dangerman" and "The Prisoner" died on January 13th age 80. Sorry Patrick, there will be no escape from "The Village" this time.
At peace.


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Subject: RE: Obit: Patrick McGoohan
From: Bonnie Shaljean
Date: 15 Jan 09 - 08:08 AM

Aahhh, sorry to hear it. R.I.P.


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Subject: RE: Obit: Patrick McGoohan
From: Dave Sutherland
Date: 15 Jan 09 - 08:32 AM

While this one is still above the line - apparently the Roy Harper epic "McGoohan's Blues" was inspired by The Prisoner.
A fine actor and a perfectionist by all accounts. Wasn't he the radical writer in "A Clockwork Orange"?
R.I.P.


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Subject: RE: Obit: Patrick McGoohan
From: Big Al Whittle
Date: 15 Jan 09 - 08:45 AM

He made some great films.

He made The Quare Fellow from behan's play.

Also he made a creditable Josh Merlin in Jamaica Inn. I remeber in the event Bodmin Moor looked too nice and not bleak enough - so they shot the whole thing round Okehampton way, which can be bloody bleak any time of year!

sorry he's gone!

My name is Drake - John Drake!

to which we countered , fair enough! duck!


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Subject: RE: Obit: Patrick McGoohan
From: Nigel Parsons
Date: 15 Jan 09 - 08:46 AM

There's also a thread below the line, but hidden by an obscure title:
Here

Perhaps a mud-elf would consider combining them

CHEERS
Nigel


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Subject: RE: Obit: Patrick McGoohan
From: wysiwyg
Date: 15 Jan 09 - 08:50 AM

The other thread title is not at all obscure to USers, plus it's musical.

~S~


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Subject: RE: Obit: Patrick McGoohan
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 15 Jan 09 - 08:55 AM

Sad news. The Prisoner remains not only his greatest achievement, but the greatest achievement of TV in general. I wonder what became of the remake? Maybe they thought better of it.

Less well known is Helldrivers, in which an inspired McGoohan plays alongside a very young Sean Connery in one of the remarkable films I've ever seen. Worth looking out for...


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Subject: RE: Obit: Patrick McGoohan
From: Georgiansilver
Date: 15 Jan 09 - 08:58 AM

He's escaped at last! RIP. Gave me many hours of pleasure and initiated my many visits to Portmerion where The Prisoner was filmed.


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Subject: RE: Obit: Patrick McGoohan
From: kendall
Date: 15 Jan 09 - 09:01 AM

He also starred in a Disney series called "The Scarecrow of Romney Marsh" back in the 60s.He was a Vicar by day and a sort of Robin Hood at night.


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Subject: RE: Obit: Patrick McGoohan
From: JJ
Date: 15 Jan 09 - 09:09 AM

On the Southern coast of England
There's a legend people tell
Of days long ago
When the great Scarecrow
Would ride from the jaws of Hell
And laugh -- with a fiendish yell...

Scarecrow, Scarecrow
The soldiers of the king feared his name
Scarecrow, Scarecrow
The country folk all loved him just the same...


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Subject: RE: Obit: Patrick McGoohan
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 15 Jan 09 - 09:24 AM

Did anyone ever figure out The Prisoner? The clue was in opening dialogue.

Number Six: Who is Number One?
Number Two: You are, Number Six.

Just a matter of emphasis really.


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Subject: RE: Obit: Patrick McGoohan
From: Ron Davies
Date: 15 Jan 09 - 09:46 AM

In the US, I think Secret Agent Man was the version of Danger Man we had. I thought it was probably the best depiction of espionage ever. I believe there was a 2-part program about chasing a scientist thought to be spreading nuclear secrets. At the end of the program, after several people had been killed, they found they were chasing the wrong person. I always thought that was probably an accurate depiction of how espionage really works.

With his clipped, precise speech, he was quietly spectacular.

Also, I believe he was Edward I in Braveheart--truly sinister.

A wonderful actor in my book--so sorry he's gone.


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Subject: RE: Obit: Patrick McGoohan
From: Ron Davies
Date: 15 Jan 09 - 09:49 AM

And the music from "Secret Agent Man" was also just great. The Johnny Rivers title song hit somehow wasn't as good as what they played on the show. And among other things the show had a creative use of harpsichord, as I recall.


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Subject: RE: Obit: Patrick McGoohan
From: katlaughing
Date: 15 Jan 09 - 10:39 AM

I started the obscure titled other thread and I could combine them, but I think I will leave them separate. While it is musical, sort of, I did move it below the line. I didn't realise it would be American-centric, but that is one reason I am going to leave it, as is. Secret Agent was the American version of Danger Man. Spaw put in a great bunch of info in the other thread about all of McGoohan's accomplishments. Well worth the read and, sorry, but the title was too good not to use!:-)

With all due respect for a fine gentleman,

kat


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Subject: RE: Obit: Patrick McGoohan
From: Will Fly
Date: 15 Jan 09 - 10:40 AM

PM played a murderous undertaker in a recently-shown episode of Columbo, with his uusual panache and dryness - I believe he also directed several episodes of that series as well.

Great actor - RIP.


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Subject: RE: Obit: Patrick McGoohan
From: GUEST,Tunesmith
Date: 15 Jan 09 - 03:50 PM

I thought he was really excellent as the nasty King Edward in "Braveheart".


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Subject: RE: Obit: Patrick McGoohan
From: catspaw49
Date: 15 Jan 09 - 03:58 PM

COPY OF MY POST TO OTHER THREAD FOR THOSE INTERESTED IN BACKGROUND:

Great guy..........He did several episodes of Columbo and directed and produced quite a few as well. The last screen work he did was an episode of Columbo where he did all three. Would it surprise you to learn he was a great friend of Peter Falk? Sometimes the greats just seek each other out don't they?


FROM HIS PAGE IN THE IMDB.COM------

Mini Biography
Though born in America, Irish actor Patrick McGoohan rose to become the number-one British TV star in the 1950s to 1960s era. His parents moved to Ireland when he was very young and McGoohan acquired a neutral accent that sounds at home in British or American dialogue. He was an avid stage actor and performed hundreds of times in small and large productions before landing his first TV and film roles. McGoohan is one of few actors who has successfully switched between theater, TV, and films many times during his career. He was often cast in the role of Angry Young Man. In 1959, he was named Best TV Actor of the Year in Britain. Shortly thereafter, he was chosen for the starring role in the "Secret Agent" TV series (AKA "Danger Man" (1960)), which proved to be an immense success for three years and allowed the British to break into the burgeoning American TV market for the first time. McGoohan became bored with the limiting role of spy and turned in his resignation right after the first episode of the fourth year had been filmed ("Koroshi"). McGoohan set up his own production company and collaborated with noted author and script editor George Markstein to sell a brand new concept to ITV's president, Lew Grade. McGoohan starred in, directed, produced, and wrote many of the episodes, sometimes taking a pseudonym to reduce the sheer number of credits to his name. Thus, the TV series "The Prisoner" (1967) came to revolve around the efforts of a secret agent, who resigned early in his career, to clear his name. His aim was to escape from a fancifully beautiful but psychologically brutal prison for people who know too much. The series was as popular as it was surreal and allegorical and its mysterious final episode cause such an uproar that McGoohan was to desert England for more than 20 years to seek relative anonymity in LA, where celebrities are "a dime a dozen."

During the 1970s, he appeared in two episodes of the TV detective series "Columbo," for which he won an Emmy Award. His film roles lapsed from prominence until his powerful performance as King Longshanks in Mel Gibson's production of Braveheart (1995). As such, he has solidified his casting in the role of Angry Old Man.


Spouse
Joan Drummond (19 May 1951 - present) 3 children


Trivia
Best known for his starring role as Number 6 in the surreal science fiction allegory series, "The Prisoner" (1967)

Used his real birthdate and publicity photo for the character he played ("No. 6") in the TV series "The Prisoner" (1968)

He was the first choice for the roles of Gandalf in the "Lord of the Rings" trilogy (which went to Ian McKellen) and Dumbledore in the "Harry Potter" films (which went to Richard Harris and later to Michael Gambon after Harris' death) but turned them down.

Was at one point considered to replace Peter Falk as Columbo.

Appeared in three different productions with the same name: the "Danger Man" (1960) episode "The Prisoner", The Prisoner (1963) (TV), and "The Prisoner" (1967). Although they were all completely unrelated, the latter two had many similarities.

Father of Catherine McGoohan and Anne McGoohan.

Played the same regular character (John Drake) in two different series of Danger Man: "Danger Man" (1960) and "Danger Man" (1964). His "The Prisoner" (1967) character, Number Six, may also have been intended to be Drake (although McGoohan has always denied this while George Markstein, who co-created the series with McGoohan, continually said he was).

Directed at least one episode of all four series in which he starred: "Danger Man" (1960), "Danger Man" (1964), "The Prisoner" (1967), and "Rafferty" (1977).

Was the title character of all four series in which he starred: "Danger Man" (1960) (John Drake), "Danger Man" (1964) (John Drake), "The Prisoner" (1967) (Number Six), and "Rafferty" (1977) (Dr. Sid Rafferty).

Two of his most famous characters, Number Six in "The Prisoner" (1967) and the Warden in Escape from Alcatraz (1979), were not given names.

Reprised his "The Prisoner" (1967) character (Number Six) in "The Simpsons" (1989) episode "The Computer Wore Menace Shoes."

Played four different murderers in four different episodes of "Columbo": Columbo: By Dawn's Early Light (1974) (TV), Columbo: Identity Crisis (1975) (TV), Columbo: Agenda for Murder (1990) (TV), and Columbo: Ashes to Ashes (1998) (TV). He also directed all of them except the first, as well as Columbo: Last Salute to the Commodore (1976) (TV) and Columbo: Murder with Too Many Notes (2000) (TV).

Turned down two roles that eventually went to Roger Moore: Simon Templar in "The Saint" (1962) and James Bond in Live and Let Die (1973).

Has worked with two actors with a glass eye: Leo McKern in "The Prisoner" (1967) episodes "The Chimes of Big Ben", "Once Upon A Time" and "Fall Out" and Peter Falk in Columbo: By Dawn's Early Light (1974) (TV), Columbo: Identity Crisis (1975) (TV), Columbo: Last Salute to the Commodore (1976) (TV), Columbo: Agenda for Murder (1990) (TV), Columbo: Ashes to Ashes (1998) (TV), and Columbo: Murder with Too Many Notes (2000) (TV).

His parents' names were Thomas McGoohan and Rose Fitzpatrick McGoohan.

Has been the honourary president of Six of One, the official appreciation society for "The Prisoner" (1967), since its foundation in 1977.

Is a close friend of Peter Falk.

Has appeared in four different productions with Aubrey Morris: The Quare Fellow (1962), "Danger Man" (1964) (three episodes), "The Prisoner" (1967), and Columbo: Ashes to Ashes (1998) (TV).

He has five grandchildren.

His granddaughter Sarah was born in 1976.

Likes to drink Irish whiskey at 217 bar in Santa Monica, owned by burlesque great Betty Rowland.

In his youth, considered becoming a Catholic priest.

Grew up partly in and around Sheffield, England.

The son of an Irish-born farmer, he left school at 16 to work in a rope factory. He subsequently worked on a chicken farm but had to seek other employment because of an allergy to chicken feathers.

His first show business job, at age 19, was as a stage hand/manager with the Sheffield Repertory Theatre. At 21, he was given his first lead role in one of their productions.

For "The Prisoner" (1967), he sometimes used "Joseph Serf" for directing credits and "Paddy Fitz" for writing credits. "Paddy" is a nickname for "Patrick" while "Fitz" was derived from his mother's maiden name, Fitzpatrick.

In the 1960s, he told TV Guide that it was his idea that his character, John Drake, should never carry a gun. The only time that Drake uses a gun is when he takes one away from another character. He also did not allow Drake to have casual sexual relationships, even implicitly.

As a youth he lived in the rural parish of Drumreilly in county Leitrim, Ireland. Although the house is still there, it is unlived in and in a bad state of repair.

He has five grandchildren, Sarah, Erin, Simon, Nina and Paddy.

On June 11, 2008, he became a great-grandfather to Jack Patrick Lockhart.

Along with William Shatner, Robert Culp, Jack Cassidy and George Hamilton, he is one of only five actors to play two or more unrelated murderers in episodes of "Columbo". He played four in total, more than anyone else - specifically Colonel Lyle C. Rumford in Columbo: By Dawn's Early Light (1974) (TV), Nelson Brenner in Columbo: Identity Crisis (1975) (TV), Oscar Finch in Columbo: Agenda for Murder (1990) (TV) and Eric Prince in Columbo: Ashes to Ashes (1998) (TV). He also directed all but the first of these.


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Subject: RE: Obit: actor Patrick McGoohan (13 Jan 2009)
From: GUEST
Date: 15 Jan 09 - 08:48 PM

I had seen all of The Prisoner in college (on VHS), but it's only in the past year or two I've been slowly working my way through Secret Agent Man (courtesy of Netflix). Excellent stuff!

-- Gary


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Subject: RE: Obit: actor Patrick McGoohan (13 Jan 2009)
From: Big Al Whittle
Date: 15 Jan 09 - 09:01 PM

am I the only one that liked jamaica inn?


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Subject: RE: Obit: actor Patrick McGoohan (13 Jan 2009)
From: katlaughing
Date: 15 Jan 09 - 10:39 PM

wld, was it a remake? The imdb thing about it lists a different actor as a "Joss" Merlyn. Sounds good,though and I am going to see if I can get it through netflix!

Oh, I see, it was a later one, without Maureen O'Hara!:-)


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Subject: RE: Obit: actor Patrick McGoohan (13 Jan 2009)
From: robomatic
Date: 15 Jan 09 - 10:54 PM

I want to thank JJ for the Scarecrow lyrics because that was my introduction to The Great McGoo...


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Subject: RE: Obit: actor Patrick McGoohan (13 Jan 2009)
From: Big Al Whittle
Date: 17 Jan 09 - 06:03 AM

I seem to remember a film (Hammer Horror no less) that went round the cinemas of my childhood in a double feature with Herbert Lom as the Phantom of the Opera.


It was calleed Captain Clegg and featured Peter Cushing as the vicar who ran the 18th century smuggling gang on Romney marshes. I loved it! Later i heard it was released in America called Night Creatures. I would love a copy, but somehow I can never bring myself to spend £15 on e-bay for a set of dodgy hammer Horror nonsense - just recall aan evening of delight when I was eleven.

this was before MacGoohan did the role , I believe.


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Subject: RE: Obit: actor Patrick McGoohan (13 Jan 2009)
From: Big Al Whittle
Date: 17 Jan 09 - 09:55 AM

Was it called dr Syn, and as a book it gets read on the radio. by Russell thorndike.


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Subject: RE: Obit: actor Patrick McGoohan (13 Jan 2009)
From: Donuel
Date: 17 Jan 09 - 11:42 AM

The show The Prisner was largely written by Harold Pintner.
Some episodes were directed by Alfred Hitchcock.

If you enjoyed The Prisoner, please watch the movie
'Youth without Youth'


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Subject: RE: Obit: actor Patrick McGoohan (13 Jan 2009)
From: Ron Davies
Date: 17 Jan 09 - 01:00 PM

Well, certainly the Scarecrow on Disney was named Dr. Syn.

McGoohan raised the quality--hugely-- of anything he was in.

I wonder why he turned down the roles of Dumbledore and Gandalf.


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Subject: RE: Obit: actor Patrick McGoohan (13 Jan 2009)
From: Donuel
Date: 17 Jan 09 - 01:29 PM

Perhaps he did not see the political subtext of the Potter series or he was just plain tired.


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Subject: RE: Obit: actor Patrick McGoohan (13 Jan 2009)
From: fat B****rd
Date: 17 Jan 09 - 03:11 PM

Nothing clever to add. I love 'Hell Drivers'and found his Edward l brilliant. In the mid sixties John Drake was the epitome of cool. RIP Mr. M.


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Subject: RE: Obit: actor Patrick McGoohan (13 Jan 2009)
From: Phil Edwards
Date: 18 Jan 09 - 12:56 PM

No, Harold Pinter wasn't involved. Most of the Prisoner was written by... Patrick McGoohan.

Like Orson Welles or Peter Cook, he achieved an enormous amount at a relatively early stage in his career, then spent most of his life being watched to see if he was going to do it again. Perhaps, like them, he'll be appreciated with fewer reservations now he's gone.


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Subject: RE: Obit: actor Patrick McGoohan (13 Jan 2009)
From: bubblyrat
Date: 18 Jan 09 - 02:53 PM

I enjoyed his performance as "Jones" in "Ice Station Zebra" enormously. His prescence lifted an otherwise mediocre film,in which the other stars ( Hudson, Borgnine et al) appeared to be ill-at-ease.As usual, of course, the film was vastly different to the MaClean book.


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Subject: RE: Obit: actor Patrick McGoohan (13 Jan 2009)
From: GUEST,Bob Ryszkiewicz
Date: 18 Jan 09 - 04:15 PM

Rest in Peace...


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